Design

Have a Good Weekend.

What are you up to this weekend? We are having lasagna tonight and watching the Warriors game. (Toby has gotten me into basketball!) Hope you have a good one — stay safe — and here are a few links from around the web…

How to help people in Texas. Sending love.

The Supernova trailer looks incredible.

On becoming a stay-at-home mother.

This headline made me laugh.

A quite possibly wonderful summer. (!)

Pajamas you can wear all day.

Feeling moved by these tiny love stories. (New York Times)

Broccoli melts for lunch, yes please.

I’m a short afternoon walk, and you’re putting way too much pressure on me.” Hahaha

Issa Rae being awesome.

Plus, three reader comments:

Say Whitney on these four comedians are giving me life: “The Mike Birbiglia stand-up special on Netflix, The New One, is so well done! His storytelling is masterful and this one was really hilarious but beautiful in a lot of ways. I don’t want to spoil anything but the ending is just perfect.”

Says Lilly on what’s your travel fantasy: “Early on in the pandemic, I was so desperate that I started to collect a variety of livestream webcams, in Norway, the Swiss Alps, you name it. They are the best! Lo and behold, a cozy bay in Liguria, Italy. And my latest discovery: live walks! It’s a YouTube genre of its own, I had no idea! For example, this is a channel that shows random strolls through Paris, including the original sound. It’s the most amazing thing; highly recommended if you’re suffering from cabin fever.”

Says B. on 15 great reader comments on sex: “Just wanted to raise a hand for anyone in happy relationships who don’t have super active sex lives. My boyfriend and I have been together for a decade and are incredibly happy together, and we don’t have high sex drives and it works for us! I often see this setup positioned as a problem and wanted to shout out to anyone in the comments who might be feeling left out. We’re all different and it’s cool.”

(Photo by Pnwonderland/Instagram.)

  1. Savannah says...

    My daughter loves walks along our car free path in town because she is obsessed with meeting dogs (and I’m thrilled to not own a dog but get all the snuggles)! Yesterday we met two matching pups named Mick and Dundee and they reminded me of this matching pair. So cute. It will be hilarious to watch those movies with my kids when they are older, laughing just thinking about their responses (all the fashion… and they have grown up with a bidet so they won’t get that joke at all)!

  2. Mikayla says...

    Feminism to me means having the ability economically, socially, and culturally to make a choice for yourself: to (not) get married, to (not) have kids, to (not) stay at home with those children, to (not) be a scientist/architect/researcher, to do any damn thing that we as women have historically been maligned, judged, or downright persecuted for doing because we are women. All the passionate comments regarding the stay at home mother article just shows that we (emphasizing that word’s inclusiveness as much as I can – literally all of us!) have a long ways to go in our feminist journey; that is, owning this ability to choose. What I see in these comments is people struggling and fighting for that choice and justifying past choices they’ve made. I honor your life experiences and admire the thoughtfulness you apply to your lives. It is a pattern I’m trying and striving my best to apply to my life as well.

    I say this with no skin in the game in terms of being a stay at home mother or not – I’m childless and my own mother did both successfully (which, I think, is a lesson in and of itself). I wish you all the best in your own journey to live an authentic, meaningful life.

  3. Susan says...

    The exchange below regarding work at home moms vs. work outside the home moms highlights why feminism still has so much work to do. We shouldn’t question the choices that other women make, and certainly not with the intimation that they have failed to advance the culture, but make it possible for all to choose whatever makes sense to them.

    Charlie says she’s never met a stay at home mom who didn’t later regret her choice because that person hasn’t lived up to her potential. Inherent in that comment is the idea that choosing to be home full time is somehow an abdication of our responsibility to change the culture outside of the home. And the retorts to her are that maybe Charlie is trying to rationalize being apart from her kids for 8+ hours a day or that mothering is important work but a marketing executive (or other “lean in types”) are doing work that no one really has to do. This exchange has less to do with what kinds of work are valuable and more to do with the fact that women are pitted against each other no matter what they choose.

