Design

Four Great Things

French bulldog sleeping

Whew! I got my second vaccination yesterday (yay) and when I woke up this morning, everything ached. I’ve been draggy all day and am now feeling a little better. Did you feel side effects of the vaccine? Hope everyone is doing okay!

garmi striped artwork

I’m always on the lookout for affordable art, and I recently came across this pretty room. The print is by Garmi, a small graphic design studio in Copenhagen, and you can find it here.

hatch target the nines

Speaking of affordable, Hatch, the beautiful yet splurgy pregnancy brand, recently launched a collection at Target called The Nines. The pieces — from striped shirts to floral dresses to paperbag pants — are priced from $24 to $40.

promising young woman

promising young woman

Whoa whoa whoa. On Sunday night, I watched Promising Young Woman, a dark comedy thriller about sexual consent and assault. Cassie (played by Carey Mulligan) was traumatized by an event that happened in med school and is seeking acknowledgement — and barring that, revenge. The day after I watched it, I felt consumed by it — thinking back to experiences in my life and also thinking deeply about how to raise boys who understand consent and will stand up to friends doing something wrong. (Here’s a past post about teaching little kids about consent.) I’d HIGHLY recommend this brilliant gut punch of a movie.

P.S. On sexual harassment, and what are your top three movies of all time?

(Dog photo by J. Danielle Wehunt/Stocksy. Artwork photo by Stephanie Baek.)

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  1. Karen says...

    RachelL,thank you,I’m from Canada and your comment made me feel a lot better.Stay safe and healthy.

  2. Cynthia says...

    Promising Young Woman was so so good

  3. Coco says...

    First dose, no issues, just sore arm, maybe fatigue. Second dose, headache, fatigue, some nausea, but within 24-36 hours it was over. Not a big deal for me. And I’m grateful for it b/c it means I can see my parents again. And I went to the optometrist. And this week, the dentist. And I can hike.

  4. Shena says...

    I clicked on your link and rented…then watched, Promising Young Woman. It just ended. OH MY GOD.

    So good. I’m dying. Thanks for the rec.

  5. Mimi says...

    Ack! Anybody *not* have side effects after dose 2?

    I had Moderna, dose 1: very sore arm/neck, Covid arm/rash 7 days later . Dose 2: covid arm/rash 1 day later, *very* slight (like, one degree) fever for a couple hours. Otherwise felt great. I have a normally/strong functioning immune system as far as I know but am worried since most people I know felt like crap! I hope my immune system kicked in properly…

    • Kelli says...

      Other than a sore arm, I had zero side effects after both Moderna shots (3/17 and 4/15) I’m also due with my third kid on 5/21 and had covid in mid January so 🤷🏻‍♀️

    • Sara says...

      You’re not alone and in fact, you’re in the majority! Around 70% of people in the studies did not have side effects – it’s just that the 30% who did/do are very vocal about their experience. Some immune systems do their job quietly, others do it while making a lot to noise but thankfully both types do an excellent job protecting us after vaccination.

    • LK says...

      I didn’t have side effects. My husband had very light fatigue.

  6. Holly says...

    I got the Moderna vaccine and I just felt hungover. It feels so good to be fully vaccinated.

  7. Amy says...

    Is Promising Young Woman triggering? I really want to watch it but news articles about sexual harassment very much trigger my own experiences. I’m curious to know if PYW would help my trauma or do more damage.

    • E says...

      I would think no, but I’m very hesitant to recommend because everyone’s level is so different. I’m fairly sensitive (couldn’t watch I may destroy you), and found it so good and worthwhile. It is a comedy, it really is. And there aren’t any graphic sexual assault scenes, though they of course allude to things.

    • Nadine says...

      I found it triggering for me. It brought back some bad memories. But of course it’s so personal and I’m not sure whether it will be similar for you.
      Wishing you the best for your healing journey Amy.

    • Katey says...

      Yes, PYW will be triggering if articles about sexual harassment are triggering.

      I read the synopsis with spoilers and several great reviews. I am sure it is as good a movie as everyone says and I admire it for its story, subject, and its style. I’m glad it was made. However, I won’t see it. The movie is successfully evocative of misogyny and violence against women. It’s goal is to make the audience think and feel uncomfortable. It ought to disturb most of us and it may trigger some of us. It goes without saying, but you don’t have to watch this film, even if it is good.

    • Courtney says...

      I am one voice, but for me it was definitely triggering. I thought I had overcome my sexual assault from more than fifteen years ago and had seen the trailer for this movie beforehand so I thought I knew what I was getting into. I watched it right after it was released so I hadn’t talked to any friends about it. I wish I had waited for the reviews and thinkpieces to start trickling out. The trailer makes it look like it will be more “revenge fantasy” satisfying than it was for me. And listen, to be fair, right after I finished watching the film, I was in awe. I was stunned and wasn’t quite sure why. At first I thought it was just that it had been “a really good film.” I didn’t have the language until a few days later for how I was feeling. That’s when I gradually spiraled into a month of PTSD episodes, which I do not think I have felt since Kavanaugh was confirmed. Fortunately I have a therapist so I saw her for some extra sessions and that helped. I have a great support system. But this movie blindsided me for sure. Again, I’m one voice. But for my own personal nervous system and its vulnerabilities, I wish I had read a comment like this before I had seen it. And for what it’s worth, none of my comment has to do with the beautiful acting and talent behind the lens :).
      This probably has some spoilers, but the article I most identified with after seeing it was this one: https://slate.com/culture/2021/02/promising-young-woman-movie-review-carey-mulligan-ending.html.
      I hope this is helpful. Sending you a lot of love and care <3.

  8. Terra says...

    Promising Young Woman is a complicated movie, and I think a lot of what’s to be gained from it comes from understanding the critical response. I found it to be a really enthralling watch, but I’ve also found it helpful to seek out responses that explore some of the nuances and assumptions in the story.
    This one from Ayesha A. Siddiqi might be helpful for you, Joanna, and other readers to see the other side a little: https://ayeshaasiddiqi.substack.com/p/id-like-this-to-stop-praise-for-a

    Love from Toronto,
    Terra

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Oh yes I read that piece and have read other criticism. The movie is polarizing for sure. But I don’t agree with the criticism in that review and saw the movie and its nuances in a different way.

    • Christina says...

      I haven’t seen it yet, but I thought the discussion of it on the always excellent podcast Still Processing was really thoughtful and nuanced.

    • Jaime DeBiasse says...

      I agree with this assessment of Promising Young Woman. I watched it and thought it was powerful yet disturbing. But Cassie wasted her life and had it end too early, which is exactly what happened to Nina! Two women had to die for one to get posthumous justice? And if the system let the guys go free for rape, are we to assume now justice will prevail and the men will be convicted of murder? Suddenly righteousness will prevail? I also thought Nina would not have wanted Cassie to have wasted such intellectual potential, a chance at happiness with other friends, possibly romance, and break her parents’ heart by dedicating her entire life to misguided vengeance attempts. Ultimately I just thought it was frustrating.

    • Suzie says...

      I just read the review and I think it is off the mark. I felt like I had a counter argument for each point made.

      The movie is equally funny, horrible, devastating, shocking and cathartic. Bug if I had to make one change, I would use a different song than, Toxic. Although it was a funny music choice, what was happening was too sad for that song. But the other music choices were amazing.

      So in my opinion, the movie was very successful. It makes point after point after point in a way that no one except a character in a movie would have the desire or balls to do. It was an English Major’s dream.

    • S says...

      Jaime, my interpretation was that the ending was not supposed to seem realistic or reflect reality in any way. Rather, it was more like a fantasy ending for the sheer pleasure of seeing justice finally served (in a way it so seldomly is in reality.)

    • Terra says...

      Interesting to read the thread here! I meant my comment to be entirely earnest in offering one glimpse of the other perspective—not intending to align myself with either view. :) Like I said, a complex movie! But I do enjoy seeking out the gut check on these things no matter how I feel, as Joanna said she’s already done!

  9. Kim says...

    I am going to watch Promising Young Women asap. When I watch or read anything with themes of sexual assault or harassment it brings up so many memories for me. I used to think that if I let a superior know what was going on then the guy would get fired as he deserved – for some reason it ALWAYS happened at work. Every job I’ve ever had – when I was 16 a supervisor not letting me go on break until I told him how far I’d gone sexually; a supervisor who called me sweetheart and always felt the need to touch my shoulder or arm when he spoke to me; more recently a coworker who blatantly checked me out, looking me up and down as deliberately as possible the first time I wore a skirt after having a baby. Not one time did I not suffer incredibly for making these guys’ actions known. I’ve had to file restraining orders, leave jobs, gotten bad performance reviews in retaliation. I have questioned myself on whether or not it was the right move to do something about these men. I KNOW I wasn’t making something of nothing, but it’s hard to not feel that way when I feel like I was punished just as much. It makes me feel validated in my choices the more I watch and read about others in similar situations. Above all, I want to be able to tell my daughters about how they do not need to accept a man’s behavior or normalize it once they are at the age this happens to them, because I know it will.

  10. celeste says...

    I have the movie on my radar! Hope you feel better soon! We have our second shot 5/8 and my husband said, “oh before Mother’s Day.” I can’t think of a better reason to lay around :)

  11. Emily Estes says...

    “A Promising Young Woman”, is one of the best things I have watched in a long time. After the movie ended, my boyfriend and I just sat in the dark silent for a few moments. I love that this movie showed not just the stereotypical misogynist man who performs bad deeds, but enters the “good guy” into the conversation and how scary the two can be.

  12. Wink says...

    Joanna, I’m just coming here to give a *slow clap* for Alex’’s amazing article on Gen X and AARP in the Times.

    This paragraph made me laugh out loud.

    ‘The message may appeal to a youth-obsessed generation that is busy fine-tuning its 401(k) plans, while still getting tattoos, curating hip-hop playlists, and outfitting its children in Black Flag T-shirts.’

    But the whole thing is great.
    Check it out, friends!
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/24/style/generation-gen-x-aarp-oscar-ad.html?action=click&block=more_in_recirc&impression_id=41be0a22-a822-11eb-9551-7d7b4131e9d5&index=1&pgtype=Article&region=footer

    So good. This Xer approves!

    • K says...

      I think it’s so interesting that the majority of Gen X parents are raising Gen Z kids, and on social media I feel like it shows. I can feel the vibes of “Hey! We thought of that first! We romanticized our social lives using polaroids and disposable cameras, you just happen to be to be doing it more easily thanks to smart phones.”

      I also think that millennials are more similar to boomers than we care to admit

  13. Ann says...

    Let me just start by saying: I am very pro-vaccine and am scheduled to get my first shot of Moderna next Friday!

    But…my husband had one of those super rare blood disorders as a result of the first shot of the Pfizer vaccine a couple weeks ago and had to be hospitalized. We’re still in the thick of his recovery now. Thankfully, it’s not the J&J blood clots, which can be more dangerous, but rather something called ITP—where your immune system begins attacking your platelets. When he was admitted to the hospital he had almost no platelets (count of 5, and the normal range is 150-450), which meant he was at risk of spontaneous internal bleeding or bleeding out from minor trauma. The doctors believe that something about the Pfizer shot just caused his immune system to misfire and start attacking his own platelets. We’re not sure if that means it didn’t also learn how to defend against COVID. And they are advising him not to get the second shot, in case it happens again. We had hoped he could try J&J but with the blood clot reports, we’re just nervous about anything having to do with his blood! So we are living in a bit of COVID limbo until general herd immunity comes around.

    The weirdest part of this whole experience—not just him having to be hospitalized and our first brush with serious medical conditions, as newlyweds, no less—has actually been the stigma we feel sharing anything negative about the vaccine. We are very pro vaccine and NOT right wing crazies in the slightest, but when he first went to the hospital, the doctors wouldn’t even acknowledge this was related to his shot, which he got one day before his (extremely subtle) symptoms appeared. The only way we knew about this condition was from a NYT article that was published back in February…we later contacted that reporter to be put in touch with other patients for info sharing and she told us she had a LOT of pushback within the NYT for publishing anything negative about the vaccine. But people need to know what to look out for in the extremely rare chance this happens to them. That NYT article potentially saved my husband’s life!

    So all to say…please be on the lookout for any unexpected bruising or petichiae (small red or purple dots) after your shot, especially on your lower extremities. My husband had very subtle bruising on his toes and a light dash of those dots…it almost just looked like a rash. If you see anything funny, get a blood test for platelet count!

    • Claire says...

      Thank you for this, Ann! This is really helpful to know, and I’m sorry that you had such a negative experience. I hope that your husband is doing better <3

    • Claire says...

      Thank you for sharing this important information, Ann. What an unfortunate and scary situation on so many levels. No good comes of information related to medical care being so heavily politicized. The medical professionals on the front lines must have seen the worst of it. Crazy. I hope your husband gets good care and continues to improve. Wishing you both comfort and an easy, safe recovery.

    • Tilly says...

      Wow, how awful for you and your husband. Like you, I am also pro-vaccine, but it is important for all side effects to be reported so that people know to be vigilant. Wishing him a speedy recovery.

