Design

Have a Lovely Weekend.

Banana Cake

What are you up to this weekend? I’m pinching myself because we’re going to the Fleabag play. Phoebe Waller-Bridge is such a genius, ahhhhh. (Also, here’s the new trailer for the second season.) Hope you have a good one, and here are a few fun links from around the web…

PSA: Today’s the last day of Shopbop’s huge sale. (I got this cutie.)

Touristy things I still do after five years of living in NYC, haha.

Is this the most beautiful cake?

How to tip at restaurants.

The new Dr. Ruth documentary looks fascinating.

A gorgeous house in Provence. (Remember her?)

SNL’s photos of celebrities.

My mom and I have decided to memorize some poems! We’re starting with this one.

Wouldn’t you love to try these Japanese toasts?

Frequently asked questions about Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s royal baby. (NYT)

True. :)

Plus, two reader comments:

Says Meghan on the funniest book of mom advice: “When my cousin moved in with her boyfriend, my aunt said, ‘He won’t buy the cow if he’s getting the milk for free,’ After my cousin’s boyfriend proposed, he went to her parents and said, ‘I’d like to talk to you about buying a cow.'”

Says Lindsey on kissing children: “A month ago, my eight-year-old daughter had a total meltdown. She was exhausted and emotional and all she wanted to was to take a bath with me. (I take one every night). I thought she was too old, but she was so fragile that I let her climb in and she rested on my chest, and I poured palmfuls of water on her back and she almost fell asleep. I’m so glad I didn’t say no in fear of her being too old — it was precious and it may never happen again.”

(Photo by Call Me Cupcake.)

  1. Kit says...

    “One Art” is one of my absolute favorite poems! I memorized it in college and come back to it again and again… I sometimes recite it to myself loudly while looking for my lost keys! It helps. :) (Love that you are doing this with your mom)

  2. Ahhh, the Provence house! Swoon.

    Thanks for the roundup, so many goodies as always.

  3. Lori says...

    Ohhhh myyyyyy. The Provence house. The dining table, the windows, the views!! I’ve thought about Sharon and Paul often since you did the outfits article. Love her style. What a truly lovely couple.

  4. t says...

    I hadn’t put much thought into tipping (I just do 20% on the total or when my kids were young and made a big mess I would add more) but when I went to the article in which this article was in response to and saw the HUGE disparity in wages from state to state I now feel like I shouldn’t tip as much in my home city.

    Servers in some states are only making $2.13/hr in wages whereas servers in my city are required to be paid $12/hr in wages. Why am I tipping as much here in San Diego, CA as I am in Hoboken, NJ?

    • Andrea says...

      I think tipping is one way to get money to the people making the least and often working the hardest in society. It’s my choice to go out to eat, or to take a cab or to get food delivered to my house. I always leave room in that experience to get more money into the hands of those who need it the most.

      Also, please do the math on $12/hour as a living wage. That’s $480 a week for 40 hours of work before taxes and $25K a year. No one in Hoboken, NJ is living high on the hog on those wages.

    • Lauren Cline says...

      Please keep in mind servers usually only walk with 50% of their tips. We are required to tip out the bartenders, food runners, bussers, etc. Usually this is calculated on sales, not tips. So if you decide to leave a 10% tip because you think we make a high hourly, we are receiving an even smaller percentage. In addition, as a server who worked in Seattle making $15/hr, I can attest to still barely being able to afford the city’s high cost of living. I’m not saying the structure is fair, but don’t think that tipping less than 20% will effect some change in tipping culture, it will just hurt the individual who served you.

  5. Ruth says...

    Excited about the Dr Ruth documentary except… I’m a college professor and my first name is Ruth. I’ve really been BANKING on the fact that 20-year-olds have no idea that “Dr Ruth” is a cultural reference. That’s what my undergraduate research students call me, without knowing it would make people chuckle. Well, there goes my anonymity!

    • hita says...

      Ha ha ha!! I am sitting here thinking about a bunch of undergrads whispering, ‘what should we call her now?’

  6. Kelsey says...

    Love the poem you linked to! I was actually looking it up earlier this week to read aloud to my 5-month-old son. (I figure the more different words he hears, the better, right?) The poetry collection we’re currently reading aloud is Lorna Crozier’s The Blue Hour of the Day. Not all the poems are super appropriate to read to a child (think, um, the sex lives of vegetables!) but at this age, he doesn’t know! :)

    • Abby says...

