Sponsored

Have You Tried Organic Wine?

Winc Natural Wine

(Sponsored)

Do you drink wine? If so, have you tried organic wine? Lately, we’ve been into the new Wonderful Wine Co. line, which is great for so many reasons…

Winc Natural Wine

In a perfect world, all wines would be made using just water and fermented grapes. But since winemakers aren’t required to list nutrition info on the label, when it comes to a lot of bottles, you may get more than you bargained for.

Every bottle of Wonderful Wine is clean — meaning the grapes were grown without pesticides and the wine itself was bottled without added sugars. They’re also vegan and low in sulfites. Plus, all Wonderful Wines are made with sustainably farmed grapes. They’re about as good for you (and for the planet) as a wine can get.

Winc Natural Wine

Wonderful Wine come in four varieties:

The white wine, featuring a blend from the Languedoc region of France, is a dry wine that’s clean and mineral focused, with notes of green apple and lemon curd. Wonderful Wine says it’s reminscent of “running through a field of white flowers.” Sold.

For red wine lovers, the Argentinian Malbec is silky, round, and supple, with notes of red fruit and sweet spice. This sounds amazing paired with pizza or burgers off the grill.

The rosé (quite possibly the king of warm-weather wines) is a blend of 50% Grenache and 50% Syrah, both from France. It’s bright and summery, with notes of strawberry, raspberry, and rose petal.

Last but not least, their limited edition Malvasia Bianca (an orange wine) is bursting with the flavors of citrus, white peach, and honeysuckle. Doesn’t that sound refreshing on a hot, summery day?

Winc Natural Wine

The starter three-pack (or six or 12-pack) lets you try the red, white, and rosé. You can also choose the the red pack or the the white pack, if you know you have a favorite. (Personally, I can’t wait to try this one.) Like all Wonderful Wines, they’re delivered right to your door. Easy and delicious.

Great news for all readers: Wonderful Wine is offering free shipping through August 6th. Thank you so much!

Have you tried organic wine? Do you have any favorites?

(Photos by Alpha Smoot for Cup of Jo. This post is sponsored by Wonderful Wines, a company we use and love. Thanks for supporting the brands that help keep Cup of Jo running.)

  1. Kim says...

    Would love to know about the pretty wine glasses featured here. Who is the purveyor>

  2. Sara says...

    As a former sommelier, I have a lot to say about this post. The major takeaway I’d like to point out is that while I’d rather support farmers growing grapes organically as opposed to not, the final product has a lot to do what happens AFTER the grapes are harvested. There are over 200 FDA approved additives for wine (Mega Purple, anyone?), so even if the grapes are grown organically, you are often far from getting a “natural” product. At the very best, these grapes are being farmed organically by people earning a living wage and with minimal intervention (ie additives) in the cellar, and at worst this is corporate farming using organic as a means of greenwashing.

    • Lori says...

      Is there a way to ensure you’re getting a product without a lot of crap added to it? For instance, I’ve heard that wines from Italy and France are by default organic, but I have no idea whether it’s customary to add sugar, etc, in those countries.

    • tori says...

      thank you for posting this! “Clean” wine, much like “clean” beauty is just a way to sell products. I’m tired of the vilification of chemicals, and I also think it is an insult to the wine makers who have perfected their crafts.

  3. Stef says...

    Wine is never healthy and never “clean” and promoting it as such is problematic. Wine culture (especially mommy wine culture) has caused so many issues for women, including myself. You don’t need to be an alcoholic for alcohol to be a problem in your life. Jo – I have read your own words on here about wanting to cut back on your wine intake. Can we get more perspectives on this please? Posts like these make me roll my eyes so hard. It’s honestly the same as posting about “clean” or “healthy” cigarettes. NO AMOUNT OF ALCOHOL IS SAFE OR HEALTHY FOR CONSUMPTION. Drink it if you want but don’t kid yourself.