    What would it be like if we respected each other’s work? And supported each other’s right to choose our own work? If being a stay at home mom was not a noble “sacrifice” but just another vocation? If going to work at a factory, office, flying a plane, teaching others, etc. were also just another vocation and not a failure to spend all your time with your children? I bristle at the “sacrifice” characterization because it implies that other women who choose not to do this are selfish and not putting their children’s needs first. But the truth is that kids get different things based upon where their mom is choosing to spend her time. For stay at home moms, it’s more time with her and the lessons she teaches whiles she’s there. For work outside the home moms, it’s the lesson that their mom is bringing home income and modeling how to work outside the home and balance her home life. Both are valuable. There is no one way to a good mom.

    Finally (sorry, I can’t resist), the multiple comments against marketing people are ironic. After all, this is a site that derives its income – and thus can continue to publish the content that we enjoy – from… wait for it…marketing things. That’s what Joanna and her employees do, they are marketers. :)

    • Jules says...

      Just wanted to say the “sacrifice” in my comment was meant as a financial sacrifice.

      I 100% agree that feminism is about supporting women & letting each one choose what is right for them.

    • Jen says...

      Brava! Well said, Susan!

    • h says...

      Completely agree, from a fiercely feminist, work outside the home, (and let’s not forget, also inside the home) mother. I also feel that these conversations are another form of ‘they’re taking your cookie’ arguments, which ignore the fact that 99% of the cookies/resources are being hoarded by those at the top of this patriarchal capitalist food chain, while women are being asked who gets the ‘better’ deal.

  4. Charlie says...

    I’d love an article exploring what it means to be a stay-at-home-mom, from a a feminist-perspective!

    I’ve never met a mother who chose to be stay-at-home or leave her job and didn’t later regret it, and hold that resentment against herself, her children, or her partner. As a feminist myself, I can’t imagine leaving my job: To me, it would be giving up the right to work and be independent, to set an example for my children (and the adults around me) that women Lead, and pave the way for my daughter and by continuing to change society’s expectations. I’ve never met a stay-at-home mom who seemed happy, fulfilled, and living up to her full potential, living a full life, contributing fully to the world. There’s too much to learn, explore, challenge yourself with, and contribute. Often, when I talk to stay at home parents, they seem to be building a story around why it works for them and rationalizing the decision, and but I’ve never met a stay-at-home parent who seemed to believe it themself. (I’m focusing on women, but this is all true for the stay at home dads I know too.)

    And yet, I know the decision must be right for some people! There’s no question there are so many lessons to learn and memories to be made by spending more time with your family. How beautiful. Most parents strive for more time together. And I agree with the author above, that job title just isn’t the way to measure life or success. I think there are rarely black-and-white “this is good, this is bad” answers to these things, and I’d love to hear more perspectives.

    • celeste says...

      I understand. My late mother was divorced for her first marriage and told me to always make my own money, and that stuck with me. But we are in a time period now where relationship choices can’t be a choice.

    • Julie says...

      My mom stayed at home with me and my brothers and truly loved it. Though she was an educator prior to having us, to her, those outside ambitions paled to raising creative, independent children and supporting other mothers in that endeavor. She also took care of her aging parents and still talks about how thankful she is she had the time/bandwidth to do that. Though I don’t intend to have children and am strongly career-oriented, I always admired how much she owned the choice of where to invest her energy. To me, that is still strength, fulfillment of purpose, and taking charge of one’s joy.

    • west coast feminist stay-at-home mom with a graduate degree says...

      “I’ve never met a stay-at-home mom who seemed happy, fulfilled, and living up to her full potential, living a full life, contributing fully to the world.

      That’s because you haven’t met me.

    • Sage says...

      How do you know they’re building a story they don’t believe? Who’s to say you’re not “rationalizing your decision” to stay away from your own child 8+ hours out of the day?

      I like staying home while doing grad school. I will never have another kid so I’m enjoying soaking up the toddlerness before I head back into a traditional career. However, I’m also going to homeschool so I’ll never have a job that takes me away from that focus. Shockingly, I have found that one can derive meaning from life outside of the workforce.

