Design

Four Great Things

In cute baby news, Alexi Ashe, Seth Meyers’s wife, gave birth to their second son… IN THE LOBBY OF THEIR NYC BUILDING. By the time the Uber arrived to take the family to the hospital, the newborn was already out. “She looked like someone who was hiding a baby in a pair of sweatpants,” Meyers said in his monologue last night. “It was like someone was trying to sneak a baby on the plane.”

Maude sex essentials

Maude, a sex essentials company run by two friends, just launched a collection of simple lubricant, condoms and a vibrator. “When we developed our line, we got asked a lot, ‘How is a vibrator an essential?’ Two words: Orgasm gap.” Right on!

If your friends haven’t convinced you to watch Wild Wild Country, here we are with another mighty plea. The six-part Netflix documentary series follows a notoriously forgotten ’80s Oregon cult, lead by Baghwan Shree Rajneesh. What makes the show especially gripping is the juxtaposition between archival footage and present-day interviews from key players of the commune and neighbors in the surrounding area. It’s enthralling and complicated, with one plot twist after another (“plot twist” being an understatement). It’s worth five weeknights — or one.

Teenagers screaming at concerts in the 1970s

The problem with “not caring” about pop culture. (LOVED.) Media that is often dismissed as campy — think: Queer Eye, the Kardashians — can be relevant, even revolutionary. “There is almost always an element of prejudice behind this kind of pop culture shaming,” writes Philip Ellis. “It is easy to imagine that, in the hive mind of these sorts… any book about the inner lives of women needs a cartoonish high-heel shoe on the cover.” Do you agree?

P.S. More fun things, including a trick for falling asleep quickly.

  1. L says...

    I am obsessed with Wild Wild Country! I loved the show, and especially how it tried not to take sides. I still think about it a few weeks later, I can’t make up my mind if this was crazy good / crazy bad / not that crazy, and who the crazies really were…

  2. Gabrielle says...

    It may be a stretch, but do you know of any companies similar to Maude that either ships to Australia or is Australian? I can’t find any vibrator that makes me feel comfortable enough to use (especially as it would be my first time using one). I’ve had my eye out since your brilliant article on vibrators!

    • Gabrielle says...

      Jo’s article* :)

  3. Nicole says...

    Someone mentioned an episode of 99pi (podcast that is about architecture and so. much. more.) about the Rajnesshees. I had to go back and find it. It’s episode 184 “Rajneeshpuram” and is a beautiful episode as always. Gotta love Roman Mars. Whenever 99pi is brought up in our house, either my husband or me automatically say, “This is 99% invisible. I’m Roman Mars.” :)

  4. Leticia Centeno says...

    Oh my, I guess I’m the only one that could not finish watching the first episode. Boring!

    • Emily says...

      I agree the first episode of Wild Wild Country is a little slow. It really sets the stage as to how devoted his followers were, and I think that is important as they grow and grow and grow into something bigger. Keep watching as the story really develops….it was so mind boggling to me and I couldn’t quit watching!

  5. Merrilyn says...

    I can’t wait to watch Wild, Wild Country. My elementary school years were spent in a small town in very Northern California, and I remember hearing about Bagwhan Shree Rajneesh a lot. And yes to the commenter above about the Queer Eye reboot! This version has all the things I loved about the original version, with the added context of today’s social issues. I’ve cried at every single episode.

    • Kate says...

      Queer Eye was so much more than I’d expected. I was definitely not expecting to ugly cry my way through every episode!

  6. Caroline says...

    Ok Joanna you’re getting me pumped for the weekend. I want to check out Maude, the Netflix show, and buy Uno for my kids because of the post before this. Nice recommendations!

  7. Sarah says...

    My favorite part of that Seth Meyers clip is right after he shares a photo of his new son, he takes a (barely perceptible) moment to soak up the face of his son. New dad love. Melts my heart.

  8. shopgirl says...

    Love the Seth Meyers’s story, OMG!!!

