Design

Four Fun Things

Have you seen the new show Hacks? Legendary comedian Deborah Vance sells out stand-up shows in Las Vegas, but to keep her dates she needs to appeal to a younger crowd. So! A down-on-her-luck 25-year-old comedy writer comes to help write jokes. The chemistry between the actors is perfect, and the script is fast and funny. After a TV drought this winter, I’m happy to have a new show to sink my teeth into.

track shorts madewell

A reader asked recently: “Now that summer is coming, what’s the shorts version of soft pants?” I’ve been keeping my eye out for cute styles and here are four: denim, track, paperbag and linen.

toast

The boys usually have cereal in the morning, but the other day, we picked up a crusty loaf of bread and have been having toast parties in the morning, just piling on leftovers or whatever we can find in the cupboards. It’s a yummy way to start the day and clear the fridge.

Katie Sturino

I couldn’t love Katie Sturino more, and her new book Body Talk — a guide to embracing your body — should be required reading for men, women and children. An inspiring excerpt: “I am fat. It’s okay. You can say it. I can say it. Once I accepted that I was inherently, unconditionally worthy of love — and that this love and worthiness has nothing to do with my appearance and/or body but rather by pure virtue of being a human being — the word fat lost its power as an insult. I’m fat? So what! Throw a party for me if you care so much. So here’s the mantra: You too are inherently worthy of love. We should all repeat that over and over together. It’ll be fun, I think. If we can accept that our appearance (including weight and body type) isn’t the thing that makes us lovable, successful, fun, stylish, etc., then we can accept our weight as our weight, our appearance as our appearance. Nothing more, nothing less. It just is.”

P.S. More fun things, and the nerdiest tip.

(Toast photos by Mav.)

  1. Lauren E. says...

    I’m 7 months pregnant and will be LIVING in maternity bike shorts this summer! It’s definitely my version of comfy pants.

  2. Chiming in for some shameless self promotion! I design a teeny clothing label and we have lots of comfy shorts, specifically designed to be summer alternatives to sweats :)

    Plus, they are made in nyc.

    https://www.planteclothing.com/shop

  3. Rebecca says...

    May we all be able to employ the “nerdiest tip” very soon! I miss high fiving but soooo miss wrapping my arms around my people. As more get vaccinated, it’s the best feeling to hug again. And I can’t wait to try out the nerdiest tip.

  4. Ann says...

    I made my own Shorts by cutting off my favorite denim, worn out, holey, skinny jeans. Why did I not do this before?! They are the best! But I have to say I love everything mango is offering right now.

  5. Hannah says...

    The insights in Kate Sturino’s book are not new. From what I’ve seen of her work, it’s a superficial gloss on the (uncredited) work of fat activists who have been working for decades to dismantle fatphobia (and racism, ableism, misogyny, etc.) COJ highlighting a “size 12-ish” individual as the face of fat activisim is… well, it’s just not right. A great entry point for learning about fat activism is Instagram, even despite its algorithm actively working against fat bodies. I love @sparklejams because she consistently points outward from herself to academic research, the history of fat activism, and uplifts others in the community.

    • Caryn Lecca says...

      I just want to point out that while Kate Sturino is the author of the blog “size 12-ish” she no longer is around a size 12. She started that blog a very long time ago and is a valuable voice for plus-size bodies. We shouldn’t take away from her positive message even if you don’t deem her large enough, which is shaming in itself.

  6. Becca says...

    I’m finally watching Watchman — which is incredible, have you seen it Jo?— and Jean Smart is one of the best parts

    • Rae says...

      Seconding Becca. Watchman is A+ and Jean Smart is amazing in it.

  7. Cooper says...

    Has anyone else watched the NBC/Peacock comedy “Girls 5eva” with Sara Bareilles and produced by Tina Fey? It is DELIGHTFUL! It’s not a show I expected to love but the quick wit, nostalgia, and hilarious song lyrics are such a mood-lifter! And so great to see a show featuring women in their 40s!

    • EG says...

      Girls5Eva is so good! I love it!

    • Meg says...

      I cannot get the songs out of my head. It’s becoming a real problem. But the whole thing is so delightful – they’re all so good!

  8. Laura says...

    If you like Jean Smart (or Kate Winslet, or murder mysteries, or just good TV) you absolutely must watch Mare of Easttown. The finale is Sunday and I absolutely cannot wait.

