Design

Have a Cozy Weekend.

bread by james ransom for food52

What are you up to this weekend? We’re watching the whodunit movie Knives Out and it’s so much fun! (“An entertainment that’s as smart, witty, stylish and exhilarating as any movie lover could wish for,” says the Wall Street Journal.) Have you seen it? Hope you have a good weekend — Happy Passover and Easter to those who celebrate — and here are a few fun links from around the web…

A genius visualization of social distancing.

Healthcare workers put their photos on their PPE. I found this so moving.

Insecure season four premieres on Sunday. Plus, an interview with Issa Rae in Teen Vogue.

What a cheerful top.

I listened to this Moth podcast episode — about a 95-year-old park ranger squaring off with an intruder — on a walk this week, and it was incredibly compelling.

Social distancing is a privilege. “This virus could have a catastrophic impact on black people in this country.” (New York Times)

Sad Animal Facts always makes me laugh so much.

Loved how they took these photos of Larry David through the window! (New York Times)

Wearing cool patterns.

Quarantine is bad for my mental health, but better for my rosacea.” Loved this honest post.

You might have seen this already, but wow! How cool is this Hamilton song over zoom?!

Ashley Ford’s apartment tour.

Pus, two reader comments:

Says Emily on 11 readers’ stay-at-home outfits: “My first thought was, ‘All CoJ readers are babes’ and then it clicked for me… maybe everyone is a babe, if you stop and give them some attention and time. Something about seeing my peers also coping with this is making me feel so much BETTER. Thank you babes of the world, and CoJ team. xoxoxo”

Says Erin on love during corona: “At the beginning of this, I was so scared to stay in my tiny 350-square-foot studio in Brooklyn. I tried to be kind to myself and think that I was lucky to still have my health, my boyfriend, my job, and Prospect Park across the street. But I grew to not trust my job security, and the divorce rate spike in China reminded me that I didn’t love my boyfriend and that I felt so insecure around him all the time. A week later, I was furloughed. My parents in Kentucky offered to come get me, they didn’t want their 24-year-old daughter alone, but my boyfriend begged me to stay and keep him company. I really wanted to go but didn’t want to be a bad girlfriend. The next day, my first day of unemployment, he dumped me in the park — the space I viewed as refuge only a week earlier — by telling me he ‘doesn’t think he likes me as much as I like him.’ The moment he said it I was crushed, then I immediately felt relief. Two days later, I rented a car, packed up my laundry and my cat, and drove the 11 hours to Kentucky in a day. I’ve been home just over a week now, and I feel light. All of the things I was so scared to lose I have now lost. But I cannot explain how calm and relieved I feel. I guess what I’m trying to say is that I was terrified of change and the lack of control I’d have over those changes. But they happened anyway. I’m now trying a new approach to this: hopefully we will all have our phoenix moment, to walk into the flames and come out stronger.”

P.S. The Cup of Jo Book Club will be held next Tuesday, April 14th, here on Cup of Jo — I’m excited! We’ll be featuring an interview with the author and questions within a post. Can’t wait to discuss the book with you.

(Photo by James Ransom for Food52.)

Note: If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission, at no cost to you. We recommend only products we genuinely like. Thank you so much.

  1. Audra says...

    Erin it pains me to think you would feel judged by any of these comments. It wasn’t too long ago that I was a young woman living alone away from my family. It makes no sense in a scary pandemic that you would not and should not “stay at home” with your family. Who you need and who need you. Now I’m a mom of young children. There is no way in a crisis that my children, whatever their ages, should not be with us if at all possible. That is what family does and why we have each other. It’s natural, and necessary and right. And you didn’t go all over town when you got home. You did the right thing in my opinion.

  2. Lauren says...

    A bit late but wanted to send a little love to Erin. I really hope that everyone who was so quick to criticize you has a chance to hear why you made the decisions you made & how you mitigated the risks.

    More importantly, I wanted to say that I have had a very similar experience/. I remember being in a cramped yoga to the people class, stressing about all the ways that my life was about to fall apart. The instructor recited a 17th c Japanese haiku which roughly translated is “Barn’s burnt down — now I can see the moon.”

    Instantly I felt the stress leave my body, replaced by a new openness and lightness. Once again I am in a place of great uncertainty but your message is the reminder I needed that change can be positive and that we can all have our phenix moments (multiple times!)

  3. I am a healthcare worker in who is continuing to work throughout the pandemic. My dad is a nurse currently testing his coworkers for COVID and my brother is a police officer also on the front lines. With myself and my family in harms way everyday I want to thank Cup Of Jo for continuing to write and post during this time. When I get home from a particularly long shift where every waking moment involves thinking about COVID, I turn to Cup of Jo for a much needed break and to lift my spirits. I feel the whole team has done such a great job of acknowledging the current issues but focusing on what they do best – creating a warm and welcoming environment amidst the chaos.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Thank you so much, Spencer xo And thank you for the work you do.

