Design

9 Real Winners of the Golden Globes

Amidst an actual globe in crisis, the 77th Annual Golden Globes happened last night. Did you watch? It was star-studded, glamorous, and… kind of strange. (Halfway through, my boyfriend left the room to “go sew some buttons back on the duvet cover.”) Even so, it still had its fair share of high points…

“What the heck are the Golden Globes, anyway?” asked my boyfriend, who was recruited to watch along with me. Unlike the Oscars (which cover film) and the Emmys (which cover TV), the Globes celebrate both film and TV, and since they take place so early in the year, they’re seen as a sort of precursor to how the Oscars may go. Ricky Gervais hosted for the fifth — and as he repeated throughout the night — last time. It was a little like watching an uncomfortable best man speech, where you’re left wondering how much they had to drink, how much they prepared ahead of time, and when it’s going to end.

There were some major themes throughout the night — everyone made fun of Cats and 1917 won seemingly everything. Beyond that, here are nine real winners:

The Real Winners of the Golden Globes

Best Act of Defiance
“Don’t make a political speech,” Gervais said at the beginning of the night. “Come up, accept your award, thank your agent. It’s already three hours long.” But his plea, of course, was immediately ignored. After all, it would be callous to celebrate Golden Globes when the actual globe is in peril. Best Supporting Actor winner Russell Crowe sent along a message from Australia, where he was helping the effort to battle the devastating bush fires, a recurring theme throughout the night. Michelle Williams spoke about women’s right to choose. Joaquin Phoenix had a special suggestion for how people can do their part: “We don’t have to take private jets to Palm Springs.” Even the vegan meal served during the ceremony was its own political statement. Best Supporting Actress winner Patricia Arquette brought it home. “We won’t look back at this night. In the history books, we will look back at a country on the brink of war. We will look at Australia burning. We have to vote in 2020. And we have to beg and plead everyone we know to vote.”

Real Winners of the Golden Globes

Best Display of Emotion
Tom Hanks, who won the Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement award, has a clip reel to end all clip reels. Philadelphia, Forrest Gump, Sleepless in Seattle, Saving Private Ryan… It went on and on, growing ever more poignant in a roundup that would be hard for anything to top. That is, until he took to the stage and was seized by a crescendo of emotion. “It’s my cold!” he kept saying, each time he got choked up. We know it’s not your cold, Tom, and we love you more for it.

Real Winners of the Golden Globes

Best Joke That Made a Really Great Point
This award goes to Bong Joon-Ho, the South Korean filmmaker who won best foreign language film for Parasite. (I was begrudgingly dragged to Parasite — I hadn’t seen previews and envisioned it would be about a giant worm! — and then discovered it was a highlight of the year. Go see it if you haven’t!) He spoke for a moment, then paused, so his interpreter could deliver the message: “Once you overcome the one-inch tall barrier that is the subtitle you will be introduced to so many more amazing films.” I could not agree more.

Real Winners of the Golden Globes

Best Pantsuit
Yes, yes, everyone is tired of hearing about Fleabag*. 2019 was the year of Fleabag. Must we start off 2020 by talking about it? But Phoebe Waller-Bridge — who won two Golden Globes for Best Actress and Best TV Series (musical or comedy) — in this sequin pantsuit is as fresh as ever. Backstage, Waller-Bridge told press she will be auctioning off the Ralph Russo suit and donating the money to a good cause — fire relief in Australia.

*But for those of you who still aren’t tired of talking about Fleabag, “Hot Priest” Andrew Scott donned a cream tuxedo jacket that was appropriately angelic.

Real Winners of the Golden Globes

Accidental Twinning Award
This award goes to Sarah Snook from Succession (left), who wore a voluminous black sequin ballgown by Christian Siriano and Ana de Armas, nominated for Best Actress for her role in Knives Out, in an eerily similar navy ensemble by Ralph & Russo. It was like Cinderella meets The Parent Trap, in the best way possible.

Best Argument for Getting a Short Haircut
This award is a three-way tie: Between Ellen Degeneres (winner of the Carol Burnett Award), her wife Portia de Rossi and Zoe Kravitz. Hide the scissors, I’m feeling inspired! (While we’re at it, Phoebe Waller-Bridge also rocked a new shorter ‘do.)

Real Winners of the Golden Globes

Best Entrance
Though he didn’t take home any awards last night, Billy Porter will always be a winner in my eyes. Over the past year, he solidified his place as the ruler of the red carpet. (See also: the Emmys, the Oscars, last but very much not least, the Met Gala.) His latest look — which included a removable train of white angel feathers — was designed by Alex Vanassche and accessorized with Jimmy Choo boots. Walk on!

Best Attempt at Making a Joke That Really Didn’t Land
Brad Pitt won the award for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy for his role in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. As he spoke to his costar Leonardo DiCaprio, he quipped, “I would’ve shared the raft.” Cue a seemingly endless awkward pause as half of the audience didn’t get it, and the other half didn’t find it funny. He was, of course, referencing the iconic scene at the end of Titanic, when Rose and Jack cling to the wreckage. “But… it wasn’t a raft,” said my boyfriend, echoing the overall sentiment.

Real Winners of the Golden Globes Olivia Coleman

Most Endearing Acceptance Speech
Olivia Colman’s speeches never disappoint and this was no exception. She was regal, yet adorable as ever as she accepted her Best Actress award for her role as Queen Elizabeth II in The Crown. “I’ve already gotten a little bit boozy because I really didn’t think this was going to happen!” she said. And that is, perhaps, the greatest takeaway of the evening. Sometimes, we don’t expect great things to happen, but then they pleasantly surprise us.

Eventually, the night was over. “Get drunk, do your drugs, and f*ck off,” said Gervais, to conclude the show. A fitting salute for a rather odd night.

Did you watch the Golden Globes? What were your favorite (or least favorite) moments?

P.S. Infidelity, Netflix style and a Q&A with Fleabag’s costume designer.

  1. Sunna says...

    I would also list Hildur Guðnadóttir, that won the Golden Globe for Best Original Score for ‘Joker’. This is the first time a woman has won this award as a solo composer in the history of the Golden Globes.

