Food

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

It’s the most wonderful time of the year! Well, it is for cookbook enthusiasts, at least. That’s because fall is traditionally the season when publishers release their A-Listers, and this year, things seem to be on overdrive — maybe because they know we might be hunkering down even more than usual over the next few months. Here are nine books I can’t wait to dive into on cozy, fire-in-the-fireplace kinda days…

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

Ottolenghi Flavor
By Yottam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage
Why I’m Excited: Sure, his recipes famously require many ingredients, but here’s the thing: the result is almost always extraordinary and stretches you to learn and expand your pantry. This book focuses on high-impact ingredients (black lime, cascabel chiles, mango pickle) and techniques (charring, infusing, browning) for boosting cooking with high-intensity flavor. I’m choosing to think of these dishes as projects or Saturday night adventures, a nice stand-in for the restaurants we probably won’t be able to go to this winter.
What’s Up First: Roasting Pan Ragu (made with mushrooms, harissa and lentils), Black Lime Tofu, Miso-Butter Onions

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

East 120 Vegan and Vegetarian recipes from Bangalore to Beijing
By Meera Sodha
Why I’m Excited: I’ve been a big fan of Sodha ever since she wrote the weeknight-friendly vegetable-forward Fresh India. Here, The Guardian‘s vegan columnist (and mom of a toddler) applies her same no-fuss style to East Asian and South Asian home cooking. She’s just the hand you want to be holding if you are going down the fermenting-and-pickling road to flavor-boosted plant-based eating. And you gotta love her mission: “I love vegetables, and I want you to love them, too.”
What’s Up First: Aubergine (Eggplant) Katsu Curry (above), Forbidden Rice Salad with Blistered Broccolini, and Miso, Pea and Coconut Chutney

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

In Bibi’s Kitchen The Recipes and Stories of Grandmothers From the Eight African Countries that Touch the Indian Ocean
By Hawa Hassan with Julia Turshen
Why I’m Excited:  The two authors — Hassan, a Somalian refugee, former model, and business owner and Turshen, a cookbook author and collaborator — join forces to share the stories and the recipes from African grandmothers who hail from Eritrea, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, South Africa, Madagascar and Comoros. “It’s not about what’s new and next,” they write. “It’s about sustaining a cultural legacy and seeing how food and recipes keep cultures intact.” Many of the recipes were transcribed from videos of the Bibis cooking dishes they’ve never written down. How great is that?
What’s Up First: Digaag Qumbe (chicken stew with coconut and yogurt, Somalia), Ndizi Kaanga (fried plantains, Tanzania), Malva Pudding Cake (South Africa)

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

Pie for Everyone: Recipes and Stories from Petee’s Pie, New York’s Best Pie Shop
By Petra Paredez
Why I’m Excited: I don’t know about you, but I’m determined to up my Thankgiving game, pie and otherwise, any way I can this year. (It’s called controlling the controllable.) Paradez’s gorgeously photographed, meticulously written book will play a central role in that strategy: The uber-popular Lower East Side pie maker shares hits from her sweet and savory collection in the most stylish way. How ’bout that cover?
What’s Up First: Her signature Chocolate Chess Pie, Pork Chili Verde, Honey Chèvre, Cornmeal Pecan Crumb

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

Mexican Home Kitchen: Traditional Home-style Recipes That Capture the Flavors and Memories of Mexico
By Mely Martinez
Why I’m Excited: Because it’s authentic Mexican home cooking from The Mexico in My Kitchen blogger, who started writing about food a decade ago because she wanted her teenage son to someday cook the family recipes for his children. With influences from Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Veracruz, Puebla, Estado de México, Tabasco and Yucatán.
What’s Up First: Steak Tacos, Mole Poblano, Pozole Verde, Chiles Rellenos

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

The Rise Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food
By Marcus Samuelsson with Osayi Endolyn
Why I’m Excited: Because I’ve been a Marcus Samuelsson fan ever since eating at Aquavit, his first big restaurant in New York in the ’90s. Samuelsson’s story has been well-documented — the TV star and New York-based restaurateur was born in a hut in Ethiopia, adopted by parents in Sweden, and trained as a chef in Europe, before opening the iconic Red Rooster in Harlem. With this book, he asks himself “What does it mean to be a Black chef in America” and answers it by sharing the stories and recipes from the Black food diaspora, from Junebaby’s Eduoardo Jourdan to author-food writer Toni Tipton-Martin. Co-authored by Osayi Endolyn; recipes by Yewande Komolafe.
What’s Up First: Salmon Rillettes with Injera, Flaky Andouille and Callaloo Hand Pies, Grilled Piri Piri Shrimp with Papaya and Watermelon Salad (above)