      Everyone has different goals for themselves and their families. The insinuation that children won’t grow up to be independent because their mother wasn’t a wage slave is ridiculous and belies your true intention, to preemptively write off stay at home parenting so that you can tell yourself that your own decision is “objectively” correct.

    • R says...

      I would love to hear this perspective as well, as someone who hopes she can be a stay at home mom! I am as feminist as they come, and married to another woman. We are early in the process of trying to get pregnant, and I’m hoping we can make it work for me to not work (or work limited hours) so I can focus on taking care of my future kiddos! I have heard from multiple moms who stayed home that they found value in it, and I find that people are much more willing to talk about this without shame to those who don’t have kids. Otherwise working parents often feel judged for not making that choice.

      I will also say that my case is simpler because I am free of gender roles, so it doesn’t feel traditional or outdated for me to stay home. It can be a decision about nothing else beyond what’s best for us.

    • Ugh really says...

      I’m going to try to temper my reaction because this comment is pretty self-satisfied/judgmental/potentially classist, but here are some thoughts as to how you might view staying at home from a feminist perspective:

      1. Domestic care is essential work in a way that a lot of lean-in types ignore, forget or repress. If you choose to have children, but you don’t want to stop being out there leading (doing *what*? towards *what*?) then someone has to raise those children for you (versus, like, marketing, which arguably no one *has* to do). The people who do that are largely underpaid immigrants, Black or brown, afforded little workplace protections by all the feminist go-getters out there.

      2. Just because domestic care doesn’t involve business travel or meetings in conference rooms or the ability to buy your own designer shoes, does not mean that it doesn’t involve exploration or “challenge.” I would have thought that in the past year, as so many of us have been forced to stay home, do our own repairs, and take care of our own children (something I like to think of as emotional or domestic sustainability), that in fact staying home is far more challenging, and involves acquiring more practical skills, than many jobs are/do.

      3. If, perhaps, you feel that the stay-at-home parents have always given you the impression that they are not happy (nice projection, btw), then perhaps that is less because of their work and more because society has consistently communicated to them that their work is meaningless because it does not involve the moving of capital. There is a lot of good feminist socialist writing on the topic, and in fact a profile of a major thinker in this field was published in the Times just this past week. Not to mention society/business makes it nearly impossible for women to reenter the workforce after taking a break to raise children.

      4. There are undeniably some careers that do contribute in obvious ways to society’s health and to the “world.” (Teacher, doctor, sanitation worker come to mind.). And yet curiously, just as you seem unable to see the value in stay-at-home work, no one has ever been able to truly articulate the value in many “traditional jobs” to me. For example, I fail to see why an advertising executive should be so highly compensated a career, when its sole purpose is to continue to encourage rampant consumerism by stoking human fears of inadequacy.

      5. An irritating thing people don’t like to hear!: children, and babies, crave and benefit from direct parental attention in their early years. They don’t really want Baby Einstein or infant music; even “social development” isn’t really so important until at least age 3 or so.

      For the record, I am a part-time working mother. I don’t think one parent should stay home full-time to raise kids, but I do think workplace flexibility would help both parents who feel forced into full-time domestic work and those who work full-time to feel freer to be more present for their children. I am hoping that this past year has taught people that we can aim for a future in which work doesn’t have to be the all-consuming goal of one’s life.

      Anyway there are plenty of resources to look into, either on socialist feminism or on the myriad ways that 4th wave capitalism-focused feminism has wildly failed, that will more eloquently explain what I’m getting at, but I think one of the biggest driving factors here is that our society has wildly skewed priorities and only really cares about careers if they earn money, and we should all understand after this baptism-by-fire we’ve undergone the past year that the jobs that are the most valuable, the least dispensable, and the most difficult are often the least revered and the most under-compensated.

    • E says...

      This comment is surely well-intended, but just as surely will be hurtful to some who have chosen to prioritize family over career. Nor do I really understand what this commenter really means by a “feminist” perspective on staying at home; they seem to be suggesting a criticism more than anything. To those who have chosen to be home with little kids or who are fed up with the “have it all” bait-and-switch—I see you, and get it!

    • Jules says...

      Oof. This is really sad to hear.

