Relationships

How to Support the Asian-American Community During This Surge in Hate Crimes

Last night, eight people were fatally shot at Asian-owned spas in the Atlanta area. Six were Asian. And since last March, there have been nearly 3,800 reports of hate incidents targeting Asian-Americans in the United States, according to Stop AAPI Hate. “Once again we see that hate is deadly,” Georgia senator Reverend Raphael Warnock tweeted.

We are holding the victims’ families close in our hearts today, and we stand with the Asian-American community. “No words can fully describe what I feel as an Asian American. We are beyond exhausted, heartbroken, angry,” writes Kim Saira on Instagram. Add Claire Tran on Twitter: “With what’s happening in Atlanta, I just want to send love to everyone who — like me and many friends — grew up sitting around our parents’ nail salon or restaurant, or nervously awaiting them to come home from an overnight shift at a convenience store. The worry never goes away.”

If you can, please join us in donating to the Support the AAPI Community Fund. We will match readers’ donations up to $5,000 — all you have to do is make a donation to an organization supporting AAPI causes and forward your receipt, with subject line “donation,” to hello@cupofjo.com. Update: Our readers donated $5,000 within a few hours, and we have matched the donation. Thank you so much.

Also, please consider following Stop AAPI Hate, Asian American Federation and Advancing Justice Atlanta on Instagram to get involved.

Thank you so much. We support our Asian-American readers and the larger Asian-American community today and always. Please share other ideas of ways to help, in the comments below.

P.S. How to raise race-conscious children.

(Photo by Jim Wilson.)

  1. Eva says...

    Thank you for raising awareness! Just donated :)

    Reminder to everyone to support your local Asian restaurants! So many have faced hardship, from a precipitous decline in business because of racism to outright vandalism.

  2. SN says...

    Horrified and still processing this abhorrent shooting on top of the long, ugly history of racism towards Asian Americans in this country. This was a tough week, and made tougher when I know many of my friends in the AAPI community felt let down by the lack of forceful and powerful response we saw during the BLM surge in the summer.

    Donated and committed to allyship in action. Please stay safe, everyone.

  3. Allison says...

    Hatred towards Asians isn’t rife with symbolism (i.e. we don’t typically see anything anti-Asian on the same scale as nooses, burning crosses, or defaced BLM signs). Instead such racism and hate often comes in the form of verbal/physical personal attacks, or attacks on someone’s livelihood.

    People can help by believing that it’s out there, even if you as a non-Asian person don’t see it happening. And regularly support Asian-owned businesses or places that employ Asian staff.

  4. Quyen says...

    Would you post about non-alcoholic beer after a post about George Floyd and BLM? Come on Cup of Jo…

    This just symbolizes how the plight of Asian Americans are not as important as others… You might not have done this knowingly, but the fact that there was a second post speaks volumes.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Thank you so much for your note, Quyen. I hear you. We absolutely should not have posted a second post on Wednesday. I apologize.

    • Anon says...

      This. I made a comment on the beer post about how it had more comments than the previous Asian assault post and it didn’t get published. THAT says something too.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Hi Anon! Your comment is actually up on that post. We sometimes just take a little while to moderate comments because there are so many. Thank you so much!

    • AN says...

      Can you consider archiving/moving/adding a note if apology to the top of that post, then? Thank you.

    • Allison says...

      Ditto An’s comment. Public acknowledgement in a place where people will see it will go a long way.

    • Anna says...

      Jo, if you “absolutely should not have posted a second post on Wednesday”, then why hasn’t it been removed?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Thank you for your notes and feedback! I really appreciate them. I have changed the time stamp of the non-alcoholic beer post to be before this post — that way, the posts about supporting the Asian-American community are both near the top of the site and can be easily seen and accessed by all readers. The beer post is now lower down on the homepage (but is still live on the site so that people who are sober or cutting back on alcohol can access it in the archives). I hope this helps. Thank you so much, as always.

    • Anna says...

      Thank you, Joanna.

  5. K says...

    What the heck is going on? For the most part, my life has been great. I can do anything I want and I’m thankful that my race and gender don’t hold me back too much in this way, in the era that I have lived. Hopefully I can make that remain true.

    I’ve dealt with racial discrimination being the status quo growing up, and that permanently affected the default way I see myself in interactions. However, on the whole, aside from wanting to reduce these incidences in the present and future, I take it as a (part of) my version of trauma. that we all go through things that take our innocence sooner or later, and this is one of those things that were mine.