  9. Ash samson says...

    I had a baby in basically the exact same way as Seth myers’ wife. She was my second child and it was just as he described his wife’s Experience except I don’t live in a building, my daughter was born in my bedroom and almost into my sweatpants. My stepmother, who has never had children of her own, delivered her on my bed in the five minutes between the phone call to 911 and the subsequent arrival of the ambulance. When she said “what do you need me to do?” I screamed “TAKE MY PANTS OFF!!!” She did, and I pushed, and out came my daughter! When the EMTs came barreling into the room, led by my husband, they said “Wait. What? The baby is here already?” And my stepmom turned around to face them and said to my husband “you have a daughter!”

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, ash, that’s incredible!

  10. Sonia says...

    Osho was a cult leader who believed that women could never reach enlightenment if they had children, so as a requirement all female members were required to go through a sterilization, any members who were found to be pregnant would have a forced abortion whether they wanted it or not. Children the few that there were on the Oregon commune were neglected and sexually abused due to the “free love policies” of the community. I find it highly disturbing that no one has mentioned these issues in the Cup of Jo post and are treating Osho like he is a fashionable spiritual guru. Read up on the whole story.

    • Emily Kunkel says...

      Thank you for saying this! I wish the film spoke about it more instead of leaving all this room of “were they bad or were the people of Antelope just unwelcoming towards new ideas”.

      No, the Rajaneesh were bad. The accounts of rape, assault, forced drugging, child abuse & neglect, as well as other things should be enough for us all to say that collectively it was a bad group led by a bad man.

    • Sasha says...

      Thank you for adding to the story.

      I, for one, didn’t end up unsure about them. Bad guru con artist, followed by some very bad people who committed terrible crimes, and followed by some extremely lost and naive people. The townspeople don’t exactly come off as open and kind, but it was pretty clear to me this was a cult run by criminals and fanatics.

    • Maria in Maine says...

      My husband and I just finished the series and are really interested in reading about what the followers experienced. It was evident this twisted tale has more layers to unravel. Where did you get your information? I would really like to learn more

    • Hannah says...

      I’m playing devil’s advocate here, but do we also say that Catholics are a bad group of people run by bad men? The stories of child abuse, rape and controlling women’s bodies are all too familiar.

      For me, the series got me thinking about the similarities and differences between ‘cult’ and ‘religion’.

    • Emily Kunkel says...

      In response to Hannah above me, I’d argue that one group sought change and to improve and the other did not. I would also bring up how prevalent/severe the degrees were of damage caused.

      People having issue with abortion/birth control is not the same as forcing a woman to abort her child. Further, less than 5% of Catholic priests (I’ll ignore other denominations and other types of leaders who perpetrated these crimes) committed such acts. That number is a lot higher in the Rajaneesh. Their numbers of child abuse and neglect were much higher. Lastly, the Catholic Church (again, your choice of example) has taken steps such as training workers to spot the signs of child abuse and to get help such as the police. Crimes are now being reported at their time as opposed to decades later like what happened in the past.

      Those are differences. How a group looks at the damage cause in it’s name and their response to it. Do they adapt? Or do they just continue on and say that society needs to change?

  11. The podcast 99% Invisible also did an episode about this same cult (about six months ago, I think) and now I’m interested in the documentary to see their perspective one it too.

  12. redfrizzz says...

    The Seth Meyers monologue/recount is great, I love his enthusiasm! For clarity: a doula and a midwife are so not the same thing!

    • Sasha says...

      A midwife attends to the birthing mother and watches over her health. She is trained in life saving procedures and carries life saving medications. She does caregiver things like vaginal checks and listens to the baby’s heart beat and catches the baby. A doula attends to the laboring mother’s emotional and physical needs. She does doula things like suggest position changes, offer encouragement, remind the mother to eat and drink, rub her back. Not the same at all, but complementary and both very nice to have (I would say necessary, but I suppose that’s my opinion).

  13. Robin says...

    Wild, Wild Country is unlike anything I’ve seen. It feels very relevant today as we broaden our thinking and encourage the individuality of others. As an First Nations woman in Canada, I could see the assimilative strategies at play and found their treatment of homeless people to be deeply troubling. And yet, I marvelled at the sheer audacity of what they accomplished! It also has an incredible soundtrack. The music felt, at times, at odds with what we were seeing and yet was so striking. I can’t stop thinking about it.