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

Snacking Cakes Simple Treats for Anytime Cravings
By Yossy Arefi
Why I’m Excited: Anyone who’s even spent a little amount of time on this blog knows about our beloved Yossy! She’s one we call when we need someone to do it all — make the food, plate the food, photograph the food. (If you’ve ever cooked a recipe from CoJ, it’s likely because she’s the one who made it look so enticing.) With Snacking Cakes, she’s right there in her wheelhouse, delivering 50 easy, comforting, everyday cake recipes — many of which, like the Buckwheat Banana I made yesterday, you can make with ingredients you probably already have in your pantry.
What’s Up First: Salty Caramel Peanut Butter, Buttered Walnut with Coffee Glaze, Chocolate Peanut Butter

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

Coconut & Sambal Recipes From My Indonesian Kitchen
By Lara Lee
Why I’m Excited: Because Lee, the daughter of an Australian mom and Indonesian-Chinese dad, journeys across the country, learning from both experts and home cooks along the way, paying particularly beautiful homage to her Indonesian grandmother “Popo,” a onetime baker who lived with Lee’s family in Sydney. It’s a celebration of a cuisine I don’t know very much about — Indonesian — and Lee’s voice and style make it look so enticing.
What’s Up First: Beef Rendang, Gado-Gado, Chicken Nasi Goreng (above)

The 9 Most Exciting Cookbooks This Fall

Chaat Recipes from the Kitchens, Markets, and Railways of India: A Cookbook
By Maneet Chauhan and Jody Eddy
Why I’m Excited: Because it’s as fun to read as it is to cook from. You’ll travel with James Beard-Award winning Chauhan as she trains her way through India, stopping at each station to sample the regional chaat — the iconic snacks of Indian cuisine that she describes as “tangy and sweet, fiery and crunchy, savory and sour all in one topsy-turvy bite” fashioned for her by vendors she calls “flavor alchemists.” I love cookbooks that aren’t exclusively shot in a studio with controlled lighting and professional stylists. You’re on the street here, you meet the vendors, you’re completely transported. And how good does that sound right now?
What’s Up First: Fresh Lime Sodas (Rajasthan), Dal Baati Churma Chaat (Lentils with Wheat Rolls, Jaipur), Idli Chaat (South Indian-style steamed breakfast pancake)

What cookbooks have you recently been into? What have you made from them? I’d love to know.

P.S. The 20 greatest recipes of all time and what’s your book type?

(Photos: Aubergine by David Loftus. Steak tacos by Mely Martinez. Chicken Nasi Goreng by Lara Lee. Pies by Victor Garzon.)

  1. Sam says...

    I’m so in love with “One Tin Bakes” by Edd Kimber – such beautiful bakes and ideas!

  2. Katie says...

    I’m so pleased that you are supporting independent bookshops by having links to bookshop.org instead of Amazon :)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you! that means a lot to us!

    • Jenny says...

      Yes!!

  3. jac says...

    Sami Tamimi’s Falastin—- This is the most exciting cook book I have seen in a very long time. A MUST BUY!!!

  4. Laura says...

    The Barbuto cookbook (Jonathan Waxman) mainly because I now have THE kale salad recipe. Also already cooking a lot from “This will
    Make it taste good” by Vivian Howard: highly recommend!

  5. Stella says...

    So excited for Bibi’s Kitchen!! Hawa Hassan is an absolute badass and Somali food is fantastic. ❤️

  6. Jess. says...

    Just this morning, I ordered everything I need to make Hawa’s Digaag Qumbe. Can’t wait!!! xox

  7. Lea says...

    @Elen, I am pretty appalled at your use of the term ‘cultural appropriation’ to describe Yotam Ottolenghi’s recipes. Ottolenghi is Israeli and his books show a deep understanding, acknowledgment, and celebration of the influence of Palestinian food and culture on his recipes and on how he learnt how to cook. Indeed, his book ‘Jerusalem’, written with Sami Tamimi, who is Palestinian, is literally written about this topic.