    However, I’m baffled at these nationwide routine physical attacks. They always happened, but it feels very ramped up in recent times. They cannot be explained away like verbal taunts. It’s so scary how tenuous the social contract is.

    When do verbal attacks become physical attacks? Why???

    For mass shootings I think it’s very helpful for the news to condemn them, but I’m not sure what helps deal with the root problem of helpless elders being bodily pummeled. Because I think a big chunk of those attackers probably aren’t watching the news and don’t care about consequences.

    I will say, I don’t want to feel like a victim any more than I actually am. I don’t want/need to be told how much Asians have suffered or made into or lionized simply by existing as a minority. I feel like all of that is distracting noise and might even be harmful. I don’t feel too tired to explain to anyone willing to listen in good faith. We are all human, liable to be oppressors or victims.

    Stay safe and aware, everyone! This can happen to anyone vulnerable. And thank you so much for posting about this, your support is felt!

  6. L.S. says...

    So important. Thank you for matching donations.

  7. Mary says...

    Thank you for this post.

    Please also follow Phillip Lim on Instagram (@therealphilliplim) as he has been vocal about Asian hate crimes.

    Thank you for standing with us and supporting Asian-owned businesses!

  8. Maryn says...

    Thank you for speaking up about this, CoJ <3

    • I’m not sure if this has been brought up already but not all Asian people living in this country identify as Asian Americans for a multitude of reasons. In conversations like this one where we are discussing what is impact all Asian people and not only American people of Asian descent, it would be more appropriate and inclusive to say Asian people. I don’t think this is something that crosses the minds US born people, even Asian-Americans. I wanted to share this perspective since my sisters and I have been having this conversation as Asian immigrant women. I started sharing my perspective recently on my social media platforms and have heard from other Asian immigrants feeling the same way with the language around Asian-American.

  9. Robin says...

    Thank you for posting this.
    As a white woman I wonder what I can do for the Asian women in my community. Would love if any AAPI could offer guidance.
    Peace.

  10. Jung says...

    Thank you so much for this post – I means so much. And, by the time I read it last night at the end of the day, was so appreciative to see the response in donations had already been met.

  11. florene says...

    Thank you for bringing awareness to this issue! Not much has been covered in the mainstream media which is disheartening. I recommend checking out Next Shark which covers Asian American news to see how frequent the harassment and assaults have been. I’m so worried for my parents who are in their 70s as it’s horrific to see that the elderly have been targeted. Fighting against racism and white supremacy means supporting all marginalized groups. Please learn more, support, and be an ally!

    • Christina says...

      I agree! Attacking anyone is wrong, and targeting the elderly just multiplies how wrong it is!!

  12. THANK YOU for writing about this, COJ! Keep it up.

  13. Jill says...

    These posts matter, and AAPI trauma needs to be acknowledged, the increased racism needs to be seen for what it is. Thank you for centering them with your platform and prompting action for support.

  14. jdp says...

    my family and i stand with our asian-american friends and community.

  15. April says...

    Thank you for sharing suggestions of how to help.

  16. Sarz says...

    As someone with quite a few dear Asian-Canadian friends, I appreciate your stance – and action – very much.

  17. Helen says...

    Thank you so much for this post.

  18. Jamie says...

    I’ve been thinking a lot about this quote from Steven Yeun’s profile in the NYT: Sometimes I wonder if the Asian-American experience is what it’s like when you’re thinking about everyone else, but nobody else is thinking about you.

    Thank you for thinking of us. Thank you for using your platform for good. Thank you for understanding anti-racism includes acknowledging the Asian American experience.

    • Allison says...

      I’m just commenting here to support and amplify what you’ve already said. I’ve been thinking of his quote a lot as well.

      It’s so telling that this post has been up for two days and there are less than 120 comments here. And three of them are mine.

  19. mika says...

    Thank you so much for this post, Joanna. As an Asian American today has been exhausting and full of rage and heartbreak. I appreciate the resources and hope issues regarding Asian Americans are continued to be talked about and amplified.

