Design

Have a Lovely Weekend.

Fall apples by Christine Han

What are you up to this weekend? My mom is coming to visit, and I can’t wait to squeeeeze her! The boys are making welcome signs for her as we speak. (Also, thank you for the Charleston recommendations! We bookmarked so many things.) Hope you have a good one, and here are a few fun posts from around the web…

Caroline and I are stocking up on this miracle beauty product for cooler days.

Call Me By Your Name is getting a sequel!

Elizabeth Warren brilliantly answered a question about same-sex marriage.

The prettiest birthday candles, of all things.

In a recent New York Times home tour, the couple framed three colorful tea towels. Isn’t that a clever idea for affordable art? (Theirs are by David Shrigley.)

All the snacks that Bon Appetit staffers stash at their desks.

These cakes are painted with frosting.

Mindy Kaling on being a role model. (I also loved this quote.)

Ha, love this post title.

The new show Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner looks great.

It’s not entertaining. It’s having people over. (NYTimes)

Plus, two reader comments:

Says J. on how to raise a reader: “Our parents gave us library cards for our third birthdays and created the rule that we were allowed to check out as many books as our age. This made turning a year older a massive celebration of ‘I GET TO GET SEVEN BOOKS NOW!!!’ It makes remembering how many books are floating around the house/car/backpack much easier when it comes time to return. And the freedom of figuring out what they like and knowing where to go in the library to find it will create lifetime readers.”

Says Becca on 11 reader comments on kindness: “After my first daughter was born, I was totally overwhelmed. She wouldn’t nurse or sleep, and I couldn’t do anything but cry and stare. A friend asked if she could stop by with food and magazines and I just never texted her back. And then I felt guilty for that, cue more crying and staring. At some point that evening, my husband opened our apartment door to find dinner, magazines, tea, glitter nail polish (!) and a note from my friend saying that she loved me and would see me when I was ready, but would be there even when I wasn’t. I mean — what a friend!”

Note: If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission, at no cost to you. We recommend only products we genuinely like. Thank you so much.

(Photo by the wonderful Christine Han/Instagram. Birthday candles via Lewis.)

  1. Dominique says...

    those painted cakes look beautiful !
    In France we have another artist named Andrea Sham, whose cakes are marvellous and poetic! If you want to see them, check her Instagram page:
    https://www.instagram.com/andrea.sham/?hl=fr
    Thank you for your weekly inspirations

  2. Allison Volpe says...

    Such a great post, so excited for CMBYN 2!! Hope you had a wonderful time with your mother Jo :) This weekend I spent some time in Manhattan, and instead of using my typical Uber/Lyft app, I decided to try something a friend recommended to me. Saferides.org makes it so easy to book a ride, and is consistently more affordable than any other ride service. Just wanted to give a heads up to any fellow NY’ers looking for a deal!

  3. Gigi says...

    I never comment but since I look to this site for a dose of goodness weekly thought I’d ask… any nice book recs that can be an uplifting escape during a week with my not so great family? Any recs appreciated!

  4. Sasha L says...

    For those that love Weleda, it might be worth a deep dive into the history of the company, it’s ties to Rudolf Steiner, anthroposophy and biodynamic farming.

  5. I’m both heartbroken and thrilled at the new David Chang show Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner. I have a similar (I mean same lol) series on my youtube channel, episodes from San Cristobal, Mexico and Sapporo, Japan are up, and I’ll finishing up Kuala Lumpur, Taipei, Mumbai.. Sighhhh.. I thought of it first, David Chang!!! If you’d like to watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNX2Fw6j3hA&t=34s

    • Jess. says...

      Your channel is awesome! And you have an edge over David Chang, because you’re doing SECOND breakfast, too. The most important meal of the day! ;)

  6. Loved reading this post and getting a glimpse into your day. Hope you have a great weekend with your mom

    • Amy says...

