Design

Have a Sweet Weekend.

sleeping cat by chloe may brown

What are you up to this weekend? We’re going to the MoMA reopening party tonight — I’m excited to see the bigger space, as well as the rise in artists who are non-male, non-white and non-Western. We’ll be sharing photos on Instagram stories, if you’d like to see. Hope you have a good one, and here are a few fun links from around the web…

Ali Wong’s guide to Asian restaurants.

This blog post title made me laugh.

Love the brand Modern Citizen. (What a pretty dress for work!)

The winners of the 2019 Wildlife Photographer of the Year. So good.

The TV show Modern Love premieres today, and it’s star-studded: Tina Fey, Dev Patel, Anne Hathaway, John Slattery and more.

What a beautiful quote.

Is it ever okay to ask a restaurant to turn down the music?

The 10 best chocolate chip cookie recipes, depending on your personal preferences.

San Francisco’s market street is going to be car free! Instead, there will be wider sidewalks, separate bike lanes and a streetcar loop.

Why Thursday is the best day.

Relationship green flags.

Plus, two reader comments:

Says Kara on 12 kitchen tools I can’t live without: “I learned the BEST pizza-cutting life hack from my friend’s mom years ago: kitchen shears! I use them for cutting pizza, quesadillas, lettuce, herbs, you name it! I only use them for food, so they live in my kitchen utensil drawer and can go in the dishwasher. Aside from being super easy to use, they don’t drag all of the cheese off of a hot pizza the way pizza cutter or a knife will do.”

Says Rosie on five big fall books: “I was thinking today how I have been reading Cup of Jo longer than I can remember. And now it feels like an old friend. It is strange how time passes; and through a loving marriage and its ending, through welcoming new friends and saying goodbye to others, and through the constant change of life, one of my favorite places to be is sitting here with a large cup of tea reading this blog.”

Note: If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission, at no cost to you. We recommend only products we genuinely like. Thank you so much.

(Photo by Chloe May Brown/Instagram. Relationship green flags via Swissmiss. SF Market Street via Kottke.)

  1. Gawd it is so soothing to be here on your site!

  2. Kelsey says...

    “Non male, non white”?? Enter any other race/gender there and the comments would go crazy in uproar. I feel sorry that in order to be inclusive we have to put down any gender or race at all. That is not progress at all and it hurts my heart to see a figure like Joanna make a statement like that and think it’s okay.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      It’s not anti-white or anti-male. Just saying that there will ALSO be room made for others, alongside the amazing white male artists. Hope that helps!

    • ally says...

      she’s not putting anyone down at all, it’s a comment on the over representation of white male artists in galleries and museums, as a result of decades of intentional marginalisation of people of color and women. It’s been documented throughout art history. I work in this field and it’s excellent that institutions are finally addressing the problem.

  3. Sasha Whitcombe says...

    Yes to the familiarity comment! I don’t quite know when I started reading but it was waaay before the boys arrived and it is my little slice of comfort reading.

  4. Emily Hertzog says...

    Totally random & not much to do with this post, but would love to see a week of outfits with Claire Saffitz from Bon Appétit! I am dying to know where all of her earrings are from!! <3

    • Erin says...

      seconding this request!

  5. Deana says...

    Ha, great post about what you can/can’t do in restaurants. I’ve easily sent food back, exchanged dishes I didn’t like, had music and air conditioning turned down, chosen better tables, and gotten freebies. I never knew NOT to do those things, and was always very polite with my requests. I do recall getting removed from a 4-person table in an empty London pub, because there were only 2 of us, and I couldn’t convince staff to let us remain at the bigger table. Can’t win ’em all, I guess!

  6. Bri B says...

    I just read “Catch & Kill” by Ronan Farrow and COULD. NOT. PUT. IT. DOWN. It was gripping – like a spy thriller – but somehow this stuff actually happened. The way he weaves his thousands of hours of information gathering and interviews into a story is perfect. Read it now!!!

    • Deb says...

      Listed!