  20. Sick & Tired AsAm Female says...

    It’s telling that there are only 58 comments on this post when so many other serious posts get hundreds of comments. I just want to make clear, Asian hate crimes have been happening long before Trump and his vile mouth. Asian hate crimes have been perpetrated by more than just “White supremacists”. This has been going on far longer than the last four years, and even this last year of the pandemic. The only difference is that it’s been stoked, and finally being reported now. Declaring “stop Asian hate” and donating some money to a cause is just lip service, a little charity to help exactly WHO to feel better? If you want to really be an ally, to help the Asian community then you need to do far more than just simply post a a few words of allyship. Go to the Chinatowns, the Japantowns, the Koreatowns, the little Saigons, etc. and support those communities through your purchases, participate in the events, etc. Stop glamorizing what feels exotic and different, STOP wearing chopsticks in your hair bun! That’s like walking around with a fork in your hair! Chopsticks are for eating and cooking, it’s not a hair accessory! I am so sick and tired of us being the latest fad. The attention that we’re getting now should have been happening long ago. And while I am grateful to be getting any attention at all, I want it to be clear that the media is presenting it to society in a very specific way. Ask more, know more. One mass killing in Atlanta is horrible. But why is it only NOW catching people’s attention, why is COJ only NOW mentioning AAPI crimes, when there have been dozens of, if not more, attacks that have happened to Asians in New York, California, Washington, Oregon, all over. They are being attacked by people of all walks of life, not just angry conservative White men. That is the larger story. We have become America’s punching bag. So sick of this shit.

    • Thyme says...

      I couldn’t agree more with your first statement. Truly speaks volume.

    • sadie says...

      i hear you and you have every right to be angry.

    • Angeline says...

      THANK YOU for voicing this. I had been struggling with precisely the same sentiments — disappointment that there were so few comments (low 3 figures now but it had lingered at the 50-something number for awhile), gratitude yes that this post was even made at all, but also frustration at the typical knee-jerk donation move which just comes across as a convenient and privileged move, and a very hands-off form of virtue-signaling. I’m not convinced that throwing money at the problem will solve anything. I’ve been following COJ for years and I had also noted the inconsistent coverage of the Asian American experience — a few splashy posts for the release of Crazy Rich Asians and the significance of representation, but then radio silence, not even a one-liner for the weekend roundup post of links that year to acknowledge the Lunar New Year, which only got mentioned in an actual full post this year, a full 2-3 years later. It’s like we Asians are invisible until it’s once again trendy to write/talk about “Oriental” (a colonial term that smacks of racism and fetishism which I truly hate) fashions, cuisine, culture, etc. Or worse, we WERE invisible until ppl started taking out their pandemic frustrations on us by punching, kicking, slapping, yelling and spitting on us with seemingly total impunity, as if they’re totally justified in blaming us for the so-called “Kung flu” or “Chinese virus”. And now with this truly terrifying spate of violent hate crimes, the latest most headline-grabbing one being of that sicko gunning down people in Atlanta-area spas, the media spin has begun. Instead of simply stating that he gunned down people in an obvious act of racism, they allowed him to blame it on his alleged “sex addiction” and thereby imply that his victims were sex workers and somehow asking for/deserving of this violence? That is just plain WRONG. Conflating racism and xenophobia with the gunman’s lame excuse of alleged sex addiction merely allows the trolls and haters to make endless snarky “happy endings” jokes at the victims’ and frankly all Asians expense, continues the age-old racist tradition of treating Asians as the punchline, and does nothing to move the needle forward on social justice or affording Asians the plain respect and dignity they deserve. I get that COJ isn’t a full-time social justice website but the timing and the amount of effort put into posts highlighting these very complex issues need to be given more thought, care and consistency. Peace out.

    • Kate says...

      She has been doing those things… check out earlier posts about things to do in NYC, the beauty uniforms/week of outfits, recipes, etc. She literally had a post last week that profiled an asian-canadian woman in nyc who uses drawings to illustrate her experiences with racism. everyone can always improve ofc, but COJ does seem to follow through on these allyship examples…

    • Angela says...

      This. Thank you for this.

    • K says...

      I agree that this problem has been much older than Trump. I am also curious why it took a mass shooting to finally incite a universal response of horror. Why was it not enough when it was “only” reports of defenseless Asian elders body slammed into pavement, hard enough to fracture skulls? I want to acknowledge that there was coverage (including from Cup of Jo), but not at this level. I agree that there is a larger story at hand. Why is the media picking and choosing? What is the benefit of that?

      I don’t mind chopsticks or forks in hair, though. That’s my personal opinion. I’m (much) more concerned with physical threats and restrictions of opportunities.

