Travel

City Guide: Berlin

City Guide: Berlin

We are huge fans of Luisa Weiss, OG food blogger and author of My Berlin Kitchen, as well as one of the definitive books on German baking. Luisa lives in Berlin with her two young sons and husband, Max, and we’re so happy she’s here to share some favorite spots in her hometown…

I am half-American, half-Italian, and a proud former New Yorker. But at heart, I’m a Berliner. I was born here and partially raised here, and although I’m not German and have spent many years elsewhere, this place is my true home.

Berlin, huge geographically, but relatively modest in terms of population, is a strange place. Its violent history so visible that you get used to confronting it on a daily basis. New buildings from the 1950’s stuck next to graceful turn-of-the-century apartments are not-so-subtle reminders of how much was destroyed; countless memorials to Jews and the different groups of people who were persecuted under National Socialism, Berlin is like a living experiment in confronting national guilt. It’s a scrappy city with perpetual housing problems and historically low incomes (unless you’re from the start-up class). But Berlin’s artistic and cultural offerings are eye-popping in quality and quantity—museums and art galleries abound, world-class music is a daily occurrence, and there is a general spirit of freedom and wildness that, though much tamed in recent years, still makes Berlin unique, not just in Germany, but in Europe.

As anyone who has ever spent time here can attest, Berliners are a funny mixture of big hearts and loud mouths, capable of generosity and a snarl, depending on the weather, the mood, the morning commute. Delving a little into the traumatic history of the city helps explain some of this dichotomy. Largely, it is a wonderful place to live and to visit, with great food and culture, the most green spaces in Europe, and endlessly illuminating and heart-wrenching historical exploration.

WHERE TO EAT

Bagel with Mackerel Salad at Annelies

Start off your visit to Berlin with breakfast at Annelies, a bright and cozy little cafe on the edge of Görlitzer Park in Kreuzberg. Its excellent and tightly edited menu is unique in Berlin, showcasing rigorous talent from the kitchen in a casual, relaxed atmosphere, with very good coffee to boot. I love their take on Bircher Müsli, chefy, yet so delicious, the chewy bagel topped with smoked mackerel salad, their pickled fennel, and the perfectly flaky pastries from Albatross, a local bakery.

Tea Time at Cafe im Literaturhaus

For a more old-world Berlin experience, head to the elegant Literaturhaus on genteel Fasanenstrasse, just off Kurfürstendamm, old West Berlin’s 5th Avenue. A beautiful 19th century villa houses this restaurant and cafe (a lovely bookstore is located on the ground floor) where you can go at any time of day. I’m partial to breakfast there, tucked away in one of the corners of the gorgeous, light-filled rooms, where they will bring you the classics of German breakfast—rolls and butter and jam, a boiled egg, slices of ham and cheese—or lunch, where we always end up ordering their take on a tuna sandwich (the only one you could find in Berlin for many years). It’s also a wonderful place to go for the requisite afternoon teatime as they have a pretty great assortment of cakes and tortes to choose from.

Berlin famously has the largest Turkish community in the world outside of Turkey, and no visit here could be considered complete without at least one Turkish meal. A spectacular one (go hungry and with friends) can be had at Fez Turkish BBQ, a bustling and lively place where each table grills their own meat orders and feasts on some of the best Turkish mezze I’ve ever had. Reservations essential. For a more casual but no less delicious experience, head to Doyum on Kottbusser Tor.

Salads at Rocket + Basil

After years of catering and biding their time to find the perfect place, two Persian-German sisters opened Rocket + Basil, a fantastic spot in Berlin’s Tiergarten district last year. Influenced also by their childhoods in Australia, it’s a delicious and casual mashup of home-cooked Iranian food, fresh and beautiful salads, and comforting sandwiches and pastries.

Renger-Patzsch

For a proper, rib-sticking German meal, head to Renger-Patzsch in Schöneberg, where the meat is braised and succulent, the dumplings plump and filling, the cabbage melting and savory, and the wine list is heavily German and Austrian. Renger-Patzsch, with its austere, pared-back interior and its relaxed attitude, reminds me very much of the old West Berlin of my childhood, without feeling old-fashioned or passé. If you must have Wiener Schnitzel, go to Engelbecken in Charlottenburg (a favorite of the theater crowd), on the banks of the picturesque Lietzensee, or Ottenthal, an Austrian favorite.

Baumkuchen at Konditorei Buchwald

After a weekend morning of strolling down the fleamarket on Strasse des 17. Juni, in the shadow of the gold-winged victory statue, make your way through the mid-century boxy buildings of the Hansaviertel to Buchwald. Konditorei Buchwald, family-run for the past 160 years, makes arguably the most delicious cakes, tortes and Baumkuchen, a finely layered cake enrobed in glaze or chocolate, in all of Berlin. Its tea-room is straight out of the 1950’s, its cakes are enormous and delicious and you can either buy slices or an entire tower of Baumkuchen, which the bakery ships all over the world to homesick Berliners.

WHERE TO HANG

In the city’s understandable desperation to tear down the Berlin Wall in 1989, remarkably little has remained of it. To get a sense of the many layers of 20th century Berlin history and the Wall’s formidable presence, I always tell visitors to head to the corner of Wilhelmstrasse and Niederkirchnerstrasse, where a strange mélange of Berlin history is visible to all who pass. Just on this one corner, there’s the Topographie des Terrors, an indoor/outdoor exhibition space built on the former site of the Gestapo and SS headquarters, one of the only remaining pieces of the “outer” wall (the one visible to the West), the mortar-marked Martin-Gropius-Bau museum, the Ministry of Finance housed in a building built for the Third Reich’s Ministry of Aviation, and Checkpoint Charlie just down the street.

Tempelhofer Feld

One of Berlin’s greatest success stories of recent years was the transformation of the former Tempelhofer airport into Tempelhofer Feld, a huge (I mean, huge) and sprawling public park. Come here to fly kites, roller-blade or cycle down a literal runway, do yoga in the tall grass, barbecue along with local residents, or just sit in a lawn chair and drink a beer. While Berlin is filled with many different kinds of parks, Tempelhofer Feld feels the most “Berlin,” with its important role in Cold War history, its recent housing of refugees, its instant inclusion as many Berliners’ favorite space, and its magical randomness.

