Design

Have a Delicious Weekend.

cookies

How are you doing at home? We made Toby’s cookies yesterday and it was a bolstering activity. Also, I’m thrilled that you’re excited about our Cup of Jo book club! Can’t wait until April 14th. Stay safe, and here are a few fun links from around the web…

I refuse to run a coronavirus home school.” (New York Times)

Found! The best way to cook spaghetti.

One of our favorite games has a new family-friendly version. They’re offering 15% off for our readers with code CUPOFJO15.

I’m loving Jenny’s new project/pantry/purpose series.

Paul Rudd is ageless!

A lovely shirt for work (aka video conference calls).

The first lines of 10 classic novels rewritten for social distancing. “Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself. Then she remembered the florist was closed. And the party was cancelled.”

A helpful list of substitutions for your fridge.

What a beautiful Instagram caption.

Wise words.

Plus, two reader comments:

Says Lee Ann on running feels good (I swear): “I’m a long-time long-distance runner, mostly on trails. I would suggest for a more meditative experience to skip the music — listen to breathing, your heartbeat and, if you can the sounds of nature.”

Says Katharine on what if your child has a favorite parent: “The other night at bedtime, my three-year-old actually told me, ‘Mama, I think Daddy is my favorite person ever.’ And after my initial moment of (internal) sadness, I said something like, ‘Daddy IS awesome, isn’t he? I love that guy, too!’ And my kiddo got this huge smile on his face before saying, ‘Mama, we both love Daddy! We can be the same person!’ It was such an amazing reminder that Daddy may be his favorite person, but my kid still thinks of me as an extension of himself. And I’ll enjoy that for as long as it lasts!”

Note: If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission, at no cost to you. We recommend only products we genuinely like. Thank you so much.

(Photo by Bobbi Lin/Food52.)

  1. Maggie says...

    Can you please stop linking to Everlane? They’ve been sketchy for a loong time now and their treatment of workers during this pandemic has been appalling.

    • Adley says...

      Why are they sketch? I was under the impression they were a good company…but I would definitely like to learn about what’s going on. Will you let me know an article or resource? Thanks

  2. Ksm says...

    The problem with article like “I refuse to run a coronavirus homeschool,” published in leading papers is that it is a momentary opinion expressed by an individual based on few days of experience. There is no way to find out what were the effects of this later when school opens or whether the writer still would make the same choices if situation arose based on the effects of this choice. I am not saying the writer should or would regret it necessarily but as someone who had done this in past with my kid. I am aware of the mistakes I made and how I would tweak it. And I agree with the comment about the tone of article.

  3. NH says...

    The article “I refuse to run a coronavirus homeschool,” was meant to allow people the freedom to make the choices they need to I guess, but I found it to be quite patronizing in tone. The parents who are scheduling every moment of every day are not Home school parents, they are people who have bought into a type of educational philosophy. Many of us who do homeschool are taking time to help our children transition to a time of staying home with learning but with a great deal of freedom. It would be refreshing to have an actual home-schooling family give ideas on how to navigate this instead of those who have never homeschooled project what that looks like. If you are feeling burnt out from too many activities or projects, slow down and read a book out loud to your kids. Read alouds can be some of the most lovely times of learning. Lot’s of grace to everyone in this time of transitions.

  4. Sequoia says...

    So my husband is a Paul Rudd aficionado and we desperately needed that laugh this afternoon!

  5. I love the link about lines from novels that are perfect for social distancing! I think that we are all feeling a little bit of this right now.

  6. Lauren says...

    My boyfriend was laid off this morning. Not unexpected given the state of the world but still tough for both of us. I’m coming to CoJ to escape to an island of happiness and positivity, re-visited all of the links from Friday and am now looking for more content to counterbalance the dreariness of the world.

    Does anyone have recommendations for similar blogs?

    Something to read thats not more coronavirus coverage?

    • KC says...

      I strongly endorse really old books for escapism! There is a blog I love that does reviews of public domain (generally, 1923 or earlier) books: https://redeemingqualities.wordpress.com/ There are sometimes “spoilers” in the reviews; it has never mattered for my enjoyment of the books. She’s absolute gold for clearly identifying the good things and the not-good things about each book, though, so that you can pick the ones that match your personal preferences.

      On the more recent side, you can take a blogger you like and go alll the way back to the beginning on an archive trawl. (I know someone who read I-don’t-even-know-how-many years of Amalah while up at night breastfeeding.)

