Relationships

Five Instagram Accounts to Follow

Stephanie Yeboah

For me, Instagram has been an amazing place to listen and learn. If you feel the same, here are five Instagram accounts to follow…

Ibram X. Kendi is the best-selling author of How to Be an Antiracist. He shares current events, videos and stories, including his own brilliant Atlantic articles, such as The American Nightmare. He wrote: “Protest is the heartbeat of humanity. It is the sound of human rights beating to live.”

Rachel Elizabeth Cargle is a public academic who also runs the online learning platform The Great Unlearn. She recently wrote: “Dear white people, I’m tired of hearing you say: ‘I’m shocked,’ ‘I can’t believe this,’ ‘I had no idea,’ ‘This can’t be real.’ That is in all actuality wildly offensive that our pain is so far off of your radar that the mention of it shocks you. It’s actually hurtful to know that the news that’s been keeping me up at night hasn’t even been a topic of conversation in your world. Instead when I keep you informed on the blatant abuse, racism and trauma happening to women of color and their families I need to hear: ‘I’ve found an organization that helps in these types of instances and I’ve donated money,’ ‘I’ve brought this topic up to my coworkers and family so we can talk through what’s happening,’ ‘I’ve researched more on this and I have learned more about the history of this particular race issue we have in our country.’ Your shock isn’t enough. Your wow isn’t solidarity. Your actions are the only thing I can accept at this point. And if that is too much for me to ask of you, dear friend, feel free to let yourself out of this community because complacency is not welcome here.”

The Conscious Kid talks about parenting through a critical race sense. They’ve also been raising money to send to Black families to help with rent and groceries during the pandemic. Among many other resources, they put together a slideshow asking if your kids are too young to talk about race. (The answer is no.)

Soul Fire Farm, co-founded by farmer Leah Penniman, is committed to ending racism and injustice in the food system. Leah also wrote the fantastic book Farming While Black. This week, she said: “I think probably the most important thing to understand is that being anti-racist is actually not about being nice. So, racism is not the sum total of a bunch of individual actions of meanness. It has a lot more to do with who has wealth, who has power, who has influence…which has deep institutional and historical roots.”

Stephanie Yeboah is a body positivity advocate who wrote the book Fattily Ever After (September 2020). Her stories and captions support the Black Lives Matter movement, and her personal photos are also a political act, helping to change the cultural conversation about body love. She says to white folks: “The work has only just begun. Now begins a lifetime of actively advocating for black voices and black visibility in all aspects of your life.”

What other Instagram accounts do you follow and learn from? I’d love to hear…

P.S. Two other influencers we love: Ashley Ford’s week of outfits, and Shavonda Gardner’s downsized family home.

(Photo of Stephanie Yeboah by Kaye Ford.)

  1. K says...

    oh boy. I started following Rachel Cargle because of the numerous recommendations but I find her content really rather problematic. En sum, the simplification of impact vs intent. Almost all criticism is explained away as “fragility.” That is an unfalsifiable argument. A look through the comments seems to demonstrate the lack of discourse that results from operating in this manner.

  2. What a beautiful picture. Happiness!

  3. Elise Gorbutt says...

    @nedratawwab is my favorite person to follow on Instagram. She’s a therapist, and her posts are informative and thought-provoking. She answers questions and provides great resources and reading recommendations on just about any topic. She’s honestly been such a light to follow.

  4. Candie says...

    @ E and @SR, I agree that we should not be burdening the DM’s of Black folks right now with these questions, and as an ally to Anti-Bias, Anti-Racism (ABAR) work, I am happy to respond to Kat’s question because I have the emotional stamina to do so. I consider CoJ a resource of readership full of white allies who can take on this work to educate our fellow ABAR learners!

    Having worked with folks who are not digitally native, I have seen how learning to effectively Google Search can be tricky. I would like to give @J the benefit of the doubt for their lack of Google search proficiency.

    I want to echo that asking Black folks to do the work of explaining ABAR concepts is not appropriate, and also advocate that the context surrounding Kat’s quick clarification of an acronym on Joanna’s post was appropriate.

    Let us allies not be too quick to condemn poor Google Search skills, I beg you at the very least on behalf of my own (non-digitally-native) mother!

    • Jessica says...