    • Lauren says...

      Seconding Mare of Easttown! We are on the edge of our seats in my house!

    • Susan L Young says...

      Sooo good!

  9. Wow! As someone who has struggled with my weight all my life, from obese teenager to early 20s anorexia to late-30s constant fear of slipping back into both equally bad habits, reading “love and worthiness has nothing to do with my appearance and/or body but rather by pure virtue of being a human being” is so beautiful. Thank you.

  10. Emm says...

    4 fun things indeed!

    I would happily read a full post on these toast parties and another featuring Katie Sturino.

    • Jamie says...

      Oh my gosh – I second that! Yes to both toast parties and Katie Sturino. I started her book and its wonderful.

    • Tovah says...

      I’m pretty sure there was a week of outfits or beauty uniform with Katie Sturino a few years back!

  11. Marlot says...

    oh yes my child just loves leftovers for breakfast. Rye bread with seeds and gorgonzola all the way for MY kid! lolololol

    Nice that your kids are willing to eat arugula for breakfast though. So anyway.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Oh that toast photo was taken by my friend Mav in maine. My kids are more about peanut-butter-and-jelly or butter toast :) and then I eat the weirder odds and ends from the fridge!

  12. Colleen Wenos says...

    All here for soft shorts, already bought 2 pairs of paperbag from old navy and love the baleaf athletic short brand on amazon.

  13. Kelly says...

    Love Jean Smart & I was excited to see the book rec from Katie Sturino- I’m looking forward to reading it! I sure wish there had been even one pair of shorts linked in your roundup that would have fit me! It would have made the body positivity message feel a little more authentic if you had engaged in some of the (admittedly tedious- I get it! ) work of curating a more inclusive clothes selection. The contrast of a fat-positive article with links to 100% clothes that don’t go up to my size 22 frame reminded me a little of my smaller acquaintances who hype Lizzo but can’t quit complaining about how fat they are in front of people considerably larger than them! I wonder if you’ve ever considered hiring a staff member who lives in a larger body to watch out for this sort of contrast in your website- it’s not even close to the first time I’ve noticed it. You all seem like genuinely lovely people, but I wonder if you’ve considered that some of your audience is…actually fat? This type of repeated exclusion makes me feel like I am not welcome here, Anyway, enjoy the long weekend!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      I actually had that thought as soon as the post went up and I’m correcting it now — thank you so much for your feedback, Kelly. Xo

    • Lisa says...

      Love this Kelly +1

    • Lindsey says...

      Exactly Kelly !

    • margaret says...

      I appreciate Kelly’s comment, very valid feedback. At the same time I feel like I often see images and celebrations of larger bodies on this website, which I love! So I want to voice my appreciation for that.

  14. Lauren says...

    Last Spring, Everlane engaged in union-busting activities and fired many workers associated with union organizing activities just as the pandemic was beginning. Additional information came out showing how poorly Everlane treated Black workers, as well as requests for more inclusive sizing. Quite a few people spoke up as COJ continued to link to their clothing. Since then, I haven’t noticed any further links to Everlane until today. Everlane hasn’t corrected its actions and continues to employ poor labor practices. I wish COJ would take this into account when deciding partners and linking to products.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/26/fashion/everlane-employees-ethical-clothing.html

    • Lauren says...

      Thank you for pulling the everlane link!

  15. K says...

    Throw a party for me if you care so much LOL!!!

    • M says...

      I came here to say the same! I love that soooo much, haha.

  16. EG says...

    If you are looking for a new show, you have to check out Girls5Eva on Peacock. I binged the whole thing in the free trial and it was so worth it. It has brought so much joy into my life!

    • Cooper says...

      I came on to say the same thing! Such an unexpected delight! I laugh every time I think of the “New York lonely boy” joke.

  17. Vanessa says...

    why would you post something about whether your women followers ‘care’ about height when dating underneath a post about ‘weight’? Are you that insensitive to those men (or women) with height issues (even if just in their mind) that you would ask HOW MUCH DO YOU CARE IF THE GUY IS SHORT? and on top of it, ask about genetics? this area has caused people so much pain and anguish. and to only post people who think it’s funny demonstrates your callousness.