      Or find a series you like (Maisie Dobbs?) and plow through them in library ebook form. I do find that having books set well in the past is most helpful for me when working on not stressing about now, and books also written in the past work better for me (Maisie Dobbs has a lot of concepts imported from “now” which distract me), but mileage may vary.

  7. Mimi says...

    I live in Switzerland. We just shut down the borders with Italy last week. Much too late. You all should be grateful that your President shut down the flights from China sooner than anyone else. You would be in a much worse state such as us if he didn’t. I seem to recall your media saying that was racist at the time. Now we have one of the highest infection rate in Europe per capita….all because of This ridiculous racist talk. Be grateful that you had someone who reacted quickly to shut this down.

  8. Very important question in these trying times:
    Is that photo of the actual cookies Toby’s recipe makes? Because they look exactly like my dream cookie, and I’ve never been able to find a recipe that makes them!

    • Bay says...

      Thank you, Jo!!! I shall spend my quarantine perfecting chocolate chip cookies. Pretty solid goal, I think. My husband is equal parts excited and concerned about his waistline, since we can’t share the food we make… ;)

  9. Nissa says...

    I tried to make Toby’s cookies with my toddler yesterday, and in an attempt to save time (her attention span is growing, bit still short), I put all the other ingredients in the bowl while the butter melted. When I poured in the butter, I ended up melting all the chocolate chips completely…which is the best disaster that could have happened! We happily enjoyed our “accidental brookies” for dessert last night, and look forward to doing do again tonight! Congratulations to Toby on a truly foolproof recipe! ?

    • Nissa says...

      Should say, “to doing so again tonight.”

  10. Emily says...

    Thank you for continuing to post! You’ve found the sweet spot of being a welcome distraction while not being tone deaf to our current situation.

  11. Libbynan says...

    Your “wise words” are indeed wise words! I plan to read them three times a day and five times on Sunday.

  12. Jessica says...

    I got a 90% on that Paul Rudd quiz. I’m hoping to put that on the next iteration of my resumé.

  13. Jessica Nicolosi Slaven says...

    Definitely agree with Lee Ann re: running. I usually listen to podcasts or music, but given our current situation running without anything at all – not even my watch (!) – has been so centering.

  14. RMB says...

    I’m feeling sad and overwhelmed and just want to type it out. I’m so grateful for this community and the comfort that I find here, knowing that I can share my thoughts in this space.

    I own my own business and have two employees. I typically have about $1500/day in sales, and I sold $1500 total in the past 8 days total. I need to sell $10K/month just to break even in running my business. I’m nervous about my income, and my ability to support my team. I have a 30K tax bill that is upcoming, even though the delayed due date is giving me some gratitude.

    My husband is in the hospitality industry, and he no longer has a paycheck. He is a 1099 worker, so he doesn’t qualify for unemployment or financial support.

    We live in the Bay Area and are now on day 6 of Shelter In Place, living out of our (very expensive) one-bedroom apartment. I’m trying to work through the days, supporting us from home, and my husband is spending his days in a growing depression, feeling “useless.”

    I’m now resentful towards my husband, as his anxiety is causing him to be immobile. He says he feels “useless” but I want to scream at him that there are a million things he could do to contribute. I’m exhausted, running my business, planning meals, keeping the house tidy, online grocery ordering, caring for our dog, filing our taxes, doing laundry, and on and on and on. I feel guilty that I’m growing resentful, knowing that these are unprecedented times, and we’re all allowed to feel our feelings. His depression is probably a million times worse for him than it is for me, but I’m still ANGRY.

    I’m stuck. How do you process your feelings when you’re literally confined to 750 square feet with someone who processes emotions in a totally different way than you do?

    • Sarah says...

      That sounds really hard! I hope he’ll turn a corner and realize that you need him too.

    • Caitlin says...

      Rmb,

      That sounds so stressful and hard- you have so much on your plate. I’m so sorry. Do you have a link to your business you could share?
      Please be kind to yourself during this time.

    • Katha says...