      We’ve been using Weleda Skin Food since Caroline rec’d it in an article last year! Soooo much love for this product! I’m like the dad in my big fat Greek wedding with the window spray – I put skin food on everything my kids have and it always makes it better! They sell it in a tub, too – it’s a thicker texture and I slather it on my daughter’s hands at night in the winter so they don’t get chapped. Caroline’s rec’s are the best!!

  7. B says...

    Warren 2020!

  8. Claire says...

    wonderful list!
    And I just wanted to share that Weleda Skin Food now comes in body butter version. I bought a jar, and I really, really like it!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      ooh thank you!

  9. Madeline says...

    Why the love for Diane Keaton after she has publicly stated she believes her close friend Woody Allen? Disappointed to see her still mentioned here in 2019.

    • Anonygirl says...

      Agreed. We have got to stop putting actors on a pedestal. They aren’t superior to us just because they star in movies.

    • Sasha L says...

      100% agree Madeline.

  10. Anna says...

    Love the Shea Serrano shoutout!!

  11. diana k. says...

    That NYT home tour has a ONE WAY MIRROR in the bathroom and y’all are writing about the tea towels!!!!!!!!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Hahahah I didn’t see that part — so cool!!!

    • Jessica says...

      …and so very much room for guests! It’s almost like they are planning ahead for those “The Real World” style moments where people are set up to be eavesdropping on each other.

  12. Jessica says...

    I wish you would link to the longer clip of Warren’s answer.
    Yes, she has a quick and deliciously catty takedown – and it’s awesome – but she follows it up with a heartfelt explanation of her understanding of Christianity, and how it taught her to love all humans as they are, and it really is something. It made me tear up a little, to be honest.
    Without the context, she just seems quick and sharp. With the context, she seems … something else entirely. Human, heartfelt, and herself.

    • Eliza says...

      The entire clip is just wonderful.

    • Sasha L says...

      I love her all ways, sharp and suffering no fools, and heartfelt too.

    • S* says...

      That’s good to know and I’m going to watch the longer clip. Because I would NOT describe the “assuming he can find one” answer in the short-clip as a “brilliant answer”. I find it reflects the whole problem in America right now… that the country can’t seem to sit with their differences without mocking / belittling those who have differing views, opinions or beliefs. It implies that people of faith are unable to find partners because of their personality or views, which is entirely untrue. And amounts to nothing more than a very childish dig. Both Liberal and Conservative America seem to have forgotten that a society with differing views and opinions is richer than a uniform one. But the key to such a society thriving is a foundation of mutual respect and civility, with adherence to the constitutional rights guaranteed to all. Until the cheap digs stop and educated debate / dialogue returns, you are going to be in a situation where the orange nightmares of the world continue to be elected into power by people who feel belittled.

    • Em says...

      S* I absolutely agree.

  13. Molly K says...

    I couldn’t play the Elizabeth Warren video earlier, and just reading the play-by-play made me wonder why she took a dig at men for no relevant reason when she said, “I’m going to assume it’s a guy who said that,”
    I was like, “What? There are plenty of women who hold the same views. Is she really saying, ‘Oh what a dumb thing to say, that must have been a guy who said that’?”
    But then when I watched the video it was easier to hear her meaning. She used the example of a guy asking the question so she could finish her thought concisely, “Well then just marry one woman!” That’s easier than having to go, “Well, if you’re a guy marry one woman, if you’re a woman, marry one guy, and I’m fine with that.”
    Ok, I think I’m caught up now 😅
    Or WAS she sort of taking a dig at men?

  14. Happy Weekend, Joanna and Team! We are on Fall Break, so we are renting an RV and trekking to Big Bend. Wish us luck!

    I love when you all post about releasing the stress around “entertaining.” I have very much taken this to heart, including even serving Domino’s Pizza. We recently started something with two different sets of neighbors. We alternate “pizza night.” When it’s my turn to host, I order Domino’s, pour a salad kit out of a bag and toss, and then make brownies out of a box. It’s not impressive by any stretch of the imagination, but it’s easy. Which makes it more fun for me!