  4. Tracy says...

    This one was fun especially the knives out

  5. Claire says...

    I recommend Rian Johnson’s first film, Brick- also a mystery, quirky, with elements of spoof/parody, but fascinating and funny too.

    • Ohhhhh I LOVE Brick.

  6. Carolyn says...

    Thank you for posting the link about healthcare workers wearing their photos. This made me cry – which is happening more than usual lately. But this moment inspired me to start somehow collecting the articles, images, videos, etc. that are effecting me so deeply these days and set them aside for my daughter to read in the future. She is currently 15 months old, and I imagine she could use them for a school project one day, haha. But mostly I want her to know how all of this is making people *feel*. Not just the facts and figures the history books will teach her. The immense amount of emotion and community that has emerged over the past month is breathtaking. However we can capture that for future generations, I think we need to.

  7. Lina says...

    Hi Cup of Jo team, thank you for highlighting uplifting content while acknowledging the new reality we live in now. In addition to all the fear and anxiety around sickness, death, and the collapse of society that coronavirus has fueled, as an Asian-American woman, my new reality now includes heightened fear of being attacked because of how I look. It’s heartbreaking to know that in a time when we should all be coming together to support one other, people who look like me are being spit on, called slurs, and physically attacked because others have given in to ignorance and hate. I hope you can use your platform to inform readers how coronavirus has been impacting people differently and encourage solidarity among us. This NYTimes really captures the Asian-American experience right now: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/12/magazine/asian-american-discrimination-coronavirus.html

    • CS says...

      That is so unfortunate, sorry to hear that is happening. Sending love from Canada.

  8. Claire says...

    I especially love the Reader Comment from Erin.

  9. Mary W. says...

    Ashley Ford’s apartment is great. Macy’s sells Marimekko sheets?? Sold!
    I did not know Ivermectin is a treatment for rosacea. I only know it as a preventive for heartworm in dogs and cats. What a wonderful drug. (My first real job out of college was transcribing the Q&A sessions of the American Heartworm Society on an old standalone DEC word processing computer. Showing my age. Also, I still know a lot about heartworm disease.)

  10. Lauren E. says...

    Wow, Erin, your comment really moved me. This quarantine is affecting me in unexpected ways, too. Thank you so much for sharing your story with us.

  11. Gemma says...

    Joanna and CoJ employees, thank you from the bottom of my heart for continuing to blog during this pandemic. The tone of your posts is perfect and this blog is a shining light during this scary and sad time. It’s one of the few places left on the internet that lifts my spirits. To even entertain the thought that people shouldn’t have fun, joke around or do lighthearted things during a worldwide crisis is insane. This is exactly what we need to be doing to get through this dark time. Keep doing what you’re doing! Cup of Jo is a beautiful community.

  12. Sasha L says...

    So many thoughts!
    1. My gosh could I love Ashley Ford more? No.
    2. Knives Out. I wanted to love this. I love Agatha Christie and mysteries and basically any movie remotely like this. Was so excited when my husband found it in an in flight movie as we grow home a few weeks ago, and we watched together. It didn’t have enough mood. The Daniel Craig character was all wrong, just weird and I really love him, so sad. AND, we both figured out the “twist”, way before the reveal and that’s disappointing. Meh. We also got to watch Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood and Ford vs Ferrari and competent loved both of those movies. Would have NEVER picked a car movie, but it was truly excellent and moving.
    3. I hope the reader finds real happiness in Kentucky ♥️ I think she’s lucky to be rid of the bf.
    4. The healthcare workers. Holy cow, that made me cry. Trying so hard to just connect, to just stay human. Bless them. A million times bless them.
    5. Silly animal cartoons. Yes. More please.
    6. That sweater! So cozy looking and pretty colors. If you are size large (that’s pretty much all that was left), I hope you snap one up and do some serious couching and cuddling and crunchy food eating in it.

    Hoping everyone is ok right now. Especially you and your family Jo, and everyone in NYC. Thinking of you.

  13. Emily says...

    Just read through all the comments here, and I really feel both sides of this debate—Erin’s story is a tough one, and yet I also hear people who are frustrated.

    But let’s try to remember that it’s not so simple. Just as many people don’t have the choice to leave, many people don’t necessarily have the choice to stay. There are all kinds of complexities at play here, and we can’t judge when we don’t know the whole story. I think the media has really played up this narrative about wealthy folks fleeing the city for their vacation homes, when in reality many people have left for other reasons—to care for elderly and isolated parents, to protect immuno-compromised children, etc.