    • Beth says...

      Thank you, Vanessa! I agree. This article bothered me so much and I think it’s a repeat.

  18. Denise says...

    OMG, Jean Smart!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 50 heart eyes emojis! I’ve been on a streaming break but this might bring me back.

    • Denise says...

      I was so excited about Jean Smart I neglected to read further. I now also want to add that although body positivity is great & I applaud Katie Sturino, if someone called me fat I’d have to restrain myself from punching them in the face. Commenting on a person’s body of any type is verbal violence. I have a friend who is likewise offended by being called skinny. There is never a reason to comment on anyone’s body. Compliments can be about how smart, how stylish, how funny, how cute those shoes, you look amazing today, or anything at all but not about body. People often say “you look like you’ve lost weight” which is so RUDE & punch-worthy. So yes, go forward and be positive about yourself and your body but no, absolutely do not call people fat. (disclaimer, I have never actually punched anyone but it is an impulse I overcome all too regularly.)

  19. Jill says...

    Is ‘fat’ one of these words that you should only reclaim if you fit that category? I love that quote from Katie – it’s so life-affirming and just plain downright sensible! Of *course* a person’s appearance is unrelated to them being worthy of love and respect! And I can see that using euphemisms like ‘big’ or ‘curvy’ just help to reinforce that there’s something wrong with being that size, because the very existence of a euphemism requires you to tiptoe around the concept. But I still can’t think of calling my dear, larger friend ‘fat’ (who has carried around a lifetime of body shame) without imagining it would deeply hurt her. But it’s so messed up that a description of someone’s bodily appearance has such deep power to hurt!

    • S says...

      Yes, I still don’t really know how to approach this subject. As a smaller person I would be way too uncomfortable to call someone else “fat” as a term of empowerment but think it’s awesome for the folks who enjoy reclaiming it for themselves. Maybe it’ll eventually evolve in the way the term “queer” has where basically anyone can use it comfortably.

    • Lane says...

      As someone who is 100% fat and has been my entire life, it’s actually really calming to accept this word as nothing more than an adjective – no different than thin, tall, short, blonde, brunette, etc.

    • Nona says...

      I mean, better rule of thumb — don’t comment on other people’s bodies at all?

    • Erin says...

      I agree that, although Katie is inspiring, not commenting on people’s body shape at all, ever, is really the way to go. I am skinny and slight, it’s just how I came, and I am suuuuuuuper uncomfortable when people comment on my body shape. “OMG, you’re so thin!” often reads as “I hate you,” “You must have something wrong with you,” or “Let me project my insecurities onto your physical self.” No thanks! Let’s just find other topics of conversation!

    • Anon says...

      I agree with what Nona writes: let’s not comment about bodies at all. And, if approaching someone close to us about the topic of body size, ask them what they prefer to be called first and foremost? <3 It would be amazing to one day have the word 'fat' be completely removed from any negative connotation, and simply a descriptive word. From what (self-identified) fat friends and loved ones have told me, that would be major move to ending anti-fatness.

  20. lk says...

    I absolutely love Katie Sturino.

  21. Claire says...

    Such wonderful fun things! I could watch Jean Smart pick her nose and find it wildly entertaining – she is just so good. There is a recent Fresh Air interview with her that is very good too.
    I am also toasting over here, and my latest toast love: mayo and sliced tomato, salt and pepper.

  22. Amanda W. says...

    For those who hate hard pants, and want a summer equivalent to their sweatpants (and find that most shorts are too short), I’ve fallen in love with these: https://jungmaven.com/products/hemp-shorts-french-terry-sport-short

    They’re a bit pricey, but natural fiber and seem really well made. And they hit me at just the right point on my thigh. They do seem to run out often, but restock fairly quickly. (Big fan of their shirts, too.)