Berggruen Museum

In a city bursting with museums, it feels slightly absurd to single out just one, but the Berggruen Museum, a jewel box of a museum stuffed with modern art, has always had a special place in my heart. Its founder, the art dealer Heinz Berggruen, was born to German Jews in the neighborhood I live in. He fled Berlin in 1936, first to the U.S. and then to Paris. Nearly 60 years later, the German government invited Berggruen to exhibit his incredible art collection in a museum across from Schloss Charlottenburg. A few years later, Berggruen agreed to sell his collection to the German government in a “gesture of reconciliation.” Whenever I wander the halls, gazing at the incomparable Picassos and Klees, I think about this exchange, and the pain, generosity, and atonement behind it, and it moves me just as much as (even more than?) the art does.

Markthalle Neun

Arguably the incubator of many of the fantastic food businesses that have cropped up in Berlin over the past decade, Markthalle Neun is a must-visit if you’re interested in food and sustainability.
Located in a 19th-century covered market hall, it’s a combination of food court, living gentrification experiment (not always with harmonious results) and event space for workshops, talks and food-themed festivals.

Wooden toys at Manufactum

The be-all, end-all German emporium for handmade objets for house, home and garden, it is nearly impossible to enter Manufactum without wanting to buy at least half of it. Elegant felt wool slippers for your husband? Check. Handmade wooden toys for your children? Check. Intensely hued wool blankets for your bed? Check. Buttery hand-stitched boots for your mother? Check. Handmade dusters, glass-bottled cleaning elixirs still made with 100-year-old recipes by a Benedictine monk somwhere in the Alps, and an artisanal steel dustpan? Check check check.

Voo West store at Bikini Berlin

Several years ago, a tract of empty office buildings in the formerly unlovely area around Zoo Station was transformed into Bikini Berlin, a modern mall overlooking the zoo. The mall is unique in that it not only has regular tenants that include the cultish Berlin eyeglass brand Mykita, the Dutch clothing brand Scotch & Soda, and Voo West, an outpost of the popular Berlin concept store, but it has rotating local brands showcased in “boxes” scattered throughout the ground floor, giving prime space to independent designers and retailers in a fun and quirky way, with views of the baboons.

WHERE TO STAY

For a luxury stay, check out Hotel am Steinplatz, a boutique hotel housed in a turn-of-the-century building in Charlottenburg, and just steps away from a neighborhood filled with galleries, restaurants and shops. The restaurant and bar pride themselves on largely using only local ingredients and the hotel breakfast buffet is one of the best in the city.

The lobby at the Michelberger Hotel

For the budget-minded, the fun and trendy Michelberger Hotel on a busy street in the youthful, bustling neighborhood of Friedrichshain has its finger on the pulse of modern-day Berlin in a way that no other hotel in the city does. Its restaurant is also consistently popular.

If staying in an apartment is more your speed, you can do no better than reserving one in the lovingly restored and decorated Gorki Apartments on the border between Prenzlauer Berg and Mitte. The area’s former grittiness has mostly been replaced by cream-colored house façades, cool stores and delicious places to grab a bite.

FINAL TIP

Berlin Philharmonic Hall

Even if you think classical music isn’t your thing, I urge you to buy a ticket to see the Berlin Philharmonic play in their iconic hall designed by Hans Scharoun. The acoustics in the unusually shaped room are unparalleled and the views onto the musicians make for an entirely different concert experience than what you may be used to or expect. The lights in the hall are never entirely dimmed, so you can see the players in their element, as well as the people around you taking in the experience. Tickets are more affordable than in other major music cities like New York or Paris, with a wide range of prices to keep the experience accessible to everyone, and the experience of hearing the Berlin Philharmonic play is transcendent.

Thank you, Luisa! And everyone, what other cities would you like to see?

P.S. More city guides including Chicago and Philadelphia. And Luisa shares 20 surprising things about parenting in Germany.

(Opening photo by Nataša Mandić for Stocksy. Annelies by Berlin Food Stories; Rocket &amp. Basil from Instagram. Renger-Patzsch by Nicola Bramigk for Renger-Patzsch. Templofer Feld by VisitBerlin. Markthalle Neun by Conde Nast Traveler. Voo West from Voo West.)

  1. Inga Urban says...

    As a former Berliner I am happy to see this post. I have to add a minor correction though, the picture in the post is not one of the Philharmony, but of the Kammermusiksaal right next to it. The Philharmony is even more beautiful!

  2. Marti says...

    Joanna and crew! As an (almost) new mom and avid traveler, I would love to learn about snagging a babysitter when traveling abroad! Are they trusted services the world over? Would love to hear other traveling mom’s thoughts about this, as well!

  3. Abby says...

    As a native Berliner I am also here to say how lovely it is to see some of my favourites (West-Berlin) advice on here. Most people do not make it to “my” part of the city and Berlin is honestly more than the “hip” East.
    I would add to this list:
    – Saturday market on Karl-August-Platz (similar but better than Winterfeldt these days)
    – C/O Berlin for the photography enthusiast
    – Schleusenkrug biergarten for breakfast/lunch/tea time between Zoo Station and Tiergarten park
    – Strandbad Wannsee for summer swims and Holiday feel
    – Winterfeldt Schokoladen café for a hot chocolate on cold days and the lovely old wooden pharmacy interior
    – Garage in Ahornstraße for Second Hand Shopping
    – the Zeiss Planetarium for both kids and adults on romantic Dates
    – Frau Behrens Torten café for amazing cakes and lovely interior
    – Goldhahn und Sampson kitchen supply and delicatessen for anyone who loves to cook and needs special ingredients like Maldon sea salt or Ibiza hot Sauce
    – Schloss Charlottenburg castle (no need to go to Potsdam – it is just as beautiful) and lovely for a picnic in the park
    Also beautifully written. Never have I seen myself and my city reflected in a guide about my hometown until now!

    • Neela says...

      Love that Garage tip! Can’t wait to go! Thanks x

    • Stephanie says...

      I am traveling to Berlin this October! We’ll only be there for 3 days, so what are absolute must sees? Also my husband is vegan, any recommendations for inexpensive vegan restaurants?

    • I love love love all your recommendations. Some of my favorite places. Aren’t we lucky?!

  4. Gwendolyn says...

    What a nice city guide, thank you Luisa. I can recommend ‘East side gallery’ in Friedrichshain, where artists from all over the world painted the wall that separated Berlin until 1989, ‘Osmans Töchter’ in Prenzlauer Berg, the best turkish restaurant in town (for my opinion) and strolling around ‘Kastanienallee’, ‘Boxhagener Platz’ or ‘Schlesisches Tor’ because of it´s hurly-burly and constantly changes – love it! :)

  5. Nicole says...

    Yay, thank you! I’ll be in Berlin in September but I’m already starting to put together my google map with all my pinpoints of recommendations! It’s been almost ten years since I was last there during college, so I am very excited to experience it again as an adult (with a little more money than I had back then!).