    What’s a family to do, for instance, if their lease ends in the midst of a pandemic, and their landlord can’t be flexible? Are you suggesting that they ought to be out touring other apartments with a troupe of children? No, of course not. In my case, we had to leave the city because of a combination of these scenarios. My partner and I thought hard about how to proceed, including moving in with friends, but in the end we had few options. We ended up driving to be family in other state before the shelter-in-place restrictions began.

    Of course, we did our very best to be careful—kiddos peeing on the side of highways, not in gas stations, picnics in the grass instead of takeout or drive-throughs, etc. And readers are absolutely right that contagion happens even when folks try to be careful. But in the end, we didn’t have a safe way to shelter in place, so we had to find shelter with family.

    So let’s remember: it’s not that simple.

    • MK says...

      It’s more straightforward than a lot of people make it out to be. The more of us who do our part and act responsibly, the fewer people who get sick and die.

  14. Marisa says...

    I loved Erin’s phoenix moment! Thanks for sharing! It really resonated too because I had a bit of a breakthrough this week too: I’ve got two boys, both under 4, and I’m pregnant with our third child, and have been a bit resentful over the past four years that I’ve alternated working short term, part time, or been completely stay at home with them. Stay at home mom has not been a role I’ve thrived in. But with social distancing being so required, something clicked over–while I still get tired and overwhelmed by parenting, it’s more enjoyable when I’m not feeling like I’m giving up so much to do it. So I’m really appreciating this little slow life right now.

  15. Elisabeth says...

    Ashley’s apartment is SO F-ING CUTE.

  16. Meghan says...

    Oh Jo, I appreciate you so much. I just picked a fight with my boyfriend, who’s my safe space and a well of positive light, and as soon as i apologized and righted things I realized I’m acting out just like my toddler. Pushing boundaries to make sure his love will bounce back like a protective bubble. Then I came over here, because you are my soft spot to land on the Internet and also a sea of shining light, and you know what? I see more people who are hurt and scared, lashing out because this IS a safe space. We’re all in this, falling apart together. Love to you and your team for always being our balm, and love to those who are hurting. And to everyone! All of you guys. Seriously, I love you all.

    • Cilla says...

      Meghan, i Love you too!

    • Madi says...

      I love this perspective. I was wondering why there were more “negative” comments than normal and this makes complete sense.

    • CS says...

      Insightful, sweet comment. Warmed my heart. Thank you.

  17. Nicky Busch says...

    It seems grossly irresponsible to highlight a post in which someone does exactly what public health officials are asking people not to do. The writer might think ‘I did the right thing for me and my family’ but if multiple people make the same choice it is the perfect recipe for contagion. Fine (if profoundly selfish) for the individual to do it but not fine for a widely read site to advertise these actions without criticism.

    • Sasha L says...

      What are you referring to Nicky? I looked back through the list and I’m lost.

    • Katha says...

      I really hope to give my Girls and also my Boy the strengh to break up a relationship, when they realise, they don’t love their partner or couldn’t be their selfes around him or her, which would be the reason to feel insecure around the partner.
      Erin was lucky, that her boyfriend broke up with her. How many people, esspacially girls and women are prisoned in a relationship, because they learned to be nice and sweet, but not to stand up for themselves?

  18. KJ says...

    Thank you for continuing to create this space amidst everything going on in our world right now. You have created a soft landing place full of love and uplifting messages. Keep doing what you are doing and ignore the negativity on here. Everyone is so overloaded with different emotions that I see so much deflection and even shaming going on. Remember love is what changes the world folks (some commenters) not disgust. Peace

  19. Laura says...

    I love CoJ so much. This blog is a place we can all turn to for a little pick-me-up during these hard times. Joanna, thank you for continuing to give us badass content, and for your patient and understanding responses to some rude/hateful comments that you receive. You inspire me!

  20. Whitney says...

    It is important to remember that in times of distress, everyone deals with it in a different way. The most important thing is not to judge another for their reaction during this time, but to shine love impartially.

  21. Lizzie says...

    We made homemade pasta last night and watched Knives Out with a glass of red wine. I found it delightful! Needed some comedy after this week.