    • Becca says...

      I hope that your husband continues to improve. That sounds very scary. Do doctors think that if your husband had contracted Covid, his body would have reacted similarly? I’ve been curious about whether people’s reactions to the vaccine might mirror how their body would react to Covid. But, regardless, I’m happy that the NYT article was published, and that you had read it. We often have to be our own advocates, which can be quite frightening.

    • Erin says...

      Thank you so much for sharing your husband’s experience, Ann! I hope that he’s doing much better.
      I met with my immunologist yesterday and he feels that I’m at a high risk of adverse reaction and that none of the available options are safe for me, so I’ve been advised to keep waiting. I am so fortunate that I was already aware of my immunodeficiency and was able to discuss options with an expert, though I wish the news would do a better job of conveying both the importance of vaccination and the potential adverse reactions. While rare, they can be serious and the general population really should be made aware of how those side effects may manifest, so they can seek medical attention if necessary.
      My mother-in-law yelled at me and told me I need to “get back to living life” but, for some of us, the best path towards normalcy is trusting our loved ones to get vaccinated while waiting for a better formula for our unique biochemistry. Apparently there are over 100 vaccines still in development, so it’s coming. There is hope.
      Thanks to everyone who has been or has plans to be vaccinate–I appreciate you all so much and feel safer because of you!

    • Ann says...

      Thanks all for the good wishes, everyone! He’s at the hospital for another round of bloodwork as I type. Fingers crossed things are trending upward. And yes this whole experience was certainly a lesson in being your own health advocate for sure.

      And Becca, that’s a great question. They don’t know unfortunately! But ITP HAS been a symptom of COVID in rare instances, so it’s possible (same with blood clots and blood “thickening). They also don’t know if Moderna or J&J would have had the same effect on him (and why they’re asking him to hold off on another shot for now). The whole thing is still really new so there’s a lot that they don’t know!

    • Jenny says...

      Thank you for sharing, Ann!
      I also have ITP, and also got the Pfizer vaccine. After the 1st dose, my platelet dropped from 55 to 41. But it came up to 48 before the 2nd dose, so I went ahead with it. After the 2nd dose, it went down to 24 – enough to make us scared but not enough to be admitted to the hospital… My doctor ordered daily CBC (platelet count blood test) last week and fortunately it slowly climbed back up, I was at 45, last checked. That was traumatizing for a needle phobe like me, but I’m sure it’s nothing compared to your husband’s experience. Wishing him a speedy recovery!

    • Ann says...

      Thanks for sharing your experiences, Erin and Jenny! I read everyone’s replies to my husband too, who says this is a very nice community :)

      Erin—sorry you’re getting pushback from your family! It’s hard to just “get on with it” when it comes to very valid fears about your health! We did talk to one doctor who wanted my husband to get the second shot “just to see what happens”—for science, basically. When it’s your own health though, you have to take the steps that feel comfortable for you. And I completely agree. We are also very much depending on those who can to be vaccinated!

      Jenny—daily CBCs! Ouch!!! Glad to hear you’re back to near your baseline. His bloodwork wasn’t back up into normal, but stabilizing it seems around 100ish. And who knows—maybe that was his baseline before the shot! Ach, it’s crazy. A few weeks ago we didn’t know a THING about platelets & CBCs hah.

    • J says...

      Ann, thank you so much for sharing this and the nyt article reference. My son has chronic ITP and I’ve been struggling with what decision to make when the vaccine is available for his age group. I have an appointment with his dr next week and look forward to hearing what she has to say. Great job on getting the info your husband needs and sharing with us.

  14. Mel says...

    My husband got his second Moderna shot 2 weeks ago and the next day slept 19 hours. He got up to go lay in the tub and run water slowly over his head. I managed our 2 kids and 3 nieces and nephews. He had a very achy arm after his first. After my first pfizer my arm was sore for maybe a few hours, like i’d done one armed pushups but not bad at all. (I chugged water that day and did pushups and chaturangas when I got home). My second pfizer is Saturday. I’m pumping my body full of all the holistic goodies this week and will continue after moreso: water, bone broth, echinacea, elderberry, ginger, etc. After my shot i’ll take a hot epson soak. And my husband will get the weekend to care for the girls while I hopefully sleep and watch Bridgerton :) Made reservations at a restaurant for 2 weekends from now and booked a sitter. SO excited!

  15. Annette Terrell says...

    I am a long time reader and usually feel well represented in opinion here. I do not feel safe signing myself or my children up to receive the vaccine. The side effects are just beginning to surface. The vaccine is being pushed out way too fast. Follow the money…

    • Claire says...

      I do get this concern. This has been a year where one has to pick which fear they can live with. For me the fear that took root was the potential heartbreak of family members dying sick, alone, and afraid in a hospital. Now my entire family has been vaccinated, including my 90 year old parents, my 19 year old son, and a spectrum of ages in between. Everybody is fine. We all felt strongly that we’d rather deal with the controlled and temporary side effects of a vaccine than play Russian roulette with the actual virus. Desperate times indeed. Wishing you peace and health and safety, whatever choice you make.

    • Heather says...

      Aren’t the side effects surfacing are more or less the same side effects we’ve been warned about in clinical trials? With some exceptions of course (I don’t remember the impact to periods), but thats expected to a degree as it goes out into the wider population and is used in mass.

      The pause of J&J based on blood clots (which…were significantly less than blood clots on current drugs like birth control) should prove that they take any adverse reactions seriously.

      Simply saying following the money seems a bit lazy and borderline conspiracy theory here. There are multiple vaccines (of various types), across multiple companies and countries as well as multiple US administrations – there is not a single entity controlling this that has tricked everyone.

      These vaccines are a miracle that will save lives and let us get a semblance of normalcy back – they should be celebrated.

    • Laura says...

      I agree with Claire that this is very much a “pick your fear” situation: 1) the immediate or long-term effects of a new, very contagious, and still largely misunderstood virus, or 2) immediate or potential long-term effects of a new vaccine (albeit one based on years of research and proven technology)? I know what my choice is (was), but thinking of it this way helps me have empathy for those who choose differently. Also, for what it’s worth, I had zero side effects from either dose of the Pfizer vaccine.

    • Sara says...

      I agree with Heather, Claire and Laura’s points. Also, since the vaccine stays in your body for such a short period of time I don’t expect long term side effects from the vaccine itself. Any long term side effects would be from your immune response, which would happen with exposure to COVID itself.

    • Heather says...

      I also think, to Laura’s point about new technology, if that’s one of the main concerns then J&J is a great alternative. There’s just a lot of options out there which is great – people can pick the one that works best for them.

    • Kate says...

      I understand the fear of the unknown, and as someone who is decidedly not a medical professional (although I have stellar googling abilities), I also had concerns about a vaccine that was so quickly produced. (My concerns were not political at all–I am NOT an anti-vaxxer, and have been following CDC guidelines about masking, etc., all along, but sometimes you just have to wonder.)

      That said, I got the vaccine as soon as I could for two reasons:
      1. The long term effects of actual covid that are cropping for many are scarier to me than potential side effects from the vaccine. Many people who have minor symptoms from covid are now discovering devastating long-term effects to their health. Here’s one (of many) articles on that: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2021/04/unlocking-the-mysteries-of-long-covid/618076/

      2. As I said, I am not a medical professional, so beyond what I’ve read in various articles, I didn’t really “get” how the vaccine works (especially since mRNA vaccines are so new). However, one of my brothers is a medical doctor, my other brother has been a nurse for 15 years, and my boyfriend is almost finished with PA school. They are all people I trust completely, and who clearly know a lot more about vaccines and how the human body works than I do. They all got the vaccine and encouraged me to do the same. So I did. I get that the unknown can be scary, but just wanted to share my experience/thought process

    • Monica says...

      Annette, thank you for being brave enough to share where you are! As other commenters have shared, everyone has a reason for what they choose.

      Informed consent is required by law in this situation and each person has the right to be informed to their own satisfaction before opting in to this vaccine program.

      Catch phrases like “follow the money” may seem “lazy” to some people, and to others, it’s an invitation to practice critical thinking and seek understanding of who exactly is making these products, what their track record is, who is responsible if something goes wrong, who makes financial profit in the short and long term, and how these realities affect public policy. No one has to learn about these things, but many people who are “hesitant” are asking these kinds of questions and until open and unbiased discourse is allowed and encouraged, many people will remain “hesitant.”

    • K says...

      I totally get your fear. I feel like I’m in the gray area between taking COVID very seriously but also not wanting to be rushed into taking a new vaccine. There are very many valid fears about a new technology– such as potential autoimmune reactions in the short to long run. This isn’t to say bad things will DEFINITELY happen, but the risk should be acknowledged. No matter how many trials have happened, we don’t have the longitudinal time data yet, although that’s changing as each month passes. This isn’t even to mention the mostly untouched topic of viral resistance depending on how we roll out the vaccine. (It’s, from what I understand, similar to creating superbugs from misuse of antibiotics and antibacterials).

      I have plenty of friends and family members that have taken the vaccine and I never told them not to, only shared my reservations when they asked if I was going to. For many, the risk of getting covid is higher–they’re elderly, they’re doctors, etc. I’ve had people ask me if I took the vaccine as it’s one of those small talk topics of the moment, and then admit that they were wary of it too. My friend’s endocrinologist actually told him to consider holding off.

      I think the most important thing is to take people’s fears seriously, and not assume it’s selfish malice or ignorant stupidity. It’s not necessarily just a pro vaccine or microchip conspiracy dichotomy.

      I’ve lost count of the times evolutionary biologists Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying talk about it, but if you want to know that your thoughts aren’t unique, you might wanna check out their podcast: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=bret+weinstein+vaccine

      I learned this quote from them: “I cannot give any scientist of any age better advice than this: the intensity of a conviction that a hypothesis is true has no bearing over whether it is true or not.”-Sir Peter Madewar

      I think one of the prevailing problems of our era is the fear of something we (assume) we disagree with, being true.

    • Heather says...

      @ Annette – I do apologize for my use of the word lazy, that was in fact lazy of me to use instead of writing up something more nuanced and nicer. I had a gut reaction to the “follow the money” statement without any additional references or links and honestly haven’t found anything of concern with regards to financing – especially because so many different entities and countries are funding them and again, it varies widely. (The caveat on this is of course these companies are making profits, but they would do that with any new product and the layers of government approval should serve as a barrier to impede pure profit driven findings).

      On the flip side – completely understand hesitancy about the vaccine itself and only meant to emphasize there are so many options that might fit your particular situation and/or concerns.

      If its helpful – I had a friends mom who experienced the rare extremely adverse reaction to Moderna. Her tongue was swollen, vision blurred, and she had slurred speech. They are speculating she’s allergic to whatever component is in these that they called out in the early stages of vaccination, but essentially, she’s been told not to attempt another vaccination in the future.

      I was heartened when my friend herself still went to get the vaccine and the rest of her family is as well. She does have doctors in her family so I’m sure this perspective helped, but in addition to this, I know she was motivated in part because in order for her mom to be safe, everyone around her needs to be immunized.

      So again – apologizes for the tone and words of my response with regards to your “follow the money” statement.

      I do hope you’re encouraged by all the (nicer than mine) comments on here confirming their own hesitations and how they’ve been able to get over them. And again by the fact that these vaccines are the results of so many different entities and even technologies so if one really doesn’t suit you, I hope you consider the others.

    • L, MD says...

      Annette, I too was a hard no on the vaccine initially – and I’m a physician. I needed solid data, which I got when the results of phase III clinical trials came out. I do not trust pharmaceutical companies (who often do a world of good) implicitly; I do trust the New England Journal and required expert peer review. I then felt safe enough to be vaccinated and received both doses of Pfizer with only a bit of fatigue (or is that my two kids?) and a very sore arm to speak of. I hope that with time and countless people vaccinated with side effect rates mirroring what was seen in trials, you will soon have the data you need and feel safe enough. Until then, keep masking and we will do the same until all kids can be vaccinated!

  16. Lisa says...

    Congrats to you all on your vaccines!! 🥳
    This is weird to read where I am – right now, only people in priority groups get vaccines (the elderly, medical personnel and teachers, and some more), or, depending on where you live, you may be able to get on a wait list and get called if a dose is left over at the end of the day. My FIL is 78, and he hasn’t gotten the first shot yet (but at least he has an appointment some time soon).
    The government expects to open vaccinations to all in June, but of course not all people are expected to actually get an appointment that month. I am in my early 30s and think I’ll get my first shot maybe in August. Oh, and pregnant women won’t be vaccinated here, so I’ll better delay my plans :)

    I’m so happy for you all, wish everyone the mildest side effects, and will live vicarously through this blog during the next few months ;)

    • julia says...

      Hi Lisa! I’m curious where you live and why pregnant women won’t be vaccinated? Thanks xo

    • Lisa says...