      Dear RMB,

      I‘m so sorry to hear about your financial and thus probably existential worries around your business and your husbands loss of income.
      I can only imagine how hard it is for you two right now. I can also understand why you‘d feel resentful towards your husband. Great that you can acknowledge his feelings. But that doesn’t make yours go away.
      Who does all the things you listed (planning meals, filing taxes, doing laundry etc.) in your usual life? Maybe he‘s used to you doing all these things? Sounds a lot like you‘re carrying the mental load.
      Anyway: maybe you could write im a todo-list? His depression might make it hard for him to take action. But maybe having a concrete task to tackle will make it easier.
      And in the longer run could make him feel less useless.
      I wish you all the best and may you get through these hard times.

    • Jill says...

      Hi RMB,
      I hear you. I am in my home with a family of five…..three teenagers, my husband and me, but feeling very alone. Our differences are shining brightly right now. I have had many moments of panic when I think about the future. I am available to talk by phone or email to help uplift you or just listen (it is my superpower). Let me know. I am sending you many prayers today.

    • Anon says...

      That all sounds very challenging and I can understand why you would feel overwhelmed. I wonder if you could find a way of communicating the idea (without screaming) to your husband? It might help empower him and help him feel less depressed if he knows that he can contribute in meaningful ways by helping you and the household. Perhaps create a list of things that need to get done, and tell him you really need his help, and which of these things could he do “today”? If you have a hard time saying it, perhaps take this comment and re-write it as a letter. You don’t even need to focus on the anger, but just on the fact that you need his help right now and list the things he could do to help. Good luck. These are such unprecedented and difficult times.

    • nadine says...

      Oh Rmb, it does sound frustrating and it must be really hard to know what to do. Thank you a lot for sharing Rmb, we’re in this together and reading about other experiences makes me feel less alone. I wish I could send some comfort your way.

    • E says...

      No advice or answers for you. Just wanted to say thank you for putting into words the struggle so many of us are feeling right now. It’s brave, and it’s necessary. I’m keeping you and your husband in my thoughts.

    • Susannah says...

      Dear RMB, I am so sorry for the load weighing on you right now. I don’t have wise words that might make things feel better, but know you are not alone. Xo

    • Sara C. says...

      I have no answers, but just wanted to let you know that I see you. And you’re doing a good job.

    • E says...

      Dear RMB, I too want you to know that you are not alone, though that’s likely cold comfort in a difficult situation. Could you possibly schedule a business meeting of sorts with your husband? Explain that these are exceptionally challenging times, and you do empathize with his job loss, and that we’re all struggling, but the only way we get through is together. Present a detailed chore list of what needs to be accomplished in your household, and divide it up appropriately. Everyone has a job to do, and a timeline in which to do it.

      I know that everyone’s situation is unique, and everyone is dealing with this crisis in a different fashion, but for myself I’ve found that order and tidiness and routine have helped me immensely. Sometimes when I feel that I might collapse under the sheer weight of the world’s collective suffering, I just try to think of the next thing I should do. Is that to unload the dishwasher? Is it to make a pot of soup for supper? Should I water my seedlings? Maybe write in my journal? Whatever the next thing to do is, we all have to find it. And then the next thing. And the thing after that.

      I know this might be of little help to you, but please know that I am thinking of you and sending you a thousand virtual hugs. We will all get through this. And we will be better and stronger for it. Wishing you all the best.

    • AMK says...

      Sending love!!! This too shall pass! I know it doesn’t feel that way. But it will. I promise. I’m so glad you expressed yourself here. I am wrapping you in a big virtual hug! I listened to a podcast today that described a scarcity mindset and a mindset of abundance. She reminded listeners that many successful businesses were born during difficult times. You and your husband are creative, resourceful and full of grit (I don’t know you but to set up your own busKnees and to work as a 1099…you guys know how to hustle and work hard). Take walks and get some fresh air while you brainstorm or meditate. We are in this together ?

  15. Natasha says...

    I’m a private tutor in London and as such much of my job involves making up for a child’s education losses – sometimes due to poor teaching, but more often due to difficult circumstances, moving abroad etc.
    I am not a parent, but one thing I would really strongly urge all of the mums and dads out there over the coming months: it is not the actual education that matters so much – children can relearn what they’ve forgotten or make up the lost learning in a few months. However, the biggest risk here is losing the ability to FOCUS! It is hard for me to express enough how important a skill this is, and a lack of ability to focus (often seen in children who have experienced some upheaval) can be absolutely detrimental to their education and development for years to come. Please, if you can find the strength in you, force your children to continue focusing! Through art, reading, puzzles, whatever, but don’t let them go through six months without it ?

    • Amanda says...