  23. Bobby says...

    So I would love this if this could be a topic for a post. I’m totally on board with Katie Sturino, but I’d like to discuss the dishonesty most women have with each other regarding body positivity. I’ve NEVER had a man say anything negative to me about my body, but (formally) at 5’6 and 132 pounds I’ve ALWAYS had other women say mean things to me about how fat I was. I remember one woman, when I was interviewing for a waitressing job telling me I was too heavy (?!) to be attractive enough to work at that restaurant. I was constantly told by other women that I had “figure problems.” One friend said that she would be very uncomfortable being my weight (again 5’6 ,132) Finally, after hormone blockers for cancer treatment I gained 57 pounds, then ran into a woman who I hadn’t seen since I was diagnosed. She looked horrified and said “WHAT HAPPENED to you??” When I told her cancer treatment was responsible for the weight, she said, and I quote, “I’d rather have died of the cancer.” Seriously. So can we maybe have a discussion of why women will say they buy into body positivity and then act so spiteful. I can’t be the only woman who has experienced this.

    • CS says...

      I am so sorry you have been the victim of such horrible comments. I hear what you are saying and agree 100%. In my experience, it has been women who are cruel to other women! I have certainly suffered cruel comments (about being too skinny) and these have always been from women.

    • Isabelle says...

      Wow, I am so sorry you have had these horrible things said to you. I’ve been on the receiving end of similar comments and it was always girls/women – never men. The first one was in 2nd grade and I am now 52 and still carry it with me…

    • K says...

      That is so rude of these people, Bobby. I think there is nuance in commenting on someone’s weight, sheerly because of appearance is so unnecessary. I think excessive weight gain can be tied to unhealthiness and on the other side it’s not helpful to ignore that. But imo, just as I wouldn’t lecture a smoker on smoking if I barely see them or know them, I wouldn’t comment on a person’s weight if I barely see them or know them.

      Hmm my experience is with family members or older people (female and male) telling me I’ve gotten fat and it was clear that there top #1 worry was appearance (I guess you’d call it old school). Sometimes I would get back to back comments with one person saying I got fatter, one person saying I was too skinny, and it made me realize that it was more about the person’s lack of ability to think before speaking rather than objectively about my body. I also didn’t trust these comments because they would sweep much bigger emotional issues under the rug, so clearly their priorities were out of order. But alternatively I am thankful when my trusted loved ones honestly asked me hey, you look fatter, anything different in your life?

    • riye says...

      That sucks so bad. I hope you know those women are wrong (especially the cancer comment–I mean, REALLY??). Sometimes I think women are made to feel like we’re stuck in some kind of contest we didn’t ask for where we’re expected to compete to look like whatever other people have decided we should look like. Completely unfair and totally wrong.

      I was brought up that if I was uncomfortable with the way someone looked–I should keep my mouth shut. Because saying something could make my “problem” the other person’s problem. Also unfair and wrong. Of course if someone has toilet paper stuck to their shoe or accidentally tucked their skirt into the waistband of their underpants–say something! :-)

    • Ker says...

      This is so sad but unsurprising. I hope your cancer treatment is going well.

      Great idea about discussing this a bit more… I guess it’s clear that these women have not bought in to body positivity. Perhaps they played lip service to it but they are not body positive. I assume it takes a lot of reading and self reflection to leave behind pervasive norms about female beauty and value. It seems as though the women who said this to you haven’t even started this work. Almost everyone upholds patriarchy and suffers for it, men and women both. It’s the air we breathe. Unless we’re actively challenging it, we’re permitting it to continue as the norm. These women are at the extreme end of upholding it, but many people (including me although I’m trying to change) allow it through tacit buy in.

      If I may add, I was very taken with Katie Sturino’s point about leaving behind a focus on the attractiveness of women’s bodies at all (body neutrality). I think many of us (me) get caught at body positivity which expands the range of bodies that are considered are beautiful. But do we need to be beautiful? Some people’s physical selves may simply not be beautiful to others. Who cares? It has nothing to do with their value. Are we aiming for a world where all people walk around feeling physically beautiful and are considered physically beautiful by others? Or are we aiming for a world where we think a lot less about physical appearance at all? Or maybe we want a world where we only focus on the aspects of physical appearance linked to choice (like style) rather than genes (like the symmetry of someone’s face, their weight)? I don’t have answers… I also think this is hard to discuss because “beauty” means so many different things (physically attractive, physically appealing and pleasant to look at, to have a good character, to be a positive presence, etc.).

    • Sadie says...

      This is such an important discussion. I have chapped lips, I always have and probably always will. My mom, friends, and aunts all buy me chapstick, lip masks — you name it as GIFTS! Like they are doing me a favor when they are actually just pointing out my flaws on my birthday.

    • Laura says...