  7. Lesley says...

    YES! Tuesdays are so bad! You are so far from the weekend and so tired from starting the week and already behind on what you didn’t accomplish Monday. Ugh! Thursdays are great though. And now that I’m old and care not about having plans on Friday, I love them dearly too. Saturdays need to calm way down though.

  8. Courtney Cooper says...

    THURSDAY! I was just discussing this very thing with neighbors last Thursday evening as we enjoyed an impromptu block party with reggae music and tequila shots, while the kids raced on all manor of wheeled items up and down the street. Thursday is the day of pleasant surprises.

  9. Erica Lee says...

    I had my baby last week and Modern Love is my favorite “rest and revover” pastime. Ugh, SUCH touching stories and the acting is incredible! Highly reccomend.

    • Katie says...

      Congratulations!!!

    • Michelle says...

      Congrats to you Erica!! Hope you after both doing well ♥️

  10. Claire says...

    nice list! I saw the photos on instagram, and it looked so beautiful. I do really love Modern Citizen – the clothes are so beautiful! I’ve never purchased because of concerns about sizing (I do not look like those long, slender models!), but if i decide to give it a shot then will for sure use the link above.

    • Mishka says...

      YES! The Thursday article has validated what I’ve claimed FOR YEARS!!! Thursday reigns supreme because it holds all of the promise of the weekend, with none of the disappointment of a wasted weekend.

  11. Annika Dawkins says...

    Is ever ok to tell a restaurant to put on music….YES. Decidedly awkward dinning with others in weird silence!

    • Mishka says...

      Haha! I too had to do a double take!

  12. Nadine says...

    Alex Beggs is my new favorite writer, fingers’s crossed she’ll come out with a compilation. And thanks for the shout-out(s) to non-white, non-male, non-Western artists. Absolutely necessary as far as I’m concerned.

  13. Winter Blue says...

    Awww totally agree with Rosie. I too have been reading Cup of Jo for-evah… like at least since 2006! It’s a great source of comfort and I’ve bought way too many things you guys have recommended. Thanks for all the love :)

  14. Hali says...

    I distinctly remember one night in college a friend came running down the hall of my sorority house into my room where I was sitting on my top bunk studying. JOANNA REPLIED TO MY FRIEND’S TWEET!! she said as she turned into my open doorway. We both giggled in shrieks as we scrolled through twitter together looking for the thread. Her friend’s tweet was the hashtag #readerfrombeforetoby – (haha, still true! still funny!) it’s crazy to think we felt OG back then and I think that was 6 years ago!

    We were the girls who read this blog. It was such an identifier! Nerds who loved style and culture! Like a podcast before podcasts were a thing!

    That night seems like eons ago and I’ve all but lost contact with that friend since we graduated in different classes. (JEN! IF YOU’RE HERE, HI!)

    Still love it here just as much as I did then, if not more. I can’t thank you enough for all the joy!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, hali! i’m so touched by your comment! i remember that tweet and how my sister and i loved it :) thank you so much for your thoughtful and lovely note xoxoxo

  15. Ro says...

    I’m American but have been watching a lot of fun lifestyle vlogs from South Korea and I’ve noticed they always cut their food with scissors when cooking. It makes so much sense! We often do things the way we do because we think that’s the only way it should be done. But there are so many other options!

  16. Elizabeth says...

    Hmmm….non male, non white, non western.
    No thank you Joanna!
    I adore you, but appreciate the art for being good art….not because it’s non male, non white and non western. That demeans the art itself.
    I agree with what I think you might be saying, but not how you said it. Not at all how you said it. No thank you.

    • Anna says...

      Um, did I miss the part where Joanna somehow demeaned male, white, Western art or artists or even stated a preference one way or the other? She didn’t imply that non-male, non-white or non-Western art was inherently superior in any way, in fact she didn’t make any judgement on the art at all, she merely expressed excitement that these historically underrepresented artists were getting more attention. I’m struggling to see how anyone could take offense to what she said OR to how she said it. Thank you for continuing to be your lovely and thoughtful self Joanna!