      I am a stay-at-home mom to our four children by choice. I have a BA & there were jobs that I thought would be fun, but growing up I always wanted to be a mom. My husband & I always knew that once we had kids I’d be at home just like both our moms were. Financially, it has been a struggle, but neither of us has ever regretted it. The only help I have is my husband who works a very demanding and extremely stressful job. I am helping the oldest two with online school and while the younger two (seem to) constantly need me.

      Our viewpoint is that we brought these children into the world, they are solely our responsibility, & we will raise them ourselves. Some days are very hard, but I love my little “coworkers” with all my heart…how many people can say that? This choice is not right for every family. Many families do not have a choice.

      If a person chose nannying as their profession, would they be looked down upon for their choice? Daycare workers? I do everything they do plus take care of the house & our dog. My husband steps right up when he’s home & is seriously the best in the world.

      My job is to be there when my children need me. To make them into responsible, respectful citizens of the world. At some point, everyone’s job changes or they retire. Mine will be no different. I keep my interest going by listening to history podcasts or books about etymology while folding laundry and doing genealogy research online after my kids are in bed. In the future, my goal is to become a certified genealogist.

      I am setting an example for my children by showing them what love, compassion, respect, hard work, & putting family first means. Being a stay at home parent is a sacrifice, but to those who love it, it is worth it. There is nothing I would rather be doing while my kids are young. I will not look back on my life & say “I wish I spent more time away from my family. I wish I’d made more money”. I am doing what I have always wanted to & I am happy.

    • A says...

      I don’t know if I agree. I have a friend whose husband makes a lot of money and she has stayed home with the kids while living in the US. She and most of the women in her town have the same life—they stay home while the husbands make a lot of money and are less around to raise children and do the work of running their lives.

      I’ve always seen it as really constrained by economics—the families don’t earn enough to have live in help and being a stay at home parent gives them a better outcome (even if just perceived) in terms of how their kids are raised.

      People tend to be rational(ish) economic actors in their own lives. It seemed odd to me that 3/4ths of the families had stay at home Moms in that town, but the economics worked out that way.

    • Skylar says...

      I have been a stay-at-home mom for 6 years and am about to start a new career. The hardest thing about being a stay-at-home mom was feeling judged for having left my job for awhile. So many people seemed to assume I had no ambition and lacked intelligence. Or that I was lazy, or rich. None of that was true. I am so glad I took those years to be with my children, and I will never regret it. I will also never forget how painful and lonely it was to be rejected by people who thought they were better feminists than me. Thank goodness I didn’t believe them. There is no one way to be a feminist.

    • Amber says...

      I want to applaud the response of the commenter “Ugh Really”! 100% yes. Domestic labor is real work, and a real contribution to society. Bravo on your thoughtful, eloquent response.

      The OP must have a *really important job* (eyeroll), and I’m glad they’re contributing so much more to society than the people who are literally raising the next generations of humans. What a short-sighted, classist, capitalist view of the world and of feminism. OP, I recommend doing some research on intersectional feminism, because your definition seems pretty narrow-minded.

      For the record, I’m a highly-paid, “successful,” feminist mom who works full time out outside the home, after staying home for nearly the first year of my child’s life, and I’ve never felt more fulfilled and challenged than when I was home with my child. If anything, I often have feelings of regret for choosing to go back to work for corporate america, as I felt like my time spent was so much more impactful and worthwhile, and my contribution to society so much more immediate when I was spending my days parenting my child, versus spending my days on a computer in the service of making money).

      Also I want to acknowledge the privilege to make a choice to either stay home or work outside the home.

    • Dana says...

      My husband is the stay at home parent, and both of us would give anything to switch. My job drains me and, on a macro level, feels so unimportant. Homesteading, caring for my children and home, taking on projects that have personal value to me but do not benefit me monetarily- all of those make my soul fly. My husband and I are both feminists – and we’d both be more fulfilled if he worked outside the home and I cared for our kids/home (more than likely we will both be working outside the home in a couple of years, but we can dream). I’m tired of the assumption that if you’re a feminist, you must have a strong desire to climb the corporate ladder. Nothing feels more inauthentic and unimportant to me. I think this is an occasion where you should apply “good for her, not for me” and stop assuming that the people around you are “building a story” as if they are out to trick you.