      This is very insightful. With the coming weeks (months?) ahead I will make a point to practice this some everyday with my school-aged kids. Thanks for sharing!

    • celeste says...

      Thank you.

  16. Lena says...

    The new article about not homeschooling is the most selfish article I’ve ever read.
    Why wouldn’t you want to educate your children while they are home?
    What’s so important that you do while staying home? And what’s more important then your children’s education?? Can’t wrap my head around this. You might be home till this Fall, good luck catching up next school year.

    • Anon says...

      1)The parent said they (mom and dad) are both still working outside of the home, so that adds a whole layer of difficulty.
      2) People process things in different ways, and I’d encourage us not to judge someone so harshly. Teaching out of the home is truly not everyone’s calling. She sounds like a loving mom who spends lots of time with her kids and helps them learn in other ways.
      3) In these challenging times, we might have to accept that kids will be a little behind and have to do some catching up in the future. And if we are all careful and responsible, hopefully kids will have a lifetime ahead to do that catching up.

    • Monica says...

      I 100% agree with you. I read the article with full incredulity. Nice try to attempt to put down pro-active, caring parents who are trying to maintain a routine for their kids during a wildly distressing time. It was the dumbest, most head-in-sand thing I’ve read in some time.

    • Blandine says...

      ‘What’s so important that you do while staying home? And what’s more important then your children’s education??’ Some families need to keep their job so that the kids keep a roof over their head. I am working from home and juggling the million different assignments sent by the teachers and i can tell you it is not easy. I keeping seeing all those articles about watching opera performances and catching up on reading but my experience so far has been very busy.

  17. Benedicte says...

    Hi Joanna! Yesterday we had a “confinement night” with friends playing our favorite game : Code names! We used the application Houseparty on our phones and played online on the website “horsepaste.com”. Such a fun night! Best wishes to everyone from Switzerland

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      What a great tip!

    • Amy says...

      Thank you so much for this – my husband’s family loves codenames and this could be the way we hang out together from far away (two of the three families were going to be visiting over spring break)!

  18. Emily says...

    I don’t have either in my blood (I’m not Asian) but I must have it in my soul because how could ANY chef say that?! Those two sauces are not remotely interchangeable. Although, I was talking with a Korean friend recently about Vegemite and said, while it isn’t the same, there is some similarly between Vegemite and Korean soybean paste and he looked at me like I had seven eyeballs.

  19. Anon says...

    As a teacher being asked to send home a bunch of work for students to do, I have worried about the extra stress this will put on some families. Parents already dealing with so much now having to convince their kids to the prescribed independent learning. Students stressed about all the uncertainty and disruption. Not an easy situation. So everyone: Just do your best, and encourage a bit of balance. Accept that this is a hard situation and just be good to each other, and yourself as you can. I am not a micromanager, and aiming at a perfect, structured schedule to mold my own child just isn’t my thing. There is a benefit to letting children moderate themselves a little. They develop valuable character traits and skills from that, too.

    • Karen says...

      YES TO THIS! Just yesterday I emailed this to my girls’ principal and their two teachers:
      Hi XX, XX, and XX,

      I hope you are all doing well as we navigate these stressful times. I know for me and my family, it has been extreme. My husband and I are small business owners, and that alone has created a good chunk of our stress. We employee over 20 people, all of whom rely on us for paychecks and income. This past Monday I thought we were closing down, then Wednesday we were going to explore reduced hours and supplementing wages with EDD’s Work Share unemployment insurance. Then last night (Thurs), I had to text everyone and say “we’re closed, you’re laid off, don’t come in tomorrow” (HORRIBLE!). THEN, today, we learn that our industry (construction, we own blueprint shops) has been classified as essential, and we CAN operate. Hooray!

      So I am managing all this during the day, on top of regular production/shop logistics/admin tasks – my daily duties – and then, then I return home to my amazing children, and I put on my “happy mom” face, and try to just BE with them.

      I truly appreciate all the emails and digital resources that have been shared with us parents – it’s amazing! But some of us parents are stretched VERY THIN right now b/c of our profession. So for me, the feeling of adding “teacher” to my already way-too-long title (Woman, Wife, Mother, Business Owner/President, Cook, ETC) right now is A LOT. And I have to let it go. I HAVE TO be okay with the fact that I haven’t yet had the energy or mind-space to click on any link or app or webinar. I printed some math worksheets for girls, I made a daily chart for them to check off what they’ve done (reading, math, journaling, art)…..and that’s helping us.

