Design

Have a Delicious Weekend.

pizza

What are you up to this weekend? It’s supposed to rain, but part of me loves getting to laze around inside without any guilt. :) Hope you have a good one, and here are a few links from around the web…

Mother’s Day is complicated, by the wonderful Anne Lamott.

Have you seen the new West Side Story trailer?

I’m the judge who approved the custody arrangement in the Parent Trap but in my defense I didn’t think they would go to the same camp.”

Mindy Kaling’s new audiobook is wonderful, especially the chapter on being a single parent.

Are these balls the same color?!!

I gave my underwear drawer a makeover.

12 moms on their secret strengths. Kate Baer’s made me laugh and nod. (New York Times)

Is this the perfect summer tee?

An honest swimsuit review. (Loved this!)

Candles are having a moment.

Salad on the same plate as dinner is one of life’s simple pleasures.

The documentary Trapped: Cash Bail In America reveals the major problems with cash bail. (Also, please consider joining us in donating to #FreeBlackMamas National Bail Out, if you’re able.)

Plus, two reader comments:

Says Anju on 12 reader comments on living fully: “This post reminded me of a ritual I had for a few decades. Each and every night, I used to blow a kiss to someone absent before going to bed. As a child this was often my dad — my parents got divorced and I saw him only every other weekend. As a teenager, the kiss was always for my current crush, embarrassingly enough. When my now-husband worked abroad for a very long year, the kiss was for him. When my grandma was in hospital, the kiss was for her. When we waited for our adopted child for a number of even longer years, the kiss was for them. (My baby is seven now and loves to hear about the kisses from mom.) And now, I have my husband and my baby right next to me when I fall asleep, and I can actually physically kiss them good night. I think that in my past lives, I often felt lonely and misunderstood, but still, there was always someone to send a kiss to. And now, I am surrounded by love and so very grateful.”

Says Emily on a sweet proposal story: “My (now) wife had been in a deep depression for the year before we decided to get married. After trying many medications, she switched to a new medication on a Monday and told me that she started to see color in the world again. By Friday, over coffee in bed, we decided to get married. No proposal, no ring, just antidepressants.”

(Photo by Homemade Napoli Pizza.)

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  1. Sarah says...

    “You might be wondering how it was decided which parent got which child. It was actually quite simple: the British mother got the British baby, and the American father got the American baby. Duh.“

    This was great!

  2. Hilary says...

    There was so much goodness in this Friday Roundup, but crunchy cold salad, you better stay the hell away from my warm, creamy pasta forever GOODNIGHT.

    • Agus says...

      HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHA

  3. Lisa says...

    While I do understand the sentiment behind all these inclusive things around Mother’s Day, it does make me a bit sad. I’ve been on both sides – we really struggled to conceive our first, and it got to the point where I became a hermit. Emotionally I couldn’t handle seeing another pregnant woman. But on the other hand – I have gone through so much to become a mother. I work really hard at it, so can’t mothers just have a moment to be appreciated for all we do? When I was in the dark time, struggling to conceive, I didn’t begrudge the women who were already mothers being celebrated. It also bugs me because I have yet to see somehting comparative come out about Fathers’ Day. If it’s not done for fathers, why is it done for mothers.

    • Lainey says...

      This is such a good point, Lisa! I hadn’t thought about it that way in relation to Father’s Day commentary. I love that Mother’s Day has become more about celebrating all kinds of mothering in recent years, beyond biological motherhood, but this idea that having one day out of the year celebrating motherhood takes something away from people who don’t have positive associations with motherhood is a bit of a slippery slope, isn’t it? For comparison, I’m Jewish and don’t complain every year about the pervasiveness of Christmas everything starting in October every year just because it doesn’t pertain to me or may make me feel left out at times.

    • Lisa says...

      I learned it from Caitlin Moran. She’s a British Journalist who wrote the book “How to be a Woman”: “I have a rule of thumb that allows me to judge, when times is pressing and one needs to make a snap judgment, whether or not some sexist bullshit is afoot. Obviously, it’s not 100% infallible but by and large it definitely points you in the right direction and it’s asking this question; are the men doing it? Are the men worrying about this as well? Is this taking up the men’s time? Are the men told not to do this, as it’s letting the side down? Are the men having to write bloody books about this exasperating retarded, time-wasting, bullshit? Is this making Jeremy Clarkson feel insecure?

      Almost always the answer is no. The boys are not being told they have to be a certain way, they are just getting on with stuff.”