    • Em says...

      From my perspective, it didn’t feel as if wine was portrayed as ‘healthy’. Joanna gave a clear definition of ‘clean’ when referring to wine, and also stated “They’re about as good for you (and for the planet) as a wine can get.”, meaning if you’re going to choose a wine, organic would be your best option. You’re right that you don’t have to be an alcoholic for alcohol to be a problem, but drinking alcohol isn’t an issue for everyone and there is nothing wrong with choosing to drink responsibly.

  4. SEVDI says...

    I don’t know if it’s only me, but I couldn’t view this post with Adblock turned on. All I got was a blank page. This has never happened with any other post on CoJ -even the sponsored ones. It may be intentional on your part, which is fine, but I thought you should know.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Thank you!

  5. Hannah says...

    Check out Vif! They’re a small Seattle wine shop specializing in “natural” wine-which, as has been pointed out, can mean a lot of things! They curate from wonderful, small, affordable purveyors whose growing practices and standards are very, very high-rather labeled “organic” or not. Please support them (or your own local equivalent!) rather than this company (where organic seems to be a trendy marketing term rather than a practice).

  6. Anon says...

    Joanna, these wines look lovely. One I recommend is “Cuma” – an organic wine from Argentina – red, white, rosé. Delicious, excellent price point, and beautiful presentation.

  7. maywyn says...

    Wow, the negative comments
    surprises and enlightens me to organic wines. Great post.

    My 2 cents…The number one factor for me with wine is taste… cheap, expensive (but not too much $) , made here or there, that way or this, (prefer USA, Canada & Spain)…Taste Rules.

  8. SARAH says...

    JO I can’t help but want to know where that pizza is from. OMG, my eyes went straight there….

    • Maria says...

      SERIOUSLY.
      WANT.

      Alpha Smoot – who took the photo, is out in Cali, near SF I think? So I’m guessing it’s a Cali pizza. But oh yeah, it looks SO. GOOD. And I’m a NYer – though Neopolitan pizza is my FAVE.

      YUM.

  9. Would definitely be fun to do a post about the differences between all the wine making/wine growing styles you referenced here: organic, natural, sustainable, low intervention. What the heck are sulfites? Why might wine not be vegan?! You’re creating more questions than you’re answering with this little post.

    (Also… Water and fermented grapes? Eh?)

    Call me maybe, is what I’m saying. :)

  10. Jan W says...

    I love the organic wines. The thing to remember is that with no added sulphites and additives, the wine has a shorter shelf life. My husband is allergic to the sulphites, so the organic wines are ok for us. Usually the taste is so much fresher. I avoid some mass produced brands like Frey and look for the smaller vineyards.

  11. Elizabeth says...

    Yes :) I get migraines from non-organic wine.

  12. Elliesee says...

    One day, after a pleasant sunset viewing on the river sipping rosé, I developed a wine ”allergy” i.e. 8 hours or worse of migraine with half a glass of wine. I was tipped on organic wine and it worked – I don’t have a headache from it. Any other wine is a gamble I’m not willing to make and I’m not too hot for champagne either. I wish I knew which wine I can drink beside organic or the cause of the problem, but I’m happy enough with the selection at my local SAQ:)

  13. CL says...

    Have been wondering about natural wines – I appreciate the overview & suggestion!

  14. Laura B says...

    One important thing to note is that there is a difference between organically grown grapes (i.e. the vineyard is certified organic) and organic wine (i.e. the vineyard is certified and the winery facility/winemaking processes are certified). The certifications can be expensive and some wineries might practice these methods but not actually be certified. It’s helpful to ask producers directly if you can! My in-laws have a fully organic vineyard but don’t have the certification to put on a label.

  15. Michele says...

    I love you Cupofjo, but please do better in choosing who to advertise/work with. Alcohol is a group 1 carcinogen (!), and organic uses pesticides too – the idea that this wine is healthier is laughable (at best).