  21. LK says...

    Thank you for posting this. I’m going to research how to intervene racist rhetoric with shut downs – it can be hard to know what to say in the moment (except HEY) but I’m finding resources on what to do when witnessing harassment. Let’s shut it down.

    I heard something recently about how we would say we don’t tolerate hatred, but it must be more than that. We must be unequivocally against it.

  22. And this very post, is the reason why I will never stray from Cup of Jo. Your posts are so comforting, woke, and joyful on so many levels. As a Filipina, an Asian American, I appreciate your voice and allyship.

  23. Sue says...

    Today is the day I felt the closest with my black brothers and sisters. And how freaking awful is that? That it takes something like this to feel such deep hurt, injustice, anger, and fear. And why is it that we minorities have this to “bond” over? It feels so unfair and the world feels so cruel.

  24. Jen says...

    Thank you thank you.
    That is all.

  25. S says...

    Thanks for highlighting this. I also appreciate that you specifically said “Asian-American” rather than just “Asian.” Also really appreciating the other thoughtful and educational comments here. Grateful for this community.

  26. Maya says...

    Thank you so much for making space for this.
    Sad to see there are such few comments here on this issue though.

  27. Becky says...

    Thank you for posting about this. I feel seen and acknowledged by CoJ which I am so incredibly grateful for today.

  28. MT says...

    Thank you for your post!

  29. Standing in solidarity with the Asian American community. ♥️

    Thank you COJ for this post.

  30. Amy says...

    Thank you so much for this post Joanna. My heart breaks when I hear of everything that is happening to asians in the US and yet none of the big news outlets are covering it. It’s a really scary time to be Asian right now…stay safe

  31. Emily says...

    Thank you for posting – and thanks to everyone for all the great additional links in the comments.

  32. Amrita says...

    Sending love to my Asian brothers and sisters today and every day. I’m horrified and heartbroken that you are subject to this, and for the awful events of this week and last year.

  33. JoAnn says...

    As an Asian woman who grew up north of Atlanta, to me it means the world you posted about this today. xoxo

  34. R says...

    Thank you. As an Asian woman in the US who has been told to “go back to China” this year- I really appreciate this.

  35. JOLTA says...

    Thank you for posting this. I woke up this morning to the news and went to Facebook, but it was like any other day on Facebook — friends and family members going about their days cracking jokes, asking for recommendations for takeout, posting pictures of their kids — as though 8 Asian women had not just gotten shot. The only people commenting about this were other friends of mine who are Asian. Most of my non-Asian friends who support BLM made no comment on this horrendous massacre. I couldn’t tell if we are just numb to mass shootings like this, or whether it only matters if the victims are any other race but Asian. It is comforting to see that Cup of Jo and this community cares.

    • Wendy says...

      Thank you COJ. Been crying on and off all day. The thought of those loved ones these women left behind breaks my heart.

    • Tired of this says...

      THIS^! For all the support for BLM, for all the times I’ve been called to be an ally, where is the reciprocation!?

    • Amanda says...

      It’s not fair to compare reactions to BLM to reactions to other hate crimes and murders. White supremacy is working if it is making us think that our activism and outrage is a competition, or something that we are owed from other racialized people.

      The murders of Delaina Ashley Yaun, Paul Andre Michels, Xiaojie Tan and Daoyou Feng were tragic, and so were the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and so many others, but just because someone posted on social media for one and not the other, it does not mean they are not thinking about it. Black, Indigenous and people of colour need to stick together, and that won’t happen if we hold animosity towards another race-based movement that gained more traction than the one for our own peoples. As racialized people, we cannot compare our movements to one another this way, because all race-based movements are movements against white supremacy, and that is a fight we fight together, whether our mouths say Black lives matter, or stop Asian hate.

    • sparks says...

      This cycle of hate in the US is horrific. I don’t know if the unaffected people are terrified or just indifferent to speak out.

  36. Janet says...

    Thank you, Jo. I’m a longtime reader. It means a lot to me. Thank you also to the other readers who have donated and for those showing support to the Asian people in their manifold individual and important ways like not telling ugly jokes at our expense. A bunch of teens threw a ton of popcorn (and kernels? it was kind of hard when it hit me in the face) at me two months ago when I walked past them on the sidewalk and yelled “HEY LING LING”. I wasn’t distracted on my phone and it still surprised me because I didn’t think they would do that. I stopped walking around midtown after that. Now there are more people around, but I still don’t feel safe. Anyway, I am comforted by seeing the support here and elsewhere today. Thanks for caring, everyone.