      It’s very helpful!

    • NM says...

      LOVE THIS and THANK YOU. I was thinking the EXACT same thing as I read the beautifully complex piece from Anne Lamott. I was like— YES to all this… BUT when has anyone ever said all this about Father’s Day?!?!? This stuff drives me crazy. It’s like— not only can’t women “have it all”, whatever the heck that means— but the moment we get ANYTHING we have to obsessively deconstruct why we got it, if we deserve it, what we should say about getting it— and what we should say about wanting to ever have it to begin with— and last but not least, offer a lengthy disclaimer for all the above.
      To be honest, this is something I cherish about women (and of course it’s not the exclusive domain of women— there’s my disclaimer!). But just the fact that women have not had the upper hand (or any hand at all, oftentimes) in shaping the course of history, in building the foundations of “civilization” and its societal structures… So we are always at a vantage point for dismantling, and closely examining. ‘Cause we didn’t build the darn thing! Mostly, we’re just trying to hack it! Sometimes we get to build a little too. But anyway. Whenever you are not in the position of greatest power, you lack the privilege of “just” living you life in the “neutral” space of it being “just life”. It isn’t “just life” for women… so everything we say and do is by it’s very nature not “neutral”. We must explain ourselves, offer our apologies, disclaimers… and write very long comments on beautiful blogs like this. :)

    • z says...

      Why it needs to be explained is because for so long we have defined mother by childbirth, which is limiting and inaccessible to many. Therefore, it requires an examination by the individual and collective as to what we are actually celebrating and what does it mean- “mother”? The American market ingrains in us an individualistic idea of motherhood and so often when we think of mother, we think of a single family unit. Lamott and others are using the opportunity to redefine mother in a more inclusive, generous, uplifting way and to shine light on how raising children is and should be the responsibility of the collective community. I absolutely think Father’s Day falls into this realm too and hope we can be leaders in expanding and opening those ideas too. E

    • s says...

      Retail marketing is just the current, expert, AI-assisted method of exploiting women. Until women wake-up and recognize these strategies – and shut them down especially in the free-market – then we will continue to be diverted from what’s important to what those who generate marketing and social strategies want us to think about. That sector has been nearly exclusively been developed by men and what men think woman want to focus on.

      And now, if we expect soul-less AI-defined marketing perpetrated by male, 25 year old computer engineers with no life wisdom but with gargantuan bank accounts and ego’s to match (because they must be doing something right – right? 🙄 ) to be an improvement, than we deserve what we get.

      Women who sorted out the social programming need to be writing and defining these social narratives IN the fields where they have the most impact: the marketplace and we do that by being honest with our families/partners about how we want to be honored. Personally I think men don’t have to deal with it on Father’s Day as much because they are already celebrated by their paychecks – they don’t need much further social acknowledgement of their value.

      Want to celebrate the modern mom? Provide realistic paid maternity leave and childcare based on Europe’s sane and practical model. America and US business is openly hostile to those who choose to have children. Why do we just continuously accept it?

      How many highly educated, well-connected, if not directly employed in legislation, women ARE there here in these comments, but also just out in the world having babies who just allow themselves and other less-fortunate women to be constrained by insanely misogynist and anti-family offices? THIS is the work the privileged among us need to be doing in whichever sectors we are employed. Because only the privileged can afford the risk and as well have connections to the decision-makers. DISRUPT now or be exploited for life.

      I find this topic super upsetting as you can see but I want us as women to do better – I try my best every day but no one can do it alone. Join me, please.

    • s says...

      *meant to say “American POLICY” and “office POLICY”
      “Policy” must support life and well-being FIRST because that is the entire point of profitable business in the first place. Policy that ignores or defies this has lost the plot and must be re-adjusted to support success. Everyone knows by now that happy office environments are far more profitable.

    • ziggi says...

      @s
      Sing it, sister ; D

      We subsidize f*ing CORN for junk food but not childcare???

    • CS says...

      S: Very insightful comment. I am so lucky to live in Canada where for almost 2 decades now new parents have been given a full year paid maternity/paternity leave (The leave may be taken by the father instead). This applies to adoptive parental leaves, too.

  4. Sam says...

    I appreciate the Anne Lamott piece (and that you shared it), but does anyone else think we should just let moms have a day without like publicly delineating all the particular ways life can suck (by having a lousy mother, having lost a mother, wanting to be a mother but not being able to be…)?? To be clear, I’m not a mom. I wish I were. And I firmly believe people are insensitive to the ways in which what they do, post, and say undermines the dignity and ignores the challenges of the non-parent. But also…can we address all that on the other 364 days a year? Mother’s Day does not need to be such a gloomy holiday!