  2. Kristie - NZ says...

    General feels – snore.

  3. Kim says...

    My favorite moment was actually all of Ricky Gervais! Whether drunk or not, prepared or not, he expressed exactly what probably at least 50% of Americans feel about Hollywood and the over abundance of self righteousness that abounds there. At these awards shows wer are “celebrating” (aka: stroking egos) for a job well done in a movie– a movie for goodness sake. A movie that most of them made obscene amounts of money for doing. Many of us don’t share their world view nor do we care about their politics. They sure don’t care about my politics. Best hypocritical thing I read, the globes went totally vegan because of you know, climate change, but they flew flowers in on jets from Italy and Ecuador. Yeah– very committed to the causes they constantly preach about to us lowly peasants. Meanwhile, I slog my way to work at 6 AM every morning to fight big corrupt health insurance companies so little babies and children can receive much needed therapy for special needs. Where is my award show with imported flowers?

    • Roxana says...

      I will give you an award, Kim! My youngest son has Down syndrome and we desperately need people like you! Despite his diagnosis I’ve spent HOURS on the phone with insurance for approving therapy. He is thankfully very healthy, but I (and other parents in our community) spend an obscene amount of time fighting for support that should be given automatically (I mean, why do we pay premiums??). You deserve flowers from all over the world and so much more! Thank you for doing what you do!

    • CathyMA says...

      Thank you Kim! The hypocrisy by Hollywood is astounding. How rich that Stella McCartney sang the praises of Joaquin Phoenix because he will wear the same tux (hers) to this season ‘s awards? HA! My Dad and my husband, who both live in the REAL world, have worn the same suits for years! How completely out of touch. And they actually believe we want advice from them on how to live.

  4. Jen says...

    Sorry Hot Priest lovers, but all I see is James Moriarty from Sherlock. Major cringe.

    • Same here. <>

  5. Brady says...

    I don’t think I’ll ever be tired of talking about Fleabag to be honest.

  6. lynn mckoy says...

    I was looking for Black nominees and winners like a set of car keys. I can’t believe so many shows and actors of color were overlooked. #goldenglobessowhite.

  7. Anne Marie Moullo says...

    There was only one moment that I liked about the Golden Globes. The moment was when Michele Williams acceptance speech. I hope more women do vote in the next election. Other than that it was one big bore. If Ricky Gervais hates hosting this why did he do it? He is not even funny. Embarrassing is more like it.

    • Ann says...

      Perphaps you do not understand his humour, might I suggest you look at his incredible back catalogue there is quite a variety from Derek, Afterlife, Extras and of course the original Office, and his stand up is second to none.

  8. Anon says...

    I do not like watching award shows anymore because I hate listening to celebrities lecture people about how things should be when they live lives that are so out of touch with reality. Not to completely generalize, but they literally have NO IDEA what goes on in normal America most of the time, so for them to discuss issues when they’re wearing millions of dollars of clothing, flying private jets, having private chefs, having the help of many, many hands and more makes me give them a giant eye roll.

    • Lynn says...

      I’m with you. They, for the most part, are quite out of touch with how us seemingly normal people live. I thought Patricia Arquette was disgusting to look at, those enormous fake boobs sprawling out of her dress, so tasteless and tacky. I like seeing what everyone is wearing, I like seeing who wins, but I could do without their “preaching “.

    • Katie says...

      Please be kinder with your words. It is hurtful and cruel to say that someone is ‘disgusting to look at’.

    • Ali says...

      So true, which is why I thought Ricky Gervais was fantastic, although slightly ironic given he is also a rich celebrity :-)

  9. Rusty says...

    Australia is burning!!!
    For real!
    (Heidi said it was a latch onto cute animals…) Crikey!!! 😖
    Hundreds….of millions….of wildlife is dead! D E A D !

    This is not some Hollywood buzzed up show. This country is on fire! Scores of people are dead, scores missing, and thousands of homes and businesses lost!

    Every time I put the TV on, I’m reduced to tears, mostly because of the old growth forest loss, the habitat that is the only thing that might possibly save some species from extinction!

    Yes, the floods in Jakarta, Indonesia are awful too. The difference is, Jakarta expects to get heavy monsoon rain this time of year (as does northern Australia as Indonesia’s near neghbour), but Australia does not expect to lose over 5 million hectares of forest, entire towns, agricultural land (Australia feeds much of South East Asia), and on the list goes.

    Cute animals? Yes.
    Immeasurable suffering of so many more animals who were unable to escape man-made fences…you bet! Piles of farm and wild animals piled up along fence lines where they burned to death in absolute agony!

    Thousands of people being evacuated onto naval vessels because there’s nowhere and nothing to return to.

    Thousands of VOLUNTEER fire fighters (only those in cities as full time fire fighters get paid in Australia), the rest leave work and pay, to fight the fires for free…and several have been killed in the process, leaving young children and families behind.

    Please….lift your head above the sand and see what’s really happening to our planet. This is serious! It’s not glib shots of “cute animals.” That comment truly made my gut heave.

    Right now, it’s Australia… who’s next??!?

    This planet is our only home. We’re killing it.

    Whiskey Tango Foxtrot!!!!

    Gah!@ignorance. 😥

    • Elia says...

      <3
      Thank you.

  10. I had no idea what the raft meant….haha…thought I had to checkout the Revenant again….well done on article you crushed it. good stuff

  11. Anna says...

    So many interesting well-informed comments and I am just here to say Hooooot Prieeeeeest!

  12. claire says...

    Long live Ricky Gervais

  13. Daisy says...

    I didn’t watch, but read about Ricky Cervais speech in the paper. While funny at first glance, I really think it was deliberately done to draw back the viewers they lost over the years thanks to their own social and political speeches.

    Less viewership = less advertising money.

    It’s all “Do As I Say, Don’t Do As I Do” in Hollywood and those actors passionate about some good cause usually get paid for it.

    There’s not one celebrity that actually donates his/her time for free to any cause.