      And I just want to share my perspective. I don’t want anything to change, I don’t expect anything to change, but just sharing another perspective – maybe there is an opportunity here that some “social forces” could remind us parents that we ARE always trying our best, and that alone is good (great!) enough…..

      Just a thought….from a woman/mom/wife/biz owner/”teacher” who is VERY glad it’s almost 5pm on this Friday!!
      ——————
      One teacher replied with such amazing words and positivity and acknowledgement. I already feel better.

    • Acadia McGee says...

      This is a great perspective from a teacher. We are a homeschooling family and have been for 4 years now. It takes a while, but you learn that home learning doesn’t have to look like school. It needs to look like a family, your own family. It can be beautiful and fun. And my kids actually learn…don’t worry. Read books together, watch movies together, go on walks…slow ones. Let them soak up this time with family, it will feed their souls.

  20. I always look forward to the Friday roundup of posts to read.

  21. Sarah says...

    The comment about rewriting literature to reflect Corona-Norms made me laugh. Today, while watching the opening scenes of Emma (thank you, instant rentals!), I gasped when the characters walked into the chapel for the wedding. I think it was 50% “they shouldn’t sit so close together!” and 50% longing and jealous of any social interaction happening, even the fictional kind.

  22. Mandy says...

    On not home schooling,… I am not a parent, but good for you! Do what you feel is right! In the light of this tragic time, you won’t get this time back. Use it how you see fit! *elbow bump*

  23. I’ve been thinking how to contribute to the collective good and as a designer/printmaker I am putting those creative powers to work. If you find coloring meditative I’ve uploaded a botanical still life to download and print for free. Just click my name above and it should take you straight through.

    If that doesn’t work, try http://www.lalleuca.com

    Take care, team. Xx

    • Mondè says...

      Thanks!

    • Amy says...

      Thanks Tracey, it’s beautiful!

  24. J. Pham says...

    Bittman, I will fight you. No, soy sauce and fish sauce are NOT interchangeable. LOL. GTFO.

    For the masses, I say: tamari or amino braggs is a sub for soy, without harming integrity of the dish.

    Fish sauce? There IS no alternative. Oh, Andrea Nguyen of Viet World Kitchen has a pretty neat vegan recipe if you wanna try it!

    Sincerely,
    Someone who has both fish and soy sauce running in their blood (southeast and east Asian heritage)

  25. Lauren says...

    Parents whose children are temporarily at home are NOT homeschooling! My kids are home from school due to closures. I, on the other hand, was homeschooled all the way from 1st grade through high school; university was my first time in a traditional classroom. My kids’ teachers gave us assignments, guidelines and resources. I do not have the huge burden of deciding on curriculum or what is appropriate for my children, or any of the other overwhelming responsibilities that my parents had while educating me or that my homeschooling friends have. For those of us who don’t homeschool, this unexpected situation is understandably stressful but it is not the same thing! And most do not have my personal experience and don’t find the learning at home thing so normal and natural. (I mean, we are definitely not doing a color-coded schedule. Do any real homeschoolers do things like that?!) Do your best, follow your teachers’ instructions, thank them for said instructions, and make the most of family time. Enjoy the flexibility homeschooling offers as much as possible! The kids will be fine. And don’t forget, you’re not homeschooling. You just are together more than you planned.

    • Sasha says...

      We can call it whatever we want. We are all doing what’s best for our kids, though, so don’t judge and we won’t judge you.

    • Roxana says...

      Lauren, I hear what you’re saying, but as a “true” homeschooler (i.e. for the last three years I’ve been doing the whole shebang: curriculum, the lesson plans, etc.), I’m perfectly fine with everyone referring to themselves as “homeschoolers.” One of the biggest challenges of homeschooling is having everyone together all the time. ALL. DAY. LONG. It’s intense. Let’s not split hairs.

      I greatly appreciated the NYT piece, because it highlighted how hard this all is. Life is full. A little too full. It is a-okay to give up on certain things or admit that you’re tapped out. There is no “failure” in that. We cannot do it all, or do it all perfectly, and we certainly don’t have to meet everyone else’s expectations.