    • Jean says...

      I agree – I’ve been wondering about this too. It feels like one of those over-analyzing internet culture things. Mother’s Day can – and should – just be a day to say thanks to our moms/mother figures. Yet for the past couple of years I’ve noticed a trend in Mother’s Day apologetics, where every possible topic related to being a mom, not being a mom, etc., is brought out as a reason to not celebrate the day or, if one must, to do so with a subdued sense of guilt. It’s truly odd to me. I don’t have kids, don’t have a perfect relationship with my mom, but it’s a day. It’s a nice thing to acknowledge the incredible gift of life we all receive from our mothers.

    • S says...

      I agree! Life is complicated, yes, but why must we also complicate saying “Happy Mother’s Day.” Jean, I laughed at “Mother’s Day apologetics.”

    • Emily says...

      I agree and I’ve been thinking about this in the context of Father’s day. I’ve never seen these kinds of posts talking about men who wish they were fathers or people who’ve lost their father. I just became a mom this year (single mom by choice) and the road to get here was long and had a lot of sadness and acceptance of hard things and things not being how I wanted them to be. But I’m here and want to celebrate that.

    • Andrea says...

      Amen! It’s like not thanking the bus driver when you get off the bus. He or she may not be the best driver ever, but they are doing the work and should get some recognition.

      I think we need more days to celebrate and remember. Life has always been complicated, but setting days apart to celebrate is better than being too afraid of doing the not perfect thing. Women carry most of the burden of raising children in every society on earth. For the love of all that is holy, brunch a card is the least we can do.

    • Angela says...

      Yes!!!

    • t says...

      I loved the piece and I love Mother’s day. I took it as friend’s tight squeeze on my hand when they know I am in a situation where I don’t feel comfortable.

      It’s just an acknowledgement. It doesn’t mean mother’s day is gloomy or undeserved.

    • Maddy says...

      “Mother’s Day does not need to be such a gloomy holiday!” – well, no, but for some people it is. After I lost my mom 11 years ago, when I was 18, I found mother’s day to be so hard. In particular, all those emails from various companies in my inbox asking me what I was going to get for my mom for mother’s day.

      There is a reason Anne Lamott said at the beginning that it was ‘ONLY for those of you who dread the holiday, dread having strangers, cashiers and waiters exclaim cheerfully, mindlessly, “Happy Mother’s Day!” when it is a day that, for whatever reason, makes you feel deeply sad. ‘. As someone who is not yet a mother but is the daughter of a dead mom, mother’s day does make me deeply sad, but I also am still able to feel joyful for the mothers I know who receive joy and care on that day. It doesn’t have to be one or the other – some of us are allowed to feel awful just like you’re allowed to feel joyful and neither of us should feel guilty for feeling either way.

  5. Angela says...

    That Anne Lamott piece is utter bullshit. That was like bah-humbugging Christmas! How can we not just marvel at the female body, that it creates all life? Because acknowledging that hurts people’s feelings? C’mon now, since when do we have to throw the whole cake away because someone else chose pie? I showed my twins pictures from my pregnancy. They were astounded at how big my belly grew to provide a safe home for them. Nevermind all the other things that make me their mother. So I can’t have a day to put my feet up and ask for what I want? Like mothers need another person telling them they’re unseen? The act she puts on as if it’s brave, when it’s actually just rude, just for the sake of saying something scandalous. I have a very tenuous relationship, with my toxic, mentally ill mother. It’s far from sunshine and roses but she still carried me in her body for months, ffs. At the very least I could appreciate the sacrifice of bodily autonomy so a 2 minute phone call would suffice.

    • C. says...

      I am a mom, and I did not find it utter bullshit at all. I think it is a dumb marketing push cloaked in sentimentality. As much as I appreciate the female body and ability to create life, that is for sure not the messaging around mother’s day. I am perfectly happy making my own choices about loving and appreciating my own body, my mother, my son, my family, and all of the others who have provided support to my parenting along the way. I don’t need Hallmark to tell me who to be as a human being, or to try to get me to buy more stuff as a gift, and I don’t need others to approve of, endorse, micromanage, or dictate my relationship with my mother. If your mother is unseen and that bothers you then change that up why don’t you, maybe do so on more than one day a year. Mother’s day has turned into an obnoxious national homework assignment forced on people who did not sign up for the class.