  6. Jill says...

    Warsaw and St. Petersburg!

  7. Jenny says...

    I almost squeal when I see anything related to the Motherhood series, Jenny R’s tips, and the city guides. Thank you for all the effort in bringing these to us.

    As far as US cities, I would love to see guides for Portland, San Francisco, Boston, and Atlanta.
    As far as the world, I would love to see guides for some of the Greek Islands, Singapore, and Madrid.

  8. Sarah says...

    My hometown.
    -Botanischer Garten (in summer or autumn, especially at sunset)
    -Schlachtensee
    – winterfeldt Markt (saturdays)
    -Jones icecream
    -Lula am Markt
    -Modulor
    – C/O Berlin and Camerawork
    – Dussmann
    -Markthalle Neun

    • So many of my favorite places!! 💙

  9. Sarah says...

    My hometown.
    -Botanischer Garten (in summer or autumn, especially at sunset)
    -Schlachtensee
    – winterfeldt Markt (saturdays)
    -Jones icecream
    -Lula am Markt
    – C/O Berlin and Camerawork
    – Dussmann
    -Markthalle Neun

  10. KM says...

    Oh Berlin ❤️. I lived there eight years in my twenties and so many firsts happened: first own place without my parents (a room in a chaotic but beautiful ”WG”), first love, first heartbreak, first real professional job, first baby. I left ten years ago and much has changed there since then, but for me, it’s still a magical place.

    Funnily enough, I lived in the neighbourghood of the now ”Markthalle neun”. Back then, it was a dirty, run down place with only a few shops inside. Among them a ”Schlecker” drugstore (now gone banckrupt) where I used to buy soap, condoms and lotion – and later, diapers and formula.

  11. Alexandra says...

    Thank you for the wonderful guide, reminds me of two amazing weeks we spent in Berlin three years ago. For any potential visitor, please be aware that Berlin is HUGE and has so much to offer in many different parts of the city. While Luisa’s guide is great, there are so many additional and different wonderful places to see and find as per the other comments, and everyone and every family has a different travel style. I would add that Berlin and the surrounding area have a lot of wonderful lakes, e.g. the Wannsee, where you can rent a boat and cruise for a day. Potsdam town and the palaces are awesome. If you have kids or teenagers, I can recommend the spy museum, as well as the Zoo with the Giant Pandas and the Olympia Stadion). Also, it was fun to visit the Spandau Citadel where you have a beautiful view, several museums and cafes and big cannons from long past wars …. We also took a long bus ride to the “Museum of the Western Allied Forces”, which was surprisingly interesting and entertaining. We rented an Air B&B in a rather residential area (not too far away from the Olympia Stadion, and my kids loved going to get pastries from the local bakery every morning. Lots of little restaurants, pizza shops and Turkish grocery stores around there as well. Very safe neighborhood.

  12. Cláudia says...

    You can feel the love of Luisa for this city! So well written.
    I’ve been in Berlin and it’s one of my favourites places on earth, very cosmopolitan, not that expensive and overflowing of history.
    Well done, and thank you! :)

  13. Jackie says...

    I really appreciate Luisa’s discussion of the horrible wrongs centered in Berlin. I am sure it is complex and challenging to live in a place that has so much negative history, but, as a Jewish person, I am thankful that Berlin faces it instead of turning away. I don’t know if I would ever feel comfortable going to Berlin or Germany in general because of the deep complicity (at best) of the German people in Nazism, but I appreciate Luisa’s nuanced presentation of her hometown and the people who currently live there.

    • maria says...

      Aren’t most of the people involved in nazism dead by now? Let the country renew itself, please. No one has ‘forgotten’ they’re just moving on, which is the only healthy response. My understanding is that no one is more appalled by their history and nazism then Germans themselves. Holding on to a horrible moment that has passed and that everyone is ashamed of does no one any good – least of all yourself.

    • Charlotte says...

      Dear Jackie, thank you for your comment. It is so interesting to read about your fear of Nacism in Germany. As a native German I would like to tell you that our history especially the terrible Holocaust is always in our mind and I personally have never met anyone who is a Nacist. In school we spent years discussing this history and the message was always clear: this was barbaric, inhuman and can never, never, never be repeated. For example I just watched a very emotional documentation about Auschwitz with my ten year old son and both of us were crying and are still talking about it. It would make me very happy if you came to Berlin and meet with Germans to start a conversation based on the believe in the good in People and look into the Future. That is the only way to go on in Peace- and we Germans need this trust as much as everyone else.
      All the best for you
      Charlotte

    • JayNay says...

      Maria, I’m not a fan of telling people affected by horrible acts to “let it go” or “just move on already”. As a German, I completely understand Jackie’s sentiment, and even if I didn’t, she is still entitled to feel however she wants about something horrifying that was done to her people.
      My sense is people in Germany are somewhat split on the evils of the Nazis. There’s an obvious recognition of “never again”, of course. But there’s also some fuzziness about the uncomfortable fact that so many people simply looked away, or even benefited from Nazi crimes, and that many of them simply lived on afterwards.

    • Tori says...

      Putting “let it go” and “just move on already” in quotation marks indicates that they are direct quotes. However I reread Maria’s comment several times and didn’t see those words anywhere.

    • Gwendolyn says...

      Dear Jackie,
      here in Berlin there is a big jewish community and many young people from Israel come over here, settle down or just stay for a while because of the spirit of this city. Especially East Berlin, where I do live, for example has a great food, coffe and art scene,so much is happening here, really everything is possible and people from all over the world are living here. So if you ever will take the step and fly over to Berlin, feel highly invated!

    • T says...

      I have a few thoughts…
      Jackie- I completely understand your sentiments as I am Jewish myself and grew up thinking that I would never step foot on German soil after the atrocities that were committed there during the Holocaust. However, while living in Israel for the past 13 years, I have heard a multitude of times that Berlin is an epicenter of culture and history which many young Israelis have flocked to. I myself visited last year on my birthday and can attest to the fact that Berlin wears its multifaceted and complex history with much courage. The scars and tragedies are out in the open and Berliners are very eager to make sure that their past does not repeat itself. For example, the Holocaust museum is in a central location and structured in a way that is prominent and simultaneously accessible. While I am not sure about the rest of Germany, Berlin is certainly a model example of how the horrors of the past should be presented and rectified and I think you would learn so much about our collective history by visiting. That being said, it is your choice alone and you certainly do not owe it to anyone to let it go- as we say every year we must Never Forget.
      Maria- as for your comment ‘holding on to a horrible ‘moment’ that everyone is ashamed of’- the Holocaust was definitely not a ‘moment’. It affected almost every Jewish person on the planet and to this day affects generations of survivors not to mention the collective Jewish identity. It is our duty to never forget what happened so that this does not happen again- anywhere. This does not necessarily mean that we must punish the German people repetitively for their past, but each person has the right to react and gauge how they handle their history.
      Last but not least- I loved the city guide! Berlin is one of my favorite cities and I hope to back again soon!
      Much love, respect and peace to all.