    And then having to look and listen to the hypocrite Eco Warriors )like DiCaprio) that flew in 114 private jets to the Google Climate Conference in Milan last year, I just know I’m being taken for a “ride.”

    So I spend my time with my “ordinary” family and 2 cats and had a great time!

    • Tina Crisas says...

      Yes! I completely agree with you regarding Ricky Gervais! His speech wasn’t an impromptu one, this takes serious planning, screening and editing by a team of people! And what do you know? EVERYONE is talking about it, exactly what they wanted.

      However, I was rooting for the part when he said: “Apple roared into the TV game with The Morning Show, a superb drama about the importance of dignity and doing the right thing, made by a company that runs sweatshops in China.”

    • jules says...

      EXACTLY what I kept saying when my husband made me watch the beginning. They wouldn’t let him say that unless they wanted him too. And the whole audience is full of actors… acting surprised.

  14. Anonny says...

    Well I always feel guilty for spending my time watching what is literally a fancy work party for millionaires but I can’t help myself – I love the clothes and the vicarious glamour to feed my lack of. So it’s a guilty pleasure.

    • Anonny says...

      I mean Billy Porter’s fashion sense is perfection – and I am a straight white woman lol. But he has the most sublime androgynous style and I adore it.

      The politics add spice as far as I’m concerned. I love hearing what people think. And I enjoyed Ricky Gervais because his timing is perfectly calibrated to deliver biting commentary and unbelievably he pulls it off – he excels on the edge and it’s entertaining to watch.

    • Anonygirl says...

      I don’t think we should feel guilty about watching a few award shows every year. We all need a break from the 24/7 news cycle. I know that we’re experiencing a global crisis on many levels, but a three hour break from all of that on a Sunday evening is well-earned for many people.

  15. Kay says...

    Ramy Youssef winning the Best Actor in a Comedy becoming the first Muslim and Arab to win it! But even more than that I loved how he said Allahu Akbar (Arabic for God is great). Thanks to media, that phrase has become synonymous with terrorism, fear, hate and Islamophobia rather than the love, glory, and humility felt when uttered by Muslims. Hopefully hearing these phrases will normalize it or at least quell the fears that some feel when they hear it.

    • Mona says...

      My thoughts exactly! I’m from Egypt and find it so heartbreaking that I can’t say a phrase that comes from a place of love and awe of the beauty of creation for example when I speak to someone on the phone on the bus because someone sitting next to me might think I’m preparing mass murder.. allahu akbar is a beautiful phrase and I’m feeling empowered to reclaim it now.

  16. Beth says...

    Thank you for mentioning the Australian bushfires.
    These fires have ravished our beautiful country destroying 15 million acres and have killed over half a billion animals including threatening the koala species. These are the largest bushfires the world has even seen and frighteningly it is only the beginning of the fire season with many hot days likely to come in February.
    The hot dry climate has significantly contributed to these and it’s a reminder to the world about the rising climate.

  17. caitlin says...

    Wait, who’s tired of talking about Fleabag?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Hahaha

    • MJ says...

      Not me.

    • Elliesee says...

      I am not tired of Fleabag, and also loved Crashing on Netflix! I wish Schitt’s Creek gets more wins as my new, cannot keep rewatching show.

  18. Meg says...

    Courtney, you shared what so many women feel about our write to choose so eloquently. Bravo and thank you!

  19. Martha Patterson says...

    I watched about an hour..but honestly at least half the shows and people I hadn’t heard of…and how could “Little Women” and “When They See Us” not get nominated for anything? Ridiculous.

    Tom Hanks and Ellen Degeneres’ tributes were well earned, but yeah, the self congratulatory and tipsy speeches don’t hold my interest.

  20. anon says...

    I can’t watch any of the awards shows anymore. It’s been a few years. Amidst all the “I know better than you political/social speeches” and the outrageous show of money in terms of themselves, the clothes that are on loan to them, etc. It’s just hard to watch. How about you dial these back greatly and use that money saved to actually go towards something much more productive and useful? I get it, the gowns are pretty to look at, but not enough for me to give them and the advertisers my energies.

    • Amy says...

      THIS.

    • Melissa says...

      But these shows do employ thousands and thousands of real people. People that need this work every year. Hollywood is a business. Fashion is a business. Advertising is a business (which pays my bills and I am thankful for).

  21. Debbie says...

    I loved the comment from Gervais because if you are liberal or conservative. Hollywood doesn’t understand the “normal” American and American family–completely out of touch. I am realizing that more and more–having a platform just isn’t enough anymore.

  22. Allison says...

    Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s Obama comment was the highlight of the night for me. I snorted wine through my nose when she said it, but it was well worth it.

    • Lauren S says...

      Agreed!!

    • Lindsay says...

      Yes, so true! Her timing is perfect.

  23. Miggy says...

    I love Ricky Gervais, and usually would have laughed along, but this year, after all we’ve been through as a country the last couple of years, and this last week (!) I’m all for kindness. I just want people to be kind to each other. I don’t want snarkiness and insults. Last night I wanted to celebrate the actors, who do work hard, to bring us the entertainment that we all want and enjoy, and talk about so much on this blog! To say they don’t have the right to champion issues that are dear to them, just because they’re rich is ridiculous. As a vegan, I particularly loved Joaquin Phoenix’s shout out about the meat industry.

    • Nigerian Girl says...

      Hear hear.

    • Ann says...

      Thank you Miggy, I fully agree with you. I do not like blanket judgments. Ricky Gervais’ shot at Apple was spot on, the rest was too personal in my opinion. Some actors are definitely out of touch, others maybe not (or we just don’t really know). In any case, even if they just raise their voice for much-needed causes like respect for women (especially in the movie industry) or climate disasters then it is a good start in my opinion. It is up to everyone to do his/her part when it comes to the challenges that the world is facing and we all have our contradictions and comfort zones. Let’s be kind to each others and to ourselves too!

    • Erin says...

      I agree! At the end of the day these people work very hard to make these movies, show, etc. It’s a show to celebrate their hard work, if you don’t want to watch, then don’t.

      I wouldn’t storm into an Awards Night at the end of a Real Estate Convention saying- “you people think you’re so great, selling real estate”.