    • Emily says...

      Pretty sure she also said at the very start – if you love Mothers Day, stop reading right now. Not for everyone.

    • Angela says...

      I just don’t get why Jo and others fell all over it, like it’s wonderful to demean mothering? To compare the complexity of that relationship to wire monkey mothering? No one was equipped for it adequately, but if you stuck with it, you learned how to mother. My 5 year olds asked why we celebrate mothers. For starters, everyone came from a mother, period. How is that not mind-blowing?

      She also said, I know I shouldn’t do this, I know people respond negatively to this but…. Which is typically a sign you should just not. I did actually stop reading then, until I saw the comments saying how brilliant the writing was. Hence the confusion in what was so brave about erasing the day.

      It’s sad you feel pressure to celebrate a day that means so little to you. Celebrating the day, whether it’s national donut day, or little league opening day is a simple joy. To feel such bitterness about a day?!? Homework is not mandatory, especially for a class you aren’t taking. If the pill is bitter, spit it out. I certainly feel no obligation to celebrate or be celebrated in any particular way. Every year I get better about asking for what I need. But I’ve put in the actual blood, sweat, and tears and I’d like 1 day a year for a little recognition from my family. Moms never get shit. They always put themselves last, so I will drink a bottle of champagne and have my meals all cooked by someone else, for one day Emily! Having to consistently listen to people, especially other women, even the high priestesses of feminism like Anne Lamott knock down the value, the labor, the work, the sacrifices, of mothering rather than extolling the virtues is just so patriarchal. C’mon now.

  6. K says...

    1. Wow that Anne Lamott post…Wow it’s so incredible when writing teachers are good writers and vice versa, Idk why that astounds me. There were so many lines that blew my socks off. I’ve never heard of wire monkeys before and that was such an intelligent reference and she just put it in there as if it was an off the cuff thought. Even if I’m not entirely sure if Mother’s Day is completely awful, I do agree with its flaws.

    2. I couldn’t BEAR to burn those candles!

    3. Loved the swimsuit review– sounds cliche, but confidence really does make a whole lot of things look good.

    4. I LOVE having crunchy cold iceberg lettuce with bolognese and romaine with cheese pizza and also cucumbers with japanese curry

    5. My favorite blurb in the 12 Mothers article is Jancee Dunn’s

  7. Charlotte Bennett says...

    I can’t read the Anne Lamott piece : I’m not on Facebook. Is it available anywhere else, for those of us who have rejected Zuckerberg?

    • Lala says...

      I’m not on Facebook either but was able to read it. Just click on the “not now” button when it asks you to log-in.

  8. Laura says...

    I’m beyond confused as to why Emily Henderson is writing about how we should stop photoshopping pictures and wear unflattering clothes… when she has literally the epitome of a perfect body by societal standards- an hourglass figure with a flat stomach. Every swimsuit looks perfect on her, so not sure why this is an ‘honest’ swimsuit review? Surprise- all these swimsuits look good on my size 6 body?

    • Liz says...

      Thank you.

    • haha Laura I felt the same way!

    • Lainey says...

      I had mixed thoughts on this post. On one hand, I appreciated her narrative about women in their 30’s and 40’s being screwed regarding body image and could highly relate to it. On the other hand, she clearly has a much more conventionally attractive figure and body type than the average 40-something (or really, the average woman at any age), so I find the idea of her being “brave” hard by posting pics that aren’t air brushed hard to swallow. She has the type of body, no airbrushing needed, that I dieted myself silly as a teen and young adult trying unsuccessfully to attain. That makes me think, “God, if I posted pics of myself in a swimsuit online, would strangers tell me I was “brave,” or would they just tell me I was disgusting, because my body looks so much less socially acceptable than this?” I have a few friends who have similarly conventionally “great” figures to Emily’s and also struggle with body image issues, and I don’t want to negate the real harm that those feelings present. But at the same time, when my size two friend talks about her cellulite, I’m going to take it a little personally, you know? I guess I’m just saying, without any judgment as to the author’s intent, holding up a curvy size six woman as “brave” is just taking us backwards.

    • Emily says...

      I think the point is that we all have varying views of our bodies. Our bodies may look great to the rest of the world, but to us look not so great. I think your comment is a good reminder that we are our own harshest critic! But it also doesn’t mean that our feelings about ourselves aren’t valid, even if others disagree.