    • Joanne says...

      Elizabeth, I agree with what you said. Non-male, non-white and non-western….really? ‘Great art by some up and coming new artists’ would have sufficed.

    • Michaela says...

      I think there is a multitude of good art in the world, and for most of history we’ve only elevated the parts that came from a white, male, Western perspective. And Joanna did not say she’s eager to see the discarding of this perspective—she said she’s eager to see the “rise” of art that comes from perspectives other than these. I think it’s simply factual to say that the majority of art and culture that we’ve been served up has come from a white, male, Western perspective—it’s not a shocking statement. Your comment seems to suggest that the reason we haven’t seen art from perspectives outside of this is due to the fact that it simply wasn’t good…

    • Cat says...

      Totally agree with you Elizabeth. Art is art. End of story.

    • Ingrid says...

      Wouldn’t it have been wonderful if art (and living) would have always been inclusive? But since it’s been traditionally male, white, western, it feels appropriate to point out the difference.

    • Anita says...

      I think if you read the NYT link you might get your shackles down a bit (also the reader who posted a similar comment below). There is no attack here on white men and trashing of “good art” just because it was produced by white men. The MoMa has been vastly expanded with new galleries to showcase art that has been underrepresented and excluded from the canon of modern art. I think Joanna was simply saying that she is looking forward to seeing some of these new galleries and collections not because of some anti- male anti-white bias but because it is new and promises to offer a different perspective on modern art and challenge the homogeneity of traditional modern art collections, and how we view these works of art. The intention of the MoMA is certainly not to “demean” art, if that’s what your worried about, by showcasing art by white men alongside art by women, African Americans, Latinos and Asians etc. but to make a visit to the museum richer and more varied.

    • Vero says...

      She’s talking about a rise in diversity in the artists who are being represented. The facts are that most art that gets included in these prestigious museums are made by men. White men. Western white men.

      Being excited that an institution is consciously including art from underrepresented groups and sharing it on a larger platform is not the same thing as hating on white western male artists. There is still PLENTY of space being occupied by that demographic.

      Thank you Joanna.

    • Alexandra says...

      Ingrid, your comment sums up my thoughts perfectly. Thank you. And thank you Joanna for your commitment to inclusivity for perspectives that have historically been ignored!

    • K says...

      Cat, if art is art, then museums would represent the variety of good artists out there. But often times mostly art from people who are white, Western, and male get into museums, and not because it is necessarily better. There is a lot of other art out there that doesn’t get showcased because maybe the person doesn’t have the connections, social status, etc.

    • mb says...

      Art historian here–I love the MoMA but in the past they have elevated a eurocentric narrative of the development of modern art. This re-assessment of the galleries works to re-introduce those artworks which the curators themselves deemed worthy of being collected into their own narrative. Please remember that our ideas of how modern art developed are based on narratives that are proposed by different art historians and museums. History is a messy thing, historians make arguments that order causes and effects. This re-imagined museum works to re-emphasize the diverse and multiple voices that existed–and all of them, simply by the fact that they were selected by curators and the museum are deemed VALUABLE and SIGNIFICANT. This is not about the art being demeaned.

      And remember–the more that artworks are put into public view the more they attract attention and that people use them for inspiration for new works. Anyway, I’m always excited about what the MoMA does, and I’m very excited about them moving away from their own set narrative.

  17. Mary says...

    I could have written Rosie’s comment! I started reading before you had kids too! The blog (and I) have evolved so much and it feels like an old friend. One of my favorite weekend rituals is finding a glass of wine or cup of coffee and enjoying your Friday links!

    Thank you for being so relevant and yet so warm. I can’t imagine it’s easy but I’m glad you’re here! Deep felt gratitude for your work! CoJ and Team!