      I love that you are reading poetry to your child!
      One Art is my favourite Poem – made for a happy face when opening the link :)

    • hita says...

      We have a book of Shel Silverstein poetry for this. But it makes bedtime tricky, sometimes. “can i try falling upward, mommy?”

  7. Morgan says...

    Re: the tipping issue – there are a few locally owned restaurants in my hometown where tipping has been eliminated entirely. The owners pay all of their employees a living wage and include some health benefits, as well. It ends up costing about the same to eat out – menu prices are all a little higher, but no tip at the end. It’s amazing, and, in a college town, has given a lot of people a higher quality of life while supporting themselves through school. It’s so encouraging to see this shift in the food industry (although of course we still have a long way to go!)

    • Sarah says...

      Are you talking about Athens, Ohio by chance? Casa Nueva is leading the way on this and has been for decades! Wish more places would get on board.

  8. Lindsey says...

    Oh, man. Having my comment featured was a thrill. My now 8 yo was born via surrogate after many years of struggle, so to see our special little moment highlighted makes my heart skip a beat. If only I could tell back-then-me that everything was going to be not just ok but beyond my wildest dreams. Thanks for brightening my day, COJ team!

    • t says...

      Lindsey your featured comment brought tears to my eyes and is such a welcome reminder of how wonderful it is to be a parent. thank you for sharing.

    • Robin says...

      Tears here too. What a beautiful moment. Thank you for sharing!

    • Abby says...

      I knew already when reading your comment that it would be featured in the weekly round up. It was just too precious!

  9. Liz says...

    I found that tipping article angry and entitled. And I find the tipping culture here exhausting. Twenty percent for good service is acceptable but tipping 20% regardless of service and on taxes seems unreasonable. Traveling abroad, no matter the country, I almost always experience superior service than I receive in the US where we are expected to tip now for the smallest things.

    I’ve always wondered what the expected tip is in numerous scenarios: ordering a baked good at a counter, a haircut, picking up takeout etc. Even my tailor recently had an option for tipping and I wasn’t sure if this was customary.

    • KL says...

      Right? Especially in sectors where the workers are being paid average wage (vs. $3 an hour). Not to sound awful here, but if you work at a cafe and I get a standard latte or cold brew, I don’t see why I should be tipping. It’s your job to make lattes, no? I’d be inclined to tip if I had a super wacky and complicated order that I feel they did a great job with/ went above and beyond for, but otherwise, the basic service for a basic beverage in my mind requires the standard amount paid. Am I way off base here?

    • Jill says...

      I abhor that people take the time to wonder whether they should tip on sales tax. I never even knew this was a thing. How much is sales tax? $5.00????? You are going to even question whether you should leave an extra dollar? I agree with the author. If the dollar means that much to you, stay home. Also you get better service overseas? Such a generalization. You know you’ve had great service as well as terrible service overseas, just like here!

  10. Gemma says...

    Oh man, tipping is the pits. I’m from Australia where there’s a decent minimum wage and employers have to pay their staff enough to live on. Tipping isn’t customarily done here and I hope it never is because it’s SO an unfair system for employees. People deserve to have a certain salary that they can depend on. I recently traveled to parts of Europe where tipping is customary and it was so awkward (some only accept cash – what if you don’t have cash on you? how do you even give it to them – leave it on the table or hand it to them? weird!) and confusing (every country had a different system). We were so relieved to come home to Aus and not have to think about it. Only, I realized that Uber Eats Australia has darn well introduced a tipping option here….sigh! How about you just pay your staff fairly Uber? That’d be nice huh! Sorry for the rant but as you can see I feel passionately about this topic.

  11. Stephanie says...

    As someone living in the UK, it’s hard not to notice when Fleabag is on tv because everyone is talking about it! I wasn’t crazy about Season 1, but Season 2 blew me away – especially episodes 4 and 6! I’ve watched it all twice already. I’m envious of all those abroad who soon get to see it for the first time. Andrew Scott is perfection, but really, it’s all so, so good.

  12. Ashley Romero says...

    Love the reader comments as well! They can be so touching, light-hearted and useful!

    My take on the tipping is the wages should just be calculated into the cost of the food! Also, the article was obnoxious. What a douche. The restaurant should be responsible for paying their employees a proper wage.
    I like how Japan does service, you press a button when you need something and they come by. None of this mouth full of food or mid intense conversation and the waiter comes by interrupting, “So, how’s everything here?! Can I getcha anything?!”