      Hi Julia, I live in Germany. The commission (called “Stiko”) responsible for vaccines does not believe that the vaccine poses a risk to mother or child during pregnancy, but there is no data on the effects because pregnant women haven’t been part of the studies, so they don’t advice for it, either. They do, however, say that in special cases and after consulting with doctors, the vaccine may be given to pregnant women, especially if the belong to one of our three “priority groups” (depending on the risk of contracting Covid or having a severe case). As a result, it is not easy to get the shot even if you are willing, it depends on the doctor. Many doctors seem to wish that the recommendations were different. Other countries do not exclude women during pregnancy this way. Hope this helps :)

    • Julia Aynsley says...

      Hi Lisa,

      Thanks for your reply. This does help to clarify things for me :) I was especially curious because here in Canada they are prioritizing pregnant women. I certainly have always appreciated German healthcare philosophies and am especially impressed at your perinatal care. Best wishes to you!

      Julia

  17. Angela says...

    So, so sick this weekend after getting my second Moderna shot. Pukes, poops, fatigue, the worst body and head aches for 36 hours. Head and body aches subsided after 48 hours. Still so much better than the real deal. Yay, science!

    • Tilly says...

      Oh no, poor you! The same thing happened to my mother. My husband and I are scheduled to have our second shots on the same day and I’m now wondering if we should try to stagger them so we don’t both end up sick at the same time, leaving the kids to fend for themselves…

    • NH observer says...

      So sorry to hear that, Angela. Tilly, I would definitely stagger your shots if you can. My husband slept for a day after his second dose, and my reaction was even more intense, starting with severe chills about 10 hours after administration, continuing with body aches and extreme fatigue for the 12 hours after that, and finally a period of about 18 hours where I could not do anything but sleep. We have a seven-year-old, and there is no way both of us could have been out of commission at once. We both had Moderna, BTW.

  18. JOY says...

    I was pretty disappointed with Promising Young Woman-to me, a sexual assault revenge fantasy does not end with another dead woman. I don’t understand why we aren’t all talking about I May Destroy You, which in my opinion, was better written, acted, produced, and the message about resiliency and survival is positive and hopeful. Michaela Coel deserves every award. I mean, Emily in Paris was nominated for a Golden Globe while this show went unrecognized. Something is wrong.

    • M says...

      Wish you hadn’t told us the ending…

    • Taylor says...

      Hi Joy, just chiming into say that reasonable minds may differ! I’m a sexual assault survivor who has real life revenge fantasies. The truth of these fantasies is they only could ever become realities if I was comfortable dying to get revenge. I’ve always said that if I was ever diagnosed with a terminal Illness I would be going through my list of rapists castrating them as quickly as possible. I cannot do this now because I would inevitably die in the process! I cried real tears to see something I’ve thought so much about, what real revenge would look like, played out on screen—it didn’t feel like another dead woman—she was dead as soon as she decided to get revenge and she knew it.

    • Jules says...

      The beginning of this comment should probably say spoiler alert -_-

  19. Clare says...

    My only side effects from Pfizer were spamming family members with “I GOT VACCINATED” texts.

    • Megan says...

      LOVE it!

  20. Sarah says...

    Got terribly sick after dose 1, nausea, vomiting, extreme fatigue, horrible dreams, sleep paralysis. Literally felt like an out of body experience for 2 days. Now I’ve missed my period. I do NOT feel safe getting #2 and am seriously considering not doing it. Can anyone relate?

    • EmBed says...

      I didn’t get these symptoms after my Moderna vaccine, but I just wanted to chime in and say that I go through periods where I suffer sleep paralysis (usually when I’m sleep deprived — my worst times were postpartum and during college when I was partying a lot) and it is the absolute worse. I can’t say whether you should get the second vaccine or not — maybe ask your doctor or try and do some internet sleuthing on this at least? — but I just wanted to say I sympathize. Sleep paralysis is one of the most terrifying things I’ve ever experienced –sometimes I get so paralyzed I feel like I can’t breathe — do I know how you feel.

    • Annie says...

      Friends who had bad side effects with the first dose had a previous case of Covid (or likely Covid) and then didn’t have as extreme side effects for the second dose. The first dose ended up acting as the “booster” bc of their previous infection. So maybe that will be your situation too.

    • Angela says...

      Hi Sarah! I can totally relate! I just did that with my second dose, and had very mild to non-existent symptoms with my first. And yes, very VIVID dreams, didn’t even think that was related, more to being sick and dehydrated. If it makes you feel any better, my terrible symptoms were what I experienced March 24, 2020 for over a week. No period- thanks to an IUD.

      Get the second shot! If you don’t I would worry that you went through all the hard part for only half immunity?

      Obviously, anecdotal but I think the immune response is similar. My husband thinks he had a mild case of Covid at the end of Feb 2020 and gets his second shot tomorrow. I’ve had friends with asymptomatic responses far less than those with the common flu-like symptoms.

    • Karen says...

      I had the Astra Zeneca and had the same side effects as you but it lasted 2 weeks.I also developed COVID arm,my arm swelled up and had a red rash at the injection site.That has finally disappeared.I’m really nervous about my second shot as I heard the side effects can be worse.No one can answer me on if I can can a different brand for my second shot.The side effects are still better then actually getting COVID.

    • Julia says...

      I had this experience as well. The day after the first dose of moderna I had a 103 fever, sore arm, chills, fatigue – the works! I also started spotting and then full on bleeding despite only being 10 days into my cycle. Everything lasted for a day and then subsided gradually over the next day or two.

      I previously had COVID in January – which caused my cycle to stop for a full three months – so I suspect that’s why I had such an intense reaction. I do wish that there was more discussion around side effects related to menstruation, because that was one I found the most disconcerting. Hopefully dose two will be comparably mild.

    • Rachel L says...

      Karen – I’m not sure where you are (i the world I mean!) but in the UK you currently have to have the same vaccine for both doses. I’ve volunteered for an ongoing study to see whether mixing vaccines for the second dose is safe and efficacious but that’s still deep in investigation. If it helps you, I’ve heard that the AstraZeneca reactions are worse with the first dose. I had fever and a very sore arm but I have no hesitance in getting my second (scheduled for the end of May unless I’m on the trial) My husband had AZ too (no side effects whatsoever except for a bit of tiredness) and my Mum has had both doses of Pfizer with no reaction either time (except a little soreness at the vaccination site)

  21. Rachelle says...

    I am taking part in the Johnson and Johnson trial to see if two shots are better than one. I had my first shot in December and my second in March. had a vague headache after the first shop and headache, chills and aches after the second shot. As I didn’t know if I was the control or not my husband was joking that I had some powerful saline. It turns out I got the real vaccine so it wasn’t the placebo effect.

    • Amy says...

      Ooo I also got the JNJ vaccine. Do you know if I can jump into this trial? Kidding but not at all kidding. LOAD ME UP with vaccines plz.

  22. Alison says...

    Joanna, I had stayed away from Promising Young Woman as the commercials somehow made it seem violent and gory. Because you raved about it, we watched it last night and I was so glad we did. It is stylishly filmed with whip-smart dialog and stunningly acted. As you said, it raises important questions about consent – I’m only surprised it didn’t win more awards. Happy to follow your recs anytime!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      so glad to hear that, Alison! xo

  23. Rachel L says...

    I had my first vaccination (AstraZeneca) back in mid-March…a few chills and very tired 24 hours later but took a couple of painkillers and went bed and fine the next day! Here in the UK they’re leaving 10-12 weeks between first and second doses so my next isn’t until the end of May. I had covid last year and while I was lucky to get over the acute symptoms fairly well, the after effects were horrible (a shingles-type rash, incredibly painful…also post-viral asthma which was scary, sleep problems, extreme fatigue, joint pain…) and lasted…and lasted! I was truly wondering whether I would ever feel properly ‘me’ again. But after the vaccination, everything disappeared! I started sleeping so much better and could take proper deep breaths for the first time in months. And then I found out that scientists are looking into whether the adenoviral vector vaccines, like AZ, are possible cures for Long Covid – in fact, a friend is on a trial for this. Either way, we owe scientists so very much (always – but particularly this year for our generation) Hoping you’re feeling fine today Joanna!

    • Megan says...

      This is great to hear, Rachel! Thank you for sharing.

    • Rusty says...

      I had AZ last Saturday and felt ill for x2 says, better now, just mild stuff. In Australia, the second AZ dose is 21 days later.

  24. Anni says...

    We are still on lockdown in Germany, and waiting to even be able to register for the vacciantion… so I am veeeeery jealous and also hopeful when I read about all the vaccinations :) Hopefully no side effects!

  25. Vero says...

    I’ve had my first dose of Pfizer in March, but Canada has decided to stretch out their first and second doses so they are 4 months apart, against the recommended window by the Pfizer… ahh.

    Also here’s a question for the “ask cup of jo” advice column…

    I spoke to my mum last night and she has decided not to get any vaccine. She is in her 60s, in poor health so at higher risk for poor COVID outcomes and I am quite worried as I love her deeply and she is my one and other mother! Any advice on how to navigate this? I want to respect her wishes and autonomy of course, and also as she is the only member of my family who has decided not to be vaccinated, I’m finding it quite distressing. She’s not the type to have done real research on it, mostly just getting her information from YouTube videos and Facebook posts. If anyone has wise words about how to navigate this, I would love that.

    • scared and... says...

      Vero, I sympathize with you for the worry and deep love for your mother and wanting to support her protecting herself by getting vaccinated. In having conversations with her, have you tried motivational interviewing techniques to empower her to make self-efficacy choices? It could be helpful for her to identify the root cause of her choice and helpful to you to support her by addressing that root cause. So many of our vaccine decisions are based in emotion, even if we know the supportive scientific/community beneficial facts behind it (provided by loving children!). “Yes, and” statements can be very helpful… yes, you’ve seen stuff on FB and are scared, I hear you…, and even with that fear and you can still get vaccinated because x,y,z. Keep going and know the road may be bumpy.

    • Erika says...

      Hi Vero,

      That is tricky! My mom did get her shot, to my relief–she can be skittish about medical stuff. I was listening to a podcast the other day about how brains work and navigating difficult conversations, and the advice there for situations like this is to start by just asking lots of gentle questions of your mom about why she doesn’t want to get it. Sometimes, the question asking alone is enough to help someone interrogate their own stance and begin changing their mind. It would also give you some clarity about what she’s worried about, and maybe help you find ways to reassure her. Good luck!

    • Heather says...

      I work in healthcare and the messaging we’re getting is that facts don’t tend to sway people but personal stories do. When you finally get fully vaccinated it might help to communicate to her how your experience went, what fears it alleviated, and how you’re able to live your life differently, now that you have some protection.

    • Andrea says...

      If you check out the CDC page “Reasons to get a Covid Vaccine ” there is some good detailed information with links etc. That might help in your discussion with her.

    • Agnès says...

      My mother in law didn’t want to get the vaccine and we agreed we would not see her until it would be safe for her as there was no way we accepted to carry the responsibilty of getting her sick . It took a few months but she reflected and is now fully vaccinated. She s 79. I am so relieved ! It was a bit of a radical choice but the moral burden of somebody else s health is unbearable. Vaccines work only if every body gets them.

    • KS says...

      The most recent This American Life episode might help — check out the last story. I’m sorry – my mom did get vaccinated but is definitely on the “I must search out my news on Youtube because that’s the only place I can trust” wave and it’s incredibly, incredibly, incredibly difficult.

      https://www.thisamericanlife.org/736/the-herd

  26. Le says...

    I had my second dose a week ago and the side effects of really sore arm and general tiredness/malaise were nothing like how incredibly good I felt as that lifted. Better than I have felt in years! My husband experienced the same–was it just us? We are sleep-deprived “old” parents of a 3 year old and 11 month old, and we both felt like we were in our 20s again for a blissful, refreshed few hours.

    • Rusty says...

      I’ve seen ad read about this type of reaction with people who’ve had
      Long- Covid! You sure you didn’t already have a super mild case of Covid??

    • Pl says...

      After my first does of Moderna, I had mild side effects: sore arm and a bit of fatigue. After a couple of days, though, I felt like you are describing … better than I have in years, unlimited energy, and I have no idea why!? It was short-lived. But, I’m waiting to see what it’ll feel like after I get my second shot.

  27. TJ says...

    Overcome with excitement about finally finding an appointment, I absentmindedly scheduled my first shot on the first (=terrible horrible) day of my period. Well, that was pretty brutal. I could barely leave my bed and the bathroom for a day. Felt pretty beat up on the second day too. If you haven’t yet, be kind to yourself and schedule your shot away from your period!

  28. Jill says...

    Hello everyone!
    I read in an article that the worse you feel after the second dose, the better your immune system is at fighting the virus and building up your antibodies. It makes sense! So I was very very happy to be feeling terrible for 2-3 days. Loved every minute of it. Ha!!