      Just chiming in to say that I’ve absolutely had many men say negative things about my body, in addition to women. I don’t know that it’s dishonesty- a lot of women still don’t ‘agree’ with the body positivity movement. I think the main thing is that society needs to catch up to the fact that thin does not automatically mean good/healthy/better. Once we can all agree on that, women will probably stop feeling as though it’s their job to get other women to be thin too.

    • Bobby says...

      Thank you so much for all the kind feedback! 1) my cancer treatment is going very well, Thank You Ker. I got into a clinical trial at Sloan Kettering, which if you have to have cancer, is like winning the lottery, technically I’m stage 4, but I got to NED, or no evidence of disease three months after the trial. I’ll know in June if I’m one year cancer free…. And 2) Except for the cancer comment, the overwhelming amount of body shaming fat comments I got were when I was 132 pounds at 5’6. I just don’t get it, and never did.

    • Cooper says...

      Yes! Such an important conversation! Also, I’ve been surprised at how deeply affected I am by other women’s comments about their own bodies. The women in my spouse’s family are all very disparaging about their own weight gain or overly praise weight loss as a moral triumph. It makes me dread being around them!

    • em says...

      it is EYE OPENING to hear how hurtful and selfish people can be with their words. I’m so sorry. cheering you on and crossing my fingers for continued NED <3

    • Minnie says...

      I know you meant well but the specificity of this comment kind of made me feel bad about myself all day (the part where you specifically said that you were bullied for being 5’6 and 132 pounds … a completely average weight… about what I am at my most lean). I feel like it’s important to not put bad mojo out in the world in connection to certain weights and sizes, even if you were just quoting your bullies. It can be really triggering.

    • Haylea says...

      Yes, my husbands family always comments on my appearance whenever I see them and it makes me nervous to spend time with them. My son was born on Easter Sunday this year and it made me realize that if ever there was a time to stand of for myself and live my values it’s now. So when they comment on my postpartum body and respond by saying that my body is not a topic of conversation. And it’s awkward as hell but it makes me feel better

    • katie says...

      Minnie, I’m sorry Bobby’s comment made you feel bad. However, I disagree that we shouldn’t talk about it. What’s so disgusting about her being bullied is that she’s not fat or big in the slightest. Her weight/size at 5’6″ and 132 lbs is perfectly normal. That’s probably what, a medium in clothing? Or I’m guessing some brands a small? I think it was important for her to mention it because it shows how awful people are and how many are still wrapped up in the model-thin, size 0/2 body image. That’s really bad and harmful, especially to young girls.

      We need to normalize real numbers.

    • Emily says...

      Katie – “What’s so disgusting about her being bullied is that she’s not fat or big in the slightest.” So the bullying would not be disgusting if she actually was fat? Or less so? I don’t think the answer to fat shaming should be “but i’m not fat” – it needs to be, what you think of my body does not matter at all . . .

    • Emily Honeycutt says...

      I have actually been told by two men that they absolutely love me, but they only like extremely thin girls so they could not date me. At the time it was crushing, but I have the best husband in the world so it all evens out!

    • Anon says...

      @Katie: I agree with all you said. Please, though, remember that for some of us 0/2 is a “real” number (and we get some pretty cruel comments directed at us, too). Please, use more inclusive language such as “diverse” numbers or “a range”of numbers. I know it is not intentional, but dismissing anyone’s size as not real is just not positive. Thanks for considering this perspective.

    • Anon says...

      @Emily: I see what you mean. But I think Katie just meant the fact that the original commenter was not even overweight shows how ridiculous body shaming is, and that it is not based on the victim but rather the attacker. It’s the attacker’s negativity that is being exposed, not the victim’s “flaws”. There aren’t really any flaws except the cruel behaviour. I don’t think Katie was saying it is okay to shame overweight people, at all.

  24. Amy G. says...

    Plus Hacks features MEG STALTER!!!!!!!!!!!

  25. Allyson says...

    I always come back to “my appearance is the least interesting thing about me.” I’m a 5’10”, plus-size (barf-hate that term. once again why did that label stick to women but miss men?), 34 year old woman with tons of gray hair. And I’m beautiful. I know I am because my 3 year old tells me as she’s standing on the kitchen stool, helping me make rice crispy treats, hugging me from behind saying “mama, your body looks nice.”