      Just let people live.

  24. Jessica Camerata says...

    I loved that navy sequin ballgown. And ellen’s speech was my favorite!

    xo Jessica

  25. Hilary says...

    My favorite moment was when Stellan Skarsgård joked about being unrecognizable and never winning awards because he has no eyebrows and then pointed out he wore prosthetic eyebrows in Chernobyl and then (raises award). Totally deserved more applause!

    Also i was thrilled to see Rami, Awkwafina, and Succession win.

  26. Joy says...

    I thought you were married!
    ??

    • CS says...

      Caroline wrote this article, not Joanna. I am guessing that’s where the confusion stems? :)

  27. Rosie says...

    I cannot believe you didn’t mention Kate McKinnon’s introduction of Ellen Degeneres. I was in tears! It was beautiful. Then they did the montage to Fight Song (RIP) and I sobbed all over again.

    • Jenny says...

      Agree! Such a strong moment full of love and big queer energy

    • Claire says...

      Agreed! That was by far my favorite part of the night. I loved how she pulled her list out of her jacket’s lapel and read a laundry list of 1/2 profound, 1/2 clothing things she loved about Ellen. And then at the end she told a room of people she was also part of the LGBT community and… everyone still loved her. What a perfect intro to Ellen! (As an aside, I was confused that Charlize introduced Tom… I didn’t realize they were friends?)

  28. Laura Greenwood says...

    I like Brian Cox’s blue glasses.

  29. Jess says...

    I liked Renee Zellweger pointedly thanking the FPA and people in power in the business, for inviting her ‘to the reunion’ after 15 years. She made the point more than once, and good for her. She’s an excellent actress with many major awards but when she reached her late 30s, she wasn’t appearing in many films anymore. I’m glad she’s back.

  30. Alice says...

    I love Olivia but her habit of getting a little bit drunk and saying she didn’t expect to win is such a trope by now that Cecily Strong lampooned it on SNL. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXm2y4KD6fk

  31. Kim says...

    Oh gosh, I totally disagree with the assessment of the Brad Pitt joke. The “I’d have shared the raft” was maybe the one-liner of the night for me! I mean, he delivered it in his dry way, and sure, half the people didn’t get it, but I thought it was hilarious.

    • lexi says...

      Agree!

    • Danielle says...

      Agreed! I don’t think we’re alone, though. I think it was generally well received. Though I, too, did immediately ask myself if it was a raft! Ha!

    • Steph says...

      Samesies! I literally laughed out loud when he said it. It needed to be said after all these years!

    • Martha Patterson says...

      Gotta say, sobriety looks good on him!

  32. Kristen says...

    As someone who is slightly interested but will never find the time to watch these shows, I really appreciate this re-cap! So much better than reading an email that comes with only a best-dressed list. Keep it up for the Oscars, please! Also – happy to have Cup of Jo back.

  33. Nigerian Girl says...

    Chris Evans. That.is.all.

    Happy New Year, Cup of Jo. Missed you guys plenty.

    • Nigerian Girl says...

      Also, I really, really wanted Jennifer Lopez to win. She was exceptional in Hustlers. Such a powerful performance. I’m still holding out for the Oscars. It’s not over till it’s over, as the old saying goes.

      I’m happy Parasite won. Very well-deserved. It’s the best movie I saw last year.

      As for Gervais, his jokes fell flat for me this time. It’s a classic case of what we call “See Finish” in Nigerian Pidgin, which loosely means (in this context) I’m so used to his jokes that they don’t amuse me anymore. Yes, I know Hollywood actors are highly privileged and supposedly out of touch with the ‘real world’ blah blah blah. But politics and sentiments aside, movie award ceremonies, in essence, are a celebration of the arts and I’m all for that. Little moments like these offer some respite in this capricious world.

    • I came here for this comment. YES.

  34. J says...

    I really think that after all the transphobic comments Gervais has made over the years, along with his behaviour after activists have repeatedly tried to educate him, he should have sat this one out. Especially if he is wary of other’s politics.

    • Jules says...

      To be fair, he did make this point himself in his opening lines.

  35. Joaquina says...

    Just a shout out for the Golden Globes offering a vegan menu.
    Joaquin Phoenix said, “this is the first time I’ve ever (been able to have) eaten the food at his ceremony. . .agriculture if the third leading cause of climate change”.
    This is really progressive for us vegans and activists albeit not much to do with this post’s exact topic.

    • lauren says...

      That impressed and pleased me as well.

  36. jenn says...

    Me too! I thought he was great.

  37. liz says...

    I did not have the time to watch it last night, but I loved this recap!

  38. Ellie says...

    I mostly just impressed that your boyfriend was sewing buttons on the duvet cover.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      hahaha

    • lydia says...

      i thought the same thing when i read that hahaha

  39. Edith says...

    I was dismayed by Michelle Williams’ comment, but at least she was truthful about valuing career over offspring. Once again, Hollywood is out-of-touch with many Americans who don’t believe career and motherhood are incompatible.

    • lemonade says...

      Michelle William is a mother (and currently pregnant), so its a stretch to say that she believes motherhood and career are incompatible, or that people who support the right to choose believe that. A recent poll showed that, while there is nuance, only 13% of Americans think Roe v. Wade should be overturned. By that metric, Michelle’s comments are in keeping with the majority of Americans’ opinions on the legality of abortion.

      Here is the poll if you’re interested in the results: https://www.npr.org/2019/06/07/730183531/poll-majority-want-to-keep-abortion-legal-but-they-also-want-restrictions

    • Courtney says...