      I think it’s also important to note that not everyone reading this is located in the US, nor are they using english-language search engines and so terms like abar that aren’t in common usage elsewhere can be difficult to find online. I use google in french and even when i search for ‘abar work’ (i have seen it over instagram a lot this week, along with ‘bipod’ that i was not familiar with) the relevant stuff doesn’t appear until halfway down the page !

    • Jen says...

      I just want to throw out that Google will give different people different results from the same search term, based on your search history, zip code (location of IP address) etc. They’re a company, not a public service! This is one of the first things we looked at when studying librarianship.

    • Christina, also a librarian says...

      Jen, you are so right! People in general don’t know much about this, or they don’t think about what it means in reality.

  5. Emily says...

    @blackcoffeewithwhitefriends is a great account focused on helping the white community understand the part that they play in all this & what actions can be taken to mitigate this. As a more liberal-leaning white woman it helps me to challenge myself to look for ways I am keeping the status quo & oppressing others even if I’m not about to march in a klan costume

    • Lisa Barton says...

      Yes!! So good…AND the author of @blackcoffeewithwhitefriends Marcie Walker has another account called @mockingbirdhistorylessons. Anyone can access incredible history lessons for free, or even better, become a patron of her Patreon community and support her work financially. The ultimate goal is to create a children’s history curriculum…

  6. Eleanor says...

    Please please please, if you are able, COMPENSATE THESE ACCOUNTS FOR THEIR WORK. Educating other (mostly white) people about anti-racism is LABOR and should be PAID as such. If any accounts that you follow have linked PayPal, Venmo, or other payment platforms available, consider giving what you can if you are consuming the resources they are providing you for free.

  7. RebeccaNYC ( @mybackstageopera ) says...

    @blackmeninopera and @blackwomeninopera My field is shamefully lily white and there is so much work to be done.

  8. hannah says...

    Super bummed to see that the comment requesting how to interact with someone’s grandmother about not ‘believing’ in mixed marriages was erased, along with all the subsequent comments kindly suggesting how to engage. That kind of erasure is exactly the kind of white fragility that holds us back. I’m guessing it was the poster and not CoJ that took it down, but it’s disappointing as other folks could have gained something from that discussion.

    • Erin Harvey says...

      That’s too bad, I thought there was a lot of great insight in that thread.

    • Raquel says...

      Me too. I shared my thoughts on that thread last night and am now wondering if that’s why it was taken down. I wrote that POC – and especially Black people – shouldn’t be expected to be give a nice and educational answer if we face a racist remark/question/comment. That’s great if white folks want to engage in that way but we are tired, super tired and angry.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      We haven’t taken down any comments and always welcome debate and discourse!

  9. Z. says...

    Can I also suggest @nowhitesaviors on Instagram? I might’ve missed it if it was already suggested.

    • Lynn says...

      Great one! Upvote White savior complex is real.

  10. Sydni Jackson says...

    OhHappyDani!!

  11. Lindsey says...

    I just started following @rachel.cargle on Instagram who is great and has a lot of educational posts for white people. @renan_ozurk is someone I followed for a long time for his great photography, but he had a great video on Instragram yesterday about how to talk to racist relatives (and not just post things on social media and think your work is done) and provided a number of people who are great resources. I love to read, so started following more Black instagram accounts to expand the books I read, @wellreadblackgirl and @blkemilydickinson

  12. Emily L says...

    I recommend following the hashtags #blackinnature and #blackbirdersweek, spotlighting blacks in the outdoors and environmental fields, one of the areas that is generally dominated by whites. I’ve found a bunch of great black environmentalists through it and it’s making me think hard about my fields of work.
    @hood_naturalist is one.

    Non – nature related is @luvvie, Luvvie Ajayi Jones who wrote “I’m Judging You.”

    • Katie says...

      “blacks”???? really???

    • Emily L says...

      Katie – I did not think I was being offensive by saying “blacks” (or “whites”) but if I was, I sincerely apologize and will try to use better language. Rather than just saying “really???” please let me know what would be more appropriate. Some people prefer Black to African American, so that was my intention. I’m trying – I will often get it wrong.

    • BLM says...

      Black people.

      Black men/women/children.

      “Blacks” (and “whites” for that matter) is dehumanising and reduces people to their race. Please do not use this term. Thank you.

    • LK says...

      I’m curious if there’s an updated list of terms – since many things we used in the past might not be appropriate now! We no longer say African-American since many black people are not African (and…I guess also American). And I would be willing to bet that black people have different opinions on what’s acceptable and what’s not. I’ll google that now.