    • Mia says...

      This comment is a reply to Maria. I am an American who has lived in Berlin for 8 years, and unfortunately, the country (just as many European countries) is actively struggling with xenophobia and racism. Just this past week, even as Nazi guards are still being prosecuted (no, they are not all dead already), the state of Thuringia elected a premier from the far-right fascist AfD party with the help of support from more mainstream conservative politicians. The rise of support for a vicious nationalism is aided by perspectives just like yours, that we should be able to elide the past because it is behind us, and that those who insist on a full and active accountability protest too much.

    • Gwendolyn says...

      This comment is a reply to MIA: I am not sure if I understood you right. Past week the parliament in Thuringia vote for an prime minister. This prime minister was from a liberal party, FDP but the scandal about the vote is that he only got elected with voices from the far-right-party AFD. The very next day he had to resign and now they have to vote for a new prime minister. What happened there caused an earthquake in german policy and many changes will come. People all over Europe see the rise of the right movement and fight against it and especially in Germany we know about our history and will never let it happen again. Yes, there is this movement of this far-right-party but there is a bigger anti-movement on the other side.

  14. Olivia says...

    When my husband and I (and our 3 little kids) travel, we have TOTALLY different styles. He rushes around to all the sites with his enormous paper map, and when he gets hungry, he just looks around for the closest restaurant– which is usually a giant tourist trap. I want to walk around neighborhoods and eat at grubby little places and pop into book stores. He HATES doing these things. So when we travel, we usually split up for a few hours each day.

    Both travel styles are equally boring to the kids, so we hand off different constellations of children depending on what we’re doing. No matter what, traveling with 3 little kids is 80% misery and 20% looking for bathrooms. But it’s way better to see my husband in the evening, show off our treasures and commiserate about all the hilarious and terrible things we got up to, rather than spend the day saying through gritted teeth “the kids are hungry, can we PLEASE STOP.” That’s how we’ve survived (and really enjoyed) Berlin, Athens, Stockholm, Ærø and counting!

    • Julie says...

      “80% misery and 20% looking for bathrooms”, Olivia, you had me laughing really hard! thanks for sharing :)

  15. Katha says...

    This post reminds me that I need to go to museums more often ;)
    And a lot if other things…

    Really liked reading about my home from someone else.
    I second the comments of other Berliners about the east/west thing and so many different things to recommend.
    (What Neela said…)

    Tempelhofer Feld is my happy place.

    I moved to Berlin 20 years ago and I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.

  16. Erin says...

    Hooray for the return of City Guides! I would love to see some for Asian, African, and South American cities. I feel like European cities are fairly easy to find tips for, but I always have to dig a lot harder for other regions. Selfishly, I would love one for Kathmandu since I’m heading there later this year :)

  17. Maartje says...

    What a beautifully written city guide.
    Signed,
    a two-years-in-Berliner

  18. Neela says...

    So excited to read about my adopted home on my favourite blog! Thanks for your well-balanced guide, Luisa. Hard to pick favourites in a town that’s constantly burgeoning amd so dynamic. And I loved the way you wrote about the city! I didn’t actually know the story behind Berggruen, how fascinating and beautiful.

    While I’m here, are there any CoJers from Berlin who’d like to meet up? I’ve been trying to find a way to connect, this might be my chance!

    • Sarah says...

      let`s do it!

    • Kate says...

      Ahahah! Moved to Berlin a year and a half ago, and feeling lonely! It sounds like a lovely idea!

    • Neela says...

      Awesome! Joanna, could you give Sarah my email? Sorry, don’t really want to post it publicly…

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      you bet! just connected you all over email. xoxo

    • I d love to be in the mix too. Native German living in Berlin for the last 10 years. Would be lovely to meet up with other Cup of Jo enthusiasts over here! could you throw my mail into the mix too Joanna? Thank you!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Yes Julia!

    • Sb says...

      Native Berliner, living here in Berlin my whole live, except for the one year I spend in the USA.

      I like to meet new people :)

    • (Another) Sarah in Berlin says...

      I’m a little late in noticing this comment, but I’d also love to connect with some fellow COJers here! I just had my 2-year Berlin anniversary and there’s still so much to discover in the city. Joanna, if you see this, will you please connect me to these ladies, too? Thanks so much!

  19. VVeronika says...

    I love Berlin too! I also remommend the Helmut Newton photomuseum.

  20. Rita now in Lisbon says...

    I lived in Berlin six years and would have completely different recommendations except for the Philharmonics, but I think that is only a sign of how much Berlin has to offer and how intensely everyone experiences their neighborhoods and favorite spots.
    I could go “what, not a single lake?” but the city just has so much to offer, you could never cover everything or even every kind of thing and still be authentic.
    My last time there, I really felt that the lack of affordable housing had changed the dynamics of what used to be a very inclusive city, but these recommendations really made me want to go back pronto, try every new-to-me thing she mentioned, and add it to my own Berlin Atlas.

  21. Nigerian Girl says...

    I enjoyed reading this. Berlin, here I come someday. I’d love to see a city guide for Lagos, Nigeria of course ;)

    • Frieda says...

      I’d love to this, too. Now that more and more Nigerians can afford to study/work/travel abroad I’d really love to lern more about that country!

  22. Hallo from another Berliner (and transplant living in France). Love this! Luisa went to my high school : ) Berlin is a magnificent city. Broke but sexy as a former mayor once declared. Another favorite Berlin quote: “Die Berliner sind unfreundlich und rücksichtslos, ruppig und rechthaberisch, Berlin ist abstoßend, laut, dreckig und grau, Baustellen und verstopfte Straßen, wo man geht und steht – aber mir tun alle Menschen leid, die nicht hier leben können! “ Anneliese Bödecke. Thanks for this list!!!!!

  23. This is amazing!!! I live in Frankfurt and LONG for the energy, innovation, community and uniqueness of Berlin. I instantly feel at home whenever I go there! This is an amazing guide and I can’t wait to visit all of these places!

    • Rachel says...

      I live in Frankfurt too, and feel the exact same way!! I like FFM but nothing in Germany beats Berlin in terms of innovation and uniqueness.