  14. Denise says...

    OMG I’m in love with Seth Meyers. Also, Wild Wild Country is SO SO good. I live in Oregon and the Rajneeshees are definitely a chapter we remember. The documentary does a great job of showing all sides. It’s still totally unbelievable how a group which seemingly started with the belief in human goodness could morph so drastically to bring out the absolute worst in humankind from all sides. Preposterous and real and definitely worth the watch.

    • Denise says...

      I just realized I presumed to speak for all of Oregon. Ha! What I should’ve said is the people I grew up with and many people I know now still remember the ’80’s Rajneeshee mayhem.

  15. Betsy says...

    I had precipitous labor with two of my kids and one of those was an unintentional home birth. The hardest part of the whole thing was selling the house my son was born in even though the new house was an upgrade.

  16. Laura says...

    Yes on the commentary for people that think pop culture is too lowbrow for them, specifically entertainment that caters to a female audience.

    I loved the Harry Styles quote from Rolling Stone:
    “Who’s to say that young girls who like pop music – short for popular, right? – have worse musical taste than a 30-year-old hipster guy? That’s not up to you to say. Music is something that’s always changing. There’s no goal posts. Young girls like the Beatles. You gonna tell me they’re not serious? How can you say young girls don’t get it? They’re our future. Our future doctors, lawyers, mothers, presidents, they kind of keep the world going. Teenage-girl fans – they don’t lie. If they like you, they’re there. They don’t act ‘too cool.’ They like you, and they tell you. Which is sick.”

    • Stella Blackmon says...

      Wow, love, Laura.

    • Temme says...

      It’s easy for harry styles to say that because he was picked up and pushed through the music industry machine, which is still very much alive and well. I don’t understand the comparison he’s making to hipster 30 year old men. That seemed like a non-sequitor. But I can say that young people will generally like what’s pushed on them massively. There’s also group think. That’s what they call a cultural movement, but I wouldn’t put it down to something as simple as “teenage girls like me because I’m truly gifted and talented”. It should be “I’ve been a polished stone sold to teenage girls and it happened to work this time”. Let’s call a spade a spade.

  17. brianna says...

    I’ve added Wild Wild Country to my watch list. I’m fascinated by stories like that.

  18. Clare says...

    The article about pop-culture shaming was very complex for me. I agree fully with the writer in some respects, yet I often find myself guilty of asking, “who?” Because of this, I want to attribute a slightly gentler, less sexist/hostile/condescending motive to the people who ask “who?” I want to suggest that there are many of us who are out of the pop-culture loop for other reasons than cultural-elitism. For instance, I wasn’t allowed to watch TV growing up, and for this reason I’m not only not much of a TV watcher, but I also don’t possess the skill that other people seem to possess for watching TV as fully fictional entertainment. The few times when I’ve watched reality TV (for instance), I find my blood pressure soaring, and feeling a little shaky and sweaty from the stress of the dramatized conflict. These days, for emotional protection, I’m often the person either asking “who?” or “what’s that?” or just keeping my mouth shut. I don’t think i’m the only person either.
    I think both the writer, and the people he’s writing about, could probably all use a little more of Jo’s motto “great for her, not for me.”

    • Laura says...

      the piece does clarify that it’s fine to ask, it’s just the tone in which it’s asked. from the article:
      “And it is absolutely fine to not be immersed in pop culture 24/7 if that’s not your cup of tea — sometimes, asking “Who?” is simply is an expression of curiosity. The question itself is not the problem — it’s the sexist and arrogant tone in which it is all too often asked.”

  19. Emily says...

    OMG….Wild Wild Country is cringe and binge worthy! It deserves a CoJ discussion all to itself!

  20. Is Wild Wild Country creepy/scary/disturbing? Or just fascinating? Going back to that scary book post several days ago, I’m an HSP (Highly Sensitive Person) and get creeped out and have nightmares easily. I’m intrigued by this, though! Someone who’s watched it, let me know! (Basically, is the tone of the doc creepy?)