    • Fiona says...

      In response to your second comment below, and coming from a place where I made many very similar mistakes not so long ago I hope this can answer some of your questions. From what I have learned, Black people (rather than “blacks”, and being sure to capitalize the B) is more appropriate. Otherwise it’s sort of like saying “the gays” or “the jews”, which at least for most Jewish and Gay people I know is supremely cringeworthy (and came up in my auto correct as wrong!), and feels very disrepsectful. The capitalization is considered a sign of respect (as in Indigenous Peoples), and adding “people” makes it about humans and undermines the “othering”.

      Second: It is important to understand that while we are putting ourselves out on a limb by sharing (a very vulnerable position and well done for doing it), that part of the work is to be open to feedback, however it is provided. While it is understandable to push back on tone when we are feeling vulnerable, it is also a defensive posture (and absolutely my go to, that I’m working really hard to overcome). It is possible the person who commented on your wall was highly sensitive to the way you shared your comment (and right now a lot of us are highly sensitive, particularly Black people and other POC who are dealing with so much stress and pressure). Particularly in situations when a person is clearly responding strongly to your comments, it can be helpful to open yourself up to feedback generally, rather than questioning how someone is responding to you and asking for them to do additional work. I hope I have helped clarify a little and if I got anything wrong myself, please consider this an open invitation in the comments to correct me.

    • Emily L says...

      Thank you everyone for your responses and for calling me out on my terminology and my reactions. I’m realizing my own “White Fragility” in how I react to feedback – specifically this feedback. (I tend to be pretty sensitive and defensive when it comes to criticism in all forms – something I need to work on.) I am also realizing that while I always felt myself to be progressive, I still have a lot to learn and assumptions I’ve made and words I’ve used over the years require me to take a hard look at them. Ignorance isn’t an excuse.

    • Ramya says...

      @Emily L – with all due respect, when you wrote “Rather than just saying ‘really???’ please let me know what would be more appropriate” is exactly what people have been talking about in regard to YOU doing the work and educating yourself rather than asking others to do so for you. You asked others to let you know what would be more appropriate (and several people kindly did), rather than taking the 5 minutes of Googling etc. that it would have taken to work it out yourself.

    • Molly says...

      If you’re unfamiliar, the acronym BIPOC stands for Black, Indigenous, People of Color. The intention is to note that the experiences of Black and Indigenous people in America is different than that of other people of color. I’ve also seen a lot of frustration when POC is used when you actually mean Black. It reminds me of a frustrating conversation I had with a co-teacher earlier this year when starting my Black Writer a Day series for BHM. She was uncomfortable with the fact that I was calling it Black Writer a Day and insisted I just call it “Writer a Day.” Black is not a bad word, and I did my best to explain that to her. However, yes, it needs to be capitalized, and yes, it should be followed by a noun. In this case that noun was “writer” not people/person.

  13. Annalee says...

    Cup of Jo, thank you. Could you also help highlight small shops that are black-owned? This could become a wonderful series, much like your Motherhood Around the World series. In the fall, it would also be great to provide resources for donating supplies to schools in predominantly black neighborhoods. Just a thought. xo

  14. Molly says...

    I’d recommend all of the following. It’s not a coincidence that they are all Black women, who we need to be listening to on the daily. I’d also say, follow, listen, learn, but if you’re white, stay out of the comments.

    @britthawthorne
    @tiffanymjewell
    @ohhappydani
    @moemotivate (read her post “How to take correction from Black womxn”)
    @feministajones
    @ihartericka
    @mspackyetti
    @lpeopleswagner (editor-in-chief of Teen Vogue)

  15. AM says...

    @AJABARBER — highly recommend

    • Laura says...

      Seconded!

    • Abby says...

      She’s awesome!

    • Oh you <3 (reading these is sometimes like sitting on the sidelines at prom waiting to be asked to dance)

  16. Layla says...

    Love all the suggestions above!
    I would add @diversereads as another great one, especially if you are interested in children’s literature.

  17. Lindsay Okamoto says...

    Thanks for this post and these resources. I just started following @HereWeeRead (http://hereweeread.com/instagram) — so.many.books! and @tiffanymjewell.