  29. Jane says...

    I would like to hear from people’s experience with the second vaccine, who has been through chemotherapy and radiation and whose body is still recovering from it. I got diagnosed with cancer out of the blue last year (am a very healthy eater, walks a lot) and had to go through a year of very aggressive cancer treatments + surgery because my cancer was aggressive. Even though I’m now cancer free, but my body is still very much broken. I have arthritis pain in every joint(from head to toes), really bad GERD, headache, and other myriads of problems. My platelets and white+red blood cells levels are also still below the normal level. I got my first Pfizer vaccine last week and so far I can’t tell whether I had any side effects from it, since my body is hurting all the time, so as my head. But I’m really terrified to get my second shot. I mostly worrying about my platelets counts or blood clots, what with being on hormone therapy (Tamoxifen) that already made me higher risk in getting blood clot . My oncologist told me I would be fine, but he also told me most people do fine with chemotherapy, and I ended up in the hospital for 3 days after my first infusion. I wish I could wait a little longer to get my vaccines, but we have been quarantine for more than a year now. My children desperately need to have some time with their friends, and I desperately need to have some resemblance of normalcy back in life, which is just doing ordinary things such as grocery shopping, worrying about ordinary things in life. Not have to think about either the possibility of a reoccurrence of cancer, or dying from Covid and leaving my 4 children motherless would be nice.

    • Caitlin says...

      Jane, I am in the exact same boat: cancer last year, chemo, was told chemo wouldn’t have side effects and did, bone marrow transplant, body still recovering, currently in a drug trial that suppresses my blood counts, and I have a four year old ready to see friends. I got both my Pfizer shots early this year and didn’t have any side effects with either. I’ve been telling people my body has handled so much this past year that a little vaccine just doesn’t even register on my bodily radar any more ;)

      And yes that first trip to Trader Joe’s was an absolute dream. They even gave me a welcome back orchid!

      Hope all goes well and for continued recovery!

    • Bobby says...

      Hi,

      So I’m on two breast cancer meds, Ibrance and Letrozole (plus had an oopherectomy last week). First the good news: when I was on Tamox, during the first year, there were a couple of days where my joints hurt so badly I couldn’t walk. IT GETS BETTER!!! Second of all, unless you’re getting the J&J vaccine, the chance of you getting blood clots is less than you would with the pill — however, talk to your Dr, they may want you to stop Tamox for a few days. My onc had me stop Ibrance for the oopherectomy and the recovery week because it lowers your white cell count. I’m truly hoping for the best for you. Anyway, the reason I mention my meds is because they didn’t cause any issues with the shot — believe me, my onc would have suggested stopping them for a few days if that was the general experience at Sloan Kettering. As for your worries about recurrence, try not to think about it. Easier said than done I know, but there are so many advances in treatment, when I was originally diagnosed ten years ago they didn’t even have Ibrance, so keep that in mind, things are changing constantly. When I was diagnosed stage four they were originally talking 18 months (I was diagnosed New Years Eve Dec 31 2019, a preview of the year to come). Now after a clinical trial, they’re talking ten years. It sounds like you’re nowhere near stage four, so odds are very much in your favor. My VERY best to you

    • Mae says...

      Hi Jane, I also was diagnosed with cancer out of the blue last year (35 yrs old, healthy habits, etc) & went through chemo, radiation & surgery. I will say that my chemo side effects have all but died down now (last treatment was in Sept of 2020, last radiation in Jan of 2021) – but at the time I got my vaccines (in Jan), I was still very achy in joints/having chemo-induced hot flashes, etc. & the vaccines gave me no issues other than feeling flu-like the day after the 2nd one (I had Moderna). Hope that helps some! And I completely relate to the fears of recurrence – I had triple negative BC which is very aggressive & I worry all the time about it coming back (I have 3 & 5 yr old little girls) but I just *try* to not let it overcome my thoughts, harder said than done some days! Hugs to you & wishing you the best!!

  30. rachel simmons says...

    TOP 3 MOVIES: Molly’s Game, (GOOD!) Julie and Julia (i swear this movie gets me, on all levels, food is life), and Dan in Real life. (Steve Carell is brilliant in this).

    • Syona says...

      Are we the same person? Julie and Julia is my comfort level and I LOVE Molly’s Game AND Dan in Real Life (the soundtrack gets me)

  31. Maria says...

    OMG Promising Young Women is the best movie I’ve seen in a really long time. It’s dark and funny and yes, I couldn’t stop thinking about it either. I found Cary Mulligan’s character strangely relatable! Like the scene with the tire iron and the windshield! So cathartic.

  32. JGem says...

    I had my first dose of Moderna a week ago, and awoke to excruciating pain around 3am. It was exactly like intense childbirth contractions, except without any break between. Some of the worst pain I’ve ever felt in my life, and I am not prone to hyperbole. It lasted about an hour; I had to take some Advil (rather, my husband put Advil in my mouth as I was in the fetal position on the floor), which thankfully alleviated the unbearable part of the pain. I haven’t heard of anyone having this reaction (nor has my doctor), and am wondering if it is somehow linked with the previously mentioned effect on menstruation? I am slightly desperate to find someone else who experienced this, and also had the second dose. Suffice to say, despite my enthusiasm for being fully vaccinated, I am dreading my second dose.

    • Claire says...

      Oh, no, I’m sorry! I did some looking around and found this article: https://www.bustle.com/wellness/covid-vaccine-period-side-effect-doctors and this reddit thread: https://www.reddit.com/r/Covid19VaccineRats/comments/m1tukc/covid_vaccine_correlationcausation_of_irregular/. Some people describe similar experiences to yours (though not exactly the same, it sounds like).

      You can also fill out this online survey, which was linked in the NYT: https://redcap.healthinstitute.illinois.edu/surveys/index.php?s=LL8TKKC8DP

    • R says...

      Hi – could it have been a ruptured ovarian cyst (unrelated to vaccine)? I just had one for the first time right before my first vaccine last month- so it was unrelated. They can happen out of the blue right around ovulation, when the cyst that releases the egg continues growing and ruptures. The fluid that comes out irritates your abdomen and causes intense pain. It felt just like what you described and was the most painful experience of my life. Consider looking into this or talking to your doctor more about it.

    • Rusty says...

      I had a ruptured ovarian cyst and it is the same as you described.
      Maybe see your doc and get a scan?

    • Jas says...

      Hi! There has been A LOT of cases like yours, women feeling excruciating pain like during childbirth or misscariage and also having their periods messed up. Go check instagram page of @ohdeardrea (first highlight) and you will find these stories.
      I am fully vaccinated with Chinese Sinopharm and had no side effects but these stories are terrifying and I believe something is going on, but no one knows what and it isn’t yet adressed by scientists.

  33. Lily says...

    I never realized before I had a little kid how much having a dog would start us down the path of discussing consent. “Does the dog want you to touch her like that? Is her voice telling you she likes it? Is she moving away from you?” Exhausting, but it might teach more than dog manners in the long run…

    • jennifer says...

      we do this a lot with our 2yo and our dog! we’ve been teaching her that sometimes the dog needs space, did he like that/did he growl, it’s okay if he doesn’t want a hug or kiss, and so forth. it helps that our dog is generally just wants all the love, but yeah, sometimes he’s a moody beastie and that’s okay.

  34. Nell Jeandet says...

    Consent. Oh my goodness. The way the memories flood back from my past when I think of allllll the times I didn’t give consent but it was taken anyway. I must education my daughter in a way that I was never educated and empower her not to go through the same thing.
    Here is a great little video explaining it by an amazing Aussie woman Clementine Ford! https://www.instagram.com/tv/COJcXPRBzKs/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      I disagree with the article but would be giving spoilers if I explained why — should I anyway?

    • Bobby says...

      YES JO!!! Please say why you disagree with the article. I had very conflicted feelings about the movie, though all in all, I think it’s an absolute must see. After watching it, I actually thought the film would make a great Cup of Jo discussion.

    • Stella says...

      YES please Jo!!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Just seeing these comments! Ok, here’s how I read the movie.

      SPOILER ALERT BELOW!

      Overall, I don’t think you need to read the movie too literally. I saw it as portraying the voice of justice for the woman who was raped (and all women who are raped). First, chronologically, Nina is publicly raped while intoxicated and her trauma is so overwhelming that she dies by suicide. Then her voice carries on with Cassie. Cassie is showing one man at a time how wrong it is to take advantage of an intoxicated woman — when she’s pretending to be drunk with a man, and then suddenly “snaps to,” each man looks horrified and panicked because he does, truly, know what he is doing is wrong. Then, she realizes Nina’s rapist is in town, so she sets out to speak up to the people who silenced her friend Nina’s voice. One by one, in different ways, she illustrates to them (the school administrator, the female friend, the lawyer, etc.) the error of their ways — that they should have listened to her friend and punished the rapist. She is speaking up for Nina and slooooooowly getting through. Finally, Cassie is alone with Nina’s rapist, but once again he literally silences the voice by saying “shut up! shut up!” while smothering her to death. The next morning, his friend comes in and says, “It’s not your fault, you didn’t do anything wrong,” which is what he has been told (and has been telling himself) all this time. But! The voice is still not gone. Before she died, Cassie sent the video of the rape to the lawyer, and the voice will continue to fight and speak up and keep fighting for acknowledgement, accountability and justice.

      So, overall, I read the film as being about the voice of justice fighting to be heard by the system — slowly, painstakingly, one by one, showing people what is right and wrong. Fighting so hard to be heard, even as women are being raped and dying and having their lives and careers and sanity destroyed, so that one day these traumas will be seen, believed, acknowledged and hopefully prevented. And even though women’s voices keep getting snuffed out, more and more voices will keep speaking up and showing that they are valid and true.

      More to say, but that is the essence! Hope this makes sense. xo

  35. Tricia says...

    Age 61, and I had no side effects with Moderna #1…until day #9, and I awoke with what I thought was a marvelous bicep reflecting my recent arm work. But, the raised area on my bicep was raised and warm to the touch. It stayed for ~8 days before abating. So not a bicep after all!

    Moderna #2 held no side effects at all. It seems to be the song & dance of women my age (60-ish). Interesting that Covid-19 hits elders with terrible force, and the vaccines seem to affect the younger generations with more grit than us elders.

    • Caitlin says...

      I’m 31 and also had the Moderna arm rash/hot to the touch near the injection site about 8 days after my first shot. It lasted about a week and then finally went away. I’m selfishly hoping that means I won’t have a reaction to the second shot!

    • Lisa O says...

      My husband had the same arm rash & swelling starting on day 9 after his second Moderna vaccine. His doctor said it’s a normal but not common side effect & lasted 4-5 days.

  36. Caitlin says...

    Anyone out there who is currently pregnant and got the vaccine while pregnant? I am 15 weeks and very nervous to get the vaccine. Any thoughts or advice?… I would love to hear!

    • Lora says...

      Hi Caitlin! I’m pregnant and received my vaccine in the middle of my second trimester. My ob/gyn and my husband (a biologist/geneticist who has closely followed the vaccine development since last March) both encouraged me to do it. My husband was completely unconcerned about any possible negative impacts on our baby (based on the biological mechanisms that form the foundation of the vaccines). And my dr was much more concerned about what could happen if I came down with C-19 since pregnant women are at higher risk for serious complications. You need to do what you’re most comfortable with, but I’m really glad I have it! I was a little under the weather for about 18 hours after my second shot, but that’s within the range of normal reactions. No other negative consequences.

    • Cecilia says...

      Hi Caitlin,

      I’m based in Toronto, 31 weeks pregnant, and will be getting my first dose of the Pfizer vaccine tomorrow. I’m not sure where you’re based, but the number of pregnant women in our ICUs (https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/toronto-hospital-reports-alarming-number-of-pregnant-patients-in-covid-19-icu-1.5393855) is quite scary. I’m actually getting the vaccine at a special pregnancy clinic set up by another area hospital because they’ve had such a difficult time with the number of pregnant women in the ICU :(

      I’ve spoken to my GP, my midwife, my OB, and my naturopath (hehe, no stone left unturned) and all agree that the risk of getting COVID while pregnant far outweighs any risk of getting the vaccine, particularly given how contagious and aggressive the variants seem to be and also given the technology used for the vaccines is nothing new. To me, the fact that the baby will also reap the benefits of the antibodies is also a plus. Are you able to get any advice or guidance from your doctor(s) as well?

      Anyway, it’s a scary time and making a decision can be confusing! I’ll try to remember to come back and comment again if I have any side effects or anything like that.

    • Jessica M. says...

      I got my first dose at 39 weeks (baby is 2 months old now). I had no side effects from either dose other than a sore arm. I feel so good knowing that my little one has some protection, both from the shot and from the antibodies in my breast milk. Go for it! The CDC just released study results showing the vaccine is safe for pregnant people, and the virus is definitely NOT safe.

    • Lauren says...

      I got the J&J at around 15 weeks right before it went on pause (cue a stressful couple of weeks on the lookout for blood clot symptoms.) Prior to the pause, I was happy to get the J&J since that vaccine technology has been used before for other vaccines given to pregnant woman. (Though I will caveat that I think we’re at a higher risk for blood clot, so maybe that wasn’t the best choice now, knowing what we do about the risks there.)
      I was on the fence about waiting longer in my pregnancy to get vaccinated but I spoke to my OB and she was extremely adamant that I get vaccinated, the sooner the better. She said that she’s worried about potential variants having surges in the US, and we know with certainty that contracting covid has adverse outcomes for pregnant women. So you have to look at the known risks versus any potential, unknown risks. For me- I feel better knowing I’m vaccinated. But overall- talk to your doctor!! They will help you feel better about making the decision.