    • Sasha says...

      I’m the same Joy, and I didn’t find it creepy or scary, just fascinating.

    • I LOVE documentaries and was intrigued by this, but my husband and I started to watch it and I almost fell asleep. I just found the pace to be really slow and boring, unfortunately. A lot of the followers are interviewed and they still seem really excited discussing the leader.

    • Elizabeth says...

      The fact that the Rajneesh are referred to as “notoriously forgotten” makes me feel 1,000 years old. They were one of the first cults I remember as hitting “the big time,” if big time means national attention. They had a lot of attention and I remember the 60 Minutes story about them very well. There’s a lot on Youtube about them.
      Lots of cults in the west…

    • Dottie says...

      Thanks for asking! I was wondering the same. I’m such an HSP (ha), that I avoided the scary book post because I worried it would creep me out. :)

  21. Really interesting article about Wild Wild Country: https://newrepublic.com/article/147657/outside-limits-human-imagination

    Definitely worth reading for some additional insight into the documentary. It’s easy to be kind of like “Whoa this is crazy! ” and kind of forget about just how sad some aspects were- like the children who moved there with their parents and sort of fended or themselves or the homeless people who were being drugged and then later abandoned.

    • Sasha says...

      Thank you for that link, wow. I am feeling stunned, and sickened. The documentary really leaves a lot of the worst stuff out. I am just horrified at how many followers say by and did nothing as women were raped, forced into prostitution, as children were raped, as children were neglected. I now feel like the people in the documentary that are still, to this day, defending the cult, are MONSTERS.

  22. c says...

    Has anyone used the Maude vibrator? I love the simplicity but I’m worried about it being strong enough after getting a bullet vibrator and it not being strong enough.

  23. Emily says...

    For those who (like me!) love pop culture, I highly recommend checking out Anne Helen Petersen’s Facebook group called “Celebrity Gossip, Academic Style.” She shares such smart and thought-provoking articles, like Molly Ringwald’s recent piece in the New Yorker.

    • brianna says...

      Thank you for this. I just liked her page.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that’s awesome, thank you!

  24. Mallory says...

    I find it incredibly upsetting that Seth Myers was back at work the day after his child was born. Women will never achieve equal pay/levels of seniority in employment if men continue to push child rearing responsibility on women. Child care is not JUST a woman’s job. Man should be proud to take paternity leave. It shows they understand how important they are in their children’s lives.

    • Temme says...

      Maybe this is what they both preferred and agreed upon in their household. How can you be upset about a decision made in a relationship that you’re not even a part of?

    • y says...

      Great point! I hadn’t thought of it that way before, but I agree completely

    • K says...

      I also thought of this! Will he be taking off time to help raise his newborn? He would definitely be an advocate for parental leave policies, but to make change- gotta be the change!

    • amanda june says...

      Yes to Temme!

    • Emily says...

      Yes to this! I completely agree!

    • Amanda G says...

      Mallory –

      Why can’t we accept all kinds of child rearing and family arrangements without passing judgement? We have no idea what the discussion was between him and his wife in terms of child care, or what the implications are from his contract in terms of taking time off or finding a replacement host.

      I’d also like to say that through his spot in the public eye, Seth seems to constantly be a voice of support for women. Change rarely happens in huge leaps and bounds and more often in small steps and grassroots movements, so why can’t we appreciate the actions of good people, however incremental? Personally, I don’t think it is wise to always demand enormous progress immediately. I’ll take progress over perfection any day.

  25. Sasha says...

    Seth Meyers is adorable! I’m so happy for his wife and family. Precipitous birth stories can be crazy and funny.

    If you’re in the mood for more pregnancy funny : https://youtu.be/2EVI7wIV7tk
    SNL’s first pregnant man skit from this weekend. I was rolling.

  26. Sasha says...

    Wild wild Country is such a thought provoking documentary. We were absolutely riveted. At one point I shouted at the TV “no fucking way!!!” I won’t give anything away, but craaaazy shit goes down.