  18. A says...

    I am disappointed to see Soul Fire Farm on this list. Soul Fire Farm, and celebrity activist (not a farmer even though she calls herself one) Penniman take attention away from actual, more marginalized, less privileged, and yes less photogenic and light-skinned black farmers in the south. We black people in the social justice world have seen this for years, even as Penniman becomes more and more of a media darling and more and more idolized by her mostly white followers. Please don’t jump on the bandwagon. Give some attention to other black farmers and people making change in food justice instead!

  19. Sarah B says...

    @biablooms is my new fave account. She has taken up floral designs and has some really incredible work. Follow her (and @beotis) and send bouquets to all of your LA friends!

  20. Joanne says...

    These instagram sites were passed along to me as a sites with very different black American points of view. Getting different perspectives is more important now than ever.
    @realcandaceowens
    @theofficertatum
    @larryeldershow
    @davidjharrisjr

    • t says...

      It is important to get multiple perspectives but you must keep in mind that these individuals (and others) are also the product of a systemic racist system. They have ingrained prejudice opinions about their own race subconsciously embedded in their every day life. Their perspective is valued and critical but most be analyzed under the veil of our society’s biases.

    • All of these accounts you’ve mentioned have dismissed that the problems which many of us work to address in our society and flat out claim they “do not exist”. Many of them minimize racism, bigotry and oppression which is woven into the fiber of our society. Please stop cherry picking opinions from black people that keep you comfortable in your bias.

  21. Stephanie says...

    I’ve been following The Conscious Kid for a little over a year now and as someone who doesn’t have kids, I’d still highly recommend it for everyone regardless of if you’re a parent or not. Not only are their posts incredibly informative, I’ve learned so much from the comments on each post. Their page is a wealth of knowledge and resources.

    • Rae says...

      Absolutely agree on The Conscious Kid. I am an educator and find their work invaluable — and often they are on the front edge of so many anti-racist and human rights issues. AND they have a Patreon so we can pay them for their work.

  22. Melissa Garrett says...

    My most favorite Instagram follows are Sonya Renee Taylor (her book The Body is Not an Apology is SO GOOD), Check Your Privilege (Myisha T. Hill), Teach and Transform (Liz Kleinrock), Desiree Adaway.

    And as others have said, PAY people for their work.

  23. Jen says...

    Gaia Cornwall, if you are still reading, my son (well, my entire family) adores Jabari Jumps. Thank you for such a beautiful book.

    • Lynn says...

      We give this gift to new parents and they love it. So yes Gaia Cornwall, thank you!

  24. Rebecca says...

    @moemotivate

  25. E says...

    Yay Leah Penninan! ClarkU grad doing great things!

  26. Elle says...

    Erika Hart (@ihartericka) and partner Ebony are also really great. They are “Racial/Social/Gender Justice Disruptors” and bring an LGBTQ perspective that is so important because harassment and discrimination is often greatest for LGBTQ individuals of color.

    I think a lot of people grow up and live in bubbles where we don’t get exposed to the experiences of other groups. So Instagram is a great way to start to see another perspective. If you don’t have people of color in your social circle, put them in your social media circle and you will learn so much. I also recommend actively seeking out books, movies, TV shows, and articles by black creators. We can’t control where we are born, and what our families and communities try to teach us, but we have the ability and responsibility to widen our circles of connection, knowledge, and understanding.

    I second that it is important that these people should all be paid for their labor. It’s a huge amount of work and an emotional burden, so support the people you follow. A lot of educators list their Venmo/CashApp/Paypal info or have Patreon accounts.

    I also second not DMing or leaving comments to ask for more from these educators than they are already giving, and not asking questions that can be answered by reading back though their feeds, or reading books or articles already recommended. Practice active listening and sit with your discomfort with new ideas before commenting. Make space for marginalized voices and then echo their messages to your circles (giving credit to creators and speakers).

    • Claire says...

      Elle- regarding the suggestion of paying people for their labor- This idea is new to me, and a little confusing since IG is a free platform. What if someone is not able to do that? there are a lot of people out of work right now, or trying to get by on less income. I am hesitant to follow someone on instagram if the expectation is to pay them, as that is not in my budget now. Maybe it’s better to look to other resources? thanks for feedback.

    • Molly says...

      Claire, there’s no paywall required to view their content, but many of the people she’s referring to are Black women who are providing this content for free. However, you can monetarily support them if you are able. There’s no expectation that you pay them to view their content on Instagram, but I would encourage those who are able, now or in the future, to contribute monetarily if you are learning and benefitting from what they are putting out there. Black people, and Black women especially, have been asked for free labor for FAR TOO LONG. So yes, if you can, PAY THEM.