    Also just wanted to say, you are doing an amazing job. Thank you so much for creating this space and community. <3

  22. Danielle says...

    I don’t want to be unjustly negative. This is my own reaction, my own thought, that I will bring up in therapy this week – ha – but I’ve noticed that, as a life long New Yorker who is acutely devastated and heartbroken by what’s happening here right now, my city I’ve lived in for decades, grew up exploring and being shaped by, the only place I could imagine living and raising my family, I have spikes of intense resentment when I read about people who have left during this crisis. It blinds me to the other points they make be trying to make. It feels not only unsafe to their other communities that they fled to, filled with privilege and “what’s best for me” mentality, but that they never really loved NY to begin with. That they would leave NY in her time of need. And what, they’ll just come back when this is all over (will it be over?) and try to make her their city again? It’s not a healthy line of thought, this “us vs them,” the ones who stayed and the ones who left, but it’s where I’m at right now. I wonder if I will always wonder and even ask people what they did during the Spring of 2020 and if they left, will I judge them? The balm for this thought right now is the nightly 7pm cheers, filled with the people who stayed, like my family, on our terraces or balconies or out windows, yelling for the front-line workers, but also for release for ourselves.

    • K says...

      Hah I think I’m on the reverse side of this.
      I left, and I’ve felt guilty for leaving as if I wasn’t “in the trenches.” But I also think that’s not a good thought to have. I think I did and am doing what’s best for me and my loved ones. There was space, and I wanted to. In turn I’m reducing the burden on NYC by lowering the chances of me and my loved ones getting sick. I also traveled by car.
      Fwiw, I don’t love or pretend to be patriotic to any one place more than another, I don’t hate places, either. I do try to help the people in my circle in the tiny ways I can (which includes healthcare workers, if that means more) when all the options to help everyone get too overwhelming, and branch out from there.

    • MK says...

      I completely feel you on this, and I think it’s a normal and valid reaction. Many folks simply don’t have the choice to leave. Those who flee want to point to everything they are doing to minimize the risk, but leaving IS the risk. When I see folks around me who aren’t being responsible, I think they have not come to terms with how serious all of this is. And yes, it’s a dark place to be, but for everyone’s safety we need to be clear eyed about it.

    • Morgan says...

      I totally understand your feelings on this, and especially when it looks like an act of privilege, leaving others behind. I think it may be helpful to remember that a lot of young, single people live in NY and, for them, it only makes sense that they would want to shelter in place with their families, like the young lade highlighted here. It’s not so much a matter of leaving NY in her time of need, but rather heading towards safety and HOME when one’s world is falling apart. Many people have lost their jobs over this and being with their parents (or other emotional safety nets) feels like the most natural move. Regardless of people’s motivations, I do think we need to hold space for grace for everyone right now. These are scary times, and we are all going to handle it differently.
      Also, I’m not from New York, but it seems from the news that their hospitals are at max capacity as is; perhaps a few people leaving the city to quarantine elsewhere isn’t such a bad thing? Just one perspective.

  23. OM says...

    I rarely comment but in response to some of the comments on here, I just want to say that I think that, as always, you and your team are doing an amazing job Joanna! x

  24. Louise says...

    I echo the commenters who said CofJ is striking a great balance. A longtime reader and of the lifestyle blogs I turn to I have loved your posts the most- a great balance of light, interesting and deep as always. Thank you so much for being a space to distract but not numb myself to what is currently going on.

  25. Melissa says...

    Oh, my sweet husband is on that Moth episode! He told a story about cleaning out his mother’s apartment after she passed away <3

  26. WOW- Erin’s comment was particularly powerful, even as a happily married (almost 14 years) mother of three. “All of the things I was so scared to lose I have now lost. But I cannot explain how calm and relieved I feel.” Prayers are answered in lots of different ways, and often in ways we don’t expect, right?

    • K says...

      I totally agree!

    • Charlie says...

      i totally agree too! My second job out of college was at a startup, where I was overworked by a terrible manager. I wanted so badly to stay and be part of the exciting, trendy, environment, but he let me go when I (like all previous assistants) couldn’t keep up with his unrealistic, ever changing demands. I was devastated… until I turned around, looked back, and realized how much a hated that job. I landed in a way better job right after, making 50% more money and working for someone who turned out to be a fantastic mentor and springboarded my career. Here’s to surprisingly wonderful disappointments, that turn into magic!

  27. Rb says...

    Sad Animal Facts is hysterical! I especially liked her totoro story, totally made my nite ?

  28. Kelly M says...

    Joanna, I just want you to know that I love your Friday posts. I suppose I do love almost every single post, but there’s just something about these ones!
    p.s. Knives Out was a great movie! And I hope you have a cozy weekend in your home with your family. Stay safe. Love from Canada!

  29. Courtney says...

    Thanks for putting a bright spot in a difficult week of full time working + full time parenting!

  30. C. says...

    Erin’s story is poignant, but I’m frustrated that you’ve highlighted it, given that Governor Cuomo enacted a shelter-in-place order on March 20 (and given the dates Erin references it sounds like she left New York after this date). Another blogger possibly read by many COJ readers (Love Taza) got a lot of well-deserved criticism for doing something similar. I understand the impulse to get out of NYC and be with family – this is a terrifying time! – but it’s totally opposed to what public health officials are asking of us (for the good of all of us) and is one of the key ways the virus is continuing to spread to new places.