  18. Carla says...

    Hi Joanna,
    You must remember better than I do your first post and the chocolate cookies that you were baking. Is one of these recipes? I thought that it would be funny to bring this one to one of your post.
    Thank you Joanna for being you and for sharing about your lovely family. I love spending time reading your blog, it is a treat everyday ❤️

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Aww you are the sweetest!! The chocolate chip cookies I baked on my first post were from the recipe from the chocolate chip wrapper :) but still delicious haha.

  19. Katie says...

    Re: hot vs. cold coffee. The struggle is real.

  20. agnes says...

    Have a good week-end! I’ve really enjoyed the posts, these past few weeks, and the comment section is such a cool place! we’re breaking frontiers, and all the barriers!

  21. Jess says...

    I actually cannot believe that you didn’t list Andrew Scott at the top of the Modern Love actor list!!!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      omgomgomg how did I not know he was in it?????

    • Jess says...

      Hahaha. I do not know?! My work here is done. Have a FANTASTIC weekend;)

  22. Emily says...

    Here to +1 Rosie’s comment. I started reading CoJ in my anxiety-ridden 20s. Since then there have been 7 (!) moves, 6 jobs, a failed engagement (thank god), a long distance love and heartbreak, a therapist, internet dating, a boyfriend-then-fiance-then-husband, an identity crisis over changing my name, a meldown over whether or not to have children, a baby, a toddler, and so many happy/sad/lonely/full days and nearly all of them have included a trip to this blog. Thank you for being there through it all.

  23. Courtney M says...

    I have to say, I’m on the fence about the kitchen shears idea. My husband has taught our boys, who still have trouble using a knife to cut food, that it’s easier to take scissors to things like breakfast sausage, pancakes, etc. I see the convenience. On the other hand, I only worry that someday while out to a nice dinner with a date, they’ll be asking the waiter for a pair of scissors!

  24. Emily L says...

    Have you done or would you do an outfits post from someone living in a snowy climate? I’m getting ready to move from Baltimore to Vermont (and from a fairly casual to a more business like wardrobe) and would love to see how to stay chic while navigating mountains of snow!

    • Caitlin says...

      Yes to dressing professionally in cold climates! I work remotely on several different job sites everyday, which means I am walking outside a lot, but still have to look professional. I struggle with what shoes I can wear that keep my feet warm, can wear on icy streets and look professional at the same time! Keeping an extra pair at the office doesn’t work when you have no office! Would LOVE to hear opinions on this!

    • Abesha1 says...

      Merrell boots, to the commenter below, Caitlin.

  25. Tessa says...

    Yes Rosie! Was Toby just a baby when I started reading? For me, in that time there’s been an engineering career, marriage, baby fever, infertility, death of loved ones, pregnancy (!), working while raising a baby, another baby (!), autism diagnosis and a career change (stay-at-home parent, how did that happen?). Life is great and Cup of Jo has been there every step of the way. Thanks Joanna!

  26. Mkw says...

    This should have been added to the book post a few days ago but also ties into loud music comments… I’m finding this book wildly insightful for interacting with many levels of sensitivities and brain wiring differences… “The Reason I Jump: The inner voice of a Thirteen-year-old boy with Autism” by N. Higashida. I’m astounded by his level of communication. I’m rocked by my new understanding. This from someone who has raised a non-traditionally-wired child and has taught many. Read it regardless of who is in your immediate life. You will learn a new way to connect with many more highly-sensitive people who crave your acceptance and can sense potential annoyance. It will be a delight to connect even if it’s a smile as you pass by on your way home from work. You will have elevated that person. And… isn’t that just the best way to improve our world?

  27. I love the Thursday article but my one quibble is that TUESDAYS are trash. Mondays are a fresh start (+) and I still have enough energy and good vibes lingering from the weekend (++). Tuesdays are so tough for me to get through!

    • Owl says...

      Tuesdays are the hardest day of the week for me, too!

    • SM says...

      I came here to make this comment! there is NOTHING special about Tuesday (it is my secret theory that this is why Taco Tuesdays became a thing):
      Mondays – you can discuss the weekend weekend
      Wednesdays – halfway done
      Thursday – good TV usually and almost done
      Friday – happy hour
      Saturday – sleeping in and going out
      Saturday – self care

    • Kim says...