    Apart from the drama, and weirdness (at one point my husband said “oh bummer, all the fun sex stuff is done now” with such a frownie face), the conflicts between the residents and the cult members gave us so much to think about. There were times when we didn’t have sympathy for either group, they were each so singleminded and biased. And I came to the realization, this is what it looks like when people completely lack empathy for each other. We live in a place not that different from this area of Oregon, and I grew up in a very similar type town, and we have many friends who we could imagine joining up, so it was just so relatable, even though it’s weird and kooky and almost unbelievable.

    • Kate says...

      Hahaha, I’ve recommended this show to a bunch of friends and last night received a series of “NO FUCKING WAY” text messages.

  27. Heather says...

    My second came seriously fast, too. It’s called Precipitous Labor. I was, luckily, at the hospital and the nurses came rushing in saying “Don’t push! Just wait!” and I laughed in their faces as my baby was born one second later. After, I thought, “That’s the kind of baby that’s born in a parking lot.”

    • Ali says...

      Haha! Loved this! I had precipitous labor with my first. I remember just lying down in shock after giving birth, waiting for the placenta, and thinking, where would this baby have arrived had my husband successfully convinced to stay at home?

    • Sasha says...

      It’s really terrible for birth workers to say (shout, yell) “don’t push” in situations like this. You can’t help it (it’s your uterus, not your will pushing a baby out) and it might make women feel like they did something wrong. And it’s just dumb, when a baby is coming that fast there is very little chance that there’s going to be a problem. Get under Mama and catch. They also could be saying a whole bunch more helpful things like “reach down and feel your baby” (calming), “we’ve got this! You are just fine” (calming) “you’ve got this! Yay!” (calming, let’s mom know she’s safe). All of this would result in less damage to Mom’s perineum, which is really a very serious thing to worry about. They could also shhh everyone, turn down lights, put some comforting hands on Mom. All would increase safety for her.

    • Colleen S says...

      Sasha-

      My younger sister was basically born the same way. My parents were at the hospital (because she was induced or went into labor—it’s been 26 years, so I don’t remember), and baby sister was coming. The nurse was holding in her body, as she had crowned, asking my mom not to push. Our bodies were made for this, it does the work, even when we aren’t.

    • HS says...

      I had precipitous labor with my 3rd, and one nurse said “don’t push, the doctor isn’t here!” and I very loudly yelled “F*CK YOU” and my daughter was born 2 seconds later. I have reasoning for my extreme reaction though; my aunt was born in the late 1940’s, and my grandma had precipitous labor with her. The doctor hadn’t arrived, and after telling my grandma to not push the nurse proceeded to HOLD MY GRANDMA’S LEGS CLOSED to try to stop her delivering. My grandma kicked her off at literally the last second, but she was so traumatized by what the nurse had done that she refused to go to a hospital for her next 3 children. Apparently during that time period it was a pretty common thing to try and stop delivery of the baby until the doctor arrived. Eff that noise.

  28. Natalia says...

    I used to be a vibrator naysayer but now I’m seriously thinking about getting one! Now that I’m pregnant getting to O in the usual positions is HARD so with having to make changes I’ve started self stimulating when doing the deed and suffice to say the last O’s have been the best of my life! haha

    LOVED that birth story, I wish that my labor and delivery hope as fast as that!!

    • Diana says...

      Get one! Run, don’t walk!

  29. Joanna says...

    All I could think about after watching the Seth Meyer’s clip was that my co-op board would fine me for doing something that was not in the house rules!

    • Claudia says...

      OMG I thought the same thing! I used to live in a condo building with a particularly stickler-y neighbor. He definitely would have notified me of some violation of the condo docs and forced me to pay to replace the carpet or sofa in the common area lol.

    • Lisa says...

      Our downstairs neighbour hates us with a passion (she’s old and housebound, we live above her with a toddler … it’s not s great combo). If I gave birth in the lobby it would totally send her over the edge

  30. kiki says...