    • Shira says...

      CDC just reissued guidance today confirming it’s safe and advisable! Best part is you will pass immunity on to your baby. Both my sister and sister in law (both physicians!) got it while pregnant, without hesitation. Feel good and good luck!

    • Stephanie says...

      I’m curious as well! I’ll be 27 weeks tomorrow. My OB is encouraging me to wait until after I deliver, but I’m interested to hear about the experiences of others.

    • Katie says...

      Im an emergency medicine doctor who got the vaccine at about 18 weeks pregnant… I’m currently 37 weeks. Best decision I’ve made. My pregnancy has been healthy, I feel safe, and little buddy kicks me all the time reminding me how strong he is. The second vaccine was tough in terms of side effects but short lived. Please consider getting it. I’ve seen too many cases where pregnant women get sick with covid, especially in third trimester. Keep yourself safe!

    • Emily Lawrence says...

      I am 30 weeks pregnant and got my 2nd dose two weeks ago! For me, a several factors played into me getting it:
      (1) There have recently been some studies showing pregnant people with COVID are at increased risk of hospitalization and death (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/pregnancy-breastfeeding.html) making the risks of not getting the vaccine greater for me than the risk of getting the vaccine.
      (2) The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists came out pretty early on saying that the vaccine is safe for pregnant people (in consult with their MD) https://www.acog.org/clinical/clinical-guidance/practice-advisory/articles/2020/12/vaccinating-pregnant-and-lactating-patients-against-covid-19.
      (3) A new study just came out looking at pregnant people who got the vaccine and the results show no safety concerns (https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2104983).
      (4) While the COVID vaccine is new, the technology it is building on is well established and has been used with pregnant people before. Pregnant people also get the flu shot, which slightly changes each year.
      (5) There is some early research that suggests you may pass antibodies to your child! https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2021/03/study-shows-covid-19-vaccinated-mothers-pass-antibodies-to-newborns/ (So cool!).
      (6) I also wanted to feel safe having my family come to visit and help with the baby once she is born. My dad is immunocompromised, so having our whole family fully vaccinated takes a lot of the stress off of gathering together and will allow us to just fully enjoy the moment and be together once our baby is born.

      So at the end of the day, for me the risks of not getting the vaccine out weighed the benefits/fear of getting the vaccine. I recommend weighing the pros and cons for yourself and assessing if for you the benefits of getting/not getting the vaccine outweigh the risks. You could also take into account what your other risk exposures are, for example if you are working from home and staying largely isolated that may be a different risk than if you are socializing a lot or have a job that takes you out of the house. If you have more questions, I do recommend talking with your provider or you could call the CDC vaccine hotline (https://www.immunize.org/resources/res_hotlines.asp).

      Hope this helps and congrats on the pregnancy!

    • Jill says...

      Hi Caitlin. I know how you must feel about this. I would feel cautious too! Please make phone calls to your obgyn and look on the cdc website to get all the information you need to ease your mind, and to enable you to make the wisest decision possible. Congratulations on your pregnancy!! ❤️

    • Mary says...

      Public health professional who works on covid vaccine rollout in Canada! Our recommendations have been updated to give pregnant women priority based on the increasing poor outcomes that hospitals are seeing in pregnant women with covid. I think you should talk to your primary care provider to work through your concerns, but all in all I think the risk of covid is much higher than the risk of adverse event from vaccine.

    • c. says...

      I would love to hear some advice too. Not pregnant yet, but working on it and am afraid to get shots in first trimester.

    • Gwynne says...

      Not pregnant, but my sister is 16 weeks and just had her second shot last week. Both shots were pretty tough for her – body aches and chills, vomiting, etc. But she’s in the clear now and very, very happy she got it!

    • Caroline says...

      Hi Caitlin,
      I’m 18 weeks pregnant and got my first dose of Modernan at 17 weeks (as soon as it became available to me here in France). Side effects were extremely mild! Just some soreness on the injection site a a headache the next morning that was easily cured with paracetamol. I’m very grateful that I was able to be vaccinated and that my baby will hopefully be born with some form of immunity.
      If you’re on instagram I highly recommend following this account and checking her highlights for more info: https://www.instagram.com/jessicamalatyrivera/

      All the best and have a happy pregnancy xxx

    • Elizabeth says...

      I got the vaccine in my third trimester on the recommendation of my OB. She said the risks of COVID while pregnant far outweighed any risk from the vaccine at that stage of my pregnancy. I had no adverse reaction and gave birth to a very happy and healthy 8lb baby. I’ve been taking a lot of comfort from data that
      suggests antibodies likely cross the placenta, meaning she actually received some benefit from me getting the vaccine while she was in utero.

      My OB did say the conversation would have been different if I’d been in my first trimester when the vaccine became available. Since first trimester is so much about how physical structures actually develop, she would have been more cautious about recommending a vaccine then untested in pregnant women. But by third trimester, it’s mostly about just growing what’s already there, so she had very little concern about any adverse outcomes.

      If you can, I’d try to have an open conversation with your prenatal provider. Be candid about your concerns and just see what they say. My provider was definitely pro-vaccine, but also said it was a personal decision and I should do what I was comfortable with (as long as I continued to take all the other necessary precautions to avoid contracting COVID).

    • Alice says...

      I know that here in the UK they’re advising that pregnant women should get the vaccine as planned with their age group (which is how we’re vaccinating), and Pfizer and Moderna are the preferred vaccines. Here’s more info, if you’re interested! https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-vaccination-women-of-childbearing-age-currently-pregnant-planning-a-pregnancy-or-breastfeeding/covid-19-vaccination-a-guide-for-women-of-childbearing-age-pregnant-planning-a-pregnancy-or-breastfeeding

    • Elizabeth says...

      I’m a RN vaccinator and we always ask pregnant women if they’ve discussed it with their OB first, which is also my suggestion to you if you haven’t already. . Congratulations!

    • Clare says...

      Congratulations, Caitlin!
      Not pregnant, but I’m a med student planning to go into OB/GYN, and I’ve heard this question a lot!
      Studies show that the antibodies you make after the vaccine can pass on to protect baby, which is super cool. OB/GYN docs also recommend the vaccine because pregnant people who get COVID are at higher risk for extra complications than folks who aren’t pregnant. For what it’s worth, I know a lot of doctors who got vaccinated while pregnant themselves.
      I’d consider talking with your doctor or nurse midwife about this, but here’s guidelines from the main professional org for OB/GYNs: https://www.acog.org/clinical/clinical-guidance/practice-advisory/articles/2020/12/vaccinating-pregnant-and-lactating-patients-against-covid-19#:~:text=been%20scientifically%20disproven.-,ACOG%20recommends%20vaccination%20for%20all%20eligible%20people%20who%20may%20consider,not%20a%20cause%20of%20infertility.

    • Kelly says...

      I’m pregnant and got my vaccine around 20 weeks (now 37 weeks). I work in healthcare, so I was eligible right away. For me it was such a relief — pregnant women who get covid are at a higher risk for serious illness and death, and the likelihood of getting Covid is SO much higher than the risk of a severe vaccine reaction. I also felt comfort knowing that my baby had developed most of his organs pretty well at the time I got vaccinated, for whatever that’s worth. Also, I’ve been so happy to see research coming out that indicates that my baby might have some antibody from my vaccine when he’s born! (There has also been preliminary evidence showing no negative side effects in pregnant women who have been vaccinated over the past several months — data that wasn’t available to me when I made my decision in December/January!). Oh, also the only side effect I had was a sore arm after 2nd dose. My OB thinks it’s because pregnant women have a weaker immune system.
      Whatever you choose, I wish you all the best!

    • Sarah says...

      I am 25 weeks, work in academia teaching public health courses, and felt very comfortable getting the vaccine in February and March when it was available to me! I am comfortable with how it was developed and am comfortable with the research we have on how mRNA vaccines should affect pregnancy (or rather, not affect pregnancy). There were a number of women in the vaccine trials who ended up being pregnant and went on to have good birth outcomes, and the research on the first wave of pregnant women in the US to get them is also promising. I was less comfortable that I could avoid getting covid, especially since being pregnant means more doctor’s office visits. I had one day of fatigue and nausea with shot one and felt nothing after shot two. (I got moderna.) I joined the vsafe registry and indicated that I was pregnant so I can contribute to the ongoing research. It appears that my baby may get some immunities to covid because of my shot, so IMO there are many reasons to get it! Pharmacist and doctor friends of mine who are pregnant have all gotten it, if that helps at all!

    • Kim says...

      I’m not, but my friend is. Her doctor recommended she get the vaccine, I believe she said the baby will also get the benefits of the vaccine in utero.

    • Claire M says...

      Ill report back to you :) going in tomorrow!! 20 weeks. Im in Toronto so theres no debate, were on covid fire over here and the risks of contracting are way too high. Remember that mild symptoms are a good sign that youre building good immunity :)

    • Frankie Rose says...

      29 weeks here and I got the vaccine in March. I had very few side effects (sore arm both times, maybe some fatigue with the second shot but that’s it!) and baby is doing GREAT. I looked at it this way: we know that COVID is more serious and dangerous for pregnant people so I wanted to avoid at all costs. There is currently a report from Michigan of a 37 yo (my age) woman who contracted covid from an outdoor family gathering and her baby was delivered early via c-section and she is now on life support :( (source: NYT 4/26). Super sad and while I’m still being cautious I feel much more confident that I am protecting my family after getting vaccinated.

    • Shelley says...

      Two of my friends got the vaccination while pregnant. Both had mild side effects and are so happy they went through with it.

    • Joyce says...

      Hi Caitlin! Yes! I got the J&J while pregnant. I, personally, felt comfortable waiting for my early third trimester, right around 28 weeks, though I think the science shows you can do it anytime and be good to go! I acknowledge it is a very tough situation. I think I felt more confident in this choice because it was my second pregnancy — and I felt more anxious about getting COVID (and perhaps getting my child sick) vs. getting the shot. I also knew once the baby is born I will be TIRED and coordinating getting the shot will be more difficult. (You will be more absorbed with your baby than you can ever imagine. Freeze meals now!! haha.) Congrats on the pregnancy!! Good luck!! xoxo.

    • Dee says...

      @Caitlin My best friend, who is five months along, got the vaccine on the recommendation of her doctor and had no side effects from either dose! (She’d been worried about a fever but it wasn’t an issue.)

      Hope that brings you some comfort, and stay well!

    • Em says...

      My sister, a nurse, got the Moderna, during her second trimester. She had some mild side effects, as she enters her third trimester, she and baby are doing just fine!

    • Tracy says...

      Talk to your OB! I know several women who have received the vaccine while pregnant or breastfeeding (including my personal OBGYN) but if you trust your doctor with your life – and your baby’s life – trust their opinion on the vaccine! Congratulations on your pregnancy!

    • Kari says...

      Hi Caitlin! I got my first dose of Moderna at 24 weeks and feel great. Sore arm for a day, that was all. My OB strongly recommended I get it. In her words, “It has some risk, but COVID has a lot more. Get it ASAP.” I had no worries about the baby but am thrilled at the idea of being able to pass on some antibodies. My only worry is that here they are automatically booking you for your second dose 16 weeks later… the week I’m due! I’m going to try to get it a few weeks sooner in case the side effects knock me flat for a couple days. Better early than with a newborn. yikes, ha.

    • Melissa says...

      A very good friend of mine got COVID when she was 25 weeks pregnant – back in late December. She was healthy and having a great pregnancy. After a week in the hospital and time on a ventilator, they decided to deliver her son at 26 weeks in order to try to save her life. It sadly did not work and she died alone, never knowing her son was born. She had just turned 32 and was an attorney with such a bright future ahead of her. Her son spent two months in the NICU and now her husband is a single dad to a newborn. I really hope that you will get vaccinated, as my friend never had the luxury of deciding.

      https://people.com/health/prosecutor-dies-from-covid-complications-after-delivering-son-prematurely-to-save-his-life/

    • Diana says...

      I got both doses of the Pfizer – at 22 and 25 weeks. I just had a sore arm both times. I’m now 33 weeks and everything’s going well with the pregnancy. I decided to get it because the risks of COVID during pregnancy scared me more than any potential unknown – but thought to be very low – risks from the vaccine. My husband has a colleague who lost first his unborn son and then his wife to COVID a few weeks later. My pregnancy is high risk for preeclampsia and COVID is also known to increase your risk of getting it, so that was another vote in favor of vaccination. And the prospect of passing antibodies to my baby was very appealing. I am very happy (and feel very lucky) to have gotten it!

    • Katie says...

      Yup! Got my first dose on the day I entered the second trimester, and the second dose just over two weeks ago. 94k pregnant women in the US have been vaccinated, last I read, and they haven’t found any sign of elevated risks beyond the normal rate. I felt great about my decision, and had pregnant doctor friends who made the same choice.