  15. Libbynan says...

    I don’t know if it’s because I was the oldest of twenty-two grandchildren on my mom’s side and spent my entire life taking care of baby cousins…..or because I was only 21 when I had my first child and I was too young and stupid to worry; but I was never intimidated by taking care of a baby. I feel for women in that mind-set, I just don’t understand it. Now pregnancy, labor and delivery was a whole ‘ Nother. Back in those days (1968) there was no What To Expect When You’re Expecting and you just did what your OB said and were good little girls. The entire experience was a total surprise, but I fortunately had one of the few OBs who were doing epidurals back then. Overall it was a lovely experience…..I just never knew what was going on. I’m kinda thinking ignorance really was bliss.

    • Sandhya says...

      That’s great. I don’t know if my experience is typical for those in the IF/recurrent miscarriage trenches, but I focused so intensely on being able to have a baby over the three-plus years of trying, failing, trying again that I devoted absolutely NO TIME to the question of actually parenting the child when he arrived. Crazy!! would love to hear from others.

    • T says...

      I know everyone handles every experience differently, but as someone who didn’t have any younger cousins and never babysat or helped care for little kids, and then spent 2.5 years having 3 miscarriages before giving birth my daughter (and being terrified of something happening to her because of that), I would think that your spending your whole life helping care for babies probably hugely helped your ability to easily care for your own child.

      I do agree with you about ignorance being bliss. Both of my successful pregnancies I had some test done that wasn’t done decades ago and there was some questionable result that had to be retested. It ended up being fine but caused a week of worry and I don’t think that anxiety just disappeared. I think, at least for me, I would have been better off with less information.

    • Lisa says...

      I had my daughter at 29 weeks after 51 days on hospital bedrest. Then she came home from the NICU two months later. I was still not quite recovered from my emergency c-section and infection. When my daughter came home all she did was cry and eat. She did not sleep unless she was held. Being a preemie she came home before her due date. We could not let her cry without holding her. She cried for 4 months straight. During that time my father died. I didn’t sleep. I had help during the day so I could nap but other than that I was awake with a screaming baby who only stopped screaming when she was eating. She weighed 25 pounds at 10 months! So yeah, being a new mom can be super effing hard. My good friend had a magical unicorn baby that slept 12 hours from the get go and never cried. She didn’t feel that motherhood was that difficult. It’s all relative.

    • Sasha L says...

      Oh Lisa! Consider yourself hugged. Your new momhood sounds brutal.

    • Sarah says...

      Sounds like you also had a happy, healthy baby. Not everyone is as lucky. I don’t think this comment reflected that the mother was “intimidated” – she was exhausted.

  16. CE says...

    I don’t care for the Elizabeth Warren link. I feel it’s not at all helpful to advancing the conversation on LGBTQ matters. If anything it only makes both sides dig in stronger to their own convictions, rather than opening up a productive dialogue. I am Christian and for legalizing gay marriage, and while I don’t always understand or subscribe to some Christians’ more literal interpretation of the Bible, I also understand that not everyone who interprets it literally is backwards or hateful. They were raised to believe those things and smug remarks like Ms. Warren’s do nothing but setback any chance of beginning a conversation. I believe there are good people, many of an older generation, who see gay marriage through a different lens — antiquated, yes, but lets not alienate them with snide comments and headline-grabbing quips. On the contrary, thanks, Joanna and team for keeping conversation open on your side. Now that IS productive.

    • t says...

      I appreciate your comment and at first had the same thought in terms of her response not opening the door to further conversation. But then I sat with it a bit longer and decided it doesn’t need further conversation because it is as simple as that! “Good for them, not for me” is a legit way to end this discussion and accept that everyone can hold their own beliefs.

      Also, I don’t see how it was snide? Maybe you are referencing the “assuming you can find one” remark at the end. I took that to not be an insult to Christians but rather a way of blatantly expressing women’s equality (a man can’t just go find a wife; it is a mutual decision).