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Thank you so much for your note! If it helps to know, the article was a response to another article telling people that one way to save pennies is to not tip service people well. So there was frustration built into it — which I actually agree with. Good debate! Thanks so much for your note xoxo

    • Courtney says...

      It could be a great solution to have wages built in to the cost of food, so that the diner is not left feeling like a tip is something “extra”. I guess the issue in the U.S. is simply that that’s not the reality. While it could be really nice all around if servers were paid their full wage through a paycheck, that’s just not how the system currently works, and this article, rather than addressing the pay system of restaurants (which some restaurants do take it upon themselves to do), is simply saying that under the current way of things, tipping is part of the cost of eating out.

    • Claire says...

      I liked it. I just went to America for the first time recently and ought to have read it beforehand. In the UK we tip 10% (usually by leaving cash on the table) if we tip at all so the intense waitressing and the automated tipping were a bit confusing!

    • Jen says...

      YES. They should be but in America, servers need tips to live. This is not Europe! Tip 20% or at the very least 15-18%. Anything below is uncalled for unless you were truly disrespected by your server in some terrible way. If you ever worked in the restaurant industry you would not question this. In America, servers make very little per hour and rely on tips to live. Unless it’s a restaurant that explicitly bans tipping bc they are paying a living wage and have offset the cost in their menu prices, tipping in american restaurants is not really optional.

  13. Kat says...

    Oh wow, Fleabag! Just finished the second series and it made me cackle and broke my heart, all at once.

  14. If you live in the US, please tip. It is expected. My husband has been in the serving industry for over a decade now, and he works his ass off to make sure you have a good night out with your loved ones – when I would much rather have him home with me and our son.

  15. Suedy Mauricio says...

    Hi Joanna!

    I have never been more jealous of living in NY then when I read you were going to see Fleabag!! Oh my oh my..HOW WAS IT?

    She is such a genius and I want to consume all her work.

  16. Mo N says...

    Hello! Loved the Reductress piece. It’s comforting that I’m not alone in spending a lot of time being concerned about others’ perceptions. I’ve been told I do it to the point where anxiety medication would help. I wonder if Cup of Jo would be a good platform for people to share experiences on medication – not advice just experience-sharing. Just a thought!

  17. Irene says...

    I have been memorizing poetry all my (very long) life. It’s a great resource when I have to hang around with nothing to read or, in the past, when I was running. You’ll find that the effort of memorizing gives you insight into what the poet was doing. A tip: The easiest are those that rhyme and have a regular meter. That’s why we all know so many nursery rhymes.

  18. Claudia says...

    hey lovelies! just a quick heads up about the photo credit: it’s by Linda Lomelino aka “Call me Cupcake” – but correctly linked! (all her recipes are simply amazing!)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Oh thank you!!!!

  19. Courtney says...

    The tipping piece was spot-on! Of course it applies to U.S. tipping culture, where tips are part of making a living. It may not be applicable in countries where tips are not requisite, but if you are in the U.S. the best line in the article was “If you can’t afford to tip 20% at the restaurant you’re eating at, you can’t afford to eat at that restaurant.” Tipping isn’t complicated. It’s part of the price.

  20. Patrisha Z says...

    Have fun at Fleabag! I went earlier in the week and loved it! If you’re looking for drinks and a bite before or after the show Lupe’s is around he corner from theater. It’s a great little Mexican joint.

  21. Emily says...

    I’ve been buying and selling antique and vintage goods for years, both in a store and online https://www.etsy.com/shop/LadyEM2?ref=seller-platform-mcnav
    Years ago I would pass up old portrait paintings, because no one wanted them. Now I crave finding them! Sharon’s home is a great example of how cool a collection of them can be.
    Thanks to Cup of Jo, I’m a huge Fleabag fan. I also love knowing I can always count on this blog to keep me informed when a new season of a great show will start up again. Really, you guys are my personal tv entertainment guide!

  22. Jeanne says...

    I have a very wonderful memory of my mother memorizing poetry with me as a child. One was Emily Dickinson. The bee is not afraid of me I know the butterfly…….
    Also, Lord Byron. The size of a man can be measured by what makes him angry. My mother created a book entitled, “Things to Remenber Always”. Now I’m 38 with two children and hope to carry the tradition and I still have the book.