      I have to say, now that it’s sunk in that I have this protection, it feels AMAZING. I live in a place without great mask compliance, and now if someone pulls their mask down in the waiting room at my doctor’s office, I can silently judge them but I don’t fear for my life. I just feel like such a burden of anxiety has been lifted.

    • Elyse says...

      I got the Pfizer shot (dose 1 at 28 weeks, dose 2 at 31 weeks) after a couple of lengthy conversations with my doctor. Aside from a sore arm, I had no reaction to my first shot. 24 hours after the second shot, I was achy, tired, and had chills and a low grade fever (maxed out at 99.3 F), but felt totally back to normal after an early bedtime and good night’s sleep. I totally understand your hesitation – I definitely felt apprehensive after the guidance went from “no vaccines for pregnant/nursing women” to “go ahead and get it!” seemingly overnight. However, I realized that I wasn’t choosing between a risky vaccine and a no-risk-with-no-vaccine situation. It’s a risk of vaccine vs. risk of COVID choice. My general advice as you weigh what’s best for you:
      1) Talk to your doctor or care provider. My doctor talked me through every tiny concern I had, from how to treat a fever if one appeared to what to do if a serious reaction developed.
      2) Really sit with what aspects of the vaccine/no vaccine equation are most stressful for YOU. When I really started thinking through the worst case scenario what-ifs, I realized I was most stressed about contracting COVID during or shortly after delivery – having to quarantine from my husband and toddler, trying to protect my newborn from exposure, AND trying to recover from birth while potentially seriously (or even mildly) ill felt much scarier than the vaccine. That was my calculus, but your own worries might be weighted more heavily elsewhere. Just recognizing what my real worries were helped me make the best decision for me and my family.

    • Christina says...

      I did! I had active antibodies (for over 13 months) and was worried I would have adverse reactions (at 29 weeks) but got both Pfizer shots and had zero reaction. My OB gave them out and have given to over few dozen mamas and no one has had issues! Good luck!

    • Jan says...

      Got both Pfizer doses during my second trimester–no side effects except for a sore arm! Super happy I did it, as is my OB.

  37. Amanda says...

    I had the Pfizer vaccine and after the first shot I had what I now understand to be a swollen lymph node in my under arm. I didn’t realize this was a potential side effect, but it is! It went away the next day. Then after the second shot I was actually vomiting the following morning which I also did not know was a possible side effect! I slept for a few hours and felt fine by midday. So, some unexpected reactions but I am very glad to breathe a little easier now.

    My mom was over last week and she is also fully vaccinated. At one point during her visit I realized I wasn’t feeling terribly nervous about her being in my house and it was such a relief.

    • Shelley says...

      Yes I got the shot in my left arm and the next morning my left armpit was killing me with a big lump! They say not to get a mammogram right after.

  38. Raquel says...

    I am one of the few people I know that got a reaction after the first Pfizer dose. The other person is my husband who started feeling achy and tired 2 hours after! Which is so weird because I had heard that woman were more prone to the side effects. Mine only started in the following day. I am so looking forward to my second shot but a little worried about how I will feel so I am stocking up on food and taking some time off work and counting all my blessings: being vaccinated, having a roof over my head, food and job during these uncertain and daunting times. What a privilege it is to be alive. Hope you feel better soon, Jo!

    • Lauren says...

      I also felt achy & tired after my first dose, the next day I was SO sleepy, walked into my boyfriend and broke my favorite coffee mug!

    • Steph says...

      Raquel,
      I felt like I had the flu after my first Pfizer dose, without runny nose and cough. It lasted for days! After my second shot I had no side effects, not even a sore arm (thanks to guidance from the wonderful phlebotomist).

    • Raquel says...

      Lauren, oh no! I would hate to break my favorite mug too..

      Steph, would you mind sharing the guidance you received?? I’ve heard you should move your arm after the shot instead of avoiding movement. That certainly works for the flu shot not sure if it does for this one…

  39. Claire says...

    Yay on your second dose!!! I had my second vaccination a month ago and felt fine for the first twelve hours or so. Then, in the middle of the night, I woke up suddenly feeling nauseous and with a headache. I was grateful I had taken the following day off of work, just in case. Over the course of the day, I had a mild headache and was really tired. Strangest of all was the muscle and joint pain, though! My thighs and biceps felt really sore (as though I’d gone for a strenuous bike ride) and no amount of self-massage or heat packs would do the trick. I also felt sore in my joints, especially fingers, toes, and wrists, and wanted to crack my knuckles constantly. So weird! The side effects dissipated for the most part within 24 hours, though I ended up taking the next morning off, too.

    In the end, I’m so grateful to be vaccinated now! While I know that my side effects were pretty strong (I’ve read that they impact younger people and women most frequently), I know they pale in comparison to contracting covid.

  40. Danna says...

    I got my first dose of Moderna on April 7, felt fine the next day just a slight with sore arm. Eight days later I woke up with hives, went to my PCP who prescribed a Medrol dose pack and benedryl. By the next day it was so much worse I had to go back to my dr and he upped the dose to 50mg of prednisone and prescription antihistamine. He said I should still get the second dose.

    I checked the CDC website and they also recommend getting the second dose even if you had an allergic reaction after the first one, EXCEPT if you suffered anaphylaxis or it was so severe you required a trip to the hospital for swelling or difficulty breathing. Still, not looking forward to the second shot next week.

  41. Meredith says...

    I’m 13 weeks and starting to outgrow my regular clothes. SO EXCITED about the Nines, thanks for sharing!

  42. Jeannie says...

    I got my second vaccine dose yesterday also! I felt like I’d been hit by a bus all day, but am feeling much better now. Still going to sleep early though :)

  43. Kim says...

    speaking of consent and kids – my mom always instilled in us that no grownup/older kid/whoever should ever ask us to keep secrets from her or our dad. especially secrets we didn’t feel comfortable keeping. it’s such a simple rule, was easy to understand as a kid and makes even more sense as an adult.

    • KA says...

      This is such good advice. My sister has repeatedly told my nephews (10 & 7) this as well.

    • Becca says...

      Great advice. My mother in law was once watching our kids overnight and kept our oldest up way past his bedtime. Totally harmless, they were reading books, playing games. But, she had told him to not tell us that he stayed up late. I was beyond livid, and made sure to tell my kid that what she told him to do was not okay.

  44. Kara says...

    I got my second Moderna shot on Sunday and was so nervous about side effects, especially because I have a 2 week old at home who I’m breastfeeding (and 3 and 5 year olds, fortunately my husband is on parental leave so I figured they’d be covered if I got knocked out). It turned out to be not too bad with ibuprofen and acetaminophen to take care of the achiness and headache. I was exhausted all day yesterday, but that’s par for the course right now anyway. Things that are worse, in my experience: mastitis, a stomach bug, the first trimester, a hangover in your 30s. I also asked myself this question to help with my anxiety: would you voluntarily get the flu for a few days if it meant less people would die from COVID? YES, OBVIOUSLY!

  45. Emma says...

    I have become obsessed with Caroline O’Donoghue, the author of Promising Young Woman, and I am DYING to watch the movie. Caroline does this brilliant podcast called Sentimental Garbage – she has an amazing vocabulary and her word choices are always like little perfect bursts of delight. She recently did a miniseries on the podcast dissecting the entire Sex and the City series with her best friend, Dolly Alderton (whom I’ve also now become obsessed with) and it’s SO GOOD. They are both incredibly smart and hilarious and clearly just think the world of each other, and it’s probably the best podcast I’ve ever listened to. I have been raving about it to all of my friends! (Told you I was obsessed, haha).

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      I *think* the book is a different story because the movie had an original screenplay by emerald fennell. But the book sounds great nonetheless! And going to check out their podcast.

    • Jenn says...

      Emma, I am also obsessed with Sentimental Garbage and newly with Caroline, and yes—it’s a different book.

      But isn’t that series with Dolly Alderton the best?!?! Tell me you’re a High/Low podcast listener. If not, you’re welcome.

    • Alice says...

      Yes, the book is completely different!! Caroline’s book is Promising Young WOMEN (plural) and the film is by Emerald Fennell.

    • Claire says...

      Yes I was confused initially too. The book is Promising Young Women rather than Woman. It’s a different story. Both are amazing though.
      (I’ve also been enjoying Caroline and Dolly’s podcast!)

    • Sarah says...

      Yes, it’s a different story – Emerald Fennel’s film is Promising Young Woman and Caroline O’Donoghue’s book is Promising Young Women. I loved both!

      And thanks for reminding me to listen to Sentimental Garbage – I still mourn the end of the High Low!

    • Denise says...

      Ooooh, I’m ready for a new podcast! And Emma, your phrase “her word choices are always like little perfect bursts of delight” is a perfect burst of delight! I had to go back and read it again it delighted me so much.

    • Christine Dansereau says...

      Just chiming in to echo the praise for Caroline, Dolly (my imaginary BFF), and the SATC series on Sentimental Garbage. BEST thing I’ve listened to in a while. (And yes, I miss the High Low deeply. Favorite podcast of all time.)

    • Emma says...

      Ahhh, thank you everyone for the clarification and comments! Now I have a new book, movie, AND podcast to look forward to! (Thank you also to Denise for your comment – made my day!) The CoJ comment section is truly the best. :)

  46. Becca says...

    Yay, congrats on getting the second! How lucky are we? No words can express the gratitude. I had a sore arm with the first (Pfizer) and was sleepy after the second, but could still care for the kids, etc. Not so bad at all.

    Promising Young Woman also really stuck with me (just had my hubby watch it today, I so wanted to be able to discuss it with someone, especially the ending). Definitely check out Carmen Maria Machado’s piece on it in the New Yorker, really insightful and interesting

  47. I’ve been participating in NovaVax’s Phase III trial, so I got my first two shots back in January…BUT I didn’t know if it was the real thing or a placebo! I had a very sore arm after the first shot and after the second, muscle aches, chills, and a fever. While I didn’t think the placebo effect could be quite that strong, I still didn’t feel confident saying I was vaccinated. I had a lot of FOMO in March when my colleagues (I work in higher ed in California) all became eligible for their shots. However, last week I had my first “switched” NovaVax shot–they give me the opposite treatment of what I had in January, still blinded–and I did not have even a whisper of soreness in my arm. I feel much more confident now that I’m vaccinated, and I can’t wait for my proof of vaccination card they’ll give me in a few weeks (not to mention their FDA authorization soon)!

    • Becca says...

      Throughout this entire process I’ve been so curious about the thousands and thousands of brave folks who sign up for the trials (and the kids doing it now!) — I feel like in all the gratitude that gets (rightfully) expressed towards healthcare workers and scientists, the trial participants aren’t acknowledged as much. But where would we without you? Curious what motivated you to do it and what the experience was like!

    • Rachel says...

      Thank you for participating in the trial – what a beautiful act of service in the name of science. Glad that you are vaccinated now!

    • Emily says...

      Joy – I am in the Novavax trial as well. The second of my first pair of shots in February knocked me out for a full day with flu symptoms, and those effects have me encouraged that I am indeed vaccinated. Today is my first shot in the “switch” which I’m expecting to be placebo, but still waiting with bated breath to see how I feel. I too am very eager for Novavax to be approved!

    • Yay Emily! Cool to “meet” another person in the trial.

      Becca, I was motivated to join the trial out of pure desperation to *do* something to help end the pandemic. My dad died in July after contracting Covid in May, and I live in Los Angeles where it was really bad here for so long. I was starting to feel a lot of despair. I follow KingGutterBaby on Instagram and she posted a link for the NovaVax trial enrollment. There was a clinic just a mile away from my house! So I applied on a whim, and like a week later I was getting my first shot! After that first appointment I did feel a little more agency and hope about the pandemic.

      It’s been an interesting process. I’ve had four appointments, signed a million pages of paperwork, peed in cups and had blood drawn almost every time, and had two covid nasal swabs….eek. I also have to input my temperature and my symptoms (or lack thereof) into an app every single day…for the next 12 months! Haha. I do get paid $150 per visit, which I plan to use to buy myself an espresso machine. ;)

      All in all I’m really glad I’ve participated. I want to be able to look back and say I did something to help.

    • Becca says...

      I’m so sorry about your dad. May his memory be a blessing. What a way to honor him and do something so tangible to help end the pandemic. Thank you for that, and for sharing the details, super interesting! p.s. Love KingGutterBaby

  48. Rachel in Berkeley says...

    I got my 2nd Pfizer last week (yay!) and only felt the same arm soreness that I experienced after the 1st vaccination.

  49. Alison says...

    Highly recommend anyone who is getting vaccinated to sign up for VSAFE (https://vsafe.cdc.gov/en/) so you can report your experience post-shot! It’s what helps us gather more data and is important even if your symptoms are basically nonexistent :) It’s been two and a half weeks since I had my second shot and the service texted me yesterday to fill out just three questions about any symptoms this week (immediately after the shot it’s daily, and then after that it moves to weekly). I like to think I’m helping contribute to science and ease someone else’s fears about a bad experience by just filling out a few questions!!

    • Sage says...

      Oh, thank you!! Signing up.

    • C says...

      I’m doing this too! It’s great!