  16. Hmm, These have a very high alcohol content. I have been subscribing to Dry Farm Wines,

    They are low sugar and low alcohol.

  17. E says...

    I love your blog! However, water in wine comes from grapes. You don’t add water. In addition, organic grapes are still sprayed. Hard to find non sprayed grapes! I’m curious about the fact checking in this post..

  18. Chloe says...

    Hi Joanna,

    I’ve only ever left positive and grateful comments here, but unfortunately I have to say that this post couldn’t have come at a worse time. Right now, here in Wine Country, vineyard workers are among those getting hit the hardest by Covid. It’s a troubling reality that the wine industry as a whole is doing very little about it. The Lationo/Latina community accounts for a whopping 69% of all Covid cases here in Sonoma County. While not all of these individuals work in the wine industry, many of them do.

    It is also worth pointing out that just because a wine is “organic” and uses “natural pesticides,” it in no way means that these pesticides are any better/healthier for the environment and the people who administer and live near the pesticide drift. Oftentimes, there is less known about natural pesticides than their synthetic counterparts. In other words, natural pesticides can be just as, if not more, harmful. I grew up here, and have personally seen a rise in both child and adult cancers as more and more wineries have come to town. With that said, I admit that science has never been my strong suit, and I’d be eager to hear input from those who have a much more robust understanding on this issue! Regardless, the lovely veneer of tasting rooms, chic bottle branding, and clever “sustainable” wording, hides a much darker and complex reality for those working in and living near vineyards.

    Thanks, as always, for providing this wonderful space for thoughtful and curious discourse.

    • Kate says...

      Thank you for speaking up for the farmer workers. We take so much of our food system for granted, starting with the workers, but our environment is sure taking a beating too. These issues are fully connected to racism, since black and brown folks are more often effected with poor treatment, low wages and toxic living and working conditions. To the crew at Cupofjo: please consider the whole picture here when you are hocking this capitalism to your readers.

    • Emily says...

      Amen. I’m really bummed to see meaningless lifestyle words like “clean” and “natural” used to sell overpriced products to people (mostly women) while simultaneously, even unintentionally, harming the folks behind the labor.

      Sort of reminds me of how terribly feminism has been commodified. Several hundred dollar “girl boss” sweaters made by folks who aren’t paid a living wage. That sort of stuff. Who’s benefiting from this?

  19. e says...

    Uhm… water?

    • a.n. says...

      huh?

    • courtney says...

      A.N., I believe E is asking why the post said that wine should be made of ‘water and fermented grapes’, as water is not normally added to wine at all.

  20. Anna says...

    These look excellent and I really want to try the orange wine, but it’s only sold as part of a much larger pack, as far as I can tell. Bummer!

  21. Leah says...

    What makes other wine non-vegan? No snark, just curious!

    • S says...

      Leah, I see your point. It all looks lovely but part of me finds the marketing to be a little too slick and misleading… also the fact that the minimum purchase is 3 bottles and $60 finds me skeptical. I just don’t see enough evidence to give up my good $8-12 bottles of Rose’ at Trader Joe’s or Wegmans. I’m willing to listen to those who have tried the wines though. Anyone?

    • Anne says...

      This doesn’t answer your question, but the bar I work at once carried a beer that was brewed with sheep skulls . They didn’t add any flavor, it was just an homage to some black metal band. Weird to write on the blackboard though.

    • SB says...

      It depends how the wine is clarified or refined. Some fining agents include casein (a milk protein) and gelatin. They’re not additives as they get removed in the fining but technically there are trace amounts that would remain, so – not fully vegan. This is also why a lot of times wines sold as natural and/or vegan tend to have more sediment in them and aren’t as “clear” as we’re used to seeing. But there are starting to be more vegan-friendly options employed for fining processes nowadays, like activated charcoal.

      *not a pro by any means, just a wine enthusiast who has asked a lot of questions at tastings and vineyard tours

    • Laura B says...