  37. Jude says...

    Thank you for using your platform in this manner. The Atlanta killings are incredibly devastating.

  38. Echoing Cindy’s comment: Thank you, Cup of Jo team and community, for creating a safe space to talk about this! Two months into the pandemic, I was taking a socially distanced, mask-wearing walk around my quite diverse neighborhood when two men in a truck pulled up close to me and, in broad daylight, yelled out an obscene death threat at me. The other pedestrians looked at me, but no one said or did anything. For the most part, I’ve shaken off this experience because I refuse to live in fear or see myself as a victim. But do I have trouble sleeping some nights because of worry for my parents, who live in a far less diverse community and who, like Cindy’s dad, work on the front line? Yes. So. Thank you for making space for us to share our heart’s innermost concerns and for us to show kindness to one another, even if the experience one person is sharing doesn’t resonate with our own.

  39. YJ says...

    Thank you so much for speaking out about this. You are the only blog I follow who was featured this horrendous news on their blog today. Another example of why Cup of Jo rules.

  40. J says...

    Thank you for posting this so quickly. This morning I received several calls from my friends to be careful when going out especially alone to places like the store or gas station. Everyone is different and America’s strongest strength is its diversity.

    From the BLM Movement that applies to all forms of societal wrongs … SILENCE IS COMPLICITY. Thank you everyone for speaking up even when it’s uncomfortable.

  41. Grace says...

    Thank you for this. I want to uplift the important work of NY-based organization Red Canary Song https://www.redcanarysong.net/ – organizing and supporting migrant sex workers.

  42. L says...

    So heartbroken. Sending love and solidarity to all my Asian American sisters and brothers.

  43. Thank you for matching donations. This means so much to me!

  44. Jen says...

    Just donated. Thank you for using your platform to bring awareness. Even though he was not re-elected he continues to call this a China Virus. Words matter.

  45. KW says...

    Cup of Jo team, thank you for posting this today and for matching the donations. As an Asian-American woman, it means a lot to see one of my favorite internet spaces not only call attention to these heinous acts and rhetoric but to also donate and uplift ways to make actual change. Anti-Asian racism is vastly underreported and overlooked in terms of “real aggression” so it is heartening to read this and to see in the comments that people are taking this and the violence and hate over the past year seriously.
    I second the suggestion of bystander intervention training. It allows people to feel more equipped to help in the real world, beyond just sharing infographics or having conversations on social media. Thanks all and take care. Sending strength to my fellow AAPI readers :)

  46. Maria says...

    Thank you for raising awareness and matching donations today Joanna! Learning many more ways to lend my support to the Asian American community from the comments and conversations started here too, thank you for this post.

  47. Laura says...

    I appreciate you sharing this today.

  48. CS says...

    My heart is with all Asian Americans, and Asians everywhere really, who are having to endure this very difficult time. Sending love.

  49. Kim says...

    Hi, why did you guys post another post after this one? Seems like it takes away the significance of the matter…

  50. Thanks for uplifting. I co-lead a progressive AAPI org for women and NB folks in Ohio. We have been talking about anti-Asian racism for a while especially since the pandemic began. This event was like a gut punch. Many of our members have experienced being harassed, spat on,etc. Many also have the awful experience of being fetishized by white men. All this coming together in this one act of terror is a nightmare. Also would like to ask all to listen to AAPI leaders on the ground in Georgia including AAJC mentioned above but also NAPAWF-Atlanta:https://www.napawf.org/chapters/georgia .

    • Cara says...

      Thank you for sharing this link and doing this work. I donated today.

  51. Anon says...

    Thank you for this. Growing up, I was always a little hurt when someone would ask, what are you? I know it was said out of curiosity, someone wanting to know what my Asian descent was. Something about how that question was worded always served to remind me that I was different and seen as different. Parents, please teach your kids to ask that question in a different way. What is your heritage or something similar.

    • leah says...

      this always happened to me too (and still does) – i always say “human” and it always shuts the other person up!

  52. Claire says...

    Such a deeply discouraging and monstrous incident, the ongoing violence is so very wrong. Thank you for offering these resources, I am grateful to have some specific things to do that may be of help.

  53. In Atlanta says...

    Thank you for using this platform to spread the word about rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans. I appreciate the additional resources so many have shared.