    • Elle says...

      Hi Claire,

      You can and should follow these people regardless of your ability to pay. For people who do have anything to give, it’s important to support the black educators you learn from. Black people are doing, and have always done, most of the labor to combat a problem created by and upheld by white people. So anyone who has any resources should do whatever they can to support that work.

      No amount is too little. Patreon accounts often start at $5 a month and through Venmo/Paypal/Cash App you can pay as much or as little as you want. It all adds up. You can avoid extra fees If you connect a bank account rather than a credit card.

      Even if you don’t have money to give right now, you can help spotlight and amplify black voices on Instagram. You can like and share the posts of black people and temporarily mute the accounts of white people posting about things besides this pressing issue. This can help game the algorithm to get more attention on this issue. Social media only shows us what it thinks we will like or what our friends have liked, so the messages of black people often get confined to the black community.

    • Fiona says...

      LOVE Naomi O’Brien! I just bought two of the guides for my nieces and nephews and am excited to share with them – glad you beat me to it!

  27. Nadia says...

    Hi Kat, ABAR stands for Anti-Bias Anti-Racist

    • Kat says...

      Thank you!

  28. Anna Breswick says...

    Instagram accounts I have found informative:

    @mspackyetti (Brittany Packnett Cunningham is an activist and also a must follow on Twitter)

    @dr.marielbuque (Dr. Mariel Buque is a therapist whose content is applicable to all but who centers black people in her work)

    @urdoinggreat (Gem is an activist who creates great TikTok videos highlighting the black experience of violence and oppression in this country with a strong recognition of intersectionality.) They use the pronouns they/them.)

    It’s important to be aware of these issues in our own backyards, so make sure to also follow black business owners, politicians, educators, and your local chapter of Black Lives Matter. BLM is posting incredible content this week with actions you can take now.

  29. Raquel says...

    Hi Jo, thanks for the list! I live in SF and I’ve come across a list of black-owned businesses across the Bay, shared by my local plant shop. You have a huge audience, it would be awesome to see a list of black-owned restaurants, coffee shops, clothing stores, etc. in NYC in the blog. A lot of small business are struggling right so if they are not opened right now, they will still need a lot of business in order to survive. Another way of amplifying melanated voices is by having more black writers in the blog. Thanks so much!

    • Raquel says...

      Sorry, that was confusing – I meant to write that a lot of business are struggling now, even the ones that are opened for take-out/delivery and will need a lot of business to be able to survive post COVID-19. Thank you!

    • Sarah says...

      Hi Raquel! Can you link the list for others in the Bay? Would love to have access :)
      Thank you!
      Sarah

    • Raquel says...

      Hi Sarah! Here it is: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/u/0/d/1mTthE5lwqVnTCIm3iQtQXLyxwK-pc17cuCp–BhAYX8/htmlview?pru=AAABcqnrg3g*3AENPjcyez_u5rndbZiYAw#
      This list was created by a SF Chronicle food critic (Soleil Ho). I believe she first posted here: https://projects.sfchronicle.com/2020/black-owned-restaurants/
      I also have two suggestions for readers: when looking for whatever businesses/services you need, search for black-owned ones in Google. The other one is holding businesses accountable: a lot of them have posted on Tuesday and I have gone through my Instagram asking them to post the places they’ve donated to, what actions they are taking within their own companies to ensure that it is an inclusive workplace for Black people and what are their diversity practices and policies.

  30. Claire says...

    You all are really killing it with these resources. Thank you.
    I would like to offer this suggestion. In addition to the excellent ideas here and elsewhere, and because I am interested in open dialogue between opposing perspectives on these difficult issues, it is also on my list to read Derek Black’s book, Rising out of Hatred: the Awakening of a Former White Nationalist, and also Megan Phelps-Roper’s book, Unfollow: A Memoir of Loving and Leaving the Westboro Baptist Church. I’ve heard them both interviewed and their stories are fascinating and heartening. Both credit other people who were open to having a dialogue with them, and that is what cracked open their awareness, ignited their empathy, and triggered profound shifts in their beliefs.

  31. Caitlin says...

    Thank you for this list! I love The Conscious Kid and wanted to put in a plug for supporting their account, and others like it, financially when possible. I recently signed up for their Patreon and feel that $5/month is the *least* I could do in return for the incredibly valuable service they are providing. I also got access to a bunch of really awesome resources, particularly excited about the recommendations for books for kids based on age level that feature diverse characters and are authored by POC.