    I think you have shown your own ignorance by saying that Ottolenghi passes recipes off as his own by calling them ‘vaguely Mediterranean’. Ottolenghi is not Mediterranean as your comment necessarily implies but is Jewish Israeli.

    It is disappointing to see such a reductionist comment in a space like this.

    • MM says...

      In addition, he also has Italian roots.

  8. Amanda says...

    THANK YOU for linking to bookshop – this indie bookseller greatly appreciates it!

  9. caitlin says...

    I am very good at collecting cookbooks (eyeing a lot on this list), maybe not so good at actually cooking the recipes (oops).

  10. Amy says...

    I pre-ordered the “Oh She Glows for Dinner” cookbook this summer. I borrow cookbooks from the library on a regular basis, and very rarely purchase them if I think I will genuinely cook from them many times. So this was a bit of a risk – and I’m relieved to say I’m happy with it! Approachable, using ingredients I already have or could easily find (and I’m not a vegan). Mostly reasonable prep times with a few projects thrown in. Many whole foods cookbooks have “recipes inside recipes”; I noticed very few here which I appreciated. Also loved that every recipe had beautiful photo(s). If you’re looking to get more vegetables in your diet, this is a winner!

  11. Jess says...

    Loving this list! Especially since it isn’t just ‘white girl cooking Asian food bloggers’- as my partner calls them.

  12. Asha says...

    It’s nice to see Southeast Asian & Asian food shown in all it’s delicious diversity. Both Chaat & East are on my holiday wish list!

  13. Diana K. says...

    Just found out that Freddie Prinze Jr. put out a cookbook a little while ago. Obviously I ordered it.

  14. Suzie says...

    Love this list! I’m so excited for holiday/winter cooking (which doesn’t make up for not seeing family, but it’s something…)

    Also, thank you for linking to bookshop rather than amazon! So great to see this.

  15. Genevieve Martin says...

    “snacking cakes”, what a great phrase/concept :D

  16. Kim says...

    Jenny, thank you for featuring Black chefs. I can’t wait to try Bibi. Actually, all these books look great!

  17. valentina says...

    These all look incredible! Thank you so much for sharing cookbooks that go beyond American- and European-influenced recipes.

    • MozartsGirl says...

      Kate has just published ‘The Little Library Cookbook at Christmas’ too…perfect present?! I so agree about the original too, just lovely …

  18. Kat O says...

    Oh man, I’m so excited to see an Indonesian cookbook on the list! When I was traveling solo around the world in my twenties (pre-Instagram haha – well over a decade ago) I ate gado-gado like every day I was in Indonesia (also lots of amazing dishes I can’t identify from roadside warungs!), and I haven’t been able to find a recipe online that quite looks like what I had. I’ll have to check out that book!

  19. Jessica says...

    I got EAST by Meera Sodha a few months ago and it’s possibly the best cook book I’ve ever owned. The recipes I’ve made have come out literally mouth-wateringly good, and she makes things which I would never have thought I could make myself (like bao) seem completely doable.

  20. Alice says...

    These all look SO GOOD. We have Flavour (it came out quite a while ago here in the UK!) and have made a couple of really delicious things from it. For anyone considering it after enjoying his book “Simple”, do note that this book is much more in the style of Plenty and Plenty More (and I think he says that it’s really a companion to those more than any of his other books).
    If you’re looking for even more, I’d highly recommend Sami Tamimi’s Falastin. This is a companion to Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem, and is SO wonderful.

    • Alice says...

      OH- and for a wonderful Christmas book- I’d highly, HIGHLY recommend Kate Young’s The Little Library Christmas. It’s SO COSY, and there are a million things I’m intending to make from it. See also: Nigel Slater’s Christmas Chronicles. SO FESTIVE!

    • Verity Platt says...

      Falastin is incredible! I love everything I’ve made from it so far.

    • Ramya says...

      I love Falastin! Ordered Flavor/Flavour a few weeks ago and it seems to be delayed – boo! Love Ottolenghi and his associates so much.

    • Alice says...

      Ramya- I love them too. My boyfriend and I actually sat next to Sami Tamimi at a supper club last year. I’d just got back from a long haul work trip that morning and didn’t twig who he was until the VERY END. Such a shame!