    • lauren says...

      I had a similar reaction to this, C; I certainly felt for Erin when I read her comment the other day, but I also felt that if it was financially possible for her to remain in her apartment here in NYC, it was extremely irresponsible both to leave and to travel so far. I also would not have highlighted this comment, were I Joanna & co.

      I didn’t answer the “how are you?” prompt the other day, but I’m not great. I live on Manhattan’s Lower East Side and am very lucky – I have stable-ish work and a stable relationship, and I am relatively young and healthy, enough so that I’ve been doing grocery and prescription runs for vulnerable neighbors – but stress and grief have just crumpled me this week, and when I hear about fellow New Yorkers who have left town or people who have made other choices that endanger others, the anger that bubbles up is almost impossible to control. It’s gotten me in fights with friends and family, which makes things even worse. I think I’ve finally gotten a handle on it for now, but: yeah. Not great.

      If flattening the curve were a snap, we wouldn’t have to tell each other to do it all the time. It’s hard and scary as hell, but where would we be if each of us bent the rules just a little bit? Virtual hugs, everyone. Be brave, or fake it ’til you make it like I am.

    • Erin says...

      Hi, I understand and grappled with this, too. However, my parents begged me to come as they are both elderly. My brother lives nearby but has a wife with two small children (under 4) and they did not want to depend on him. Additionally, they were afraid of me being all alone with extremely bad asthma. We all weighed our options and I hope you can see why at this time we felt this was necessary for us. I only stopped for gas, not even food, and we have not left our house in the 12 days I’ve been home due to fear of spreading, not even for groceries.

    • Angela says...

      OMG I know!!! Stay in NYC please! I can only imagine how scary and lonely it must feel there, but you put the rest of us in danger when you flee the city. Please, please, please stay put.

    • Sam says...

      Yeah hopped down to the comments to see if anyone else’s mentioned this. I’m not sure what else Erin could have done in that circumstance, but to highlight it as an inspirational story when it’s exactly the sort of thing that spreads the virus is…not good

    • AMK says...

      My sister’s lease in NYC was up last week. She is an education and community relations consultant. Her business dried up overnight. Her landlord wasn’t going to let her live in the apartment for free after the lease expired. She had to leave and come home. She couldn’t afford to stay in place.

    • Thelma says...

      Exactly what I thought when reading it too! I feel terrible for anyone stuck in hard situations right now but I live in Italy and we’ve been watching the world half-do what is required for weeks now. In this time, we CAN’T just make our own decisions to go to the place we feel most at ease… so please, just know that for many many people there will be no ‘silver lining’ to this pandemic,,, and we just have to do the hardest thing.

    • Sasha L says...

      Erin, hugs. I hope everyone gets a chance to read your explanation and have more understanding for your particular situation. I think if we want to, we can find reasons to judge everyone. Literally everyone has made or will make a decision that doesn’t feel like the right one to somebody. It’s a stressful and scary and uncertain time. We should all he’s the experts and do our best. But let’s please try to give each other the grace that we are all doing our best. Even that person who made a decision you don’t agree with. I think we can beat this thing faster by sticking together and not turning on one another.

      Also, we need big societal solutions to many of the gaping problems this pandemic has exposed. The powers that be desperately need us to stay afraid and to blame one another. Let’s please work together and look at the big picture. Many people are making decisions (that aren’t great for all of us) based on money and access to health care and insurance coverage. Don’t blame them, blame the system that forces these dangerous choices.

    • Katie says...

      Erin, you sound very responsible and like you made a difficult yet solid decision for your family. I would hate for these comments to cast a shadow on your feelings of lightness and resilience. This is a dark time for our country, but I can’t imagine you will ever regret spending this time with your elderly parents.

      And thank you CoJ for always being a bright and authentic place on the internet.

    • ks says...

      You’ll see Erin’s story included here – I think this is a time not to point fingers but to dig in and understand. It sounds like she had a really good reason to go and you punishing her for putting her family in her plan does not foster community nor encourage people to share here.

  31. Liz says...

    have a good and safe weekend! thanks extra for the posts this month!

  32. Colleen S. says...

    I rented Knives Out, and I thought it was okay. It started out well, but I checked out halfway through.

    • L. says...

      Erin’s story was heartbreakingly beautiful. It took my breath away!

  33. katie says...

    I’m so grateful for this blog – the combination of reality, hope and connection that I crave, especially during times like this. THANK YOU to the whole team for continuing to deliver excellent work that touches so many.