  32. A says...

    Rachel Elizabeth Cargle launched her bookstore in Akron, OH this week. It’s called Elizabeths Books & Writing Centre. In her post on Instagram yesterday, she said that a percentage of all book sales will be donated to The Loveland Foundation, which focuses on Black female mental health care services.

    I was looking to purchase some antiracist reading material through a Black-owned store, and even though a lot is currently sold out, Elizabeths is allowing backorders! I happily purchased and will wait patiently for restocking. Just wanted to share.

    • Catherine says...

      I looked at the website for Elizabeth’s, and it seems to be a curated book list through a site called bookshop.org, not an actual bookstore. I wasn’t previously familiar with them, and can’t seem to find much information beyond their affiliate program. Does anyone know if Elizabeth’s will eventually open a store-front? Right now, it looks like Elizabeth’s earns a commission for books sold, which is different from being a book seller.

      The Loveland Foundation is also created by Rachel Cargle and there was some controversy about the fundraising aspect in the past. There’s a need for more transparency when asking for donations.

  33. s says...

    @iamrachelricketts has amazing resources available including her spiritual activism courses.

    AND anyone EXCEPT shaunking. he is a grifter who peddles in trauma porn. the hashtag #shaunkingletmedown has loads and loads of examples as well.

    • mollC says...

      I came here for the anti-Shaun King commentary! There are too many red flags about him and the questions of his authenticity, fundraising dollars disappearing, using his platform to abuse, etc. Thank you!

    • Melissa says...

      Yes, many many black activists (see below) have asked that people stop giving money to Shaun King. He has mainly white followers who don’t know his troubled history of fundraising money disappearing.

      https://medium.com/@deray/on-shaun-king-351bd812318c

    • Julie says...

      I knew this about Shaun King but had not seen DeRay’s medium post, thanks for linking.

  34. Nadia says...

    Hi Kat, ABAR=Anti-Bias/Anti-Racist

  35. Julie says...

    I would also add if you’re looking to support activists online you should acknowledge some ground rules:
    1. Do NOT DM these folks asking “what you can do?” A lot of them have provided LOTS of resources already.
    2. Be prepared to be financially supportive.

    Also—diversifying your feed doesn’t mean only following people who talk about race and racial issues. There are lots of black people in every field and we should fight the algorithm and support them too.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Great points, Julie, thank you.

  36. Claire says...

    I’ve had the fortune of listening and learning to Ijeoma Oluo, based in my city of Seattle, speak twice. Her Instagram (and book, “So You Want to Talk About Race”) are equally powerful. @IjeomaOluo

  37. Caitlin says...

    Wow, thank you for sharing all of these. I’m especially moved by The Conscious Kid’s slideshow. Using race to pick a playmate at 2.5 years old? Let this be a wake up call to white parents who think there is an age too young to talk about race.

  38. LK says...

    Deb from Smitten Kitchen suggested a bunch of black chefs, including Benjamina from the Great British Baking Show! Her handle is @bakedbybenji, she is an author, baker and food stylist.

    • anne says...

      Samin Nosrat did something similar, and it was great! It’s the most recent posts under @ciaosamin

  39. Sydney says...

    Thank you for this.

  40. @ShaunKing He puts a spotlight on racial injustices which creates an action network!

    • Another brown gal says...

      Multiple people have commented (including here) that Shuan King should not be followed. Many black activists have issues with him, not to mention he has been accused of stealing a ton of money that he fundraised.

    • Clare says...

      It’s pretty aggressive but I’ve used, “That means you’re either ignorant or racist, so which is it?” in a number of situations. Doesn’t win them over much but it usually shuts down the convo.

    • Julie says...

      There are quite a few black feminist activists who have highlighted the serious issues with some of Shaun King’s content, including posting of what some call trauma porn. You can also google him, there’s quite a few accusations of misuse of funds.

    • Clare Wisner says...

      There’s some controversy with his fundraising and how much of it gets to who it’s intended to.

    • aga says...

      A big ditto for @shaunKing !

    • Moriah says...

      I ask that you do some thorough research on Shaun and his fundraising practices.

    • t says...

      just to be clear many Black activists advise that we DO NOT FOLLOW SHAUN KING.