      What I took from her speech is that it is important to preserve women’s right to choose, whether or not it is something you would exercise yourself. There are many of us in this country who are not Christian or who are Christian and believe that women should have control over their pregnancies and their bodies and that respect for human life co-exists with women’s reproductive autonomy. That does not mean that we lack respect for those religious beliefs but rather than we do not want those beliefs legislated and forced upon us. Indeed, the idea that the rights of a fetus should automatically take precedence over the rights of the mother, turning women into mere vessels for childbirth is for many women (and men) abhorrent and terrifying. The fact that many of our legislators (and citizens) continually legislate (or vote based on) anti-abortion policies that fly in the face of established Supreme Court precedent, are rooted in conservative Christian religious beliefs and morals not shared by all Americans and are justified by incorrect statistics about the availability and prevalence of abortion (especially late term abortion) is perhaps the greatest threat to freedom of religion in this country and to the idea that women should enjoy the same freedoms as men and equal protection under the law. The implications of these laws are astounding – they necessarily contemplate that women could and should be be jailed or placed under supervision to ensure that their pregnancy is taken to term or charged with murder for attempting even an early term abortion and also prevent medical professionals from doing their job based on science rather than religion. Moreover, these laws disproportionately impact women of color and women in lower income brackets who are more likely to be policed for their decisions or who may not be able to afford to travel to a state where reproductive freedom still exists. In order to truly maintain freedom of religion we cannot simply legislate one set of religious beliefs – there must be room in the law for those who want to exercise their freedom of choice and control over their own reproductive rights to do so.

    • Jess says...

      That was not her comment at all. Not even a little bit. It wasn’t about her ‘career.’ It was about knowing and deciding for herself – because each woman knows herself best – when she can/can’t be a good parent, given life’s circumstances. She never, ever, ever even hinted at valuing her career over offspring.

    • julia says...

      A woman’s right to choose is not anti-motherhood or anti-baby.

    • Sara says...

      You missed the whole point. Having the right to choose is good for all women and families. It’s a PERSONAL choice full stop. No one has the right to make that decision for you.

    • Jessica says...

      Courtney, you’re comment was a pleasure to read. So articulate and respectfully delivered, while perfectly summarizing how abhorrent anti-abortion policies are. I wish more conservative minded people would give consideration to your points.

    • Roxana says...

      Thank you, Edith. I agree completely. I don’t think you misinterpreted her words, at all.

    • Roxana says...

      Courtney, I hear what you’re saying, but I think you’ve mis-characterized a few things. First, Edith didn’t say anything about being a Christian, so I’m not sure why you went there in your defense of a right to choose. You assume quite a bit. There are plenty of strong arguments against abortion that have nothing to do with Christianity and everything to do with science (these arguments, of course, assume that the taking of a life is wrong). Either way, I think it’s safe to say that the moral prohibition against taking a life is hardly unique to Christianity.

      That aside, I’d like to address what you say and in particular what a Christian viewpoint is on this (I identify as a pro-life Christian). You say that “. . .the idea that the rights of a fetus should automatically take precedence over the rights of the mother, turning women into mere vessels for childbirth is for many women (and men) abhorrent and terrifying.” As a pro-life Christian I think I can safely say that very many of us do not see abortion as an issue that puts the life of the baby over the life of the mother. Women are not merely vessels for childbirth. We don’t see it this way, because it isn’t this way and it shouldn’t be. Indeed, a Christian should argue that the life of the mother and the life of the baby are of equal importance. We believe this because God loves all people equally and that Christ died to save all. The Bible states that all people are created in His image and are of divine importance (regardless of size, race, age, gender, orientation, etc. I mean, I shouldn’t even qualify it, but I did). Anyway, there are many of us who are working really hard to address this issue and to address it in a holistic way where women’s lives are truly valued and where a baby’s life is truly valued. . . where women truly have a right to choose (and as an aside, you are right that abortion affects lower income women and women of color more than others). Statistics show (and unfortunately, I’m not in a position to site any as I write this, but I know that they do exist) that many women (a majority, I believe) would prefer not to have an abortion but do so because they don’t feel that they have a choice (e.g. lack of resources, support, etc.). I live in the Chicago-land area and work with several organizations that truly work to give a woman a true choice. When women feel and receive true holistic support, they don’t choose abortion. The women we serve do sometimes choose to end their pregnancies, and they still come to us and we still welcome them and love on them. We do not villifey any woman who finds herself in an unplanned pregnancy, even if she does choose to end her pregnancy. Personally, I think it is a tragic choice, and I do think it’s the taking of a life, but the Bible tells me to love her and support her in a God honoring way, regardless of her choice. Anyway, I think we need to acknowledge that the choice to abort is very often made because of systemic problems and because women in unplanned pregnancies are often victims themselves, but perhaps that’s another topic.

      That said, there are plenty of women who *could* have a baby (i.e. they have the means and resources and support?), but choose not to. . . because?? Insert a multitude of “reasons.” I personally really struggle with these scenarios, and find them difficult to understand and accept. I’d be lying if I said otherwise. I do think that Michele Williams probably falls into this category as she grew-up as the daughter of a multi-millionaire and has spoken of being financially secure in articles that I’ve read about her. Admittedly, though, it’s always hard/dangerous to judge, isn’t it?

      Anyway, the other issue you raise, which I find troubling, is that women often try to equate their freedoms with that of men’s and vice versa. You reference “that women should enjoy the same freedoms as men and equal protection under the law,” and while I agree entirely with the spirit of this, how does it apply to this specific issue? Especially with bodily autonomy? It gets really tricky. Women and men are NOT the same. A man does not have a uterus. Men cannot bear life in their wombs (I hope it’s obvious that I’m shelving transgenderism when making this argument). I mean the differences between men and women (from multiple angles) have been thoroughly quantified. If we’re going to legislate (or not legislate) certain things for either gender then let’s first address the differences and the root problems. Let’s first address better paid family leave, let’s address equal pay, let’s address better health care (all around), let’s address education, let’s address abuse, let’s address housing, let’s address all these things that could potentially lead to a woman believing she needs to end her pregnancy in order to live her life to the fullest. Let’s really empower a woman to experience as many facets of her femininity (e.g. child-bearing and rearing) so that she doesn’t feel that ending the life of her unborn child is necessary. I mean, women are strong. Women can do incredibly hard things. Women can have children and finish college and get graduate degrees and have enormous careers. To be clear, motherhood is, admittedly, one element of our multi-faceted identities (and yes, there are plenty of women who choose to be childless), but when Michelle Williams essentially states that she chose to end the life of her baby because she was pursuing her career, is that not a tough pill to swallow? I don’t know how to hear her words as other than “I ended a life, so that I could do what I wanted to do.” That is a profoundly dangerous ethic to accept. I would encourage anyone reading to flesh it out. Don’t you think we should try to do better? Abortion is the ending of a life (whatever you want to call that life, a fetus, a glob of cells, etc. we know what the end result would be), so shouldn’t we strive for a world where no life has to be ended or no dream be shelved? I think we can all do better.