  23. Rosalie says...

    Wow, that article about tipping was so agressive! I think it’s because I’m not from the US (I live in The Netherlands): here, we tip if the service was really great and usually it’s a couple euros only. But if you don’t tip it’s totally fine too! If I go out for lunch, I don’t tip quite often and no one thinks anything of it. The servers get paid a good salary and tips are just extras. Personally, I think this system’s way better than the one in the US. I’m curious, other internationals, what’s tipping like in your country?

    • Myfanwy says...

      I also read the article and thought how interesting it was. In Europe it is very common not to tip and it’s often no reflection on the service. Here in Switzerland people sometimes round up their coffee to the nearest 100 and leave 30c but a 5% tip is the norm if you leave a tip. Waiters earn a salary equivalent to many other professions and so many people don’t feel it’s necessary to leave a tip.
      Interesting how cultures differ.

    • Angela says...

      Well, I’m from America and I thought that article was aggressive too!! We just got back from a Europe trip, so maybe that swayed my thinking! I am ALL for 20% tips if the service merits it, but the article said 20% no matter what, which contradicts the definition of a tip to me. Maybe the system is just faulty on the whole. Also want to add, I’m usually a 25% tipper or more if our kids are with us.

    • Alex says...

      Haha I felt the same. I’m from Slovakia and although it’s considered polite to tip, most people just round the bill up a few cents or euros – usually not more than ten percent of the bill. Also, there we have no extra taxes or such things, you just pay exactly the price that you saw on the menu card.

    • Zahra says...

      Yes I agree! I’m from London/Cambridge England and I find it bizarre that people aren’t paid properly by their employer. I tip but I do it out of embarrassment which can’t be a good thing :/
      And if the service is bad, tipping ain’t happening.

    • cilla says...

      The same in Slovenia. I think the whole Europe has the same system. Or maybe the whole world, except for USA :)

    • Sally says...

      Tipping is such a funny issue – I’m Canadian, but lived in Switzerland for a few years. In Canada, it’s customary to tip well, for the same reason as in the US: servers are very poorly paid and make most of their wages through tips. But in Switzerland, servers were well paid and service charges built into the prices. You might round up to the nearest franc or two if you particularly liked the service. When I moved there though, I found it so unnerving to not leave a tip. I was so accustomed to it that I felt like a terrible person! And then a few years later I moved back to Canada and felt irritated by the whole tipping infrastructure and the way it’s essentially required but not presented that way.

    • Uli says...

      Hey! I remember reading an artice some years ago about tipping beginning to be an issue even here in Germany. And the writer had the same opinion than you, and I’ve often thought about it since: If you let yourself be “forced” to give more and more tip, you just help establish a system where waiters aren’t paid well and have to rely on tips! I think it’s way better to be paid a stable and fix salary and not to rely on the kindness of your guests or even on how many guests you served in one shift!!

    • nadia says...

      I’m from Italy, and I’ve lived in France and Spain before moving to Canada. In the countries I’ve being living in Europe it’s the same as in the Netherlands, Servers get paid a regular salary and the tips are just extras, I’ve being usually tipping only when the service was really great and it may happen more often in fancier places then let’s say a regular cafe’. While from the other side, in Italy I was working in a restaurant during my student years, I was paid by the hour and if there were any tips at the end of the night we would split them between all the servers and the kitchen staff.
      In Canada, as far as I understand, the salaries are a bit better then the US but not as fair as in Europe and is common practice to tip around 15-18%. Someone told me that servers usually pay taxes as if they received 15% so if the tip is less it actually cost them more, but i’m not sure if it’s true. Anyone has better info? How does it work in the US?
      Last week I went to New York for a couple of days and I was tipping 18%, after reading the article I feel really bad, damn, I wish I could go back. Thanks for the article, next time I’ll be in the US I’ll definitely remember.

  24. Traci Mann says...

    Here’s a wonderful poem to memorize…

    Keeping Things Whole
    BY MARK STRAND

    In a field
    I am the absence
    of field.
    This is
    always the case.
    Wherever I am
    I am what is missing.

    When I walk
    I part the air
    and always
    the air moves in
    to fill the spaces
    where my body’s been.

    We all have reasons
    for moving.
    I move
    to keep things whole.

  25. Abesha1 says...

    My sister and I memorized poems together, and snippets of books… but she’s dead now and no one else knows them the way we did them.

    I still love them, though.

    • Joanna says...

      I’m so sorry for you loss, Abesha1. What a special thing to do with a sister. Thank you for sharing. May you find comfort in the reciting.