  41. J says...

    Really happy that you shared Leah’s quote about how racism isn’t about meanness. I think that one of the biggest impediments to racial justice in America is the way many of us (speaking as a white person here) are taught to understand racism as individual acts of conscious hate. When you have that framework in place, it seems like all you need to do to fight racism is just to be nice to people, but what that actually does is prevent you from digging into structural inequality.

    Anyway, very happy to see CoJ talking about this misconception.

    • Julia says...

      That statement about racism not being the same as meanness REALLY spoke to me. I am deeply concerned about the limitations of history/social studies in this country, which in my experience neatly wrap up their (limited) coverage of race and racism with the 1960s. When, say, an old white couple can afford to pay for their own elder care because they got a favorable mortgage in 1976, but a black couple can’t, that’s racism, too. When the black couple’s daughter has to take a few years off of work to care for her parents (and loses out on that income), that’s racism. It’s not a cruel name or a statue glorifying a Confederate general, but it’s still real and important and, because it’s not overt, largely ignored.

      So I hope people look at their kids’ textbooks, and see if they cover red-lining, school funding, lead in the water, etc. Hell, just ask your kids if they know what DECADE the Civil War took place. If their schools don’t cover those issues, write a letter asking why. If we don’t study our history, and don’t *thoroughly* examine the ways in which it bleeds into the present, I don’t think much of a shot at improving things.

    • Elle says...

      The Democrat party has promised to fix the structural inequality for 50 plus years, yet black people’s neighborhoods remain poor, and schools remain failing. I’ve seen enough promises that are lip service only. President Obama did nothing to bring the black community out of poverty.

  42. Nadia says...

    Thank you for highlighting the work of these amazing individuals, Joanna! They make the world a better place, and so do you by using your platform to elevate their voices.

    Because you have such a huge readership, I would consider adding a note to remember that these accounts are experiencing a massive surge in followers right now, many of which are brand new to ABAR work in general. Please, dear friends, do not DM these (or any) Black people to announce your “excitement” on getting started/ ask them “where to start”/ or use them as a personal resource for reading lists, documentaries, etc to further your ABAR journey. Their PAGES are the resources, not them personally. These. people. are. exhausted. Let’s respect that. Plus, CupOfJo has already compiled similar lists for this very reason! (ty!)

    With that said, I’m a teacher who has been donating regularly via Venmo awesome Black educators like @thetututeacher + @diversereads, @readlikearockstar, @wokekindergarten, @msadamsteaches

    Thanks as always for the great work, CupOfJo team!

    • Kat says...

      Hi, thank you for this comment…I was feeling conflicted over how to best follow new accounts and this helped. Can you explain what ABAR stands for? Thank you!

    • Well said, Nadia. And love those educators too. (And I didn’t know about @wokekindergarten but I am following now. Thank you!)

    • Suzanne says...

      @Kat, ABAR = anti-bias and anti-racist.

      A reminder – in the spirit of @Nadia’s comment and to piggyback on what was said, in addition to not asking questions of Black people, please use your Googles to find out the answers to questions (especially to something like an acronym, as that’s a pretty clear Google…)

      I’m hoping that my tone doesn’t come across as anything but a loving reminder to us that while we’re all in this together, there’s some beautiful autonomy in finding answers yourself without putting the burden on others.

    • J says...

      @Suzanne, when I Googled “what does ABAR stand for” the only result that came up was “Alternate Battery Acquisition Radar.”

      Just a loving reminder that using acronyms can be exclusionary, and that sometimes the small burden of writing out the full phrase can more effectively communicate its importance :)

    • SR says...

      @J if you google “ABAR” + “education” the first result tells you what it is! Get your boolean search skills on and add some context. :)

    • Stella says...

      Nadia, as a pre-service teacher I also love learning from educators on Instagram and consider learning about ABAR essential to my teacher prep education! And thanks for adding your note about not DMing or asking for more labor from these folks. A few more Black educators I would recommend @teachingwithmxt @blackgirlsteach @hotmessteaching
      Some non-Black teachers of color I’d also recommend: @teachandtransform and @teachtoblossom

    • E says...

      to add to what SR had to say: the search “ABAR work,” the exact phrase Nadia used, returns the same results! I’m new to the acronym though not so new to the work, and do feel that everything people can do to self-serve here makes a difference. I appreciate Suzanne speaking up about this and putting it so eloquently. Google is free, after all, and as Nadia said, people are exhausted.