    • Happy SAHM says...

      Oh Charlie, you’ve got it all wrong! We stay at home moms do it BECAUSE of how fulfilling it is, how much of a positive contribution it is to the world, and how much we’d regret it if we didn’t. Can you imagine doing a job so all consuming , so (oftentimes) thankless, and so (inexplicably) looked down upon if you didn’t find great personal value in it?

      Please play a little game for me-here’s a quote from your comment:
      “ I’ve never met a stay-at-home mom who seemed happy, fulfilled, and living up to her full potential, living a full life, contributing fully to the world.”
      Replace the words ‘stay-at-home mom’ with whatever your job title is, and let me know how it makes you feel.

    • shannon says...

      Firm agree with Ugh Really. Say it loud for the people in the back!!

      Won’t repeat what’s already been said but if you are interested in learning more about a balanced approach for couples to work and parenting I highly recommend the book Equally Shared Parenting.

  5. Vanessa says...

    I used to have a Bernese Mountain Dog, like those pictured, and he always had a dirty bib (like those pictured) unless he just got out of the tub and then it was a bright lovely white. I had a friend with a Berner who had a bright lovely white bib – all the time! No tub required. I felt like a failure when our dogs got together, so I was relieved to see those dirty bib guys in your picture!

    • Kat says...

      hah! I just met a bernese mountain dog this weekend for the first time at an airbnb we were staying at, and I fell immediately in love. such friendly, lovable giants they are!

  6. Marisa says...

    I love how you chose a dog photo that we couldn’t possibly get confused thinking its yours! hahaha

  7. Audrey says...

    Supernova came out in the UK several month ago, and I still think about it regularly. Incredibly beautiful and moving film. See it as soon as you can!

  8. caitlin says...

    Please donate to relief in Texas if you can! It’s been a very rough week. Dell children’s hospital in Austin ran out of water and had to use cat litter. They have water now, but many people are still suffering and we have a lot of work to do to recover!

  9. Beatrice says...

    Thank you for sharing B’s comment, I agree with her 100% – not everyone has high sex drives and that’s ok! It was just very refreshing and my husband and I are the same… and I just appreciated it! Thanks B :) xo

    • AG says...

      Same! I very rarely see this situation discussed in the media, so it’s easy to feel like something is wrong with us…when by all accounts we are both very happy and fulfilled in our relationship. For what it’s worth, my understanding from mental and sexual health professionals is that what’s most important is for the sex drives of both sides of a couple to be roughly matched, regardless of whether they are high or low.

    • Mouse says...

      I agree. And for many people–not all, of course–aging brings a decrease in sex drive. I am so so grateful to have found my husband later in life after I realized that a deep passionate friendship is really the more important thing for me. It’s what will last in the long run, and our talks, laughter, and just feeling happy to be next to each other during this pandemic have proven the case. Now if he’d just turn 70 already so he can get the vaccine……:)

    • Mara says...

      Joanna, I really appreciate you sharing B’s comment. I absolutely hate hearing “Sex is a barometer for your relationship,” which seems to be everywhere and marginalizes countless people. For all those “Normalize ___ in 2021” memes I see, I wish having less-than-frequent sex could be one of them. While my husband has a low sex drive and I have a medium one, and could stand for more sex, we are intimate in other ways that satisfy me. In today’s age of increased inclusivity and acceptance of different lifestyles, I am so surprised that we are delivered the message ad nauseam that tons of sex = healthy relationship. Tell that to my 20-year-old self who was having incredibly hot sex multiple times a day with a drug-addicted liar and manipulator.

    • E says...

      I appreciate this as well! I’m nearing the end of my second trimester and can’t begin to count the number of articles about how your sex drive should be higher and this is the time to have lots of sex…and I just have ZERO desire to. I don’t feel remotely sexy in my body, all my lady bits hurt, and I can’t figure out how to physically get in a position where my big bump isn’t in the way. I’d love to see just one article that says something like “If you don’t want to have sex while pregnant, that’s just fine.”