    I JUST watched that Seth Meyers video through a buzzfeed link and thought, I bet this will be on Cup of Jo’s Friday link round up. LOL. So good!!!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      hahahaha yes, kiki! you know us well ;)

  31. Elizabeth says...

    I just shared that Seth Meyers video with a friend whose wife is due to have a baby any day and another friend who just had a baby they named “Axel” – what a great story!

    The last story about pop culture made me think of the great recent CoJ post about romance novels. I’m trying to own my love of all different genres of fiction – from the classically highbrow to the books with high heels on the cover and everything in between.

  32. What an incredible birth story WOW! And it was so moving how he got choked up in the end – so sweet!

    My father watched that documentary and had actually bought a house from the cult in our hometown in NJ in the 80’s! It turns out the lawyer they interviewed was in charge of selling the real estate and my dad met him a few times to discuss the sale. He thought they may have ditched plans to start the cult on the east coast! They also owned a local castle!

    Eva

  33. MJ says...

    I often think about how media and entertainment geared toward or starring women is trivialized while entertainment geared towards men is seen as worthy of being very serious about (ahem, football). I watch and love reality TV because it’s one of the few places where I can see an hour of television starring ONLY women!!

    • Sasha says...

      Well said! (Ahem football. And all the other balls too).

    • Diana says...

      Football is glorified reality TV, straight up. Don’t even get me started on Fantasy Football….

  34. celeste says...

    People always ask me, “WHO?” Thanks :)

  35. Lisa says...

    “I’m getting choked up just thinking about how brave I was.” hahahahaha

  36. Lauren says...

    Oh man, this Seth Meyers monologue is everything! All the feels while watching this. I have to admit that I have such a crush on both Seth and Alexi – I have been a huge fan of his show for years and Alexi is this kick-ass human rights lawyer doing incredible work to help stop human trafficking. After watching this monologue I pretty much just want to be best friends with them.

  37. Kate says...

    I’m for any media that provides a platform for showing female characters that are intelligent and emotionally nuanced. I’ve loved shows like Veronica Mars, Amy Sherman-Palladino creations, The Good Wife, and even Aaron Sorkin’s West Wing for depicting smart strong women (hello, Amy Gardner & CJ!) who stand up to real-life emotional and professional challenges and lift up those characters as more than emotional train wrecks and sex symbols. The setting of the show doesn’t need to be the oval office or a court room for it to have value, just look at the first two seasons of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. It just takes good writing.

    • I didn’t love the 3rd season either…. Fingers crossed it all comes together for this last one.

  38. Sarah says...

    Seth Meyers is hilarious recounting his son’s birth. I have a son named Aksel (I’m assuming different spelling) too! :)

  39. That Seth Meyers video is hilarious…hopefully now he realizes that mansplaining a woman’s birth experience to her is not the way to go, LOL

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i laughed so much at that part!

  40. Rae says...

    That Man Repeller article is so good! Thanks for sharing Stella.

  41. Amy says...

    So my uncle was in this cult! My parents called the guy “Bagworm” and it was kind of a joke in our midwestern hometown, but now I see it was actually all pretty scary. My uncle’s name was Greg but I remember him sending me cards signed “Swami Digant” and being all confused….and my parents telling me that I was not to talk to him or go anywhere with him unsupervised when he visited. He got out eventually before all the craziness went down.

    • Stella Blackmon says...

      So interesting to hear, Amy! Thanks for sharing.

    • Paola says...

      Bhagvan (bagworm?) means a deity in Hindi and Sanskrit.

  42. Laura says...

    Assuming that “highbrow” storytelling is automatically unreadable, close-minded, and straight-male-centric is as problematic as assuming that “lowbrow” media is frivolous, feminine, and irrelevant. There are examples of both pop culture and more academic writing or media that we should be more open to and accepting of, and both categories have changed and broadened, encompassing more perspectives and voices. And there are examples of both types of media that are sexist and arrogant. Of course pop culture and its participants should be seen as vital, but I don’t think it’s necessary to dismiss the merits of “highbrow” work or generalize those writers and participants as male and “pretending to be above something.” We do not need to shun one thing in order to accept another.