      To all you parents facilitating your child’s/childrens’ education (whatever we want to call it): If I were in your boat, I’d let it all slide. No disrespect to all the teachers who have busted their butts getting all these lesson plans out! But I think we’d all do well to enjoy being together during this unique time. The world will not end if they putz through the last quarter of second grade. Their multiplication tables will be there next fall. There is so much learning to be done in living and relating. Plus, the kids are stressed, too. This season of emotional expectation of “What will happen?” is really exhausting for everyone. Emotional stress shuts down the ability to learn. Literally. Parts of the brain stop working. The kids are better off playing. Or being read to. Or taking a bath in the middle of the day.

      We can all only take so much: WFH, pray that Zoom doesn’t crash, wonder whether we’ve been exposed, take care of the household (laundry, food, TOILET PAPER!), make sure the kids don’t kill each other and/or watch obscene amounts of TV, video games, stay in touch with elderly neighbors, scold our parents for leaving the house. . . the list is endless. Let’s all give each other (and ourselves!) a little grace, and remember to BREATH :).

    • Lauren says...

      Yes, of course you can call it whatever you want. But this past week has confirmed for me that I would be completely overwhelmed by real homeschooling and I feel like there needs to be an acknowledgement of how huge it is to do it for real. I hope your time at home with your kids goes really well.

    • Neela says...

      Beautifully said, Roxana <3

    • Betsy says...

      It is a different homeschool experience in that parents had maybe a weekend to prepare for it. If I homeschooled my kids outside of all this I would have needed several months of research and planning, and the highlights would have been field trips to museums and science centers and zoos and everywhere else. Given our situation my kids and I are doing the best we can and I’ve already seen a lot of progress at my homeschool.

  26. Amy says...

    I did not expect the article about how to cook spaghetti to be so entertaining. I almost didn’t click on it; I’m 32, I cook dinner almost every day of the month for five people, I feel relatively confident in my ability to cook pasta. But it was worth the read!

    • Jesse says...

      I’m a teacher of 10plus years and many friends have asked me for home schooling advice. My response don’t be a school. Sure read with your kids everyday but don’t try to replicate a classroom. Do things they would never get a chance to do at school. There are so many things we can do with our kids creating rich learning lives. My favourite suggestion- family history, take this time while you’re all at home to record as many family stories as you can; call the grandparents, collate old photos, write down as many funny stories as you can remember (scribe for your little ones), you’ll never get this time to reminisce with the same intensity again.

    • Roxana says...

      Oh, Jesse! I LOVE the family history idea. Thank you for sharing!

      And thank you for being a teacher! ;)

  27. Cynthia says...

    I agree with the parent who wasn’t going to run a homeschool. Her boys are learning a lot. They’re researching topics they like, which may not be part of a regular curriculum. They’re reading, and it really doesn’t matter what they’re reading, as long as they do it. Baking involves math, especially fractions, and again, reading skills. You can learn lots without being in a formal classroom. I’m a recently retired teacher, and I think there is too much pressure on children today what with standardized testing and everything they have to deal with. And parenting is not a competition. Who cares what you friends’ children are doing? As long as your children are happy and thriving, that’s all that matters.

    • Joanna Schoff says...

      I agree 100%. We are able to do all the things they “don’t have time” for at school.
      I am loving teaching my children at home; strengthening some skills that they are lacking.
      I am fortunate that i am a teacher.
      I can imagine how difficult it must be for many parents. I certainly could not jump into other job roles and figure it all out instantly.

  28. Maddie Warner says...

    I love to feel that this is a space where we can all share some of the ways to contribute to the collective good in hard times and I am looking for a bit more of that along with the important nourishing words and images that I find here – quickly figuring out and supporting the organizations that are most vulnerable in this time of social service disruption is so huge and whether it’s locally or globally identifying how to give food, money, goods
    etc helps with the free floating anxiety of times like this – and I know a lot of people hate it but if you DON’T please Donate Blood as also it is going to be an ongoing issue and need and it is safe to do – they are taking huge precautions!
    https://www.redcrossblood.org/give.html/find-drive?scode=RSG00000E017&cid=nonbrand&med=cpc&source=google&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI4ZC2rfCp6AIVVoNaBR19iAlkEAAYASAAEgIm-fD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

  29. Stephanie says...

    Yes to not homeschooling!

    My sister lives in another state, and her second-grade daughter’s school assignments take 2+ hours each day—and are required for continuing on to the next grade. I’m so grateful that our district sent out a list of resources explaining that parents and students could use them as need-be to facilitate learning, while emphasizing that work done at home would not affect grades in any way.