    • Jessica says...

      You really should look at – and Cup of Jo really should link to – the longer clip.
      She goes on to discuss her Christian upbringing, literally singing the song she learned in childhood – “They are yellow, black and white. They are precious in his sight. Jesus loves all the children of the world.” – as an explanation of how her Christian faith taught her to love people as they are. It kinda made me tear up, and I’m sad to see that the longer clip isn’t being shared – because the shorter one is open to this criticism from people who don’t see it.

    • A says...

      Agreed. Thank you.

    • Lyndsey says...

      CE, thank you for sharing this perspective… I echo many of your sentiments and appreciated reading your kind and thoughtful response to her remarks.

    • mariela says...

      You say you are against alienating people with different views, but you are not acknowledging that people who fight against gay marriage are attempting to alienate gay people. Her quote makes perfect sense – if you don’t believe in gay marriage, don’t enter a gay marriage. But don’t ask people who have been oppressed and alienated to agree with and coddle the people who are inflicting those things on them. Gay people are not asking those people to live a certain way or attempting to take away peoples rights. There is no excuse for attempting to take away people’s rights that have no bearing on your own life.

    • diana k. says...

      Her quip was not pro-gay or anti-christian, it was pro do your own thing. Believe what you believe. She quipped at the idea that someone would want to impede on someone else’s rights. Practice what you wanna practice. Sounds healthy and productive to me.

    • Dana says...

      “We can disagree and still love each other, unless your disagreement is rooted in my oppression and denial of my humanity and right to exist.” ~James Baldwin

      This isn’t a “two sides” issue. This is about recognizing the humanity of others, which shouldn’t ever be up for debate. When people are fighting for equal rights, we must believe them and support them. I don’t have any sympathy for people who haven’t caught up yet.

    • Anna says...

      Why should we coddle those “good people” who have views, even if they were raised with those views, that aim to bash and diminish the existence of other groups of people? On another topic, I’m sure lots of racists were raised to think that way, but then you grow up and ideally go out in the world and educate yourself and open up your mind and maybe even have the tough discussion with your family that they’re views are abhorrent. I can’t stand it when anyone says we people of color should love and respect racists into loving and respecting us.

      Similarly, I understand my own straight privilege- I don’t have to think twice about walking down the street as a woman holding my husband’s hand. I wasn’t raised to think this; I was raised in a conservative religion and culture where being gay is just wrong but I always spoke out against gay-bashing anyway when I heard it amongst my family. I didn’t know all the facts as I was a teen at the time, but despite what I was taught, my moral compass told me it’s wrong to wanting another human being to suffer and be treated second class for loving someone of the same sex.

    • Claire says...

      I liked Elizabeth Warren’s response ok. I did not find it snide, although I can see how someone would have. I agree that it is a huge mistake to lump Christians into any one demographic. These days there are some really interesting, progressive, positive and dynamic changes happening in Christianity. I also think when high profile religious leaders use their platform to advance destructive politics using Christian language and ideology the damage they do has fallout for other Christians. And it does seems a lot to ask of a candidate to adequately address all aspects of LGBTQ concerns, and Christianity, in a response to one question at a town hall. I think she is smart, and I am always impressed with how articulate and quick on her feet she is. I am leaning heavily toward supporting her. But for myself I have made the mistake in the past of thinking I know a candidate from clips like this. I was a Hillary Clinton supporter in 2016, and considered myself an informed voter, but I was dismayed with myself after she lost to realize that I hadn’t been clear on where she stood on a lot of issues- I just simply liked her best. Which is a shame because she had some strong, constructive policies, and I would have been a better voter and citizen if I had been able to talk about those. I had good intentions, but I’ve made the mistake of being pulled into viewing the campaign as a reality tv show instead of a election with serious consequences. Character is so important, of course, but I feel a responsibility for this coming election to be a better voter, to focus on issues and policy, and to not ever allow my choices to be spoon-fed to me (there seem to be a lot of destructive interests that count on us being easily manipulated). Other commenters here have shared that the extended clip of Elizabeth Warren’s response is actually more thoughtful and insightful, and gives better context, and I intend to take some time to watch that (thank you to those who pointed this out!). It’s so easy to view the candidates through the same lens that we view entertainers and tv shows and sporting events. I guess it comes with the territory, and candidates have to market themselves, and this is how the machine seems to work. But I think the burden is on us to look beyond it, put our reactions and emotions aside, avoid dualistic thinking, and give calm, clear, serious thought and analysis to what is being discussed. She may not give the appearance of having done so from this clip, but there is probably more to learn. And I feel a need to dig deeper, take a broader perspective, examine concerns from other points of view, talk to people, turn on my brain and engage in critical thinking. We are such a complex divided country, and the issues now are so dire and urgent. What we’ve been doing in the past isn’t working now. I just don’t think we can move forward unless we change. If we want to get better then we have to engage better.