    • Stella Blackmon says...

      Really great points, Laura! We were actually discussing this exact subject in the office, and totally agree.

    • Fatima says...

      Totally agree with you Laura.

    • Kate says...

      This is a better-articulated version of what I was trying to say above. Thanks, Laura!

    • Yes, absolutely. To me Jane Eyre is a beautiful example. One of the first novels to look extensively at the inner life of a woman, and her own agency despite circumstances. Written by a woman, at that. And beautiful, worthy, and classic.

    • Laura says...

      Thanks Cait – Jane Eyre is a perfect example! As an educator and English teacher, I’m always fighting to get my students to consider what they might learn from things like Jane Eyre, despite the time and voice being different from their own. I want them to see through all kinds of lenses – not just young ones, but old ones too.

  43. Caitlin says...

    Ahh the Man Repeller article was PERFECT and summed up so many feelings I had had for so long. This line really stuck with me:
    “We can’t ignore the fact that there is a lens through which many of us are encouraged to view art: The work created by and targeted toward men is perceived as inherently good, and art historically geared toward women is seen as innately feminine and therefore frivolous and not worthy of analysis.”

    • Stella Blackmon says...

      YES!

  44. Last week my husband and I finally got around to watching the Queer Eye reboot together. Every episode was so moving that BOTH of us teared up several times (ok, I sobbed). There was an op-ed in Vulture where the author described the purpose of the show as “healing broken masculinity” and that really resonated. The love and tenderness and encouragement from the Fab 5 is enough to knock you off your feet.

    • Stella Blackmon says...

      Yes, Bethany!!!!! Loving this season. P.S. How sweet is Antoni?!?!?!?!?

    • Sasha says...

      Best show on TV. I feel like they are single handedly taking on the patriarchy, one sad guy at a time.

    • alison says...

      I don’t even know what to do with all straight single lady feelings I have about Antoni.

    • If nothing else, I think everyone should watch the 4th episode. If you’re not in tears by the end, call the coroner because you’re probably dead.

    • These comments about Antoni are cracking me up! I totally agree – also Karamo is *fire emoji*. And Christine, I’m with you on Episode 4 – I cried through the entire thing!

    • Lisa says...

      I watched QE out of curiosity, and ended up sobbing my way through the entire season in about two days. It’s jusr so healing.

      As for Antoni … check out his Instagram feed. Today he’s in underpants. * swoon *

  45. Nay says...

    That video is the best thing I’ve seen this week. I didn’t really know or much care who is Seth Meyers, is but maybe I do now. And yes I Googled his wife after watching this video.

  46. Jessie says...

    Oh no, please don’t call Bagwhan Shree Rajneesh a religious guru. He was a cult leader. FYI, ‘bagwhan’ means ‘god’. ‘Guru’ means teacher. Don’t legitimize this cult leader.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      great point, jessie. thank you.

    • Clare says...

      This weekend, I was watching Instagram stories while watching Wild Wild Country (multi-tasking at its finest). I follow the founder of XtendBarre, who, that very night, had posted a story with an “inspirational” quote from Bagwhan/Osho. I messaged her to be like “Hey, you know there’s a Netflix doc all about the cult this dude lead, right?” No response. . .

      It was BIZZARE.

    • Raquel says...

      I totally understand the criticism to Osho. However, I do like a lot his meditations and his books and I know I am not alone. It is unfortunate that doesn’t hasn’t been addressed in Wild Wild Country but I guess it would have to be a much longer series to show all that.

  47. Jessie says...

    My friend delivered her baby by herself in the front seat of the car while her partner was driving them to the hospital. So.

    • Meg says...

      Hero

    • Rae says...

      I used to babysit for a little boy who came into the world the same way. Now that I have gone through labor this is even more impressive to me!

    • Lauren E. says...

      My friend, also! It was her third and the baby just came so fast. When she and her husband pulled up to the hospital, her husband was such a wreck that the nurse who helped them volunteered to drive their car around himself and my friend BEGGED him not to get in. They got the car cleaned top to bottom after that day.