  24. Jimena says...

    I lived in Berlin for a bit over half a year in 2018-19 while my boyfriend was studying there and we were lucky enough to live very close to the best place to eat baklavas in Berlin, Pasam Baklava, in Schöneberg. Highly recommended to anyone visiting.
    Also, breakfast at Albatross and lunch at Doyum, YES!
    Can’t wait to go back to try out all the other places (and go to Berggruen, one of the few museums or galleries I neglected to visit!). Some of my favorites in that department were also C/O Berlin and Berlinische Gallerie.
    Thank you for this guide and for bringing back so many happy memories xx

  25. Jess says...

    Big fan of Luisa’s Classic German Baking. We actually use it every week to prepare snacks for our family’s German classes. We may be going to Berlin in the spring – with twin 5-year-olds. Any kid-friendly Berlin tips? Thanks!

    • Olivia says...

      Hi Jess! I went to Berlin two springs ago with my then 4-yo son. He loved the Technology museum– that was the highlight of our trip. There are the loveliest little parks scattered around Berlin, so most of our days were spent hitting up bakeries and cafes and playing at parks. My best advice would be to rent a cargo bike to take your kids around in :) At 5, I’m guessing they’re too big for strollers but too complain-y to walk for hours, so a cargo bike will save you! Also, the Kreuzberg neighborhood is a great place to stay kids and very convenient if you have a bike. Enjoy!!!

    • Jane says...

      Hi Jess, I am German and live about 3 hrs from Berlin, but go as often as possible. This summer, I went with my then 5 year old for the first time. She loved the Humboldt Museum für Naturkunde and spent hours marveling at the dinosaurs, meteor fragment and specimen in huge glass jars there. She was also enchanted by the old Babylonian roads, gates etc at the Pergamon Museum. We walked a lot and took some time off at the playground (Robin Hood themed) off Kurfürstendamm. One of the highlights for her and me was breakfast for dinner at 24-hour breakfast restaurant Benedict.
      I would highly recommend getting an apartment in a “nicer” neighborhood with kids though. Berlin, while extremely exciting, can get/be a bit rough at times. Nothing you would worry about as an adult, but a bit overwhelming at least for my smalltown kid. We were lucky enough to get to housesit a friend’s apartment in the Guentzelkiez and it was the perfect location for us. (And they had great little shops, cafes and an ice-cream place just round the corner as well as several bakeries).

    • Clau says...

      Don´t miss the zoo

    • Neela says...

      Olivia’s right, definitely go to the Technikmuseum, but make sure you go to the Spektrum part, as it has levels of interactive displays! The aquarium, if you’re stuck on a rainy day. And see if you can check out some of the amazing playgrounds- definitely a few in Prenzlauer Berg (I think CoJ even had one featured once), but also the Hexenspielplatz in Schöneberg, for instance.

  26. Aysegul Oguz Goodman says...

    Exactly 15 years ago in the height of a personal crisis I won a scholarship to live in Berlin for a month. I met my Canadian husband in my German class! Berlin is the most special city for us. Amazing cultural scene, great people and beauty all over. We still yearn for Berlin everyday! And I love Luisa’s book My Berlin Kitchen. Better than any romantic book or movie that were released in the last 10 years!

    • Oh my goodness, thank you so much!

  27. Wow you know, on all my travels I have never been to Berlin, I have seen so many cities, but never ever to Berlin, seeing your photos I get the feeling I have missed out, I just came from Europe, now in Central America. Not sure when I will be back. :-(

  28. Erin says...

    Love this series, so glad city guides are back!

  29. Olivia says...

    Luisa is just the best – loved her memoir and can’t get enough of her cookbook! Would love to see more posts featuring her <3

  30. Annie K says...

    I’m ready to abandon my small children and eat my through Berlin.

  31. Rashmi says...

    Wonderfully evocative guide! Makes me wanna head off to Berlin right now.

  32. So happy City Guides are back, thank you!

    Any chance of featuring Auckland, New Zealand? xx

  33. em says...

    Luisa, could you tell us more about the muesli at Annalies? it’s a simple but wonderful breakfast food, and I’m always happy to hear another riff.

    • Yes! It’s Bircher muesli, so usually kind of gloppy, but here it’s slightly drier (still lovely!) and served in a gorgeous pool of strawberry-basil sauce and topped with powdered dried berries (I think the flavors change seasonally, but not 100% sure) and it’s just a delight to eat and look at.

    • em says...

      sounds delicious (and not so simple)! thanks so much for sharing your wonderful city :)

  34. K says...

    Brilliant! Love these posts!

    Was just at Markethall 9 last month, and can confirm it’s grand! Also second what has been said about exploring the east too, just as good.

    Would love to see A Norwegian city like Bergen!

    • I live in Oslo and would love to create a city guide! Oslo often gets overlooked because of its more beautiful cousins Stockholm and Copenhagen, but it’s a lovely city with a lot to offer and never crowded. I tag all of my Oslo pics on Instagram with #onawalkinoslo if you’d like to take a peek – so many off the beaten path things to discover on simple walks!

  35. E. says...

    Man, I LOVE Berlin and sooo want to go back to visit. Also, Luisa and her writing have long held a special place in my heart, that of a German expat in the Midwest. So great to read from her again!

    • Thank you! x

  36. This take on Berlin is unabashedly west and old school, and wildly different from what I would typically recommend to new visitors (with my demographic being mostly the childless millennial set). I love to see it!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      so curious to hear your recs, michi!

    • Olma Calhoun says...

      I had the exact same thought. I wish my Granny were still alive! She would love these places. :-)

    • So glad to hear it!

    • Kay says...

      I second this :)

  37. A City Guide to Berlin and no mention of any of the techno or house music clubs??? One of the most fascinating parts of my (very short) visit to Berlin was to observe (and participate) in the dance music scene, which seemed to be a part of many Berliners’ lives – from teenagers in sweats to moms on a night out. It was my favorite part!

    I’d love to see city guides on Mexico City, Montreal, LA, Denver, Amsterdam, Lisbon, Tokyo, Kyoto…

    • Em says...

      Yes, please, to Kyoto!

    • Rita Dantas says...

      I lived there for six years and want dancing all the time but never went to one of the big clubs.
      I am a little embarrassed, I guess, but I am not a big techno fan, so kept planning to go to Berghaus on a Sunday morning out of curiosity and then postponing it… I think these city guides are more a personal stance than a comprehensive guide-guide.