  9. Meg says...

    Salad on the dinner plate dinner is my favorite! My husband and daughter are grossed out when I pile my arugula salad on a piece of pizza or mix radicchio in my spaghetti bolognese. It’s the best: acid and fat, crunchy and soft, cold and hot.
    But I am also a dip your hot salted fries in a milk shake kind of gal. The more contrast the better!
    I’ll also rock a puffed sleeve with abandon.
    Love your Friday line-ups!

  10. Kristina says...

    I love the article about the strenghts of mums. I have to share mine! I am the best in stuffed toys talking. It started when I bought a muppet when my daughter was about 1. She is 8 now and just today we’ve been to a long walk and for an hour straight she’s been takling to “Sheep The Adventurer” Hana even correts me when I forget the high pitched voice, ha! “Hey Mummy! It’s Sheep takling!!!” Now it’s just a play from time to time. But when she was little, this been a great hack when we’ve been somewhere long, or shopping or something. Once we’ve been running errands with talking apple. Anything was ok as long as it talked in a high pitched voice and asked serious questions about life around, haha!

  11. T says...

    I just wanted to say thank you for all of the positive, empowering, courageous comments in the comment section. I’ve been reading this blog a long time. As I’ve become a mother of 2 over the last 3 years, left a challenging and invigorating career in medicine, and become a stay at home mom, I always feel like I’m in the middle of a conversation with good friends here in the comments. Thank you for the community Cup of Jo.

  12. Emily says...

    Mmmmm, that pizza photo reminds me of the homemade pepperoni pizza we had last night, with the awesome pepperoni that curls up on the edges and holds pools of pepperoni grease. My four-year-old said, “That pizza has bowls of water on it!”

  13. Kate Rookes says...

    Thank you for sharing! I donated to National Bail Out in honour of my sister for her first mother’s day!

  14. Emily says...

    Salad on the same plate with dinner is a real debate with my circle of friends. I’m on team yes. There’s nothing I love more than a big loaded baked potato or pasta dish mixing in a bit with my salad! I feel like I end up using less dressing this way too, and that saves me calories.

  15. Sylvie says...

    « I’m not sure how I’m going to feel sober in the sun » Best line ever in the bathing suit article you linked!!

  16. Michelle Morey says...

    Parent Trap article is making me laugh cry loudly. Thanks!

  17. Courtney Cooper says...

    What kind of dirty mind do I have that I find all the cool candles so… sexual?!?

  18. Kay says...

    Until I saw this article I honestly thought that everyone had salad on the same plate as their dinner!! It’s just normal in our household and everyone that I know too. Having it as a separate course or on a different plate would only be done in a restaurant. I am English, maybe you do things differently elsewhere?

    • Angela says...

      We eat salad out of a bowl in our house. Just had a Cesar salad, steak and baked potatoes with corn on the cob tonight.

      I do agree. Something’s just taste better in combination, especially cold salads with rich contrasts.

  19. Lauren says...

    I read that as “Is this the perfect summer tree?” and was picturing glossy, dark green branches spreading over the perfect spot to lounge and socialize.

    I’ve never been so disappointed in a 100 dollar t-shirt.

    • CS says...

      LOL!

  20. tegan says...

    i would kill for pizza on the same plate as (and touching) a salad with a yummy vinaigrette rn

  21. Alice says...

    The Parent Trap judge—bahahahahaha!

  22. rachel says...

    ps: there are some great tutorials online for making twisty candles yourself!! you just soak the long candles in hot water and twist away! In case you have some straight “boring” candles laying around ;-)

  23. rachie says...

    Salad on the same plate as dinner is LIFE. One of my favorite pizzas from CPK was the BLT pizza that was a normal hot pizza with cold salad on top. BOMB

  24. LuLu says...

    So happy you linked to Miss Moss. One of my favorite bloggers ever! I want her to design my home, be my stylist and be my friend!

  25. Oh I loved that NYT piece! Priyanka Mattoo’s made me laugh and Amber Tamblyn’s made me tear up. It’s very healing to think of about the particular strengths we bring to motherhood, especially when they’re not the usual soccer mom variety.

  26. H says...

    Thank you for that Mother’s Day post. I really, really appreciated that read.

  27. A says...

    Deciding to give audiobooks a try recently reopened the door to reading for me. So, thank you for suggesting Mindy Kaling’s audiobook. I’d love to see more audiobook suggestions!