    When I worry about taking up too much space (on airplanes, around men with their obvious baggage, in stores where NOTHING comes in size XXL or women’s shoe size 11), I just remember that’s THEIR shit. Not mine. Imagine having a problem with someone else’s body. What a tilted, fragile state to be in.

    • rosieb says...

      But how would you feel if you didn’t have anyone who told you?

    • Emma says...

      Allyson, yes! I love how you say this. It IS their shit (the patriarchal shit that so many are still unconscious of carrying), and it’s such a tilted, fragile state. I hope we can all heal. I’m working on it continuously.

    • Allyson says...

      Rosie – I’d feel the same. It’s just a reminder for all the shit opinions out there, there is my daughter who loves my soft, warm, cozy body that sheltered her and continues to do so. This wasn’t meant to read like her assessment of my appearance is validation, but more like the function of my body in the great, wild world is beautiful. Are you worried about being told your beautiful or others taking that to mean more than their inherent worth?

    • Kim says...

      I see all of that. And I am so appreciative of your comment. But, as a society, how would you recommend we deal with people on an airline who might be spilling over their seat? Or cause extra health care costs? I ask this not as a challenge. I just don’t know how to think about it. (And personally, while the health care costs are removed, the airplane seat thing is quite real for me.) I appreciate in advance you engaging or directing me to resources. Sturino is the only fat account I follow on IG.

    • Kelly says...

      Hey Kim,

      You asked “how would you recommend we deal with people on an airline who might be spilling over their seat? Or cause extra health care costs?” I would challenge you to reframe those questions to “how can we deal with airlines who intentionally design their services to be inaccessible or unpleasant for so many of their customers? How can we deal with a health care system that is so rife with discrimination and inequity, along with being so expensive?” I have a feeling that if more of us, of all sizes, started asking these questions, we could create a more just world for all.

    • M says...

      @kim since you were asking for resources, you should check out the podcast Maintenance Phase hosted by Aubrey Gordon (@yrfatfriend on Twitter) generally, and specifically the “Anti-Fat Bias” episode.

      They also touch on the airplane issue and point out – have you ever sat next to a 6’10” basketball player on a plane? Bodies come in a lot of shapes and sizes and airplanes are too small for a lot of them.

    • Irina says...

      @Kim – I think the problem is with the airlines, not with people’s bodies. Clothes makers have adjusted to average body size increasing in recent generations by adding larger sizes, and airlines should likewise adjust by making their seats wider. I know, it’s harder for an airline to do this, but we need to demand change. Small seats are uncomfortable for people with wide bodies, people with tall bodies, and people like me who have smaller bodies but need to pull their legs up to sit comfortably. An airline might not be able to made all their seats wider (after all, an airplane is only so wide), but maybe they could install several rows on each plane where there are two large seats instead of three standard ones, etc. Passengers would then have the option of requesting one of these seats when booking their flights. Priority seating for people with disabilities and space for wheelchairs on public transit are now the norm in the U.S., so why not larger airplane seats?

    • Ana D. says...

      Kim, that’s the airlines’ problem. They know what size humans can be, and they choose to make seats that prioritize their cost savings over the comfort and dignity of passengers.

    • Ana D. says...

      To expand on that, Kim, you’re expressing the desire to be comfortable in the seat you pay for on an airplane. Larger people want the same thing. So do people in wheelchairs, and those who intersect across both populations. And until an airline resolves this, it stays unresolved.

      Also for healthcare costs, there is no correlation between healthcare utilization and a person’s body size. If every person woke up tomorrow at the BMI you wished them to be, healthcare would still be as effed as it is today and a lot of people wouldn’t be able to fit into their favorite pants anymore.

    • margaret says...

      Quick response to Kim’s comment. I’ve heard many people in everyday conversation refer to increased healthcare costs as a basis for critiquing people over weight issues. What I don’t remember hearing (except in public policy articles) are references to increased healthcare costs as a basis for critiquing people for drinking wine or beer or eating red meat or cheese, etc. This suggests that some folks might simply be using “healthcare costs” as a socially acceptable basis for criticizing people’s weight. I certainly don’t mean to ascribe this motive to Kim – I really don’t. Rather, this was a question that I used to push my own thinking on body weight issues a few years back, so I thought I’d share it with this community.