    As for my two boys (kindergarten and pre-school), we are taking as many walks and bike rides as we can. Inside, they’re building and drawing and snacking and tv-ing and running around the house like mad.

    And they’re also asking lots of questions, reading or being read to, seeing what it looks like to sacrifice for others, learning how get to the other side of boredom and working (ever so slightly) on conflict resolution.

    For our family and in this time, I’d say that’s education enough.

    • b says...

      YES! They can catch up on the academic stuff as long as they’re playing and reading and doing whatever they love and whatever keeps moms, dads, caregivers, etc. sane and intact.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you! i took out the link. xo

  30. Erin says...

    Love that comment about “daddy” being their favorite person – such a sweet loving way to look at that.

  31. CARRIE JONES says...

    Oh my gosh Paul Rudd IS ageless. I got a 15/20 but I had to study his face so hard before making my guesses!

    • Alex says...

      Ha! I got 19/20 and I am SO PROUD! I didn’t study his face though, but relied more on the kind of “first impression/ intuition” lol!

  32. Kaela B says...

    My dog recently had a big orthopedic surgery and at her 8 week x-rays the vet said, “Errr… you can start jogging with her?” I do not jog, but now I guess I do! Veterinarian’s orders.

  33. CS says...

    All the stress and sadness of this pandemic aside for just one moment, a bright ray of sunshine appears. They are saying that, in China, the air is clearer than it has been forever! It does make me think: wow, we could change the course of climate change. If we start to do things differently, nature can heal remarkably quickly. It is within our power to do this.

    • T says...

      I read that the other day, too. Ever since this started I have been thinking, are we someday going to say “remember how in a weird way Coronavirus kind of saved the world?”. Not just with climate change, but also like a human reset of priorities.

    • CS says...

      Thanks T. Odd as it sounds, your comment gave me goosebumps.

    • Rebecca says...

      I’ve thought about this a lot. I hope that, no beg that, humanity uses this awful, stressful time as a huge opportunity for changing our global norms. Reduced flights for work trips that could be done via video conference, more flexible work schedules, increased sick leave policies, checking-in regularly with our elderly friends and family, walking daily to breathe fresh air, etc.

      Right now inessential factory products are halted, like makeup and fast fashion. The last week working at home I gave my face a break and I’m starting to enjoy seeing its true reflection every morning in the mirror. Fashion has taken a backseat as I turn to my comfy basics. When we return to “normal” how do I stop myself from just turning right back to the way things were, thereby contributing to consumerism and global warming all over again?

      Usually when there is a crisis (hurricane, wildfire, etc.), people donate funding and supplies and energy in mass force for a month, and then forget. It’s out of sight out of mind. This being a global crisis, maybe we will be forced to continue to see its aftermath. Maybe it won’t be brushed under the rug, business as usual. Maybe this could truly alter our values, our priorities, our actions as a collective mass.

  34. Lea says...

    Thank you for still posting, it feels like a lifeline!

  35. Elizabeth says...

    Well, that made me feel better. :)

  36. Justine says...

    Love the link to the no homeschooling article. While homeschooling may be an option for some, it places unnecessary pressure on already stressed out parents now placed in the additionally stressful situation of working from home, or suddenly unemployed and worrying where F$@$ the money to pay the bills is coming from. Parents and people everywhere need a little grace to wallow, let go of the “norm” and adjust. That is going to look really different for everyone.

  37. Annie K. says...

    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU for continuing with content. This list…I looked so forward to it and it’s delivering. Thank you thank you thank you. And best wishes to everyone.

  38. Em says...

    To my favorite comment section on the internet: my gym closed on Sunday and I was feeling pretty down about it since my workout routine is my #1 source of self-care and a sense of routine. Monday I went for a jog outside (despite NOT being a runner, it’s a last resort), and I fired up the CoJ Workout Tracks Spotify playlist that one of you fine ladies put together after Caroline’s post about workout tunes a while back. I had such a lovely run in the sunshine, jamming out to the fun songs you all recommended, and I felt connected to a community and certain that all will be ok, in the end! Thinking of you all.

  39. Oh, Joanna! The swans in Venice! I loved seeing this. Such a brief time and already nature begins to repair itself. This filled my heart today, thank u❤️

    • I says...

      It is sadly not true. There are some links in comments above this one.