      It’s the fining process (removing small particulates from the wine before bottling). There are a few ways to fine (and a lot of wines aren’t fined and that’s great too!) but the most common is to use egg whites which attract the particulates. Also, casein is often used to fine white wines which is a milk protein. I hope that helps, as someone in the wine industry I like to nerd out on such details :)

    • Elliesee says...

      I’m not sure, some wine are filtered with eggs?? I thought it was the bugs that made wine non-vegan:)

    • Leah, isinglass is sometimes used to clarify white wine ( and beer). It’s a byproduct of fish, so not vegan!

    • Ophelia says...

      Many conventional wines use an added enzymes and fining agents that are products of animals. So a wine made without them would be vegan. :)

    • Caz says...

      Hey Leah, many red wines are made using egg and/or milk as refiners.

    • Nina says...

      Normally wines are clearet/filtered through a medium derived from egg whites.

    • Alexandra says...

      The way wine is clarified makes it vegan or non-vegan. Usually they use casein (milk protein), albumin (egg whites), gelatin (animal protein) or isinglass (fish bladder protein) for this process.
      For vegan wines they use e. g. clay-based filters, charcoal or leave it unfiltered.

    • Alice says...

      Sometimes animal products are used in the “fining” process :)

    • Hi Leah,
      Some wines are clarified using things such as egg whites or fish bladders, which means they’re not vegan. There are no leftovers in the actual wine, but it does mean the process isn’t. Hope that helps!

    • Alex says...

      I was going to come here to answer this question about non-vegan wine (or spirits) but look at all these amazing answers! So cool to see all the knowledge about where products made of animals are used!

  22. Stella says...

    Wish I could ship wine to my door step! (Illegal in Utah) it’s frustrating that our state-run liquor stores limit the wine we can buy — particularly from smaller, independent producers. Also, an interesting fact I learned recently: it costs a lot of money to get the “organic” designation for wine, so many small producers that make organic wines don’t pay for it but are still organic! If this is something you care about when buying wine research specific producers to see if it is organic after all!

  23. Amelie says...

    Please do a roundup of natural wines from Black-owned vineyards!!

    • Kelsey says...

      yes! I love Zafa/CO Cellars in Burlington, VT

    • C. says...

      If you know some then please list them here.

    • sal says...

      Brown family, Napa valley

  24. L says...

    This may be a dumb question but is this the same thing as natural wine?

    • Stella says...

      It’s not! Many natural wines are organic but not all. Natural refers to the use of ambient yeast & bacteria cultures (from the air) in the fermentation process. Compared to conventional wines that buy commercial yeast cultures for consistency. That’s the most basic definition but natural wines are commonly also hand-picked and produced, sometimes unfiltered, or use limited to no additives.

    • L says...

      thanks so much!

    • Samantha says...

      it’s important to note that there are NO (NONE, ZERO, ZIP) regulations on using the term “natural”

    • Stella says...

      @samantha thanks for adding that! Yes, there’s no regulation, but rather a “general consensus” among wine producers that natural refers to the fermentation process. But no regulation, so it’s best to research specific producers if you’re concerned about sulfites, additives, spraying, etc. Natural wine isn’t really claiming to be “healthier” in the way that natural or organic food claims to be, that’s how I’ve come to understand it. The natural wine movement is mostly a call to produce wines the way the used to be made for hundreds of years before big box wine companies used more industrial methods.

    • Stella says...

      Yes to Broc cellars and RL! ❤️❤️ Some of the few natural wines I can find in Utah. :))))

  25. Gigi says...

    I am a little bit confused- do you mean natural wine? Or organic wine? The way you deecribe it sounds like natural wine.

    • Ophelia says...

      They didn’t describe the fermentation process and the yeast cultures they use which would determine if it’s natural wine or not. So idk? To me it sounds like it’s organic but maybe not natural.