    • Sasha L says...

      CE, I don’t think the work today is in convincing those that remain bigoted to give up their views. I don’t think Elizabeth’s response was meant to reach out to them, or further a conversation with them. She’s declaring herself an ally, and I completely respect that. If by 2019 one hasn’t come around to respecting all people in who they love, then too bad. You’re going to be marginalized and poked at and made to feel uncomfortable, and it’s 100% your choice. It’s not anyone’s job to try and win you over. I’m going to spend my energy on supporting the people who are still being oppressed. This issue doesn’t have two sides. I was raised to be racist and bigoted…..I gave all that up because it’s wrong, zero sympathy for anyone unwilling to do the same.

  17. agnes says...

    Thank to you I went to see Call me by your name, which helped me survived winter and is now one of my favourite movie; I then read the book and enjoyed it inmensely. André Aciman is such a deep writer. I am quite excited about this new book, but also scared. Will Elio and Oliver…? Do tell us when you read it!

  18. Jen T says...

    Love that you are stocking up on Skin Food (what a miracle product, seriously) – but it’s about 6 bucks cheaper on target.com!

    • Sandy says...

      Lol! I thought this the moment I saw the price on the link! Even Whole Foods has it cheaper…

  19. Grace says...

    I adore David Chang and Ugly Delicious. His podcast is also great and I appreciate that he brings up mental health and sexual assault/harassment in the restaurant industry. Can’t wait for his next show!

  20. Jodie says...

    Just sitting here on a Friday…shredded from that Mindy Kaling quote. God I miss my Mom.

    • Joaquina says...

      I am so sorry for your loss. Your words do not go unnoticed. You have reminded me to call my dad, who has cancer, to tell him I love him.
      Take care xo

  21. celeste says...

    Buying some candles!! But I have enough lotion from last winter. Diane Keaton is the best in the Father of the Bride movies – always the mom I wanted. And have a fab time with your mom!

  22. B says...

    I love the Weleda skin food! I tried it because of Caroline’s recommendation and now my MIL is using it, too. Just wanted to pipe up and share that it is almost half the price if you buy via Target :)

    • Joaquina says...

      I also have Caroline to thank for Weleda and I purchase online from Target. It really is the best.

  23. Nancy says...

    Joanna and team, I read these links every week, but this list in particular was outstanding. Laughed, then cried, then shared with my girlfriends. *welldone

    • Jodie says...

      Me too! I shared the one about the Call Me By Your Name sequel and then the candles and then the cake to the same person as the candles. It was a busy lunch hour….sharing, crying (Mindy K quote).

  24. One more Charleston tip: visiting Charleston was painful for me because it is hands-down the most segregated city I’ve ever visited. If I ever go back, I would spend extra time and effort looking for Black-owned businesses to support. I also think it’s important to teach children about the history of slavery while in a place with so many plantations, plantation tours, etc. that trivialize or gloss over the horrors of history. When I was in Charleston five years ago, I remember reading a promotional magazine interview with a White plantation owner who was proud of still owning his family’s plantation, and he said that many of his employees were descended from slaves who had worked on the plantation. I couldn’t believe that he wasn’t troubled by his family history or by how unjust the current situation is, and I was even more shocked that this seemed like a good way to advertise the place.