    Sending light to all involved – hope you are able to enjoy a weekend that’s as stress-free as possible!

  34. LD says...

    Man, some of these comments are rude.

    Thanks, Joanna, for making this blog a safe space to land amongst all the mess. It certainly gives me comfort.

  35. Tara says...

    Erin! We must have been neighbors in Brooklyn before I too was dumped in the park and moved back home (in my case to New Mexico)! Realizing how ambivalent I in fact felt about that 5-year relationship has been an unexpected quarantine hobby (in addition to gardening, facing my fear of change, sewing masks, screaming into the void, and baking). Wishing you well in this uncertain, transitional moment. And sending so much love to the Cup of Jo community, and to my old NYC home.

  36. Mimi says...

    Thank you Cup of Jo team for all you do, for who you are in this world and for the bits of hope and love you spread along the way. Wishing you all health and continued strength as you face each day in the midst our nation’s center of the crisis.
    This week has been particularly hard and heavy and I need a bit of ‘normal’ so I will be surprising my husband by dressing up for a date night at home; and yes, we too will be watching Knives Out. So excited. Big hugs to ALL! ❤️

  37. Iris says...

    Honestly can you stop linking to Amazon? We all have a responsibility to support small, and if we can local, business, during this crisis. You have a platform that influences people all over the world, you could really make a difference if you wanted to.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      I think amazon prime is the only place you can watch knives out? Are there others?

    • Tori says...

      We rented it from Red Box. (Which is also not a small local business)

    • Bee says...

      This hit me…CoJ influences me every time I visit to be a more introspective, conscientious citizen, which I’m sure holds true for many other readers. We are all trying to get through right now and are finding and searching for new ways to do so that are safe and healthy. I’m making a point to let others do so without the judgement passing.

    • Mercy says...

      Only one link in the post is to Amazon, and it’s a feature film, it’s not going to be available through a small, local, business! According to my research it’s available on Amazon Prime, Vudu, Youtube, and Google Play — no way to go small and local with this.

    • nadine says...

      You can rent Knives out on Itunes or through the Cineplex website too!
      By the way I recently rented a few movies from my local indie theatre. I love cinema (I work in postproduction) and I used to go to the theatres at least once a week, so I’m missing it a lot lately.. But luckily a couple of my favourite indie cinemas here in Montreal are releasing a few movies to rent on demand. If you’re interested try looking if your local theatre has something similar! If you feel you can afford it, it’s a great way to help the theatres that are struggling.
      Anyway I found Knives out to be such a fantastic movie, the acting is impeccable and the story is so well layered and smart! I loved the political undertones.

    • Joaquina says...

      Amazon Prime is so far the only platform offering it but perhaps Iris is suggesting to not link to them at all? There are so many negative & worker’s rights implications associated with it.

  38. Lara says...

    I love Cup of Jo every day, truly, but just popping in to say that the links were particularly excellent this week – such a perfect mix of powerful, thought-provoking, heart-warming, reverent, solemn, and joyful – and I love the tone you’ve been able to strike lately. Keep up the fantastic work, you guys! It means a lot to me (and the gazillion friends I share your content with regularly). <3

    • K says...

      I totally agree! Felt like the link version of a great DJ’ed playlist (lol do you know what I mean, language is escaping me).

  39. Ashley P. says...

    Can’t wait for book club!!!!

  40. Came here every day this week. A good hug when hugs are sleeping for a little while. And I never would have found Jenny’s wonderful series without you having mentioned it!
    I like imagining you working from home with the boys bopping around, watching you manage a blog and learning about your incredible business savvy. Happy Passover and Happy Easter internet friends!!
    Love.

  41. Jay says...

    I LOVE YOU, ERIN! Thank you for sharing and dropping some knowledge about control and fear and anxiety, I love it. Best of luck to you sister, you’re gonna be just fine <3 Pet that cat, I miss mine.

  42. Stella says...

    Have a good Easter cup of Jo!

  43. Gabby says...

    I just can’t believe that you live in NY where a lot of people is dying everyday, and you just hope a “cozy weekend” like nothing is happening around… you are treating this as the world is or would be the same during and after this crisis…. I think it’s absolutely inmoral and offensive…. I expected much more of you. At the end you are just another lifestyle posh blogg…so disappointing

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, of course we aren’t treating the world like it’s the same! please read the links here and also the posts this week and i hope you’ll see that. we are trying to keep people’s spirits up and be a place of respite but we are very cognizant of the fact that this pandemic is real and catastrophic. thank you so much for your note. xo

    • Alexa says...

      What’s she supposed to do? Those of us who aren’t working the front lines ~ and who are lucky enough to be able to socially distance ~ must stay home and let essential workers do their work as safely and effectively as possible. So, again, what’s she supposed to do? Draw the curtains and wilt? There will be life after this, and in the meantime, as best we each can, we must tend to both the world around us and fortify our spirits within us.