  21. Alexandra says...

    Jenny – I need you to drop whatever meal plan you have for this weekend and make the Katsu Curry from East. It is *SO* good. You don’t even have to deal with the eggplant if you don’t want to. It’s amazing with whatever roasted veggies you have in hand and rice, or on naan, or a spoon…

    • Jenny Rosenstrach says...

      I am so in! I’ve had dreams about that photo, so don’t need a lot of convincing.

  22. Julie says...

    I LOVE cookbooks! Ottolenghi is always a favourite, so I will definitely be getting this latest. I just bought Oh She Glows for Dinner by Angela Liddon, and I’m loving it!

    • Susan says...

      Thanks for sharing this! I love Vivian Howard and didn’t know she had a new cookbook!

  23. Nathalie says...

    I love how every time I get a cookbook or discover a new cooking blog it shakes me out of my old cooking habits/routines. Just today I was gifted The Yoga Kitchen Plan by Kimberly Parson, so tomorrow instead of my go-to apple cinnamon overnight oats, I will be eating chai spiced porridge.

  24. Lisa says...

    Omg. Flavour is 100% my favourite cookbook of the year. Read it cover to cover and it was so exciting. Ottolenghi’s approach to cooking is just my favourite, love love love!! Completely recommend him to anyone getting adventurous and advanced with their veggies

  25. Katie says...

    We are pescatarian, and have a small child with food allergies (egg and sunflower– a tricky combo because a lot of vegan substitutes involve sunflower lecithin or oil!). When our kid was first starting to eat solid foods, we discovered Power Plates by Gena Hamshaw, and we’ve now made almost every single one of her recipes. Each recipe is a complete meal, which takes a lot of the guesswork out of making sure things are a) tasty, b) nutritious, and c) don’t take a ton of time to cook.

  26. Meghan says...

    I just ordered the new Oh She Glows cookbook for my dad for Christmas. I think I may have to give a few of the recipes a pre-run before gifting it ;) I love Angela’s approach to food and find her writing so homey and warm.

  27. Katherine says...

    I would add 100 Cookies by Sarah Kieffer, which I discovered on COJ!

  28. Molly says...

    Soul Food Love by Caroline Randal Williams (author of My Body is a Confederate Monument) is a great cook book!

    • Whitney says...

      I love this one! The food is simple and nourishing. Caroline Randal Williams is an excellent writer.

    • Becca says...

      Thank you so much for sharing this. I just looked her article on the NYT. Her writing gives me chills. So powerful.

      Also, thank you to Jenny for this article and for reading the room and sharing so many cookbooks by POC. I see your allyship and I’m so glad to have to your books in my cookbook collection.

  29. Amy says...

    I’ve been loving “Palestine on a Plate” and “Baladi” by Joudie Kalla. Palestinian food is absolutely delicious, and these cookbooks are a beautiful way to preserve and celebrate that heritage!

  30. Beth says...

    East by Meera Sodha came out a while ago in the UK and it is the MOST WONDERFUL book – we cooked almost everything in it during lockdown, and very few recipes disappointed. Everything in it is so easy to cook, bursting with flavour and looks as beautiful in real life as in the photos.

    • Kristin says...

      Oh She Glows has such good recipes on her blog, too … we adore and regularly make her Layered Raw Taco Salad for Two 💕

  31. Hilary says...

    It isn’t new this fall, but my bestie just gifted me “Dishoom: From Bombay with Love” which is part cookbook, part tour guide/maps, part love letter to the food, Irani cafes and many people, cultures and religions that make up Bombay. It’s HUGE, gorgeously photographed on the most perfect paper, charmingly written, the recipes are to die for…I could go on.

    Having eaten at Dishoom in London a magical couple of times, it’s fun to feel like I can travel back there via this book, which is especially a treat at 38.5 weeks pregnant in a pandemic. It feels like I’ll be pregnant, miserable and stuck in my house forever. This book is a nice reminder that the world is big and we’re gonna be ok. And one day, we can all be together again. Preferably over a nice cold glass of chai!

    • So well said! I just got the book too and feel exactly the same! Such an incredible book that made me feel so nostalgic for Bombay :)

    • Meg says...

      My all time favorite restaurant and cookbook! I’ve cooked from it nonstop this year. I recommend The Spice House for some of the more difficult to source ingredients used in some of the recipes.

  32. Hannah says...

    My copy of Snacking Cakes just arrived minutes ago! After careful hand-washing and book sanitizing, I just sat down to enjoy my daydreams about all the wonderful cakes we’ll be eating this winter. Can’t wait to actually try them out!