    All that to say that I think it takes extra work to visit and enjoy Charleston while thinking about and working toward racial justice, but I think it would make the trip a lot more powerful and empowering. Especially during a time of rising hatred and White Supremacist movements in the United States.

    • kathy says...

      Thanks for this. I was thinking about the history of Charleston when it was referenced earlier and wasn’t sure exactly how to raise it. Your comment is such a thoughtful way to address this issue. Thank you.

    • Denise says...

      Thank you for this comment <3

    • Elisabeth says...

      Thank you for this.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you for this, kristy.

  25. Laura says...

    Jo, I just want to thank you for bringing this wonderful space and community to life. I have been living through the hardest couple of months of my life, and frequently wonder if things will ever feel easier. I know I can count on the content and comments here to make me laugh and cry, and help me get back to getting through things, one step at a time.

    • Heather D says...

      Hi Laura. I don’t know what you’re going through, but I’m thinking of you and saying a prayer that things get better!

    • Maggie says...

      Big hugs, Laura. Thanks for being part of this community, too.

    • Libbynan says...

      Sorry, Laura. Read a wonderful quote recently about patience and acceptance being key to getting through problems. Patience because everything passes and acceptance because so much of life is totally out of our control. Hope things improve soon.

  26. Gina says...

    Elizabeth Warren only “brilliantly” answered that question if you think it’s funny to mock Christians. I thought we were supposed to be kind towards all? Even if they have different beliefs? Shame on you Jo.

    • celeste says...

      Let’s be kind to gays as Christians.

    • Grace says...

      I only see it as mocking fundamentalist Christians that insist everyone else must believe what they do or they’re going to hell. Everyone is entitled to their own faith and beliefs, but it crosses a line when you use that faith to justify discrimination against other humans.

    • Sarah says...

      I am both a Christian and a supporter of same-sex marriage.

      Interestingly, I found Pete Buttigieg’s answer (a few weeks ago) more compassionate to all. He admitted that people of a certain generation have seen a lot of social change in their lifetime. And was empathetic to that experience. It was much more nuanced and less “gotcha”/click-baity than Warren’s response. (Though, to be fair, marriage has been defined in the Bible differently at different periods.)

      Buttigieg consistently speaks respectfully on this topic.

      https://www.cnn.com/videos/politics/2019/10/11/pete-buttigieg-religious-liberty-lgbtq-town-hall-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/cnn-lgbtq-town-hall/

    • agnes says...

      (I’m not american and not interested in american politics); I think the answer is clever, not mean. Why would you think it’s mean? equal rights are exactly here to protect your faith, as long as your faith doesn’t limit my rights… The fact that Jo published your comment is quite remarkable. Bravo Jo.

    • Susan says...

      Respectfully, I don’t believe that she was mocking Christians. The question is worded in such a way as to suggest that, just because the hypothetical supporter believes that marriage is between one man and one woman, it provides shelter to deny marriage equality to people who do not believe that. What she was saying, in an elegant – and yes, slightly tart – way is that she’s ok with you holding that belief and practicing that belief for yourself. But she’s not ok with you trying to impose that belief on others.

    • Francine says...

      I do not think she was mocking Christians, she rather was mocking people who think their personal beliefs should inform public policy.
      I am a Christian, and I do not think that the moral choices I make for myself based on my faith should be made law.

    • Eloise says...

      Errr, many, if not most, Christians I know don’t define marriage that way, so you may wish to reconsider your use of the term “Christians” as an umbrella one referring to those who define marriage that way. Thanks.

    • Elle says...

      As a Christian, I didn’t find the comment mocking. Rather, pointed. Who are we, as Christians, to judge? We are to be a walking example of love.