      Tuesdays are the WORST.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      hahahaha

  28. Jen says...

    Yep to that Rosie comment :)
    From landing as a green emigrant in the US when you just met Alex, to moving home when you had your kids and keeping reading through having my own, it’s like a a big cuddle at the end of the week to curl up and read the lovely stories and considered comments from a big lovely pile of ladies across the world. Thanks Joanna ❤️

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, these comments are so moving to me! thank you so much xoxo

  29. Laurel says...

    Heaps agree with Rosie. I started reading CoJ when Toby was about 2 and have absolutely loved watching your boys grow. My guys are 6 + 4 and I’ve gleaned so much insight from reading about your kids, so thank you! Plus, your blog truly feels like a community. Glad to be a part of it.

    • KK says...

      Ditto to everything Laurel said, all the way to the starting to read when Toby was two, and my guys are 6 + 4, as well.

      Also, COJ, prob my fav set of Friday links ever.

    • kk says...

      One other comment, does anyone else’s partner/friend just expect to get sent links on Fridays? My husband was just sent 3 links from me, from the Friday list. And he knows right away, that I’m reading CoJ’s Friday links list.

  30. Rachel says...

    Totally agree with Rosie — I’ve been reading this blog since before I got engaged, married, or had my baby… it’s such a huge part of my life! :) Cheers to old friends we’ve never met, that feel like family. <3

  31. Joaquina says...

    You’re going to the MoMa re opening, how thrilling! It is times like these I wish I were on social media; so jealous your followers get to see the IG Stories of your time tonight.

    Re: is it ever ok to ask a restaurant to turn music down….
    My father and I have hearing loss and it can be very challenging to participate in conversations in way too many places because of the annoying decibels. If I am a regular, I politely explain our situation and ask for the volume to be turned down. But in our ever-popular, “hipster’ spots in Southern CA, this is an impossible feat. There was a really interesting article in the Times recently about how and why our cities are becoming noisier.

    • natalie says...

      orrrrr, if you’re dripping with babies/toddlers, it’s “iced coffee or luke warm coffee.” so my year-round answer has been iced coffee for 5 years now. hot coffee, one day we can hang.

  32. Lauren E. says...

    Why did Rosie’s comment make me tear up?! I, too, have been a reader for many years and have truly come to value this space. Thank you for fostering such a lovely, supportive community.

  33. Denise says...

    Okay, I love the visual relationship green flags! I had no idea what a healthy relationship looks like but now I do.

  34. B says...

    I love Rosie’s comment. I discovered your blog just as I was moving back to the US after years abroad. I moved back to start my PhD and the program was far from the relationships I still had in the states and far from the life I had just left. In those lonely early days, the blog was my own little refuge for recipes and ideas. I felt a little less alone. To my surprise, years later I was at a reunion with friends from college and we started talking about your blog. It wasn’t just me who felt alone in my late 20s to early 30s; all of us felt a little adrift as we moved around and started careers, relationships, and families and all of us were reading your blog at the end of long tiring days. Now we all of have young kids and we send each other texts (“Did you see COJ today?”). Thanks for creating a little refuge and a place to connect and reconnect.

  35. ANDREA says...

    Also the October dilemma: Light coat or heavier coat?!?!?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      haha yes!!

  36. Megan says...

    How is it NOT racist to say “non male, not white, not western?” Truly— I am at a loss to understand this.

    I get the whole inclusion and diversity thing, but I feel like we’re now treating the “privileged white male” the same way we’re so clearly trying to avoid with every other enthnicity/gender. If we truly wanted equality in all things, gender and enthnicity shouldn’t matter at all— and we shouldn’t be requesting to see more of a certain kind. That’s EXACTLY what makes gender and enthnicity unequal today— we keep pointing out the differences/lack of representation and then LABELING what we want to see instead/more of (eg; “more black women,”). Isn’t that woven from the same racism thread were so desperately trying to avoid??? How is downplaying a certain type of race/gender (“the white male”) helping improve equality?