    • Lauren says...

      Agree 100%

  10. Emily says...

    In a world where the internet is an increasingly critical space, just want to let you know how much I appreciate this blog, this space, your writing and ideas and the people you bring into my world because of it.

  11. Diane says...

    Oh my gosh – that trailer had me in tears.

  12. E E Deere says...

    I watched Supernova, it is an exquisite movie. Loving. Watchable in the bet way. I recommend it.

  13. Maggie says...

    That trailer killed me! Total sob mess – multiple grandparents who live with or have passed from Dementia. Such an ugly illness for both the person experiencing the mental decline and all loved ones involved. Movie looks fantastic though – excellent cast!

  14. miranda says...

    Thank you for sharing it, although… The article on becoming a stay-at-home mom sounds incredibly suspect. It sounds more like she was let go – which makes sense being as she was less than 6 months on the job, and it’s possible she just wasn’t a match. Just that it’s so strange to cover up the idea that layoffs and goodbyes are a standard part of climbing the ladder, and we don’t have to compare it to the glories of being a stay-at-home mom. I fully understand that she might have rebranded the situation. Plus, would she make the same choice if her partner couldn’t support their family?

    • JJ says...

      Imagine doubting a woman’s desire to take care of her family. Not everyone strives for #girlboss status.

    • J says...

      I didn’t read it this way at all. I felt it was a thoughtful reflection on career, identity, and life choices.

    • Rosie says...

      I wasn’t a fan either. I don’t believe we can talk about the choice of working or staying home without talking about the MANY financial implications for women.

    • Cph says...

      This comment seems a little harsh. She specifically references her privilege at being able to make this choice, and it entirely possible to choose to leave a job after 6 months (though I’m not sure where you got this number, I don’t remember her specifying). As someone who has been home full-time with kids since the start of the pandemic (at first finishing up grad school in the most anti-climactic way possible, now doing nothing else at all), it was really lovely to read anything about being a stay-at-home-parent.

    • E says...

      Ouch, I feel like this is one of the assumptions that makes it so hard for women to feel confident in their decisions to stay home or quit their jobs. 2 years ago I decided to quit my job for various reasons and likewise was able to do it due to the privilege of a stable financial situation, but if most people looked at that decision and what came next it would be very easy to assume I was laid off or fired. I felt incredibly defensive whenever I talked about it, especially because it was NOT to be a stay at home parent, and it was really no one’s business why I made that decision outside of me and my husband.

  15. Erin says...

    I love these posts but I always find myself a bit surprised when you link to cupcakes and cashmere. I find her just so out of step with the times, and so out of touch in terms of being able discuss issues of justice and inequity. Just seems so out of step with the meaningful conversations on this blog. And the writing on that piece specifically was so cringe. Comparing your life to an uncooked egg? No thanks.

    • Emily says...

      I thought it was kind of funny because in the throes of all day with a small child I, too, find my mind doing random-and-sometimes-very-existential things while a cartoon blares in the background. I thought it was a good look at how career doesn’t always equal identity, and how being in a state of transition is so appropriate for right now.

    • Alex says...

      I also was surprised to see that link as well. I wish the cupcakes and cashmere team well even though they consistently miss the mark with tone-deaf posts. Most recently, the decision to turn off comments completely. If you feel like your comment section has derailed into harsh negativity, perhaps look at the content of your site. Of course the anonymity of the internet will always allow the trolls to pop up, but a thoughtful site will foster more well-intentioned considerate comments (Cup of Jo being a wonderful example).

    • MyHanh says...

      I’ve been following the recent “unraveling” of cupcakes and cashmere as they struggle to be authentic when platforms like theirs are being called to be more racially inclusive and aware. The piece linked is by Thao Thai, a recent and regular guest contributor. For me, she is the one bright spot on c&c. I actually find her pieces more apropos for CoJ, but will read her wherever I can!
      In terms of the piece itself… beautiful. As a second generation Asian American– specifically Vietnamese American– woman also raising a bi-racial daughter, I found it completely resonant and reflective of my voice and experience. I’m so glad I happened upon her writing.
      I recommend reading her other contributions on c&c (https://cupcakesandcashmere.com/author/thao-thai), and specifically:
      How Microaggressions Destroyed My Dream of Living in Suburbia (https://cupcakesandcashmere.com/motherhood/how-microaggressions-made-my-dream-of-living-in-suburbia-impossible).
      ::peace and love::

    • Grey says...