    • Daisy says...

      By the same means, it is well documented throughout recent history, that Christian Missionaries in the name of converting others to their beliefs went about totally altering the local practices/faith system/ destroying local religious relics because it did not confirm with their faith or was too erotic. So let’s just live and let live.

    • Lynn says...

      “Shame on you” is a rather unkind thing to say. And just a note to others who didn’t watch the clip, there is no mention of Christians specifically.

    • Grace says...

      I see at as mocking fundamentalist Christians (not all Christians) that espouse homophobic views and believe that anyone who doesn’t share their beliefs is going to hell. Everyone is entitled to their own faith and beliefs, but it crosses an unacceptable line when people use that faith as a justification to hate and discriminate against others. We’re all human beings.

      This podcast (the hosts are former Evangelicals) has taught me so much about white Evangelical Christians. Much of it is disturbing but also fascinating: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/straight-white-american-jesus/id1441649707

    • Robyn says...

      I thought her comment was wonderful, and not at all mocking to Christians. It is disrespectful to homophobes, which to be honest, I can live with.

      Depriving someone from having a right you have because of your personal beliefs is not a valid opinion, and frankly does not need to be responded to with kindness.

      A valid opinion is “I don’t like the idea of two men or two women marrying.” I disagree strongly, but of course we are all entitled to our views. What we are not entitled to is to demand that our specific beliefs translate into laws which give others fewer rights than we have.

      I would say exactly the same if someone were suggesting the removal of your right, as a Christian, to worship or to marry the person you love for any reason.

      I loved Warren’s response. It really honed in on the issue – marriage is personal. Do what you choose, but don’t expect your homophobic views to be given any weight. And maybe realise that if you don’t believe every American is equal under the law, you may have a lack of empathy which members of the opposite sex may find troubling and unattractive.

    • Raquel says...

      How is she mocking Christians, Gina? Isn’t what she said the truth?! If you don’t agree with same-sex marriage for ANY REASON, religious or not, don’t marry someone from the same sex. End of story.

    • Kara says...

      I could see where you’d think it was a flippant response and perhaps wish that she would take beliefs of this nature more seriously. I could also see where you dismiss it as “click-baity.” As an American who is very interested in American politics and is tired of having to be tolerant of beliefs that literally strip whole groups of people of their rights and livelihoods (please Google the case that is currently in the Supreme Court re: the rights of LGBQT people in the workplace), I found it brilliant in that it shows that Elizabeth Warren is not going to waste time pandering to people who believe discrimination is right. By making it a “zinger” remark, she guarantees that her message will be shared over and over. Cup of Jo team, thank you for sharing this.

      Anyone who feels hurt by her remark because of your beliefs (I refuse to label them Christian because I know many Christian people who support same sex marriage and are horrified that their religion is being co-opted for discrimination), imagine if someone could fire you for those beliefs. Imagine if that WAS UP FOR DEBATE IN THE SUPREME COURT RIGHT NOW.

    • Jessica says...

      This is why it’s irresponsible to only post the short clip.
      Warren immediately goes on to discuss her Christian upbringing, literally *singing* the song she learned in childhood – “They are yellow, black and white. They are precious in his sight. Jesus loves all the children of the world.” – as an explanation of how her Christian faith taught her to love people as they are. It kinda made me tear up, and I’m sad to see that the longer clip isn’t being shared. Without the context, you think her comment is mocking Christians. With the context her comment is ABOUT being Christian.

    • mariela says...

      She is not mocking Christians. I know many smart, thoughtful, loving Christians who would never be as entitled to assume that their personal beliefs should govern another person’s life and happiness. Especially in law. Her point was, if you don’t believe in gay marriage (Christian or not), don’t enter a gay marriage. But your PERSONAL belief is not law or fact or anything a gay person needs to live their life by.

    • Anon says...

      People need to watch her entire response, not just the clip. Watch it. Then, the case will be closed.