  50. Erin says...

    It’s so interesting seeing everyone’s vaccine reactions! I met with my immunologist today to discuss options because I have the allergy that is causing severe/fatal reactions to the mRNA vaccines (PEG). I was hoping to get a thumbs up for J&J, but some immune issues I have are causing severe reactions to the J&J in his other patients, so I’ve been advised to keep quarantining and cross my fingers that Sputnik V is approved in America soon, as that’s the safest option for me. I don’t know whether to laugh or cry!! I was feeling so bummed, but it’s brightened my day to see others are getting vaccinated and getting through the rough patches. Hopefully it will be my turn soon enough.

    • Heather says...

      Aww Erin – I’ll be sending tons of positive thoughts your way and hoping enough of us keep getting vaccinated to make it safer for you in the meantime!

    • Oh, that sounds so hard. Have you looked into NovaVax? That’s right around the corner and it is not an mRNA vaccine.

    • Erin says...

      Thanks Heather and Joy! I’ll talk to my doctor about NovaVax – I haven’t looked into it, but I’m going to call my immunologist’s office today to make note to discuss it at my next appointment. :)

  51. Kimmie says...

    I had just heard about the effect the vaccine can have on cycles right after my 1st shot so when my period didn’t start when I expected it to, I assumed it was that. Turned out, I am just pregnant. It didn’t take long for me to figure it out, but I did think the timing was funny. My partner and I had started to try for our second so it was a welcomed surprise.

    I anticipated feeling badly after the 2nd shot, on top of my all day morning sickness but I ended up having no symptoms other than a sore arm. Most everyone around me seems to have an adverse effects though!

    • Claire says...

      Congratulations on your vaccination and pregnancy!

    • Tricia says...

      Huzzah!

  52. Megan says...

    I had aches, fever, and chills after my second Moderna. Oddly, I was super dehydrated too. I drank water all day, but struggled to get on top of it. I hadn’t heard that symptom.

    • Julie says...

      My husband had those same symptoms, especially thirst, but he got the AstraZeneca one.

    • Anne Elliot says...

      I had Moderna too. Sore arm after the first shot but seconding “aches, fever, and chills” after the second. I never felt super-sick but had that “I’m for sure getting sick” feeling, like when you know you’re going over the cliff into the flu or something. I had heard enough about bad reactions to the second shot that I scheduled mine for Friday morning so that if I didn’t do well, it would be over the weekend. I’m glad I did. I had the shot Friday morning, and had to leave work at 3:30 when I started to feel truly lousy. Felt lousy all night and all day Saturday, slept for like 12 hours Saturday night, and woke up fine (if a bit fatigued) on Sunday. Totally, totally worth it, though, and I’d get it again — and will get the booster if necessary — without question.

  53. Kelly says...

    Wildly jealous of you Joanna! I have my 1st vaccine scheduled for this weekend. Things are slower here but we’re getting there. So grateful and excited!

    • Nathalie says...

      I live in Germany (Hessen) and they’re just starting to vaccinate the over 60’s. . . Rather frustrating to have no idea when it’ll get down to my age group :/

    • Amy says...

      I’m with you Nathalie – I live in Canada and my province is also vaccinating around age 60 right now. It feels so far away for me (34) that it’s surreal to hear of people having already received their second dose and feeling like maybe they can start moving on from all this. It just occurred to me that the vaccine pace will start moving even slower as it moves younger, since there are likely far more 45 year olds alive in our population than 70 year olds…

  54. Ann says...

    My arm was really sore the night of the 2nd shot shot, and the day after just like the first Pfizer injection. I felt pretty wiped out the 2nd day wanting to just sleep and feeling on the verge of a sore throat with a low grade fever and a little headache. Third day completely fine! Hope it passes as quickly for you!

  55. K says...

    Well since I loved Sound of Metal and White Tiger both of which Cup of Jo raved about I’m definitely adding Promising Young Woman to the list!

    If there’s any similar knock out films, I’d love to know! (For random reference, I thought White Tiger knocked Parasite out of the park)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that’s awesome! hmmm, what else has been great? I LOVED the father, loved loved loved.

    • Laura F says...

      Another Round is amazing, so much deeper and more introspective than you’d expect from a movie about drinking. Plus: Mads Mikkelsen.

    • Marisa says...

      I just watched “The Trial of the Chicago Seven”, which was excellent! Bonus- perfect for the hubs, too.

    • Hannah says...

      I recommend Minari! It starts off slow but then gets really good. It’s funny and you really root for the family

    • Joanna says...

      Nomadland was also wonderful!

    • K says...

      Thank you for all the recommendations! Excited to sink my teeth into all of them :)

  56. Elle says...

    Promising Young Woman is SOSOSOSOSOSOSO good! I recently watched it too and feel like we’ve all been sleeping on it. Probably too intense for some, but so important and done with pops of color. Carey is brilliant.

  57. Charlotte K says...

    I am way past periods, so no problem there. With 1st Pfizer I had a sort of leaden fatigue descend about 48 hours in. With 2nd Pfizer (just last Friday), about 36 hours in, ditto with the fatigue, plus a little weird flu-y feeling–but no aches, fever, chills, as some friends and commenters have had. Arm sore like a sore muscle both times. I think everyone seems to have a different experience. I just want to persuade anyone holding off on the 2nd dose, please do not do it. GET THE SHOT! However I felt physically, my psychological wellbeing improved vastly!

  58. lk says...

    For our vaccines (Moderna) my husband and I had only MILD fatigue after our shots! Felt so grateful and happy.

  59. Alex says...

    I get my 2nd dose of Pfizer tomorrow! Hoping side effects are minimal…

  60. Mary W says...

    I got the J&J. The weirdest thing about it was that I got that funny-bone feeling like when you hit your elbow or knee– only it was at the injection site in my muscle. It lasted for the afternoon, but, man, it was crazy.
    Happy to hear you’re doing OK!

  61. Christina says...

    Congrats on getting vaccinated Joanna!!

    I’m interested to hear what other preggo mamas thought about The Nines collection. I bought two items from there and they did not fit me at all — they were so large and frumpy! I was surprised bc my body type generally fits into everything. Not sure if I should try others to see if the two items were the outliers.

    • carly says...

      I am LIVING in the black overalls (23 weeks over here), and wanted to get some of their tops, but the reviews are horrible and doesn’t sound like will work out, which is a bummer!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh so interesting! I know hatch is really loose / oversized (as part of their overall vibe/style) so I wonder if it’s just not translating in the Nines pieces. thanks for the feedback!

    • Jordan says...

      In the first run I tried a top, a dress and a pair of shorts and only the shorts fit. Recently I found 2 more dresses in summer styles (one more fitted and one being an empire waist maxi dress) that both fit perfectly but weren’t available online. I think my verdict is that they might have made some tweaks to the 2nd run for summer which I’m excited about!

  62. Justine says...

    I had my AstraZenica shot last Friday and felt HORRIBLE for about 24 hours, but I took at as a positive sign of my immune system kicking into gear, went to bed and slept and slept and slept!

  63. Sharon says...

    I loved Promising Young Woman! So dark but so good. I especially loved how good the chemistry was between the main character and her doctor boyfriend. It was such a great reminder that people can be “nice” and so many “good” things but still have a shaky moral compass…

  64. Christa says...

    The second shot definitely kicked my butt a little–I tried to push through and went for a run anyway then came home, crashed on the couch and couldn’t move for like two hours haha. I felt better quickly though. Yay for full vaccination though! :)

    PS I don’t know if you’d be open but I’d love if your blog did a post on vaccine misconceptions/reasons to get the vaccine. I’ve heard so much misinformation circulating lately.

    • Tory says...

      I also did the run to nap route today post second dose. Just waking up!

    • Erin says...

      I think this is a great idea! Unfortunately, my mother has a coworker scaring her with misinformation and it’s been exhausting trying to debunk everything and convince her to get vaccinated. I’d love suggestions on how to get through to people when science, empathy, and fear aren’t quite doing it.
      I’ll also toss out that there are some legitimate reasons to delay vaccinations, which may be worth discussing. For example, I have severe allergies and autoimmune conditions, so my immunologists feels that the options currently available (Pfizer, Moderna, J&J) would cause more harm to my body than protection. Some friends have been cruel and critical, but I’m continuing to strictly quarantine until my doctor feels comfortable making a recommendation. I would implore people to practice empathy if they encounter anyone who hasn’t yet been vaccinated… not all of us are crazy antivax conspiracy theorists.

    • Clare says...

      Sending hugs your way, Erin! I’m glad you are able to have good conversations with your doctor.
      This is why it’s so important for immunocompetent and disease-free folks to get vaccinated — it’s about protecting everyone else, too!

  65. frugal_JD says...

    Take tylenol for 24 hours after the 2nd shot. And drink lots of water. Doing that will ensure you don’t feel achy and eliminates most of the symptoms.

    Hope this helps.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you!!

    • anon says...

      It was recommended to me by my doctor NOT to take any anti-inflammatories like Tylenol/Advil. As I understood this is to ensure your immune system ‘fights’ the vaccine/you build immunity. So I guess please ask your doctor when you’re vaccinated

    • Em says...

      Yeah, the general advice medical that I’ve read is that if you are really struggling and with severe side effects after vaccine, it’s likely OK to take NSAIDs. But it’s better to not take them if you can manage. There are concerns about it dampening the immune response.

    • Catherine says...

      The pharmacist who gave me my second dose of Moderna recommended taking Advil, so I think the advice is just all over the place. I had body aches the next day and didn’t think twice about taking Advil for the pain. It helped me get through the day. Congrats to everyone getting vaccinated!

    • Amy says...

      The pharmacist who administered my first dose (Pfizer) said it was ok to take Advil- but to wait at least 6 hours after the shot was administered.

  66. Kristen says...

    This Onion headline pretty much summed up how I felt after my first shot:
    “Vaccine Dose Reminds Sedentary Man What Muscle Soreness Feels Like”

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      hahahaha

    • Joy says...

      omg I’m not gonna lie I’ve been feeling very judgey of my male coworkers who all made a really big deal about how bad they felt after their shots. oy vey.

  67. MK says...

    The day after getting my second Pfizer shot I was down and out for the count — chills, fever, aches — but felt fine the following day! I will say my period was affected (was late, more cramping than usual); and starting to hear from friends and read (NY Times, CNN, others) that it seems the shots are messing with the menstrual cycle a bit.

    • Katrina says...

      I did fine for both shots (Pfizer). Got arm soreness but that’s about it. Looking back at my chart my period after the second vax was about a week late and was heavier! Strange.

    • Capucine says...

      My second Pfizer was harsh…two days of fever, aching spine, legs, and wrists, and a migraine. Halfway through day two, I caved and took Tylenol and Advil every four hours since clearly my immune system was functioning whereas I was totally not for my kids (I wasn’t even talking, my immune system definitely was all over that little spike protein). Then near the end of day three, poof, I felt totally normal. My period was very weird: almost no flow at all, a night of the heaviest gore-fest ever, then two more very light days and over; just bizarre. You’ve parented with the flu before, the advantage this time is you know it might be coming, so stock up on freezer pizza and chicken nuggets for a menu on the fridge door and bone broth for you, and voila! Best flu ever – advance warning, no barfing, has a purpose, and over asap!

  68. Sage says...

    Same with the second vaccine for me as well. (Pfizer.) Achy, then I slept for 12 hours, my fever broke, and I felt better. The next day, I got a weird 30 minutes or so where my legs were shivering/trembling. I chalked it up to anxiety (I had been up late working on my last assignments for my degree), but my legs did feel weird all that day. I still reported it as a potential side effect, but I’m back to normal now. Not to be negative or fear mongering in the slightest, I am still EXTREMELY HAPPY to be vaccinated and highly recommend it to anyone. :)

  69. Megan says...

    Got J&J a month ago and the next day felt like I’d taken opioids (pretty loopy) but that’s it–totally fine the following evening. Such a bright spot to hear all these ladies talking about their vaccines!

  70. b says...

    I get my second dose of Moderna May 8. My parents, my aunt and her significant other all had Moderna with minimal or no side effects, so feeling hopeful that I will have the same experience. Either way, excited to get it and have it done with.

    • W says...

      My country is slooooow with vaccins, so mine will probably be in July / August, but am scared already!

      I have Graves disease (fast working thyroid) and am soooo grateful it’s doing fine-ish right now. BUT all the talk about the vaccins triggering hormones and the immune system makes me so nervous!

      Does anyone else have this fear of the vaccine triggering an already existing auto-immune disease?

  71. Karen says...

    Great list, Jo!

    I get my 2nd shot tomorrow!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      ooh congrats!

  72. Charlotte says...

    I had a pretty rough go of it after my first dose. I had covid last autumn, and the nurse told me that it can trigger a stronger response in people who have had covid. I was miserable and achey for 24 hours and then poof, fine. The second go around I was bracing for more of the worst and I ended up being just a bit sleepy and dopey. More than anything I feel so, so grateful and like a weight has been lifted.