    However, the targeted group in Atlanta is also sex workers. I suspect this may be missing from mainstream media for a variety of reasons surrounding the legality and judgements about morality. As an Atlanta, these few blocks are smack in the middle of our community (I drive by them almost every day) and are known as being part of the sex industry. I hope that the narrative will shift to include rights and protections for sex workers, and the reasons why sex workers are often from vulnerable, unprotected populations.

    Please consider adding this important element to your post if you are going to use the events that transpired in Atlanta as a catalyst.

    • Monica says...

      In Atlanta, thank you for sharing this piece of the story and doing so in a respectful way. It has been missing from some mainstream sources as well.

    • Olivia says...

      I’m not sure what it matters what their occupation was. Innocent lives were taken by a white male terrorist.

    • A.M. says...

      I have to admit that I feel naive (or ignorant?) about this so I hope you won’t mind me asking the question. Every news story I’ve read (including this post) has described the locations of the shootings as “spas” or “massage parlors.” Are those euphemisms that most people know the meaning of? Also, what’s the correct name for these types of businesses? When I read these news stories I feel like I’m a kid again and the adults are talking in code. Yet it seems like it’d be important to call them by the correct name, right?

    • Also in Atlanta says...

      A.M., I live in Atlanta not far from two of the spas that were targeted and drive by them often. Their signs say “SPA” or “Massages” but there are no windows, they prominently advertise that they are open 24 hours a day and their nearest neighbors are strip clubs and liquor stores. They may officially be massage parlors or spas, but it’s still pretty apparent to even a casual passerby that more is going on there than just massages. They definitely don’t look like a spa where I would book a facial or, for example, a Korean day spa where you go hang out in different pools with your friends in between treatments.

    • Maya says...

      If your feminism or anti-racism doesn’t affirmatively extend to sex workers – then you are missing a big part of the picture. Maybe google sex workers and racism – just a thought.

    • Also in Atlanta says...

      Seconding this comment as a fellow Atlanta area resident. The shooting suspect said the murders were motivated by his sex addiction — not race. https://www.wsj.com/articles/atlanta-shootings-fbi-investigating-killing-of-eight-at-massage-parlors-11615989454?mod=popular_AMP

      Of course the situation is still tragic and horrible, and it doesn’t lessen the reality of an increase in Asian American hate crimes across the country. Just sharing facts around this particular shooting incident.

    • joy says...

      @A.M. Spas and massage parlors vary in the types of services they provide, both sexual and non-sexual. Some are essentially brothels. Some do not provide commercial sexual services at all. Some workers are being trafficked. Others are not. Some massage parlors leave it up to the workers whether they will provide commercial sexual services at customer request; others make it clear that if sexual services are not provided to customers, the workers will be fired. In many cities, Asian women are overrepresented in “spa” or “massage parlor” settings for commercial sexual services for reasons having to do with racism, misogyny, and the intersection of racism and misogyny with US immigration policy.

    • Hurt says...

      Dear “Also in Atlanta” – what the murderer said is not “facts.” What the murderer did – seek out businesses that are staffed by predominantly one race and murder them – is “facts”. Georgia signed new hate crime legislation in 2020. Since when do we allow a murderer to decide what crimes he should be accused of?

    • J says...

      Agreed that we should acknowledge the vulnerability of sex workers. What I worry about is erasing the fact that this hate crime doesn’t exist in one silo vs. another – rather that is intersects different targets of hate. And there are deeper questions about who become sex workers that cannot be stripped of the context of race and opportunity.

    • Amanda says...

      @Olivia and others, their occupation is extremely important to understanding the type of hate that led to this hate crime. Not only was this a targeted attack on East Asians, it was a targeted attack on women, and a targeted attack on sex workers. The media has spent years hypersexualizing Asian women, and it is getting people murdered. We cannot talk about race-based violence without talking about class-based violence, and gender-based violence.

  54. Amy says...

    Thank you, thank you, thank you for bringing light to this issue, for centering AAPI voices, and for facilitating a clear action. This is one reason why I continue to love being part of this community.

  55. Amanda says...

    If anyone reading this is the non-Asian adoptive parent of an Asian person, I *need* you to know that your kid will not be protected from racism because of who their parents are. I haven’t been.

    Fellow Asian people, it’s been hard enough dealing with this just for myself; I can’t imagine how difficult it is for those of you with kids and elders to worry about as well. Solidarity with you.

  56. Katherine says...

    Thank you. Truly.