      Sorry for this epic comment. I hope I’ve helped provide some perspective on this. I’m sure I’ve said things that might not make sense or are confusing, so thanks for your patience and grace.

    • J Alexander says...

      I wanted to speak to Courtney’s comment. Christianity is not the only religion that does not support abortion. A brief time spent researching a number of the world’s major religions would reveal pro life views of varying degrees. Since Christianity was singled out in your comment, I will speak to that religion specifically. I would also like to note that your comment regarding a medical professional making decisions “based on science rather than religion….” is offensive as you seem to be insinuating that anyone with a prolife stance couldn’t possibly be using science or reason to form their beliefs.
      The American Academy of Pedeatricians states:
      “The American College of Pediatricians concurs with the body of scientific evidence that corroborates that a unique human life starts when the sperm and egg bind to each other in a process of fusion of their respective membranes and a single hybrid cell called a zygote, or one-cell embryo, is created.

      “As physicians dedicated both to scientific truth and to the Hippocratic tradition, the College values all human lives equally from the moment of conception (fertilization) until natural death. Consistent with its mission to “enable all children to reach their optimal physical and emotional health and well-being,” the College, therefore, opposes active measures that would prematurely end the life of any child at any stage of development from conception to natural death.”

      My hope is that someday the value placed on a human life will not be based on its convenience or its geographical location, whether the child lives in Africa, China, America, or inside of a womb. Judeo-Christian writing offers an important principle known by the ancients as “Imago Dei”. It is the belief that each individual is made in the image of God, regardless of location, status, wealth, achievement or social standing. This truth holds the key to the conviction that Christians stand on when they champion the cause for this particular area of human rights. The children’s book, “Horton Hears a Who” is a favorite of many, and we all love to cheer for the courageous Horton who stands up for and protects the lives of the “Whos” that live on the tiny spec of dust that he stumbles upon. Horton declares: “A person’s a person no matter how small.” And we all agree. And we all root for Horton and for his cause to fight for those too tiny and marginalized to fight for themselves. The unseen “Whos” on the life bearing spec of dust are certainly dependent on Horton for their survival, but their dependence and helplessness doesn’t take away their worth as living creatures, and it doesn’t make Horton any less of a hero for fighting to protect them, if anything, it makes him all the more valiant.

    • Aideen says...

      Courtney, Thank you for expressing so neutrally, respectfully and matter of fact-ly, what many of us believe.

    • Julie says...

      “That said, there are plenty of women who *could* have a baby (i.e. they have the means and resources and support?), but choose not to. . . because?? Insert a multitude of “reasons.” I personally really struggle with these scenarios, and find them difficult to understand and accept. I’d be lying if I said otherwise. ”

      Roxana, I’ll give you a few “reasons”:
      They don’t want children.
      They don’t want children.
      They. Don’t. WANT. CHILDREN.

    • Edith says...

      Respectfully, Jo, there’s a literal chasm of differences between choosing not to have a child and choosing to have an abortion. One is preventative, the other is not.

    • Roxana says...

      Julie, maybe it’s obvious and maybe you’d have the same response, but I was referring to women who become pregnant and then choose to terminate. In which case, I still don’t understand it. If you don’t want children, then don’t become pregnant.

      If you don’t want children, but are sexually active and find yourself pregnant, then you made your “choice” when you had sex. Abortion is not birth control.

    • Angela says...

      Nope. Choosing to have sex is not choosing to have a child.

    • Courtney says...

      Thank you for both the support and discourse on my comment. This follow up is unlikely to be seen but I do want to expand on a few things: (1) My comment focused on the fact (and it is a fact) that conservative Christian views (and politicians) dominate the American pro-life discourse and the attempts to enact stringent anti-abortion laws. And when I say stringent laws I mean heartbeat laws that essentially outlaw all abortion, and may not even have exceptions for rape, incest or maternal health. So although Edith did not say anything about being a Christian, leaving out the impact of conservative Christian politicians, lobbies and voters in a discussion of reproductive choice in the United States would miss the mark. I do not believe that all Christians are pro-life or that all pro-life people (Christian or otherwise) advocate for eliminating the right to choose. Indeed, another commenter pointed to a poll that said the majority of Americans (which in this overwhelmingly Christian country would necessarily include Christians and people who hold pro-life views) do not want Roe v. Wade overturned. Yet 200+ members of Congress are seeking to do it anyway. (2) It is disturbing that the American College of Pediatrics is quoted here (or anywhere) as a reliable source for medical information The American College of Pediatrics (ACP) is a group of doctors that split off from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) after the AAP endorsed such “liberal” policies as support for adoption by same sex couples and legal abortion. The ACP is a hate group that specifically espouses a pro-life and anti-LGBTQ agenda. The ACP actively spreads anti-LGBTQ propaganda, including (a) that “reparative therapy” (ie reorietenation therapy) is good for LGBTQ youth, (b) same sex couples are bad parents, and (c) transgender youth should not be affirmed. The ACP also uses fear tactics regarding late term abortion to support its agenda. (3) I applaud the commenter who wishes to fix systemic issues that might cause women to choose abortion over childbirth. The lack of support for pregnant women and mothers (whether it is economic support, childcare, medical resources) is appalling. However, even if it were a perfect system the fact still remains that a baby cannot survive outside of a mother’s womb until about 24 weeks. And a baby born that early is likely to require intensive medical care both as an infant and potentially throughout life. This is not meant to be a commentary to on premature birth, differently abled people or what it means for a baby to be “viable.” Rather, I am trying to emphasize that there is no way to separate the woman from the pregnancy. Even if you believe life begins at conception, a women needs to carry that life for at least 5 to 6 months for the baby to survive. Outlawing abortion, or restricting it so greatly that it is in effect unavailable means that women could be (and have been) forced to be a vessel for a pregnancy they may not want or may not have intended. I find the idea of forcing a woman who became pregnant after a one night stand to carry that pregnancy to term as abhorrent as forcing a woman who was raped to carry that baby to term. Regardless of circumstances, a woman should be able to easily and quickly terminate an unwanted or unsafe pregnancy without interference or shame. Conversely, I also hope that there is medical, emotional, financial and physical support for any woman who does want to carry a baby to term, regardless of the circumstances of conception. (4) Women may be biologically different than men, but that does not mean that women should be subjugated to childbirth or subject to morality laws that are not applied to men. Respect for life should co-exist with reproductive autonomy. Removing choice means that women can and will be punished, restricted or incarcerated for the simple act of having unprotected sex, unwanted sex or for using ineffective birth control. Men, however, are treated as passive participants and face little to no fear of reprisal.