    Seriously— this honestly blows my mind and makes NO sense to me. I’m not trying to be argumentative— I just genuinely don’t understand how double sided this “inclusion” movement seems when we’re alienating ANY at all.

    • Emily L says...

      I can see your point, but I was recently at a museum where 90% of the art was white, male, western. A curator may not have overtly said “let’s not have women/blacks/Muslims/etc.”, but the lack thereof is still unacceptable exclusion. I don’t believe it is racist to point out that there should be inclusion and the facts that there still is not enough equality. I would love to hear what your thoughts are to increase inclusion and equality in a different/ better way! (Genuinely interested in what you have to say, not being snarky.) Perhaps this is still a factor of people not fully understanding what racism is. The systematic exclusion of a group of people over time – whether is it deliberate or not (and many time is was historically deliberate and we are still living with those ramifications) – is still racism.

    • AN says...

      Someone here will have a much more eloquent answer, but to not leave you hanging…and of course you can do your own Googling about this…

      In essence, the eons-old systems of oppression in our country which have resulted in white men in positions of power and decision-making in mostly every arm of U.S. structure (government, business, education, arts, etc.) means that we must now swing the pendulum hard–that is, make deliberate and systematic decisions, in MOMA’s case, to give a stage to all these other folks who until now have had very little if any presence. It’s the only way we’ll eventually have equity, and only then equality. Male/white/Western is the power structure of all.the.things., until we make changes so that it’s not. Does that make sense?

    • Abbe says...

      Hi Megan! I think Jo was referring to the fact that traditionally, institutions like MoMA would only showcase artists who were male, white, and from the Western world. So in this instance, the refresh is geared towards hanging art from traditionally underrepresented groups. The argument that “we should just be race/gender/ethnicity/Global South vs Global North blind” assumes that those groups are on equal footing to Western white men, when in fact a lot of the same structural inequalities that put art from white men in galleries in the first place still exists. So, when an institution like MoMA decides to target groups other than those men, it’s not excluding them from the art world. It’s just making room for everyone else. One day through initiatives like these hopefully everyone will be on the same footing, and we’ll get to see art from everyone hung everywhere. Until then, be patient and make room. Hope that makes sense!

    • allison says...

      The short answer is, if we’re going to truly get to equality, we need to go out of our way to ensure that communities whose voices have been marginalized (often women, LGBTQ, communities of color, Indigenous people) have a chance to be heard and seen and lead. And the people whose voices have traditionally dominated the space — white people, men, westerners — will need to proactively take a step back. It takes extra effort, especially from those communities with systemic privilege, to get to equality.

    • Amanda says...

      Megan –

      In a perfect world, race wouldn’t be an issue at all. But the world we are living in today is faaaar from perfect, and one of the only ways to dismantle the white-, male- and Western-dominated systems that are entrenched in this country is to use EXACTLY the kind of language Joanna did. White people (and men especially) have always had the upper hand in this country. There is a good quote from Rachel Cargle where she says “the only way we can work towards this TRUE ‘colorless’ equality that we’re dreaming of is to ACTIVELY do the work to dismantle the oppressive systems our forefathers built…it’s not enough to just not be racist, you have to be intentionally anti-racist.” In my view, celebrating the rise of non-white, non-male, and non-Western artists in the MoMA, as Jo is doing, is on the same path as doing the work and actively speaking in an ANTI-racist way.

    • Jo says...

      Amen, Megan. I’ve never commented before but I have to applaud you for this comment because i do NOT understand this either. It’s so frustrating.

    • Anon says...

      I kind of agree with this. These days, it seems perfectly acceptable to make assumptions and disparage white males based on their gender and colour, and nothing else. I don’t think that is right.
      My son is 16, and he says he really feels the injustice of it: Men are always being mocked and put down. Not a healthy or productive dynamic, imo. Equality, justice, respect… we all deserve this.

    • Lindsey says...