  57. Caroline Yoe says...

    Hi Joanna,

    I’ve been following your blog & community since 2010 and it’s post like these that remind me why I continue to stay connected to your platform.

    Thank you so much for bringing attention to this issue and making substantial actions to fight hate and dismantle racism.

    I woke up on Monday feeling overwhelming excitement as I saw the Oscar nominations roll through – I thought maybe, just maybe, America is ready to accept people like me.

    Less than 48 hours later, the shootings in Atlanta were a grave reminder that there is still more work to be done.

    Hoping for change and a brighter future, we can’t do this without allies like you.

  58. Anica Law says...

    I’m so comforted to see this. Thank you.

  59. SlyBK says...

    Donated. Thank you for your post.

  60. Stephanie says...

    Donated, thank you again.

  61. Sage says...

    Donated. Thank you for putting your money where your mouth is.

  62. Bora Kim says...

    Thank you for this. I have been following the news with a heavy heart since the news broke last night. Your post and request to stand in solidarity with the community is so very much appreciated.

  63. Kelly says...

    Donated! Really appreciate the tangible measure of support.

  64. Linda says...

    TY for highlighting!
    as an asian american woman, it’s disorienting to me that it’s 2021 but i actually feel afraid when i step outside my house.
    Every encounter, every stranger, i brace myself for potential conflict.

  65. Thanks for this post! It’s been a scary time to be Asian American (and worrying about my parents, my children, my fellow Asian American friends), but it helps me feel better to know that people are interested in learning from the situation.

    Non-Asians can support us by making small changes:
    – Be mindful of how your words and actions contribute to the narrative that we are not American (or any other predominantly white-populated nationality). Instead of implying that we’re not American because we are not white, ask “What is your heritage?” (not limited to AAPI BTW, use that with anyone! Even white people!) Don’t call COVID “China Virus” or “Kung Flu” and correct people who do – did you know that the 1918 flu’s most probable origin was Kansas? Government & public responses dictate how a pandemic is spread or contained, not ethnicity. If you’re familiar with the expression/game “Chinese Whispers” (lookin’ at you, UK), please find a different expression to use that doesn’t imply that people of Chinese descent are spies or liars

    – Please educate yourselves on the origins of Chinatowns and International Districts

    – Please try to teach your children about the vastly different cultures that encompass “AAPI” (food is a good icebreaker) and recognize that “Oriental” is very much a hurtful racist term used by colonizers who never cared to learn what distinguishes our people and cultures from each other

    – If you’re already familiar with the MANY massacres of Chinese miners in the 1800s, Japanese internment camps during WWII, and the Chinese Exclusion Act, I urge you to reflect on how wins and losses against white supremacist government & public policies affected Asian Americans and other BIPOC too (redlining, Loving v. Virginia, Lum v. Rice). The generational impacts of those are still felt today, despite the important advances of the Civil Rights Movement
    -Lastly, please don’t forget that all forms of racism exist and that during this time of attention on hate crimes against Asian Americans, it’s still imperative to be anti-racist with the people you interact with regardless of what race is being disparaged. All BIPOC deserve respect and safety amongst our white peers.

    • Sage says...

      Thank you for this, Irene.

    • SlyBK says...

      <3

    • Susanna says...

      thank you so much for this!

    • RKM says...

      Thank you so much for your helpful comment, Irene. I just forwarded it to some of my family. I appreciate you taking the time to share this.

    • Thank YOU, RKM! It means so much that you used these talking points to discuss the issue with your family. Silence is violence – the rhetoric we use and the actions we take fuel the escalation of either respect or ignorant, dehumanizing prejudice, the latter of which threatens the safety of myself and so many people I love, including my kids, because it sends the message that we’re expendable and deserve to be harmed. Thank you for caring! Thank you for being a small part of a positive change!

      And thank you to everyone else who mulled over the suggestions as well! Or donated to non-profits providing AAPI mental health services or that magnify visibility of anti-Asian hate crimes. It is all so thoroughly appreciated!!!

    • Alison Marcell says...

      This is so helpful, Irene. Thank you.

    • Lindsey says...

      Thanks for taking time to write this helpful post. I wish you didn’t have to feel the fear you do for yourself and loved ones. It is not right. I will keep working for a better country. May we all

    • Caitlin says...