  40. Kells Diviney says...

    I adored Ricky Gervais’s speech. Good for him for calling out the lack of minority representation in nominees – which resulted in the complete absence of black and latinx winners. I felt like he was more begging off Hollywood hypocrisy (e.g. “woke” shows that stream on platforms run by companies that don’t pay taxes and have an abysmal human rights/labor record.

    • Heidi says...

      I couldn’t agree with you more, Kells. His comment that if ISIS started a streaming service, actors would call their agents, felt really spot on to me. There is so much hypocrisy in Hollywood; certain celebrities who repost about Australia on Instagram (yet stay silent on disasters in developing nations like the current devastating floods in Indonesia… probably since there aren’t any cute animals dying to latch on to) but gladly partner with corporations… I find it ironic, for example, that Ilana Glazer just released a standup special called ‘The Planet is Burning’ on Amazon Prime, of all platforms. I understand some people are just trying to promote their brand, but compliance in the face of injustice is itself, injustice.

    • Amy says...

      I 100% agree with the lack of minority representation–there is still lots of work to do. We can also nitpick to death all the true and/or presumed hypocrisy of celebrities and “coastal elites” down to what cars are parked in their driveways and who they stump for in elections. But this telling famous people to shut up and “stay in their lane” when they talk politics or are bombarded with what-about-isms is getting old. Ricky Gervais’ essentially boiled down to a compilation of millions of Instagram comments when a female celebrity expresses any opinion whatsoever. Actors are also citizens, and they have a right to express whatever political views they want and support whatever causes are dear to them. Not all of them grew up in Hollywood families with a silver spoon in their mouths. How many of them would have loved to have universal healthcare when they were waiting tables and living hand to mouth before their big break? They are still human, and like the rest of us, do not have the emotional or physical bandwith to carry the torch for every single issue out there.

    • Emily says...

      I love Ricky as a host. Towards the end I felt it went too long in between him being back on stage. He and I have a very similar sense of humor, and you really can’t take it all too seriously.

      But he did speak a lot of truth to minority and women representation.

    • Kimberley says...

      Agreed. Also as Brits, we debated in our house whether everyone would understand Ricky Gervais’ humour…it appears not! hehehe x

  41. Janet says...

    Caroline, you could rock a pixie!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i agree!

  42. Shannon Marvin says...

    How could you forget Michelle Williams’ speech on the right to choose/women’s power as a voting block? That was my highlight of the whole deal, but certainly would have included in the roundup of political speeches.

    • Caroline Donofrio says...

      Completely agree with you, and we did include it! It’s actually listed with the other political speeches.

    • Shannon Marvin says...

      whoops my bad! Thanks for the reply!

  43. S says...

    Quick edit note if I may: under the “Best Joke that Made a Really Great Point” paragraph, it should say
    “so his *interpreter* could deliver the message”

    Translators work with *written* text, interpreters work with *spoken* word.
    Most everyone doesn’t know this difference, but it really matters! :)

    • Caroline Donofrio says...

      Thank you for pointing that out! We’ve edited accordingly. :)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that’s so interesting, S! I didn’t know that!

    • Anonygirl says...

      This makes sense. There aren’t sign language translators. There are interpreters.

      Side note: has anyone ever seen an interpreter at an awards show?

  44. Michelle says...

    I didn’t watch the show. I never do. I heard about the Ricky Gervais speech an absolutely agree with him. I’m a registered democrat. Actors aren’t some evolved species and they aren’t more important than teachers, doctors and nurses. Take your award, say thank you and go.

    • Leslie says...

      Here here!!!!!!!!

    • Tari says...

      I agree.

    • becky says...

      That sounds like it would get old real fast. It not just about the winners but how the winners use the time when they are up there. It’s the unpredictable. It’s a chance to actually see them as a person. One person may be passionate about global warming another about womens rights. Someone else about poverty animal neglect you name it. If they keep it short and sweet why not? As for Gervais, the show would have been great without a host. His act is getting old.

    • El says...

      Professor here– I use my much smaller platform to engage students in pressing political issues all the time. Seems like that’s scalable and actors do it at awards shows all the time. I loved hearing Michelle Williams speak up in defense of women’s access to abortion. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    • Margaret says...

      Also didn’t watch the show and never do, mainly because I’m not interested in these awards. But I disagree with the idea that actors should restrict themselves to thanking their parents and agents. There’s no reason they shouldn’t use the platform to talk about their political opinions. FYI, I’m a teacher. Hearing a celebrity make a political statement does not make me feel less-than or disregarded.

    • Ana D says...

      They aren’t less important either. Using their voices and platform doesn’t necessarily diminish or quiet the voices of others.

    • Rosie says...

      I don’t think they think they’re more important than teachers or think they’re more evolved. I think the one’s who get on stage and choose to talk about politics or the environment are aware they have a very large platform for a good minute and it is better spent saying something important to draw attention to an important issue than thanking a bunch of people who already know they’re appreciated!

    • Emily says...