  38. Sabine says...

    From the perspective of a Berlin resident of over 15 years it`s remarkable to me that this post is almost exclusively about West Berlin. As with most places, Berlin of course has a gazillion different faces, but the East/ West issue is still a big one that has an impact on the people who live here and the experience of the city as a whole. East Berlin has a lot to offer too!!

    • Of course it does! I find that almost all guides to Berlin now focus mostly on Mitte and the eastern neighborhoods. All newcomers and tourists to this city that I meet think the west is just a sleepy suburb! But there’s so much interesting stuff going on here too… So this is my personal list of favorites that I believe are truly special and worth a trip, even if it’s just from Friedrichshain… :)

    • Neela says...

      Also a resident of 15 years here! It’s true what you say, though I think it’s the nature of the city- it’s so huge, you barely have time to get to know anything outside your own Viertel! Especially when you have kids in tow and relatively little time for the mammoth undertaking of travel to get to various spots. I’m also a West-Berliner, and (sometimes) miss my student days of living on the East side. I feel like the more cutting-edge culinary and art scene is happening over there; though if you know where to go, you certainly don’t miss anything on the west. I feel like Luisa managed to fit in a lot of great tasters from all around, anyway! A classic guide.

  39. Catherine says...

    I really enjoyed reading this! My husband has traveled to Berlin several times for work and, just this week, was contacted by a recruiter regarding a job there. I don’t think it’s doable for our family right now, but we’ve both been daydreaming about it. Maybe a trip would scratch that itch.

  40. Lauren says...

    I’ve been in Berlin for 8 years now, I came for my German husband and now we have three littles and we generally love living here. I would add the Berlinische Galerie to the list of must-see places, depending on the temporary exhibition. It’s a wonderful space and the cafe is good. Also, the Philharmonie is of course fantastic but Pierre Boulez Saal is also remarkable and the concept and programming is so much more innovative and inspiring.
    Berlin is a great city but has a lot of problems with the infrastructure and the schools are kind of disastrous—by German standards, anyway. We’ve been really lucky in that respect. I know a few people who have moved here from New York in search of lower prices and better social services, and they’re pretty disappointed. We love it here and I’m proud to be the mother of Berliners, but the troubled past of the city definitely still exacts a toll.

    • Jess says...

      Hi Lauren! We may (fingers crossed) be traveling to Berlin with our twin 5-year-olds this spring. Any recs for kid-friendly stuff to experience (and eat)? Or is there another city/area of Germany we should consider instead? Thanks!!

    • Lauren says...

      Fun! If you come after the weather is warm enough, the playground scene is pretty happening! The parks are full in the summer— usually in a good way— and you can play your way through the city! There is an unbelievable amount of good ice cream. And my kids are obsessed with our local bakery— German bread is the best, hands down. And Biergärten have sausages that most kids go nuts for. My kids love the Technisches Museum and the adjacent Science building that’s really interactive. And the Zoo! We have newborn twin pandas! it’s a great city to walk and bike around, take in a sight or two, and let the kids run off some energy on a playground.
      When it’s nice out we love the Biergarten at Cafe am Neuen See in the Tiergarten. There is also a large-ish Italian population and great pizza is not too difficult to find. I’m sure you’ll have a great time! When the sun comes back out from its winter hibernation the city is in a collective good mood and it’s really fun.

    • Jess says...

      Thanks so much for these ideas! Can’t wait to research more :)

    • Kim says...

      Hi Lauren,
      Would you elaborate on your experience with German schools, please? I’m so curious about the options, paths, and assuming you are AMERICAN, the differences (strengths/weaknesses).

      Thanks so much!

  41. Kate says...

    FREE WALKING TOUR. Best tip for tourists, especially if you’re not there for very long! It was about 3 hours long, but I am SO glad we went on it. Worth every minute. I feel like we would have wasted so much time trying to find our way around to see all the exact things the tour touched on, but instead we got a great introduction to the city with a really amazing guide (whom we tipped very well at the end, of course!). The tours meet at a hostel close to the old radio tower, so I’m sure you can find it with some googling.

    One of my favorite memories of Berlin was walking to the train at 8 or 9 in the morning and hearing all the loud music coming from the makeshift clubs where the dancers were still going strong!

  42. The Rachel Syn says...

    Thank you for sharing your beloved Berlin with us, Luisa.

    • xo

  43. Marisa says...

    Berlin sounds amazing. I’d love to see City Guides for Abidjan and Dakar!

    • I absolutely second these two suggestions…as a German (married to an Ivorian from Abidjan…living in Barcelona, with a 4-years-long-term in Riyadh/Saudia Arabia…another, very fascinating experience).
      Thank you all so much for this amazing community here, sending greetings from Barcelona:)

    • Jessica Cash says...

      Yes to Dakar! And Accra please:)

  44. Ashley says...

    I read My Berlin Kitchen years ago and fell in love with her!! ALSO she made me want to live in Berlin for a while — and this did not help that at all!! Man, sure do love her!

    • Thank you, dearest Ashley!!

  45. Nicki says...

    So excited to see my hometown on my favourite blog! And to read the beautiful love letter to the city from Luisa, who I know not only from her blog but because we went to the same German-American school as kids (at heart, Berlin is just a large village).

    All of these are top tips. I can’t resist adding:
    – If you don’t manage to snag tickets to the Berlin Philharmonic’s concert hall, don’t despair. Every Tuesday at 13.00, from September to June, they host a free (!) lunchtime concert, around 45 min in the “Foyer”/entrance hall (https://www.berliner-philharmoniker.de/en/concerts/lunch-concerts/). It’s a wonderfully informal affair with a diverse crowd of all ages – there are a few seats and tables (and a small canteen to buy food and drinks), but most people sit on the stairs or lie down on their coats on the floor. I think I almost love these concerts more than the evening ones, with the exception of the end-of-season concert that takes place in June outdoors (in the “Waldbuehne”, an amphitheater that’s virtually in the middle of the woods). Tickets for this one sell out VERY quickly.
    – If the weather is nice, don’t miss the outdoor “beer gardens”. In town, the “Cafe am Neuen See” in the Tiergarten is lovely, a bit further afield you can combine the “Fischerhuette” with a one-hour walk around a lovely lake, the “Schlachtensee”.
    – Finally, for a splurge on exquisitely prepared German food and wine, I love “Lochner Weinwirtschaft” in Schoeneberg or the “Weinbar Rutz” in Mitte (food downstairs is more traditional and affordable than in the two-star Michelin restaurant upstairs).

    And now I’m homesick!

    • The best Dorf in the world. Hi, Nicki! And thank you for these perfect tips!