    • Candy says...

      I second Hannah’s comment. I just made the Mostly Apples Cake from Snacking Cakes and it’s great. All Yossy Arefi’s recipes are easy to follow, creative, and each one offers options to make it in different sized pans (square, round, loaf), which is so helpful.

  33. Cora says...

    Wow, these all look delightful and delicious! And wonderful gift ideas, too, as so many of us are shopping for the holidays.

  34. Louisa says...

    I have a habit of buying cookbooks in airport bookstores and reading on the plane and planning what I’ll eat when I’m finally back home in my kitchen! No flights in 8 months means no new cookbooks. I’ve enjoyed Repertoire (meatballs in particular), and I have loved the Run Fast, Eat Slow cookbooks (this is my go-to for healthy weeknight recipes – too many great recipes to mention!)

    • MG says...

      Why have I never done this? I looove this idea! Definitely remembering for when we can fly again!

    • Michal says...

      Repertoire is one of my all-time faves! I’ve never made so many recipes from another cookbook. Close seconds are It’s All Easy (Gwyneth Paltrow, I know, but I love it!) and Half Baked Harvest Super Simple.

  35. Ruth says...

    The cover of the pie book immediately made me think of high school art history classes and Wayne Thiebaud’s dessert paintings! A lovely aha moment.

    • Jenny Rosenstrach says...

      I had the exact same thought. Something tells me it wasn’t an accident. :)

    • lori says...

      Oooh thank you for bringing up Wayne Thiebaud! I haven’t thought of his paintings in years but now I am picturing all those lovely pastel-y coloured pieces of pie!

  36. Louisa says...

    My university does a cookbook using foreign students’ favorite recipes from home every year at Thanksgiving. In the most recent one, someone noted that the recipes are only complicated because Americans cook alone. Looking at the 3 sets of hands peeling cardamom on the cover of Bibi’s Kitchen reminds me of this. Peeling cardamom with family would be a delight. Peeling it alone would be a chore. Really missing family this time of year!

    • Nicole says...

      That is such a beautiful point!

    • Sadie says...

      What a good reminder :)

  37. Cheryl says...

    These look divine. Long story but I had to toss all our cookbooks recently (bugs, shudder!). I’ve so missed reading recipes not on a device and scribbling notes on dog-eared pages. We’re moving and I cannot wait to restock cookbooks in our new place. Definitely putting several of these on my list.

  38. Nicole says...

    OK, these all look amazing!! But, what about a cookbook for not-so-great home cooks who will be leaning heavily on pantry items for the winter, thanks to the probable Covid-related shortages and not living in a big city with access to specialty stores. Any ideas? Maybe Chaat fits that bill?

    • cristina says...

      Nicole! have you listened to chef Samin Nosrat’s and Song Exploder podcaster Hrishikesh Hirway’s podcast for the pandemic? It is called “Home Cooking” and the premise (way back in April maybe) was to help folks cook with what they had in the pantry at home. They have continued to make it and it’s honestly delightful. There are episodes with everyone from Antoni Porowski and Jason Mantzoukas to Yo-Yo Ma.

      sending love! https://homecooking.show

    • Calla says...

      Budget Bytes is great for this! Lots of recipes on the blog and she also has a physical cookbook. It’s aimed at the budget-minded and as a result relies on a lot of canned and dried goods and easy-to-find produce and proteins. I can’t recommend it enough

    • Whitney says...

      HOMECOOKING is sooo good! Listening to Samin and Hrishi chat about cooking at home and make jokes is the most delightful and inspiring thing for me right now.

    • celeste says...

      Thank you Calla! Will def use Budget Bytes!

    • Lila says...

      Home cooking is wonderful and so heart warming to listen to! I live for the calls with Sumesh uncle (food scientist/Hrishi’s dad). Definitely recommend!!

    • Nicole says...

      Thanks for the recommendations!

    • k says...

      Another vote for Budget Bytes! If you search “pantry”, you’ll see a post with 200+ recipes for pantry staples. That should hold you for a while! :)

    • Jenny Rosenstrach says...