      Thank you for taking the time to share this Irene❤️

  66. Susanna says...

    Thank you for this post. I just donated to the Asian Counseling and Referral Service, an organization that provides a wide variety of services to the AAPI community in my city of Seattle. https://acrs.org/services/

  67. Alison says...

    Heartbreaking. Thank you for highighting this and thank you to you and the other commentators for promoting practical ways to help.

  68. Tricia says...

    Thank you for using your platform to bring awareness and for your support. It means a lot!

  69. Rosa says...

    Just donated. Cup of Jo, you are brilliant.
    Sending love from Montréal, Canada.

  70. K says...

    Thank you, Joanna!

  71. Thyme says...

    COJ, thank you for stepping up and putting this issue at the forefront. I grew up in the Atlanta suburbs, and I was that child sitting around waiting for my family members to come home from their nail salons, like Claire described. During winter breaks, spring breaks, summer breaks, I was at the salons, helping my family out. These murders were in my backyard. I went to bed sobbing last night thinking about my family as the target, especially myself as an Asian woman. I am deeply disturbed, and cannot say that I am surprised. This was a hate crime, and it was not an unprovoked incidence. The anti-Asian rhetoric that laid across the media nurtured this environment. I feel unprotected and afraid. Afraid that the media will move on and nothing will be done about it. I feel so exhausted.

    But again, thank you COJ for your voice in this fight. I appreciate this community so much during these hard times. Thank you all.

  72. nandini says...

    Thank you so much for writing this.
    This week I have been attending these training: https://www.ihollaback.org/harassmenttraining/
    They are very well done and I recommend them to anyone. They are free of charge and they have a few more happening next month too that should still have some spots available.
    In the bystander intervention one I attended on Monday they were giving practical examples of techniques to use depending on the situation/your personality/comfort. I felt I learned a lot, and I wonder if you could make a post on the topic?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you so much, Nandini. looking into this right now!

    • Megan Raitano says...

      Just signed up! Thank you Nandini!

    • Jennifer says...

      Thank you! Just signed up too!

    • Kay says...

      Thank you for sharing! I signed up :)

    • Ditto! I took this training last year after experiencing verbal assault, and I found the training to be insightful and actionable. I feel better able to protect myself AND be an ally to others thanks to the training.

  73. celeste says...

    I can’t stand how this has spread to all Asian groups. For example, the shooting victims were Korean. Nobody deserves this. In my hometown in Central Wisconsin, and MN too, there is a large population of Hmong who sought asylum here in the 1970s after Laos conflict. I donated this morning to help a Hmong man whose business van was vandalized. For some people just a few bucks makes an enormous difference! https://www.gofundme.com/f/help-yee-fix-the-van?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=m_pd%20share-sheet&fbclid=IwAR2Xp-8b1figxd3F9hqFUdJlOHJ6_921UA_YjWPo94RbzOUKFvN6JBufO1o

    • Lauren says...

      Thank you for posting this. I just donated! I went to grad school in Central Wisconsin and that is when I first learned the history of Hmongs, and why they sought asylum, and was disappointed in the hate so many people had for them. One of my favorite books (heartbreaking to read but one I wish everyone would!) is The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures by Anne Fadiman.

  74. Genevieve says...

    Thank you for matching donations and sharing the links to support anti-racism in Asian-American communities. Asian Americans and other people of color have just been through way too much during the pandemic. The killings in Atlanta are just so devastating and all of this is so exhausting and making me want to scream.

  75. Cindy says...

    Thank you so much for using your platform to bring awareness to this issue that is going on. As an Asian American, born and raised in the states, I have encountered a couple unpleasant racist folk but I didn’t pay too much attention to their ignorance. But since the pandemic, never have I felt SO AFRAID of my life. Just even going to get groceries, I keep my head down low so I don’t attract any unwanted attention. My father, once an immigrant but now a fellow American citizen, still works hard at age 63 to make ends meet to support the family. He does delivery all along the tristate area. What was once just another day at work for him, is war on the front line and the entire family is afraid that he will be attacked while on the job. We pray every night just so he comes home safely.

    This is not the America that my family has once knew. We need to a change and all the support we can get. Especially when the media doesn’t report 98% of the attacks and murders our people are facing unprovoked.

    • Kiki says...

      Hi Cindy, Thank you for sharing your story. I can’t imagine how scary it must be for your dad and family every day. This is not the America we once knew indeed. But think that the good people outweigh the bad, we just need to be louder and more proactive in helping each other. Sending you the biggest of hugs