      I believe she’s doing a beautiful job of respectfully and mindfully providing sunshine in these times, unlike many influencers who are 1. fleeing NYC when it is far too late to make that decision or 2. pushing their Article sofas and Avocado mattresses like this crisis isn’t happening. There’s a difference between hawking furniture at this time and offering sweet ideas for keeping busy whilst indoors 24/7.

      Thank you, Jo and team, as always, for the work that you do. xx

    • Andrea says...

      I think it’s possible that different readers come here for different reasons. Like many people, a lot of my daily life has been reshaped by the current pandemic and it feels like we’re all under the weight of grief and fear right now. I get my coronavirus news from other sources, not here. It’s nice to come to a place like this blog where I can occasionally be reminded that not everything in the world is broken right now and there is still light shining through the cracks. Thank you, Joanna and the rest of the team. Hoping all of you are well.

    • Samantha says...

      Cup of Jo is NOT a news outlet- it is, in fact, a lifestyle blog. The news is available by all major outlets (for free, from most I would add). I, for one, genuinely enjoy a way to attempt to see the silver lining in all of this and to have a BREAK from all of the scary news.
      So, THANK YOU Jo & Team for all of your hard work to try to put a smile on our faces in this difficult time.

    • Lindsey says...

      This is such a gross comment and really proves that you aren’t a long time reader. Joanna, you are light in the darkened. Keep shining.

    • Susannah says...

      It is so hard to strike that balance between comforting, informing, witnessing, refuge, empathy, diversion … Cup of Jo team, somehow you are doing it. Gabby, I hear you with those feelings of grief. And I am also grateful for this community that feels like we’re all in this together. Xo

    • Megan says...

      I love that CoJ is staying so true to its roots during this unreal moment in history. Keep up the amazing work. I for one see the point of cheerful tops! I recently bought a NEON PINK sweater just for video meetings, something I never would have worn before. It’s such a pick me up in an otherwise absolutely stress-filled time. Love to all, and Happy Easter to those celebrating this weekend xoxoxo

    • Deanna says...

      Hey Gabby, as a NYer and a three-time cancer survivor, I can attest that it’s nice to focus on having a cozy weekend when everything around you is falling apart. I really love this blog and visit every day, in great part because it’s a safe haven and overall delight for my mind. Immoral? Please!

    • shelley says...

      I have to completely disagree. I think this blog has handled this better than any of the other blogs out there.

    • Emma says...

      Gabby…did you click on any of the links posted? Have you read the multiple posts from this blog about the pandemic? Your comment sounds like it’s holding a lot of pain. Wishing you peace and light, my friend.

    • Kelly says...

      Just to share a counterpoint, I feel like this is actually exactly what we need right now. Everyone is coping the best they can and to continue to have this bright spot of COJ in my day is everything. A little bit of normalcy and distraction in a world that has been turned upside down. Jo, keep doing what you’re doing – we are so grateful.

    • Abigail says...

      Jo + team: thank you so much for putting such care and consideration into the content you share. You’ve struck a particularly lovely balance in the midst of chaotic, stressful times. Sending my very best to the entire CoJ team.

    • Lainey says...

      I do have to say that my immediate reaction to the “have a lovely weekend” tone of the last couple of weeks’ Friday posts has been a little cringey. Like, maybe there could be better word choice to accurately reflect the weight on the world and many of our individual lives right now. But, I’ve almost immediately given myself a kick in the butt and been so grateful for the beautiful and heartfelt distractions that the wonderful CoJ staff is providing right now. We’re all coping differently right now. If this doesn’t feel like the right space for you right now, select to spend time doing something else, but don’t begrudge those who find value in the happy distractions.

    • Hope says...

      Yikes. Just chiming in to say I have been reading COJ for like eleven years and Joanna has always created a kindness-forward, extremely empathetic corner of the internet for anyone who wants it. Wishing all of you the best in these hard times.

    • Laura says...

      I totally disagree! I feel the tension that’s being beautifully honored here: that everything is SHIT, and we have to do our best to find small comforts and care for ourselves and our families, while keeping our ears and hearts open to this hard moment. It’s all over the posts. Please be gentle to the website that’s offering me (and many others) so much heartfelt comfort in this incredibly hard time.

    • Agnès says...

      Gabby this is no such thing, this blog is a much loved place, so careful and inclusive. Thank you for the comfort and hope you provide dear cup of jo.

    • K says...

      I love coming to this blog during this time. I think you guys strike a great balance between highlighting the realities of the current pandemic and delivering brighter (but still relevant) content to help keep me mentally sane. Keep it up!