      Sarah Copeland just came out with a book called Instant Family Meals — slow cooker and pressure cooker meals that rely on staples. It’s supposed to be great:

      https://bookshop.org/books/instant-family-meals-delicious-dishes-from-your-slow-cooker-pressure-cooker-multicooker-and-instant-pot-r-a-cookbook/9780593139721

      And I second (third? fourth?) Cristina’s recommendation to listen to Samin and Hrishi’s podcast. It’s not just incredibly useful — it’s a lot of fun.

  39. A feast for the eyes and stomach. I love cookbooks. And I love novels with recipes even more. I have assembled a list of my favorite foodie fiction over on my blog. Link under my name.

  40. Great recommendations, and I am DELIGHTED that these links are to bookshop.org, not to Amazon. this is a HUGE deal, and I applaud Cup of Jo for taking this step. Much gratitude and many blessings.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you so much, shanti!

    • Sanna Ruth says...

      Hear hear!

    • cristina says...

      want to echo this!! thank you Cup of Jo!

    • madeleine says...

      Whoop! Shanti good call on celebrating this. CoJ thanks for showing us how to continue to step up.

    • Kate says...

      Agreed!

  41. NH observer says...

    I have to confess that I have now adopted the phrase, “Five Stages of Ottolenghi” to describe the process of anticipation and inspiration shifting to inevitable frustration and disappointment I all too often feel when making his recipes — most recently this past Saturday when I made the roasting pan ragu. (I haven’t bought the cookbook, though I do own Jerusalem, but the ragu recipe was in the latest issue of one of my favorite magazines.) As an avowed lover of mushrooms and all the ingredients in the recipe, I thought it would be fantastic and would offer me the chance to reverse my Ottolenghi trend. I even did the obligatory sourcing-four-days-in-advance for the coconut cream (NOT MILK) that’s required. And . . . sadness. It just tasted weird, and salty, and made me feel vaguely sick to my stomach. I ended the evening eating anchovies on toast while the ragu alternative sat forlornly and reprovingly on the counter.

    • sookiestackhouse says...

      Agree. I’ve tried and tried… His cookbooks are so gorgeous and everything sounds so tempting, but the one I have (can’t remember the title — it’s vegetarian) is basically a lot of glorified side dishes. Who can spend so much time on a little appetizer?! I will continue to admire the photos and to envy anyone who has managed to make his cookbooks and recipes work.

    • Mae says...

      Ah, NH! I sympathize with this. Lucky me, the Ottolenghi book I have is “Simple.” And I have one big success there I come back to again and again–his pesto. The gist is, use pistachhios in the pesto and add sliced snow peas & roasted cherry tomatoes to the pasta. Hoping this allows you that sought-after Ottolenghi success. :)

    • Hilary says...

      “The 5 stages of Ottolenghi” made me laugh! I feel this way, too! I’ve had the privilege of eating at his London restaurant once and I would rather let that mind blowing experience be what I think of, instead of the many sad mishaps I’ve had with his recipes. I also feel this way about Bon Appetit recipes – so many failures, so much wasted food.

      For me, Ottolenghi is best served by the man himself (or his kitchen minions) while I stick to a more reliable kitchen guide, like Deb of Smitten Kitchen :)

    • My objection to Ottolenghi is cultural appropriation. He takes Palestinian dishes calls them Mediterranean or some other vague language and pretends that it is his own. Hard pass on all his cookbooks.

    • Kari T. says...

      I have “Ottolenghi, The Cookbook”, you may have better luck with this one! It is full of great and fairly accessible recipes (I live in Northern Ontario, 45minutes from a basic grocery store). I also have Jerusalem but haven’t attempted any just because of ingredient accessibility.

    • Tesia says...

      Whaaat? I love Ottolenghi’s recipes and have five of his cookbooks! Yes, there have been a few duds, but that’s normal. They can often seem daunting or have that infamous mile-long list of ingredients, but I’ve almost always found the effort to be 100% worth it. However, I do seem to be freakishly good at judging by the ingredient liat if I’ll end up liking the dish in the end or not. I do also cook a lot and have recently come back to recipes that seemed impossible 6 or 7 years ago, but are totally doable now. I do see most of his recipes as less of an every day affair, especially since I’m not just cooking for myself and my husband, but also for two absurdly picky little kids. The beauty of Ottolenghi’s recipes is that they get me excited about veggies again, help me out of a cooking rut, and inspire me to try new flavor combinations.

  42. Emma says...

    Hi Jenny, this is a wonderful list. One little update you might consider: ‘Ottolenghi Flavor’ has two authors: Yotam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage. Thanks!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you!