  26. B says...

    Were you able to find out about Hilary’s sweater/coat from the previous post? So curious!

  27. Kinda feeling amazing 😉 it only happens once a year! says...

    Thank you for the bath comment. My 5 year old fell alseep on me twice today. Once after waking up this morning while I drank some coffee and watched the news (I had already showered, dressed, made their lunches and mine and packed snacks and swimming gear for swim team after school and work). I came home from work and she fell asleep on me again. We missed swimming. It was so worth it.

    • Lindsey says...

      Don’t you wish we could bottle it up to save it forever?

  28. Sam says...

    I actually have tried the japanese milk toast before! It is called shokupan, and we stumbled upon it watching a cartoon that my kids love (Sarah & Duck). One of the characters is Japanese, and one day he sorrowfully complains about the bakery never having any shokupan. He describes it to Sarah as light and fluffy, like a cloud. So Sarah goes to the Baker and they make one together, with an actual cloud as the base, hehehe. But my daughter was intrigued, so we looked for a recipe to make it. My husband’s aunt and uncle lived in Osaka for years, so we ran it through them to make sure it sounded right. It did, and they had so many fond, delicious memories of the bread! We made it, and the entire loaf was devoured the next day! Those thick, fluffy slices were heavenly covered in butter and jam. And I was thoroughly amused by the fact that it all happened because of a kids’ show!

    • Katrina Peine says...

      Sarah and Duck is by far the most creative, lovely, non screaming childrens show of all time. I recommend it to every person who has a child in their lives.

    • Ohhh so interested to hear the other poems you choose. I memorised “Hope is a thing with feathers” when I was a teen and can still recite it now.

  29. Rosa says...

    A teacher who had us memorize poems used to write one on the blackboard (RIP blackboards) and have us read it aloud. Her trick was she’d erase a few words each day, leaving blanks behind. By the end of the week, we could “read” the all-blank board. Give it a try for your poetry memorization.

    • M says...

      Cool!!!

    • Emily says...

      Genius!

    • Abby says...

      Great idea! Thanks for sharing!

  30. April J says...

    I recently made a goal for myself to start memorizing some poems too! After a lot of practice reciting under my breath (while getting ready in the morning, walking in to work, etc.) I’ve finally gotten my first one down. I love how each stanza has an image in it that opens up my mind and heart in a new way, and specifically how memorizing rather than just reading helped me to see that. I smile every time I recite the third stanza, and the fourth and fifth ones are challenging me in such a good way. It’s definitely rewarding in a way I didn’t anticipate, and now I’m looking forward to memorizing more :)

    https://www.mindfulnessassociation.net/a-morning-offering-john-odonohue/

  31. shannon says...

    brb, moving to Provence 💨

  32. Shauna S says...

    I adore memorizing children’s poems for my son. It started when he was a baby and would *wail* during every diaper change. I learned some poems to help me stay calm and measured, and ideally to help him also stay calm. Now he is a toddler and I often pull out different poems for different times. He knows his favourites and tried to join in which I think is so sweet. My favourite was Dennis Lee’s collection, ‘The Ice Cream Store’ but I recently picked up Chris Harris’ new book, ‘I’m Just No Good At Rhyming ans Other Nonsense for Mischievous Kids and Immature Grownups’ and it is sublime! If you have any interest in children’s poems, you must get it/borrow it from the library. You will have a riot, I promise.

  33. Carrie says...

    When I was around 8 years old my mom let me take a couple showers with her over the span of maybe one month. In the shower she would tell me a little about each step she took, what each product did. When we got out she walked me through her whole routine, explain the purpose of each product, etc. It was fascinating. That’s probably when I became a product junkie. I’m sure she must have realized I was on the verge of needing to start learning the art of personal grooming and yet still unashamed to shower with her. Looking back I don’t remember her body or anything like that, I just remember fun time spent with my mom.

  34. em says...

    buying the cow lolol

  35. Jen says...

    My dad was always joking about how many goats my sister’s fiance was going to pay out in exchange for marrying her. At the reception he gave my dad two beautifully made toy llamas, which he now proudly keeps in a display case.

    • Tia says...

      Dowry is an issue in many communities across the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. Many black and brown girls do, in fact, have their worth measured in this way. I find it strange when western ppl- specifically white ppl – find humour in it
      But thanks for sharing a cute anecdote

  36. krista says...

    Seriously, I want to be Sharon Mrozinski. I mean that in the non-creepiest of ways.