    • Becky says...

      Wow completely unnecessary. If you are that upset write her an email or go journal about it. Dont try to publicly shame someone who is doing her part to keep up a positive vibe. Cozy encourages some momentary peace in all this craziness not to be oblivious to all the world.

    • Rose says...

      I feel your attack is unfair. Many of us who are regular news junkies need a place of positivity away from the constant waves of bad news, uncaring government, and pointless deaths. Cup of Jo has suggested ways to help and is mindful of the current situation while still trying to provide community. I think you’ll be hard pressed to find another site striking as good a balance. This isn’t exactly Gwenyth Paltrow peddling you goods from her mansion and telling the poor to eat cake, so maybe reserve a little kindness for a publication that is acting responsibly.

    • Gabby, I realize that the pandemic is stressful, but I feel that your response is not fair at all to the COJ staff. “Cozy” can mean sheltering in place with the best possible attitude.

    • Sasha L says...

      I’m struck by three things coming out of Gabby’s comment: 1. How much fear is propelling our behavior right now. I’ve seen this in so many ways in myself and others. Fear doesn’t often lead us to be kind, thoughtful or understanding of others. 2. How much empathy is expressed in these comments, both for Jo and co. and for Gabby, and that is really beautiful to me. 3. How much I felt the outpouring of love for this space in these comments in defense.

      I think some of us are kind of losing it. Or not so kind of. The care and empathy we continue to show for one another is such a light in this darkness. And I think most of us see this space as a light shining brightly (even if a word choice feels off, or a selection seems odd – it’s ok. We get the intent, and it’s all good)

  44. Janey says...

    Thank you for being here and providing a little ray of joy in an otherwise scary world. Keep safe. X

  45. Alya says...

    And since it was not acknowledged here, I send a warm message of Happy Passover to the millions who observe. You may not be celebrated (or safe) in the streets of Brooklyn, but I see and acknowledge you.

    • Zoe says...

      Thank you so much, Alya. This is exactly the message I needed today, like a light in what feels like a million miles of darkness. <3

    • Sasha L says...

      Was the happy Passover added late? It was there when I read.

      Happy Passover, happy Easter. Hoping everyone is safe.

  46. Sarah T says...

    Thank you lovely COJ team for continuing to post! It is always lovely to settle into the sofa and see what treats are in store as my physical world has gotten smaller these days. I would say coming here is always a welcomed break! Hope you are are staying well, sending all those COJ readers some hugs and good health wishes.

  47. Britt says...

    I’m so excited for the book club! ?

    • Erin says...

      Me too!

  48. Blair says...

    The comment about being terrified of change. I work in a business for the federal government that the only thing that is constant is change. I had been able to control my life until a point two years ago when all of these new policies put into place prior to a position change for me could have a real impact. Little did I know that the change I was fearing, giving me anxiety and keeping me up at night was exactly what I needed. The same with this pandemic. I am in a field that is thriving and will be in the future however being constantly exposed, vulnerable and out there is terrifying. Sometimes, giving up your control is the most freeing thing you can do! Thinking of everyone during this pandemic!

  49. Annie says...

    We need more Ashleys and Kellys In the world! What a wonderful couple. Their love and support for each other is palpable and inspiring.

  50. Frédérique Poirier says...

    As always, thank you for sharing such powerful articles. The one of The New York Times really resonate with me.

    I’m truly privilege to be able to work from home and to fell secure. It is not the case for so many people, and I truly think that we should do better to help them. Yes, in Quebec, where I live, we have a lot of programs to help them, but that is simply not enough. We have to do better for the woman who are victimize of violence, for the children who live in a family that simply don’t have enough money to put food on the table (1/3 children goes to school without eating in Quebec) and for all the immigrants who came in our country in the hope of a safer life. The crisis that we are living right now emphases the beauty in our world, but also all the gap in our society. Let’s work together so everyone can come out of it stronger and better. Xx

    • Rae says...

      I love your comment Frédérique and whole-heartedly agree. I work with a very at risk population – a community of kids in poverty who have both food and housing insecurity. Before Covid-19 I have been thinking about a career change as I am paid very little for my work. This experience has made me realize that the satisfaction I get from my work, and the help it is to the community, is far more important than my need for more stability or comfort.

  51. OOOOOH yes, that episode of the moth was SOOOO good! The latest one about heros was pretty stellar as well! I loved the story about Kevyn Aucoin!

  52. Tania says...

    Yess, I loved Knives out! I love a good murder mystery — there’s something weirdly comforting about the formula, and this one has a great cast and just enough twists to keep you guessing.

  53. Laura says...

    Yay, Erin! Good for you! Thank you for sharing your experience.