  46. Jane says...

    Luisa’s first book helped me through a tough break-up and finding “myself” again (and my now husband). I often reread Wednesday Chef and so many of her recipes are part of our family rotation. Luisa, if you’re reading, I miss your blog so much! Berlin is also my favorite city. Thank you for this incredibly well-written and historically insightful and empathetic outlook.

    • Thank you so much, Jane. Your comment made me so happy, truly. xo

  47. Agnès says...

    I went to Berlin for the first time 2 years ago, just me and my 4 y-old. As a french person, it was a big deal, especially because I was 16 when the fall of the wall. I remember it so vividly. My father was 10 during WW2. I was so moved when I was in Berlin; I felt more european than ever. I am so so sad about the Brexit. There is so much we have to fight for together, as europeans. I completely recognize what Luisa writes about the remains of the past and the freedom of Berlin… Thank you for this lovely post.

    • What a beautiful comment x

    • Goosebumps, Agnes.

    • Anna says...

      Thanks so much for this comment, it’s such a sad day today for so many of us Brits :'(
      Lovely to see a European city featured here.

  48. Berlin is one of my top 5 favorite cities in the world!! I spent a month there in my twenties, staying in the punk-artsy neighborhood of Friedrichshain in East Berlin. I love how Luisa described the spirit of freedom and wildness there, which is just so evident and which I reveled in (as a naturally quite inhibited person). I remember walking down the street in Berlin and feeling like I could be completely myself there. ALSO, I stayed there in January, when the weather was completely awful, so if this born-and-raised Californian loved it then, I can’t even imagine how much I’d love it in the summer. Also, YES on the Turkish food…so good! And also I remember really loving using the public transport there, it was so easy and convenient (but maybe it just felt that way to me compared to LA ;) ).

    • OMG, if you come in summer, YOU WILL NEVER LEAVE :)

  49. Alycia says...

    I love Berlin! If I had to move anywhere tomorrow, it would be to Berlin.
    Templofer is the best. And for a wild sight, go to Treptower Park to see the giant Soviet War Memorial.
    Also, the Philharmonic offers free lunch concerts on Tuesdays in the lobby. It was so fun to see at least a thousand people smushed together to hear beautiful music.

  50. Micah says...

    Berlin is so cool. I lived in Germany for two years and always loved visiting!

    • Beth says...

      This was a great post and I’m so happy to see the return of the City Guides. I was THRILLED to see the Berlin Phil recommendation. The are absolutely the greatest in the world. I am a classical musician and will say for those of us here in the states, to me, the Orchestra not to miss is Philadelphia. Please go enjoy their rich sound, pay close attention to how the strings move together, the winds take turns coming out of the fabric, and the brass blend and breathe together. Both Orchestras are astonishing to hear for their sheer beauty of sound!

  51. Elly says...

    I’ve been to Berlin over ten times now — my husband is a native, and we actually got married there in 2018. This guide mostly featured places I’ve never been to, though, which is wonderful! We were just there for the week of New Years and felt kind of bored with our same old routine. I look forward to busting out this guide on our next trip.

    Some other places I’d recommend:

    Zollpackhof beer garden — close to the Reichstag and Kanzleramt, and where we had our polterabend the night before our wedding!

    Amrit — an Indian chainlet in Berlin with giant, cheap cocktails

    East Side Gallery — an outdoor museum; it’s a stretch of the Berlin Wall along the Spree painted with murals

    Buchkantine — a cute cafe/bookstore hybrid in Moabit on the Spree

    Cafe am Neuen See — a lovely restaurant with a beer garden on a lake in the Tiergarten. Perfect for summer nights!

  52. Maire says...

    I would love to see another Midwestern city like Minneapolis, Indianapolis (I can help!), or Detroit. Internationally, I second the calls for cities in South America, and I would additionally love one for Seoul, South Korea.

    I was in Berlin 11 years ago for a few days and enjoyed it so much, this city guide makes me want to go back!

  53. Heart soared when I saw this! Just moved to Berlin for a new job and this guide is so so useful and beautifully written :)

    • Welcome!!

  54. Lovely tour guide! Though I’ve been to Berlin several times – reading this makes me feel like like I’ve even seen it!! Can’t wait to go back!

    • Frieda says...

      Even for me as a native Berliner there is a lot of new stuff on this list. It’s always interesting to see what other people suggest. :D

  55. Birge says...

    Happy to see my hometown featured with some recommendations I have not been to yet. Just one thing: Could you please correct “Tempelhofer Feld”, please?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes! thank you!

  56. Stephanie Robinson says...

    I wish I’d read this before I went this summer! We just loved Berlin as well!

  57. Meghan says...

    I love this! Berlin is so magical and Luisa is charming. Are city guides back?!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes! we’re happy to be doing city guides again! most recently we did chicago and philly. xoxo

    • Meghan says...

      Yay! I always love scoping out other cities and trying on peoples lenses in which they experience their beloved hometown. May I humbly submit Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver for future considerations? <3

    • Kate says...

      I wonder why she chose to say “national Socialism” instead of the nazi’s? It’s definitely gonna be like a dog whistle to folks who know very little about fascism vs. what socialism means here in the US.

  58. Courtney says...

    Would love to see more Scandinavian cities…after all they have the happiest people in the world!

  59. Ellen says...

    Luisa!!!!!! So good to see you here! (I actually first discovered A Cup of Jo–over a decade ago!–through Luisa’s “Rotating Favorites” link list on her blog.)

    My family spent a couple of months in Berlin (following nine months in Tokyo, during a sabbatical research year for my parents) in the mid-90s. So many memories of an incredible city. We did a “walking tour” a couple of times with a guide who provided a very helpful introduction to Berlin history.

    • China says...

      Me too!

  60. Lee says...

    I went to Berlin when I was studying abroad (about 10 years ago now) and still have a ring from the fleamarket she recommended! I absolutely LOVED Berlin–it’s in my top 5 cities I’ve traveled to. : )

  61. Alexandra says...

    Thank you Luisa for sharing your Berlin with us! This made me so interested in visiting :) I would love to see a City Guide for Stockholm, my mom’s native city (and my very favorite city in the world). I’d also be really excited about a South American City Guide. It has long been my dream to visit a major city in South America (perhaps Buenos Aires? Santiago?) and I’d love to learn more.

  62. Christy P. says...

    Crazy! My husband and I were just talking about whether to go to Berlin or Dresden for the upcoming 4 day weekend!