  26. b says...

    I LOVE Jean Smart. From Designing Women to her star turn in Frasier as Lana, she’s such a freaking talent. Also, thank you for the shorts links. Off to make some purchases.

  27. dana says...

    I always want to wear shorts– I buy a pair or two each summer in the hope that they’ll work for me, but without fail the shorts will creep up my thighs when I walk. It’s uncomfortable and I can’t imagine it looks great. Has anyone found shorts that won’t do this? I assume it has to be a fit thing, but I don’t know how to fix it….

    • Karin says...

      For me, longer shorts eliminate this problem. You have to try a few pairs to find the length and shape that doesn’t creep up.

      For lighter-weight shorts that creep up, it might also help to try Chub Rub stick or similar on your inner thighs? I haven’t tried it for that purpose, but seems like it may work to reduce friction/clinging of the shorts.

    • R.S. says...

      I really hate the shorts creep too! I find that a somewhat sturdier fabric can prevent the creep, or I buy the longest shorts I can find – ones that hit a few inches above my knees. I bought some seamless shorts for wearing under dresses, and that’s a great way to be breezy and covered at the same time!

    • AN says...

      okay, i’m not sure if you’re looking for athletic shorts or like, “going out” shorts. so for athletic shorts: i have sizeable, strong thighs and a big ole butt (god bless), so any time i went for my neighborhood runs, my poor neighbors probably saw my entire ass by the end of it, because NO PAIR of shorts has ever stayed put – they all crept up my thighs and it was so annoying. until! i tried on the athleta mesh run racer shorts. i have worn them now for 20+ runs and not had to fix them one. single. time. they are SO comfortable. and, for “going out” shorts, the athleta farrallon and skyline shorts are the same! i am frugal, so spending $60 on shorts seemed outrageous to me until i realized i wear them each 1-2 times a week and feel so comfortable and confident in them.

    • Harriet says...
    • Julie says...

      You’re a lifesaver, AN! Just fell down an Athleta rabbit hole and also found the perfect summer dress.

  28. C says...

    I love Hacks and have also been watching Mare of Easttown. Basically my new rule is if Jean Smart isn’t in it, I’m not interested.

    • b says...

      This is a solid rule, C.

  29. Amanda says...

    OK! Jean Smart from Hacks also plays Kate Winslet’s mother in Mare of Easttown and she’s hilarious on that show. She looks like she’ll break her iPad at any moment while playing Fruit Ninja and keeps a pint of contraband ice cream in a bag of frozen vegetables. She’s the sardonic matriarch of her family, but has real vulnerability. It also took me a bit to warm to her character, in a way I’d expect if she were someone I knew in real life. I can’t wait to watch Hacks for this actress alone. I’ve been dying for a new show that will grab me and I think this is it.

    • Mallory says...

      Agree, I’m watching Mare (soooo good) and Hacks and I am just obsessed with Jean smart! So lovely to see these interesting roles for older women too.

  30. bevan says...

    This summer I plan to wear long loose flowy dresses instead of soft pants or shorts. I just want to feel pretty and goddessy. And comfortable ; ). I’ve also decided to pay more attention to fixing my hair. I feel the need to look as beautiful as I can. No reason. I think it maybe feels like a form of gratitude for making it through. So far.

    • Julie says...

      I’m going the dress route, too. Maxi dresses in breezy fabric, yes please! Have fun goddessing. :)

    • Erin says...

      Loose flowy dresses are my plan too! Except I live in the south so my hair will be in a ponytail or bun until October! Thanks humidity!

    • NH observer says...

      Totally agree. I considered buying soft shorts for about a minute today, but then realized I would never wear them when dresses are so much more comfortable! No zippers or fasteners, just pull over the head and go!

    • K says...

      Agreed! The my summer equivalent to soft pants is a cotton dress and no bra.

  31. Ash says...

    Hacks looks SO good. Thanks for surfacing it!

  32. jane says...

    Firstly, to the last segment, Katie Sturino looks Amazing in that gingham bikini, this coming from a lifelong skinny person. I love it.
    Secondy, Hacks looks incredible! Finally! I mean, wow. Thank you to all who created and got this off the ground.

  33. Abbie says...

    I am loving Hacks and can’t wait to read Katie’s book!