    • K says...

      I am a Christian and agree with the many who expressed that my beliefs and faith should not be made law. It frustrates me when other Christians believe this should be the case. if I lived in a country where they tried to impose a religion I didn’t believe I on me, would it make me want to believe it or like the religion? No way. There are so many other Christians who are like me, but those who aren’t can be so loud and disruptive that they give Christians a bad name. I like that Warren referenced that song… Truly one of the foundations of Christianity is to love all people. That is what Jesus strived to do and what he calls Christians to do too.

    • Elisabeth says...

      Thank you to all the Christians who are responding to this argument (and ironic judgment of Jo and Co) by pointing out that it’s only mocking to those particular Christians who believe that their beliefs should be enforced upon everyone, and for rightly pointing out that if you watch the entire clip, you’ll notice that Senator Warren is herself an open-minded, empathetic Christian who is actually living Jesus’ message of love without condition (and Jesus was also against the state enforcing religious beliefs on its citizens).

    • Elisabeth says...

      *forced, not enforced

    • Emily says...

      She’s not mocking Christians; she’s mocking hateful Christians. If Christians themselves could begin to acknowledge the difference there, and own up to their immense and rarely-discussed “Christian privilege” in the US—-and OMFG why do we not talk more about this issue more!?!?!—-then we wouldn’t be having such a debate about what is essentially hate speech toward the LGBTQ community.

    • Sarah says...

      She isn’t mocking Christians – if can find and watch the entire clip, she goes on to explain how her Christian upbringing has influenced her to express kindness towards all people. Highly suggest watching the whole thing.

    • Cait says...

      I’m Christian and I didn’t feel mocked at all, bc my faith tells me to love all people and I also know that the laws of this country shouldn’t be based in anyone’s faith. No one gets to speak for all Christians.

  27. Sarah says...

    I knew before I clicked the cake link that it would be Buttercream Bakery. I was so excited when they opened in my DC neighborhood and am loving following them on Instagram! They have lots of other delicious things beside cake, so if you’re in DC you should stop by.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      they look so beautiful!

  28. Hannah G says...

    My daughter turns 3 in three weeks and now I’m going to go get her her own library card!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      so cute!!!

    • My daughter turns 3 in 3 weeks too!!
      Congrats to us both for surviving, haha

  29. Courtney says...

    Why did Weleda switch to putting Skin Food in a plastic bottle??

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i don’t think it is? all the ones we’ve used came in an aluminum tube, like toothpaste.

    • Laura says...

      The picture online makes it look plastic but I’m pretty sure it’s not

    • laura says...

      the one i ordered (on amazon, i think) was plastic!

      P.S. how exactly is one supposed to use this “miracle” cream? i tried it for a week but wasn’t happy with it, so now im wondering if i was doing it wrong.

    • tina crisas says...

      Yes, my last two bottles were also plastic. (Purchased in Greece) However, I still love it, I slather it on my face and hands every night, and a teensy tiny bit under the eye area before applying concealer.

    • Amanda W. says...

      Thank you for this; I was coming here to post the same. I’ve always loved Weleda’s Skin Food for my hands, but stopped using it when they switched to all plastic (yes, the screw-on top was plastic before). I now use Trader Joe’s Ultra Moisturizing Hand Cream, and love it just as much, if not more. Sometimes our dollars are the only thing that speak.

    • Anon says...

      Write a letter or email and let Weleda know that you don’t want plastic. A few letters can make a big difference!

    • Courtney says...

      Thanks, I’ll try the TJ’s one AND write a letter. I adore Skin Food, and it used to always be in the aluminum tube, so I was confused and disappointed when they switched to plastic.

  30. Lee says...

    A few months before my husband and I got married, I bought a tea towel that was printed with the calendar year of our wedding. My mom sewed a little heart around the wedding date and we got it framed for our kitchen. It is my favorite piece of “art” in my home. : )

    • AG says...

      Adorable!