      I was going to take the time to answer this but honestly, I’m so tired of doing the research for people. Do some research. Start with “Me and White Supremacy” by Layla F. Saad.

    • Amanda says...

      To all those who are troubled by comments that are pro-women/POC/etc and anti-men…might you use that feeling as a better window into understanding what minorities go through on a daily basis??

      White people, and men especially, have always had the upper hand in the United States. They do not need our pity.

    • E says...

      I’d suggest looking at the work of Layla Saad to better understand how white supremacy is baked into our culture.

    • Ari says...

      Megan, I assure you – you do not “get” this whole inclusion and diversity “thing”. If you did, you wouldn’t have made this comment. Please take the time to educate yourself on misogyny, white supremacy, and colonialism. I’ve seen people take the journey towards better understanding the above-mentioned issues, and it’s opened up their worlds in profound and generous ways.

      Within the context of the MoMA reopening, maybe this all seems frivolous; however, using your lens in other contexts costs people much more than just their representation in the art world – people are losing their health, their jobs, their homes, their actual lives. You may not be trying to be argumentative, but your lack of awareness and understanding is an affront to those affected by these destructive, compounding systems and to those trying their hardest to dismantle them.

    • K says...

      Emphasis needs to be placed on including art from non-male/white/Western because males/white/Western people are already given the advantage and privilege in this country, especially in the arts industry. Whether they like it or not, it’s the unfortunate truth. I’ve seen so many white males get the job over someone else in the currently predominantly white male art/film industry because he is nice and somewhat skilled and the majority feel more comfortable with him than someone who is a minority. Whereas someone who is a minority has to work twice (or more) as hard and stand out more. Bravo to the Moma! Hope you have a good time Joanna!

    • Anon says...

      Amanda – yes yes yes. If you’re upset by the non-white, non-male, not Western comment, CONGRATS – you have gained insight on how it is to be severely underrepresented in society today.

      I would love for everyone to be viewed equally but sadly that isn’t the case and in order for it to happen, we HAVE to actively work to bring visibility of other identities into the spotlight.

    • C says...

      You know this reminds me of people who, before thinking hard about it, wonder why we need to have a black history month. They wonder, isn’t that racist to exclude the history of everyone else?! And then someone mentions that almost all history that has been written About and studied thus far has been about white peoples and written by or through the lens of white men. Art. Almost all male. Almost all white. It is not disparaging to point out the facts. I find that instead of our boys feeling that or disempowered, they can be taught to use their power and privilege to spread equality and to be a voice towards sane and thoughtful discourse.

    • Em says...

      Beautifully said, Ari.

    • Dani says...

      this comment, and others like it…everywhere not just here, makes me feel so incredibly sad and discouraged and unseen. there is no way i can respond in a way that is eloquent and articulate and clear enough to break down your blinders. but please, i am asking you to take the kind of time and energy it takes to write comments like these to educate yourself. gender and ethnicity shouldn’t matter at all? megan, of course it should! that’s the whole point. it’s literally NEVER mattered in history resulting in minority groups being ignored and mistreated for as long as we can remember but we’re finding our voices to tell you now: we DO matter and to please listen to us and our stories and learn.

      “we keep pointing out the differences/lack of representation and then LABELING what we want to see instead/more of (eg; “more black women,”)” please don’t say that the demand to see more of the people i come from is a label. it’s a demand that we’re making so i could have grown up seeing more black women in television, magazines, runways, museums, science labs, etc. or my sister could have seen more gay POC doing pretty much anything. please try to imagine what it’s like to take an art history class and constantly learn about artwork predominantly created by white, western, males. i consider art a representation of the artist’s observations of their life, society, surroundings. why wouldn’t i get tired of seeing art continuously representing the same perspective?? it’s not to say i can’t appreciate some of the work, i just really don’t need to see MORE of it. and please, that’s not “downplaying” the white, western male. that perspective’s just been overdone/market is saturated…can’t you see how marginalizing that is? it’s a really lonesome feeling.
      if it truly blows your mind and makes NO sense to you, then perhaps it’s time to get uncomfortable and learn to make sense if it all.