      I just don’t think there’s any way they can get it right when they have social justice posts interspersed with posts showing, say, an absolutely massive designer shoe collection. Maybe shut down the blog or just use it for brand promotional purposes?

    • Nigerian Girl says...

      It’s okay if you feel the way you feel about Cupcakes and Cashmere. But surely you can’t possibly expect everyone else to feel the same way you do and withdraw support for the blog? I’ve read that blog for many years and I’ve been appalled by the recent vitriol in its comments section. Most of those comments were not constructive at all. They were driven by hate, envy, bitterness, misogyny, transferred aggression and overly unrealistic expectations of ‘wokeness’ from a lifestyle blog. If the content is as out of touch as those ‘commenters’ claim, why then do they keep visiting the blog? Aha. I fully support the team’s decision to prioritise their mental health and shut off public comments completely. The people who run the blogs we read are human beings.

  16. C says...

    The “pajamas you can wear all day” link made me laugh because… we can wear *all* pajamas all day now! I’m not saying I feel great at the end of another day of wearing my dumpiest pj’s, but the plus side is I don’t get too bent out of shape when I dribble food on them. Hehe, just a little covid humor here. 🥴

  17. Leah says...

    I look forward to Tiny Love Stories every week. So much love, humanity, and emotion every time I read them.

  18. Marie says...

    I co-sign the Mike Birbiglia rec and will add that he is doing zoom shows where all the money is donated to charity and he tests new material. We did it as a date night the other night and it was so fun. Check out his instagram or website for details.

    Also, that Atlantic article suggesting optimism for the summer took my breath away. I didn’t realize how much I needed to read that it may be reasonable to think summer could be a return to regular-ish times and not a pollyanna fantasy.

  19. Kelly says...

    1. The “short afternoon walk” article made me feel both seen and attacked at the same time. Either way it is solid gold.

    2. I’m obsessed with Mike Birbiglia!!! Is it possible to have a pandemic celeb crush? If so he’s it. Watching his specials and listening to his podcast have been getting me through.

    • Meredith says...

      I totally agree about short afternoon walk! I laughed out loud, and then sighed.

    • b says...

      I’ll third the comments about “short afternoon walk.” The minds behind McSweeney’s are absolutely brilliant.

  20. SJ says...

    Thank you for sharing that link for Texas relief. It has been a crazy week.

  21. Sarah says...

    Joanna, do you know about Window-Swap.com? It’s my absolute new favorite thing! You can toggle through views from windows all over the world. I love landing on a window, googling the city, and planning a move/vacation that I’ll never actually take. A happy way to pass a half hour during my break or lunch!

  22. Sunny says...

    That link should have come with a warning, gosh!

  23. Liberty says...

    The “Now I Know Why” Tiny Love Story broke my heart into a million pieces. <3<3<3

    • Cece says...

      omgggg me too <3

    • Briana says...

      Same.

  24. Ellen says...

    Thank you for the links and great reader comments! The links for helping Texans were super helpful & I know I will spend some (possibly way too much) time on the the web cams this weekend.

  25. Veronica says...

    Thank you for the link for help for Texans! As Houston residents, my family and I will be spending this weekend hunting for the groceries we need and getting creative with what we have in the pantry (our fridge contents were lost when we were without power for a few days). Also, we plan on enjoying a beer and just being grateful that we only lost some groceries. I’m looking forward to a warm weekend :)

    • Claire says...

      Veronica, I’m in Houston too! So glad you and your family are okay. Today’s 29 degrees and sunny weather felt like summertime compared to earlier this week! I’m so excited for a warm weekend! Enjoy :)

    • Eileen says...

      I’m in Houston, too ! Hope y’all enjoy the warmer temps this weekend. The sun feels glorious! Here’s to a better week to come.