    • Jill Palumbo says...

      I know, me too! Love both of her homes and I think they are the sweetest couple. They always look so happy together.

  37. K says...

    Omg Fleabag! Have just finished the 2nd season here in the UK and I have all the feels! Loved it so much, she is a genius

  38. Ksm says...

    Speaking of poems, thanks to my six year old, I am now back to reading the work of Shel Silverstein. Just the best.

  39. N says...

    I saw Fleabag the play and it was amazing! I loved seeing how the one woman show version went and of course Phoebe is glorious! I was so disappointed initially because all the tickets were sold out but I kept checking the site and one became available for the next day so I bought out and took a bus from Maine (leaving children and husband at home:) it was sooo good:)

  40. Breamons says...

    I cannot wait for the day when that quote about “the milk for free” dies from the English lexicon.
    It’s so degrading to both men and women (and everyone in between) in a partnership. It minimizing all human interaction to the carnal in a way that shows men as sex crazed maniacs with no higher mental faculties and no space for emotional input or output of any kind. It’s degrading to women as it dehumanizes them to only the commodity of their body – shameful and something to use and apparently use up? It’s just so so toxic. Human partnership is so much more than a zero sum sex game – I can’t wait until the “judgmental aunts” are the minority!

    • Anu says...

      Hear, hear!

    • Regina says...

      THIS THIS THIS!

  41. KC says...

    I missed the “buying a cow” comment! Thank you for featuring it, because that is hilarious. :-)

  42. Louisa says...

    I love the idea of memorizing poems.
    Several years ago my grandmother (in Belgium) shared with me that—at age 16—she learned to recite a beautiful French poem in school, right before it closed due to the second world war. At 92 she was sad not to remember the lines. She recalled some combinations of words though and with stubborn googling I found her poem back (Est-ce que les oiseaux se cachent pour mourir? By Coppée). I sent it to her and surely, the next time I visited she knew the whole thing by heart. She would go over the lines in her head whenever she had trouble falling asleep.
    I now often reread the poem when I miss her and think… I should really just memorize it.

    • Julie says...

      What a lovely story! How amazing that you found the poem for her <3

  43. Sandra says...

    OMG, I can not wait to see the Dr. Ruth documentary! I used to listen to her radio show in high school in the 80s and can’t wait to learn more of her story.

  44. Lisa says...

    Both these reader comments 💕. My oldest is 7yo so especially the second one. I’m typing this with tears in my eyes. Thanks for sharing.

  45. Courtney says...

    The BEST Friday post! Thank you! All I needed to see was the link to the house in Provence…OMG!!!

  46. Katie says...

    Well I’m ready to move to Provence. There’s a sense of peace and ease that comes through so vividly in the pictures.

  47. Laura says...

    Lindsey’s comment just made me tear up! I have a five month old daughter. The “holy shit what do I do with this baby?” feeling is finally starting to abate and I’m beginning to look forward to all those magical mother-daughter moments <3

    • Lindsey says...

      This made me laugh because during her meltdown that preceded the bath I’m pretty sure I was thinking, “Holy shit what do I do with this kid?” Hahaha – it never goes away.

  48. Karin says...

    Reading to my child was one of the things I looked forward to most before having a baby. However, I didn’t realize that it’s kind of tough to read to a new baby – not only is it logistically challenging to manage a big picture book and floppy newborn, they just don’t really care that much. It’s like they have something better to focus on in the early days (like, oh, growing?).

    I quickly gave up trying to read to her but I still wanted to engage in that ritual somehow, so I memorized Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll. I kept the printed version tucked into the front pocket of her carrier and on walks around the neighborhood I would remember more and more of the poem without looking. The cadence and nonsense delighted her well into her first year and it was a lovely non-threatening challenge for my taxed new-mom brain. Now, four years later, I still remember the whole thing.

    https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/42916/jabberwocky

  49. Maggie says...

    I’ve followed Cup of Jo for years and I always always read and look forward to the Friday link roundup at the end of my work week. aaaaanyways, just writing to say the recent addition of the reader comments is my new favorite thing and favorite part of an already wonderful Friday tradition. Happy weekend!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Maggie, that means a lot to me! Thank you so much for saying so. Xoxo.

    • Mariana says...

      Same here! The comments are always a joy to read.

    • Lauren says...

      Same here – I LOVE the reader comments!!

  50. Tania says...

    Oh my god, that Provence house. I wonder if they ever rent it out when they’re in Maine!