    • mb says...

      I’d like to address something. Words matter–“How is it NOT racist to say “non male, not white, not western?” “-The only race-related element there is whiteness. You can speak of sexism and eurocentrism for the other two parts that you brought up.

      Beyond that, there are a number of fantastic artists who are women, not heterosexual, not from Europe or the USA, not “white” and are absolutely great artists. Their work has been excluded because it simply has not fit. It also happens that throughout history the people that have been most frequently writing the histories we read are white males. They have generally valued artworks that speak to them–art that was made by people like them. This continues to be a problem and one that is present in museums, galleries, art history and even media. Here’s a letter that presents the issue of sexism in the art world.

      https://news.artnet.com/opinion/womens-place-in-the-art-world-artist-adrian-piper-responds-to-our-special-report-1661554

      And for some data–here are the Guerrilla Girls whose entire work is intended to demonstrate the problems behind exhibits.

      https://www.guerrillagirls.com/#now

    • Claire says...

      If you were going to a singing contest and said “I’m excited to hear some songs that are not in English” would that be racist?
      Would it be wrong to host an educational exhibition that celebrated the work of students who were not privately educated?
      Institutions of Art in the West are unquestionably guilty of excluding work by people who are not white or not male. I don’t think Joanna’s words were at all racist.
      Joanna used the word ‘rise’ and I don’t see how you could wish to stop the elevation of people who have been ignored and kept down until now. Surely Joanna is entitled to state which elements of a gallery she is excited to see.
      I don’t feel the need to protect the space that has always been held by and for white men.
      I want to see a diverse representation of artistic expression that is NOT white and male dominated. Let’s celebrate work that has previously been disregarded, in order to present the most accurate and invigorating picture of what it means to be a creative human.

  37. Sarah says...

    I feel the same way as Rosie. Let’s start a friends of COJ club!

    • Z says...

      Yes! If anyone is in Seattle and wants to meet up for coffee, hit me up!

    • EL says...

      I would love a way – not just in the comments – of connecting with CoJ people from around the world!

    • Sarah says...

      Joanna, can we start a virtual COJ community via Facebook? I’m from Seattle, but our family moved to Vienna last year. Would love a way to connect with other COJ readers!

    • Britt says...

      I’m in for this too!

  38. You are going to love the new MoMA! Have such a wonderful time. It’s impossible to see it all in one evening, or even one whole day. The rehanging of the collection is incredible and it feels so special to see the pieces in conversation with each other. Whatever you do, make sure you go to the 5th floor and see the gallery with the pairing of Picasso’s “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon” and Faith Ringgold’s “American People Series #20: Die.” I teared up both times I have visited so far.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you for the tips!

  39. Megan Lec says...

    Is it just me or does that list of best chocolate chip recipes feel like the most delicious to do list? As for the iced versus hot coffee debate, living in Florida I get away with iced coffee year round (I almost always regret a hot coffee when I walk into the humid, somehow already oppressively hot, morning air.) Rosie, I couldn’t agree more! I’m closing in on a decade with CupofJo and my work days just wouldn’t be the same without it.

  40. Hannah says...

    The kitchen shears comment lined up so well with Ali Wong’s book excerpt! It’s one of those moments from “Always Be My Maybe” that stuck out in my mind about Korean cooks: they use kitchen shears for everything. I went out and bought 5 pairs of kitchen shears and started using them for pizza, sandwiches, hot dogs, etc., and OMG, what a game changer!!!! She repeats it in her book excerpt and deservedly so!

    About the restaurant music level: I recently had to do that at lunch with my 4-year old who has mild sensory issues. There was a speaker in the bathroom, and the music was so loud that he was scared to go in and pee. The restaurant was very nice, turned down the music for a few minutes so we could take care of business, and then back to its usual volume when we were done. Also, every since then, I’ve noticed that music is always soooo much louder in restrooms! I guess it has its benefits to cover other sounds!