  63. km says...

    ahhh, Berlin! I loved it so. You mention the fantastic Turkish cuisine available, but you failed to mention the beauty that is the Doner Kebab! A seemingly simple, yet delicious concoction that is far greater than the sum of its parts. A few places have finally opened here in NYC, but they’re just not quite the same as the ones I had there…

    • Anne says...

      Döner Kebab, yummy!

    • Elly says...

      Yes, also perplexed by the failure to mention the humble döner! It needs to be stressed that you must go to hole-in-the wall, unassuming places to get this particular delicacy. My favorite spot was near my mother-in-law’s old place in Moabit, right by the Turmstrasse U-bahn station. And you shouldn’t be paying more than 5 euro for it.

      Döner in New York are terrrrrible. They’re small, understuffed, and exorbitantly priced — like $15! It’s almost offensive.

    • Cristina says...

      The Doner Kebab at Doyum in Luisa’s recommendations is my favorite, and only 4 euro!

  64. Sarah says...

    Great post! I’m already on kayak looking for flights. How does everyone manage the cost of getting there? How long do you stay? Four plane tickets @$500 a pop puts a major dent in the overall budget. Any tips appreciated!

    • Elly says...

      Unfortunately Berlin is a bit under-served airline-wise. The airline Air Berlin went under a few years ago and they were the best resource for affordable flights and had a rare NYC-Berlin direct route. Lufthansa briefly assumed this after Air Berlin failed but stopped running it within a few months. Usually what we do is fly Aer Lingus via Dublin. Always quality service with them.

    • Anne says...

      as a German I’d say – Berlin is super good connected from other cities via train and can be reached easily and fast. try other cities which are better connected for cheaper fares and then go to Berlin by train from there!

  65. Meg says...

    I love Luisa and Wednesday Chef! This was a delightful tour.

  66. Ella says...

    This just underlines my long-term hope of making it to Berlin sometime. But also: any chance of a London city guide, please please?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes! on it!

    • Alice says...

      Joanna, I’d love to help with a London guide! I’m a recent-ish transplant (5 years) but my boyfriend is a born-and bred Londoner- we have such different views of the city and would LOVE to share if you’d like!!!

  67. anja says...

    I would also suggest to visit the Mauermuseum to see how it worked when the city was still divided. Within walking distance of that, in the Brunnenstrasse, you can find Du Bonheur, a lovely Patisserie. And just a small correction: it`s called Tempelhofer Feld. Greetings from Berlin, Anja

  68. Monica says...

    I loveeee Berlin. One thing I miss most, food wise, is going to a Sudanese falafel place and having my falafel come with peanut sauce!! It’s a game changer.

    • Lana says...

      Yes! We used to go to a place called Nils – I still think about those falafels!

  69. celeste says...

    Love her intro! I didn’t know much Cold War history, but my 12 year old read “A Night Divided” – a fictionalized account of how it may have been in 1963 when the wall went up. We’d rec the book and I think Berlin’s on her bucket list because of that.

    • Thank you for the book tip!

  70. Morgan says...

    Thank you so much for this! In just under a month, I’ll be spending a week in Berlin for work, and am excited to have a list of places to check out while I’m there. Last year was my first time in Berlin, and I struggled a little to find cool places to eat and hang out between work meetings, so this is perfect timing. :)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i’m so glad, morgan!!

    • Cristina says...

      I travel to Berlin for work from NY every 1-2 months and can’t wait to try this list. Doyum is on my regular rotation for a casual meal, and I also love Botzow Privat, Lebensmittel in Mitte and Katz Orange (all in Mitte), Zola, Spindler, Cocolo Ramen, and Datscha (all in Kreuzberg) – all work well for a solo meal. I also like to visit Modulor for office/art supplies, Prater Biergarten on a nice day, and going for a run in the Tiergarten or along the Spree. The city is so lively when it’s nice out. Enjoy!

    • Morgan says...

      Thank you so much Cristina!! I’m making a note of all your recommendations and looking forward to trying some of them.

  71. Hilary says...

    Ahh Berlin is my favorite city! I can’t wait to go back with my daughter. I have to add:

    – House of Small Wonder- Super darling and beautiful. I have the best memory of ducking in during a sudden downpour. We cozied up, ate sandwiches, and enjoyed the atmosphere.

    – Neni- stunning views and great homemade flatbread

    • Carla says...

      Oh what a delight to see a Berlin city guide here! I‘ve been living in Berlin for 8 years and can also highly recommend a visit here, especially during the summer months! Magical! Luisa‘s tips are all great. Love her writing and her My berlin kitchen book.
      My favorites include: in Schöneberg the Akazien- and Goltzstraße are lovely (great coffee at Double Eye, best sourdough bread at Brot ist Gold, the amazing farmers’ market on Saturdays at Winterfeldplatz, the vegetarian cocktail bistro Bonvivant)
      Also for modern art check out the Sammlung Boros in a former WWW II bunker (reserve tickets in advance!).
      If you’re vegan or vegetarian, Berlin is your new paradise!!
      So much more I could recommend, it’s hard to pick favorites! :)

    • Elly says...

      Neni is delicious! And the views of the zoo are great.

  72. Christy says...

    What a fun surprise to open this post and see it’s about Luisa’s Berlin. Her book was so lovely, I really enjoyed it and highly recommend to all. Thumbs up!

    • Thank you so much, Christy!

  73. Love this guide! Lived in Berlin myself for three years and can vouch for all these places <3 Would love to submit a Copenhagen guide to Cup of Jo!

    • Rosie says...

      Yes! Copenhagen is my favorite city and I’m going back in the spring. I would love some new recommendations.

    • Hilary says...

      Welp thanks to this comment, I just spent 20 minutes googling flights to Copenhagen and checking out AirBnBs. Berlin has been our favorite city so far, but it looks like Copenhagen may be next on our list!

    • Jessica says...

      Yes please! We are going this summer with our three kids and I would love some direction.

  74. Sharlene says...

    I have always wondered what Berlin is like. Looks like a city that’s honoring the painful past, while also looking toward the future. I love these kinds of posts – as someone who loves the idea of traveling & thinks it’s important, but somehow has never made it farther than the Bahamas, it makes the world seem that much closer to me.

  75. Ramya says...

    This is such a lovely write-up! Makes me want to visit Berlin ASAP.

  76. Lauren E. says...

    Wow, that story about the Berggruen Museum gave me chills. Berlin sounds like an incredible city. Also, I’m starving and off to Google “baumkuchen near me.”

  77. Kate says...

    From another (full) Italian who moved to Berlin: thank you Luisa for the city guide. It’s so nice to learn what other people in this city where I still don’t feel at home :/ I particularly love winterfeldplatz markt!

    • One of my favorites!