  73. Love the simple art! I love how beautiful it is but yet makes such a statement. I have not seen the movie you wrote about but now it’s on my watch list! I feel that it’s so important for trauma like Carey Mulligan’s character to have a voice.

  74. Alissa M says...

    I’m among those who had no side effects with the vaccine. My parents and husband and I all had no trouble with it, and now I’m just waiting for the vaccines to be authorized for children so my ten year old twins can get vaccinated as well.

    Feel better, Joanna, and congratulations on your growing immunity!

    • Sara says...

      Believe it or not, you are in the *majority*! Most people don’t have any side effects and it’s important to keep that in the messaging, especially as millions forgo their second doses due to fear of side effects.

  75. Heather says...

    Sending this out into the ether in case my over analyzing super worrier mind can be calmed – I got my second shot for Pfizer on Saturday and the pharmacist told me to massage my arm while I waited so I did! Then for some reason, after the fact unfortunately, I googled if I should do this and saw articles saying not to.

    Did I just completely mess up the vaccine of my dreams?!

    • emily says...

      No. I got the pfizer one too, and they told me to massage my arm and flex the muscle, so it wouldn’t get as sore bc it would get the vaccine to move out of my muscle. My arm still got pretty sore but it did help to rub it and move it around a lot.

    • Capucine says...

      It’s right on the official CDC Pfizer info sheet they give after the shot: “move your arm a lot”. You’re good!

    • Heather says...

      Ahh okay thank you for responses!

      I wasn’t sure how to interpret the CDC’s guidance as I wondered if there was a distinction between simply moving your arm versus massaging it. As usual, I spent way too much time thinking about this!

  76. A says...

    Round two of Pfizer left me feeling a bit stoned. I laid on the floor naked that night and just stared at the ceiling for like half an hour. Also, just exhaustion and feeling majorly sluggish for a day or two after.

    • Amy says...

      Oh my gosh! I actually emailed my dr about this. My period was two weeks late after my first Pfizer vaccine! That never happens! She said she hadn’t heard of any period irregularities after vaccinations at that point but I knew that wasn’t normal for me. Going to read this now!

  77. Just wanted to share that people should watch out/note if you have a weird period after you get the vaccine. Normally I rarely get a period (Amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea) but after I got the second dose, I had my period for two weeks!

    I didn’t realize it might be related to the vaccine until I read a Popsugar article (what a source!).

    The New York Times has covered this as well.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/20/opinion/coronavirus-vaccines-menstruation-periods.html

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/14/well/live/women-covid-19-vaccine.html

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      ooh good to know! thank you!

    • Denise says...

      This is interesting as I got my second dose and the next day got my period out of sync w my regular cycle. I didn’t realize it might be related to the vaccine at all. Thanks for sharing!

    • Capucine says...

      Yeah but REALLY! Mine had an almost-dry start, a night of more bleeding than I had post partum (yeah), back to two days of almost-dry and over. Nothing at all like my normal six day cycle, just bizarre.

    • Maryn says...

      My period after my first Pfizer dose was bizarre as well! It was like my body waited to give me typical Pfizer side effects (head and body aches, stomach problems, etc) till my period started a week later (and early too). Not fun.

    • t says...

      Yes!! my periods are usually like clockwork and two days after my second shot i got my period early and it lasted 8 days instead of the usual (for me) 3. I was going bonkers. Googled it and saw all the links. Super interesting.

    • Rachel says...

      Glad to hear I’m not the only one! My second Pfizer dose wasn’t as bad as I’d prepared for based on reports from friends (only nausea and dizziness and mild body aches for a couple of hours but no fever/chills/extreme body aches), but after both doses I had unusual periods with side effects that I am tempted to attribute to the vaccine because nothing else really makes sense. That NYT article was correct, we need more studies that focus on women.

  78. SJ says...

    I got my first dose yesterday and my arm is super achy! I also woke up with a swollen eye but my doctor said it’s unrelated to the vaccine. I got Pfizer!

    I hope you feel better, Joanna!

  79. Cassie says...

    YES to promising young woman!!!!!

  80. caroline says...

    i felt a bit off after my first moderna shot (fatigue and sluggishness) and am gearing up for the 2nd shot to knock me off my feet. did anyone else feel off after their first? I’m in my late 20’s–maybe that had something to do with it.

    • Emily says...

      I got Moderna and was prepared to feel HORRIBLE after my second shot. I got it in the morning and by the evening just felt tired and achy and tossed and turned while I attempted to sleep. The next day just felt “off” and took it easy (took off work), but fortunately nothing worse than that! I’m in my mid 30s. Seems very different for everyone!

    • Elizabeth says...

      I felt a little off after my first Moderna too and I’m also mid to late 20s. Some chills that night and just tired/some brain fog the next two afternoons. I felt ok in the morning but spent by 1pm. Younger people and women generally have stronger immune responses so it’s actually a good sign if you feel knocked out! Second dose might get us but that just means the vaccines are working and our immune systems are getting stronger and know how to get rid of Covid :)

  81. Andrea says...

    I got my second vaccination yesterday too. Woke up achy with a headache, low grade fever, and not much energy. A couple quick naps and some acetaminophen, and I’m feeling much better. I have been so lucky to be healthy all year, so feeling a little off is completely foreign to me! I am thrilled to be vaccinated – and so thankful to all the scientists and researchers who made this possible. Hope you are feeling 100% soon, Jo.

  82. Bobby says...

    Hi, I felt like I’d been hit by a truck after the second dose. I’d like to put this out there in case anyone has any medical tests coming up — make sure you tell your Dr. WHEN you had your vaccine, and in WHICH arm. I’m a patient at Sloan Kettering, and pretty much everyone who had cancer screening within six weeks of their shot had stuff show up on their scan. Fortunately Sloan Kettering knew what to look for having seen this in virtually all patients, but those catching up on routine exams in smaller towns might not be as tuned in. ALSO, two friends had weird EKG’s after their shots, which thankfully turned out to be normal, just a few days later.

    • Alissa M says...

      I’ve spent a lot of time at MSKCC (my husband had a stem cell transplant there) and I’m sending hugs and good wishes to you.

    • Bobby says...

      Thank you so much Alissa, you’re very kind. I hope your husband is doing well.

    • Elizabeth says...

      Woah this is really good to flag, thank you! I’d imagine my oncologist is clued in already but I have a maintenance check up the day before my second dose in two weeks…so it’s good to prepare myself mentally just in case. #scanxiety

    • Fay says...

      Hello! Thank you for sharing this, Bobby. Sending good thoughts and encouragement to you. In case helpful, his guidance about mammograms and the vaccine has more info. Not encouraging to wait on a mammogram if it is close to the vaccine appointment, but useful background info to have on potential swelling, timing and options: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/14/well/live/women-covid-19-vaccine.html.

    • em says...

      yes, definitely does not hurt to mention to your oncologist (or the radiology tech- I’m seeing more and more scan reports mention a recent covid19 vaccine). many of us are just so thrilled that our patients are getting protected:)

    • Andrea says...

      Also, I scheduled a colonoscopy about 3 weeks after my first shot, and the intake nurse told me that the anesthesiologists were not wanting to do elective procedures within two weeks of the covid vaccine. This was back in January (I’m a health care provider so got mine pretty early) so it might have change by now. I would have been bummed to put off my procedure at that point after waiting a while to get on the schedule.

  83. Katrina says...

    We are vaccine twins; I got my 2nd shot yesterday too! “Woke up & everything ached” & “feeling draggy all day” are perfect descriptions. Not nearly as bad as I feared; lot of people talked about night sweats/chills/fever, etc. Planning to lean in & have a lazy night, and crossing my fingers we’ll all be back to normal tomorrow.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      <3 <3 <3

    • K says...

      Make that vaccine triplets! I had to leave work this morning with a 102° fever even after medication. (2nd dose of Moderna.) But isn’t science COOL?! The shot is working!!! (Even if I am super miserable!)

    • L says...

      Haha put me on the board as same! Second dose of Pfizer yesterday and feeling pretty rough today but so so happy it’s done. Hearing about the Covid hell right now in other places has me feeling infinitely relieved to have it in my arm! Thank God for good vaccines!!

  84. Gretchen says...

    Thank you so much for the link the art print by Garmi. I’ve been searching for a neutral, large-scale art piece for my apartment. I didn’t want to splurge on something, because who knows how long I’ll live in this specific apartment. But I also wanted something nice to honor my current place. I just purchased the perfect print! :)

  85. Agnès says...

    I had my first shot on friday and felt tired and shivery all week-end. I’m sorry you’re not feeling great. I hope you can take the day off and rest and keep warm. You deserve it, you’ve been so uplifting for this past year, I’m really happy you’re fully vaccinated now! Thank you Joanna.

  86. Shelley says...

    My second covid shot wrecked me. Splitting headache, fever, felt like my body got ran over. Terrible! And soooo worth it!!!!!! :) that hatch line is making me wanna try for baby number 3 haha

    • Shelley says...

      I had Pfizer btw

  87. E says...

    Promising young woman was so dark but so good. Loved it and I May Destroy You. Both took such a good approach to the revenge fantasy idea and showed how it can be appealing but also it can just keep eating away at you.

  88. Colleen S says...

    I get my second shot in a week. My mom had dizziness for several days afterward, and my sister felt slightly off, but was better by the next day. I’m hoping that because I’m nine years older than she is, that I’ll have the same reaction as my sister. Knowing my luck, I’ll get the headache.

  89. j says...

    2nd dose, ugh yes, but the next day I was back to normal. I hope that’s the case for you! it seemed to really vary among my friends, who are all in their 40s.

  90. Erin G. says...

    I’m one of the people who had zero side effects from my second vaccine … and I was disappointed. I’d cleared my calendar, stocked up on soup and audio books and was ready to bed down and ride it out. So this NPR story resonated with me: “You Don’t Have To Suffer To Benefit From COVID Vaccination — But Some Prefer It.” https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2021/04/27/990992425/you-dont-have-to-suffer-to-benefit-from-covid-vaccination-but-some-prefer-it

    • Agnès says...

      oh Erin thanks, fascinating article! especially the part on small pox! Medicine is so interesting — I come from a family of doctors and though I am not one, I love learning about how the body can be healed.

    • AN says...

      haha! i didn’t have any side effects with the 2nd dose either (i kept reading/hearing that you should go in to it super hydrated, which helps with side effects, so i drank like 150 oz of water and peed 982 times). i had taken the following day off work in preparation, but since i felt great, i used that day to pick up some to-go food, go for a long walk in a park, read for a long time! it was awesome and a very nice surprise!

    • Amy says...

      Same for me, Erin. Just a sore arm with the 2nd Pfizer. I was all prepped too😆

    • Alissa M says...

      I’m with you, Erin and Amy! I had my second dose on a Wednesday around lunchtime and that night I did an hourlong Peloton spin class and a big session with weights and wondered if perhaps I’d been given some kind of superpowers along with the mRNA. In retrospect, I think I was just super psyched to have the second dose in my arm.

      Congratulations to everyone who has been vaccinated!

    • Lisa says...

      Be excited. My husband and I were planning on spending all day watching movies in bed while my mom watched our daughter. Instead I had the worst migraine of my life and could barely open my eyes without extreme pain. So no movies happened. Still 1000% worth it!!!

    • Jane I. says...

      Erin G. I am so with you!! I was totally prepared after my second shot – I meal prepped for my family, got my magazines, blankets, and Tylenol ready. The 1st shot totally effed me up! I was oddly disappointed by how underwhelming the 2nd shot was followed by a sense of relief. I texted my husband and said, “It is finished.”

  91. Erin says...

    Yes – I definitely had the achy-ness the day after my second vaccine and my husband felt crummy too. Thankful for the sign my immune system was doing its job!

  92. Em says...

    I’ve been trying to make art for our home. It’s hard as a recovering perfectionist but also a fun challenge. I’m not going to lie, I’m nervous about the second dose being in an intensive phase of motherhood. But trying not to overthink it. Many of my friends have had a strong immune response to it. I realize that’s a good thing! Congratulations on receiving both doses!

    • Gus says...

      I feel the same way! I haven’t been sick since having my first baby 9 months ago, and the thought of not being able to take a break no matter how bad you feel makes me so anxious.

    • Kelly says...

      Ugh same. My second dose is this Friday which means I’m gearing up for a rough Saturday – our little dude goes to daycare during the week so it would have been nice to have that as a backup! Instead I’ll just be holding it together as best I can. We’re moving next week too, so this was supposed to be a packing weekend…

  93. Veronica says...

    Sorry to hear you are feeling bad. I had terrible side effects after my second dose; at one point, I felt like I had severe morning sickness. After a week, it has almost subsided. My anxiety has been better all week though :) Hope you are feeling better soon!

  94. Cynthia says...

    I had the Johnson and Johnson vaccine before it was put on hold. I had a headache the next day and felt draggy for a couple of days. I hope you will feel better, Joanna.

  95. Yes Jo
    There is often a sluggish feeling achy a bit ill after 2nd shot. I think women may experience it more than men. Should just take it easy and hopefully feeling goes away in 24 hrs. or so.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you so much, Barbara!