  43. Ashleigh Wilson says...

    I love when you guys recommend cookbooks:)

  44. Alexis says...

    These all look so wonderful! I’ve been looking forward to Bibi’s Kitchen. I’d also like to add the Xi’an Famous Foods cookbook by Jason Wang. I’ve been a fan since 2004 when they were still a tiny stand in a Queens shopping center basement. They didn’t even have proper plates that first time I went. The recipes are labor intensive but worth it – we have made the spicy cumin lamb noodles at home and it makes my mouth sing.

  45. Fiona says...

    I’m SO excited for Bibi’s Kitchen I love them both a lot!

  46. AS says...

    So cruel to be posting this right before lunchtime when I have nothing nearly as delicious as any of this food. Going to buy about half of these recommendations right away. Yay for snacking cakes!!

  47. meli says...

    *Comoros :)

  48. SlyBK says...

    There’s a great new “fresh air” podcast episode featuring Marcus Samuelsson. Highly recommend!

  49. Karen Li says...

    I’m really obsessed with the cookbook Six Seasons, created by Joshua McFadden, the owner of Ava Gene’s restaurant in Portland, OR. The book embraces using the vegetables “in season” around the year. Though it is not a strictly vegetarian book, it has really opened my mind on how to build meals around fresh vegetables.

  50. Jen says...

    A Mexico in My Kitchen cookbook?! What a pleasant surprise!

    I cook her recipes a few times a week—they’re that good.

    More importantly, through her blog, Mely helps me keep my husband’s (a Mexico City native) memory alive for our two boys.

    Two years ago, we started the tradition of making Mely’s recipe for his favorite dish, Cochinita Pibil, in honor of his birthday.

    I’m so grateful to her for helping us stay connected to him by sharing her love of cooking. Looking forward to supporting the new book!

    • SARAH says...

      What a lovely way to honor your husband, Jen!

    • Rn says...

      Beautiful. May his memory be a blessing for you and your boys. I once lived in Mexico City and it has some of the best food on the planet. Enjoy.

  51. Chaat is hands down my favorite food! It’s reminds me of home, it’s the food my Mom has ready for me every time I go back home. Love that Maneet Chauhan’s book mixes chaat + travel!

  52. isodora says...

    Oh No, these all look like amazing. The trick to Ottolenghi recipes is to get all the ingredients you don’t have then just cook regularly from the book until they are gone. His recipes are so rewarding that it’s always worth it.

    This should work with other cultural cookbooks too. There’s a bit of incentive to use up the ingredients and you get to try dishes you might not make otherwise.

  53. We’ve already tried 5 recipes from Ottolenghi’s Flavor and they’ve all been FANTASTIC!! I almost never cook from other cookbooks anymore, because his always deliver. Yes, there may be longish ingredient lists, but that doesn’t always mean it takes long to cook (and when it does, it is worth it)!
    Huge fan!

    • Faye says...

      Totally agree, Anja! Ottolenghi’s recipes are such a fixture in our home that he’s become a household name for even our non-cooking family members. Sometimes the recipes are complex, but the payoff is huge. I hosted a dinner for friends last weekend with three dishes from Flavour, and I’m planning to make the cauliflower with chile butter for dinner tonight.
      Someone else mentioned that his veg-forward recipes are just sides, but I welcome his approach of having an interesting vegetable dish (or two) as the entire meal without relying on the meat/starch/veg formula.

  54. B says...

    I WANT THEM ALL!!

  55. Calla says...

    Wow thank you so much for putting these on my radar! A friend recently gave me a gift card to our local bookstore to get myself a cookbook and I was out of ideas. Now I can’t wait to get Mely Martinez’ book!

  56. Christina says...

    I literally gasped when I saw the cover for Chaat. Every book on this list went directly onto my library holds list! Thanks Jenny!

    • Calla = says...

      Wow I don’t know why I’ve never thought of checking out cookbooks from the library! I’m always hesitant to buy them because I live in such a small space. Can’t believe this never occurred to me!

    • Kathryn says...

      I love to check out the ones I am not sure if I want to buy, sometimes I end of buying them once I return them other times they just disappear!

    • Katie says...

      My local library has tons of cookbooks as well as recent editions of food magazines, so it makes for a good Sunday morning out to read, meal plan and takes photos of your “must cook this!” recipes.