    While I am suggesting ideas for stories, I’ll suggest one more. I was moved the story about children’s books by Asian-American authors. I’d love to see that story become the first in a series of stories highlighting children’s books by authors that share some aspect of their backgrounds/lives (e.g. Mexican-American authors, authors from the Mississippi delta, LGBTQ authors, etc). I think it would be fun to try to identify themes to celebrate the many different authors that contribute so much to children’s lives.

    • Sarah says...

      A, excited for you to get back into reading through audiobooks! Not sure what has kept you from reading recently but for me it became really difficult once our second was born, and audiobooks feel like they have saved me from some of the tedium of caring for kids and a home. I haven’t read read a book in a long time but listen to at least one a week and it’s one of my greatest pleasures and helps me relate to others about things I used to relate to others about. Some of my favorite audiobooks from long ago were The Help and Unbroken. More recently I loved the audiobooks for Transcendent Kingdom and This Is How It Always Is. David Sedaris always reads his own books and has such a distinctive, great voice. And Tina Fey read Bossypants, too, and it was so great. Enjoy!!!

    • A says...

      Sarah, Thank you so much for the suggestions. In my case, the problem is tinnitus–persistent ringing in my ears. I can force myself to ignore it (enough) to concentrate on work, but not to read a book for pleasure.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you for these audiobook recs! I also recently enjoyed So Help Me Gosh, a memoir by Brooke barker about growing up mormon and converting to judaism.

  28. Me says...

    Blowing a kiss to someone absent is the best tip I’ve read in a long time.
    Going to start this practice tonight- lovely. Thank you.

  29. E says...

    Antidepressants led to my proposal too :)

  30. Erin says...

    or those jeans……sorry no I can’t

  31. Anna says...

    Looking forward to your Friday posts makes my week a little brighter. Thank you!

  32. Meghan says...

    WOW I am ready to have my heart wrecked by the new West Side Story.

  33. Chrissy says...

    For those who deep dived into the ‘candles are having a moment’ piece- I just came here to say that I headed straight to google to find out that R225.00 (In South Africa) is equivalent to about $16 US dollars. I almost had a heart attack when I FIRST saw that price before I googled and realized, ok, 16 bucks isn’t THAT terrible for some cool tapers.

    • Naseem says...

      For anyone who loves cool candles and is feeling crafty, most of the molds those candles linked are made from on etsy! Get yourself some wax, wicks, and go to town!

  34. Sarah says...

    Going out to celebrate my husbands birthday, finishing his penultimate grad class, and our first trip away from our triplets!! Dinner at Peter Luger tonight *drool* and MOMA tomorrow (more importantly, MOMA gift shop). Happy Friday!

  35. Amelia says...

    Thank you so much for highlighting Bail Issues and the mother’s day bailout!! It’s one of those issues that can seem niche and procedural, but is actually such a massive and horrific part of systemic racial oppression and cruelty today.

  36. Amy says...

    Happy mother’s day to this wonderful community. Love the anne lamott post and would add that someone does not have to birth a child to be a mother. Raising a high five to this great group of readers and especially to Joanna!

  37. K says...

    As much as it pains me, I have to say it: I am totally mystified by the puffed sleeve thing. It may be a character flaw to admit it, but there it is.

    • Lori says...

      I am SOOOO with you K – I’m not a fan at all!

    • Cookie says...

      What, you don’t enjoy looking like a football player or a court jester? :D

    • Emma says...

      Same, and they make me look like a 12-year-old from the early 20th century, so I really can’t get behind it.

    • ali says...

      Agree, and I wouldn’t call it a ‘tee’, it’s a blouse.

    • Emily says...

      No you are not alone! No puffs for me please, feels like a costume!

    • Louisa says...

      I like to think of fashion marketers daring each other, saying: “Okay – you got grown women to wear rompers. Nice job. Next dare: I bet you can’t make mom jeans popular.” “Okay – I’ll try to make mom jeans popular if you try to make the pirate shirt fashionable!” And they’re on some tropical island now laughing at us all.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Hahahaha

    • CS says...

      Hilarious! I must admit… I love the look! Lol! Though at 49 years of age, maybe I need to try the look on before buying! Hahaha

  38. Agnès says...

    Thank you for being such a sensitive person and posting the text of Anne Dermott; it was a great read. (and yes, the west side story trailer is goood; I was so sure it couldn’t beat the classic, but it probably can!!).
    Have a great week-end everyone! here in Paris, it’s still cold but sunny this week-end, so probably a picnic!