      I know many people feel celebrities should just shut up and act, but I don’t agree. It’s more than just having a platform. Many celebrities are activists and take their time and money and put it towards the things they are passionate about. They start important non profits and charities. I think those celebrities especially have every right to speak up! Having said that, I love how J Phoenix called out the environmentalist jet setters…….. very true.

    • cg says...

      Amen to that! ^^^^^^^^

  45. Ricky Gervais’ speech was the best — calling out all the celebrity elitists for their hypocrisy. I loved it!

    • laetitia says...

      I agree, I loved it!! Best part IMO!

  46. Liz says...

    Ricky Gervais was the best thing about that show.

  47. KC says...

    What about Awkwafina making history as the first Asian American to win that award?

    • A.B. says...

      AMEN!! WHY WAS THIS NOT INCLUDED??!!

    • Caroline Donofrio says...

      Thank you for your comments! We love Awkwafina and The Farewell and were thrilled when she won the award. Our round-up posts cover made-up awards (vs. being a recap of the actual winners) which is the only reason it wasn’t included. But we could not be more excited about this historic and well-deserved win!

  48. Annie says...

    Kate McKinnon’s tribute to Ellen and Ellen’s acceptance speech both had me in tears. It’s so easy to get caught up in the ‘actual globe in crisis,’ and this was a welcome reminder of how far we’ve come, and how lucky we are to have the comedy and heart of these two souls and countless LGBTQIA others on our screens.

    • celeste says...

      My 10 year old son was sitting next to me during that tribute. I’ve spoken with my older daughter about LGBTQ issues, but explained it to him for the first time.
      Son: “Is she joking about thanking her husband Steve?”
      Me: “Yes. When they say the word ‘gay’ they mean she loves a woman and has a wife. See that blonde lady there, that’s her wife.”
      Son: “OK”
      Cue the tears. My parents never explained.

    • Claire says...

      Agreed! There’s so much wrong about our current world, but Ellen has made such a profound, noticeable different in her lifetime.

  49. Ana says...

    I really like Ricky Gervais, but it really seemed like he didn’t want to be there. Normally when he does Painful and awkward, it’s funny. I’m bummed that this time it was just plain painful…

  50. Lauren E. says...

    I didn’t realize I’d be in the minority, but I LOVED Ricky Gervais’s opening monologue. When you really think about it, these award shows are just a big group of rich, out of touch people congratulating each other. Maybe it’s because I work on the periphery of this industry, but I just think it’s absurd how all-important people within entertainment think they are. Ricky Gervais pokes relentless fun at them and I, for one, reveled in it.

    • Riley says...

      Yes!! I totally agree. I LOVED it.

    • ACS says...

      Agree with this. I thought Gervais was hilarious. He wasn’t telling the crowd to only care about Hollywood and not care about the world in crisis–he was just telling them that no one wants to be lectured at by wealthy people who are mega-privileged, fly around in private jets, live in giant homes, and face little of the type of hardship regular people do. Which is 100% correct!

    • Emily says...

      100% agree! It was amazing.

    • Leslie says...

      100% well said!

    • K says...

      I agree with you as well. Honestly, if they believed it would be callous to celebrate Golden Globes while the actual globe is in crisis, they could have cancelled the ceremony and donated the money spent on it. The vast majority of the people who received an award are not under-appreciated and have plenty of other opportunities to be celebrated.

      It struck me as very narcissistic rather than defiant that they believe they should use acceptance speeches to moralize. And I agree with almost everything they advocated for!

    • E. says...

      100% agree–I love how he just *goes for it*, blowback be damned. So few entertainers do that anymore.

    • CS says...

      I didn’t watch the Awards, and I really like Gervais. So the comment I am about to make might be way off. However, I disagree that entertainers shouldn’t express political views during their speeches. Why? Because they are helping raise awareness and generating dialogue. I admire when someone takes that opportunity to focus on a cause, rather than on themselves. And as far as hypocrisy goes, while I am sure that there are some big and ugly examples of that, I am not quick to judge most people. At least they are trying! No one is perfect, I am an “environmentalist” who does all sorts of environmentally irresponsible things each day (eg: I drive to work, and the list goes on). But at least I am trying to do some things right. If we demand people choose between perfection or nothing, most people will have to go with nothing. Who can be perfect? We are all caught up in this cultural current that has us consuming more than we should, driving more than we should, using more plastic than we’d like… I say do what you can! A little is infinitely better than nothing! And if you have the platform, and you want to raise awareness and get people talking… BRAVO!

    • Denise says...

      I didn’t watch the GG, but have read recaps here and at another site I adore, “Go Fug Yourself”.

      I wanted to chime in here on the idea that the awards shows should be cancelled and the money that is spent to pull them off be donated to worthy causes. While I understand (and can agree with this sentiment about the wastefulness and wantonness of it all) I want to point out that a significant number of people benefit from these award show events: stylists, make-up artists, clothing designers, restaurants, hotels, photo services, limo companies and on and on. Not to mention producers, aides, assistants, speech writers, who pull the awards shows together.

      There are a lot of “little people” involved in the industry who make the majority of their year’s salary during awards season. They are not rich or privileged, but perform services that allow them to support themselves/their families and their communities. We may not like capitalism, but this is how it works in our current configuration (top tier with massive privilege, vast majority not so much). And, we may not like that a percentage of Americans are involved in the entertainment industry to any degree (the insubstantial, inconsequential nature of much of the content pushed out by the entertainment industrial complex). But that’s just moralizing to a different tune than the one being played by Hollywood.

      If there are causes that need to be championed – whether the Hollywood elite champion them or not, nothing is stopping any of us from taking up a cause! Champion with whatever platform is available to you. But don’t chastise people who are taking the opportunity that they have and doing what they can with it.

      These people make money because as a society, we have decided to spend money on entertainment. Same as professional sports. And until we’re all willing to stop clicking, reading, watching, the content will continue to be generated.

  51. B says...

    Cup of Jo is back! Missed this these last 2 weeks. Hope that you all had a wonderful holiday!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      we are so happy to be back! can’t wait to catch up.

  52. CC says...

    You forgot Charlize, she also rocks short locks.

    • lauren says...

      Yes! She’s the queen of the pixie.