Style

A Week of Outfits: Dana Chehab

Week of Outfits: Dana Chehab

Dana Chehab lives in Houston, Texas, with her husband and their three young children. “My husband and I are both Lebanese, and we raise our kids as Muslims. It’s a big part of our culture at home,” she explains. “But we also have an American lifestyle — we watch Netflix, our kids play Nintendo.” Here, she shares five outfits she wore in a week, including the best minimal basics and house slippers…

A Week of Outfits: Dana Chehab

Top: Just Female, similar. Tank: Everlane. Jeans: Madewell. Moroccan slippers: similar.

“I bought these house slippers from an artisan at a market few years ago — I wear them in the kitchen. We make a lot of tabouli, and I’ve been experimenting with Lebanese-style pizza — manakeesh — with cheese and za’atar, plus tomatoes, olives, mint and pickles. My husband and I also love lavender lattes. They’re regular lattes but you put in lavender syrup. It adds a good sweetness.”

A Week of Outfits: Dana Chehab

Sweater: babaà. Pants: Black Crane. Tee: Lululemon. Moroccan slippers: similar.

“Houston is really hot, but you don’t walk around outside that much — you go from the car to Target and back to your car! I choose breathable fabrics, like linen. Because I wear the hijab, I always cover my arms, legs, neck and hair for modesty. I like that what I wear on the outside mirrors my internal state. Many women choose to wear the hijab when they reach a certain age; I started wearing it when I went to college. It ties to my spirituality — living simply, being thoughtful in what I wear and how I live. I have fun with the colorful hijabs from Alibaba.”

A Week of Outfits: Dana Chehab

Dress: Black Crane. Skirt leggings: Mimu Maxi. Necklace: Melissa Sonico. Straw bag: similar. Mules: similar.

“These photos make our backyard look like a forest! There’s a fruit tree, and we pick kumquats and give them to neighbors and friends. My mother-in-law loves them. The basket is a random find from a local Arabic grocery. The shop owner uses the baskets to display bags of rice, but I saw one on the ground and was like, are you selling this? He was like, ‘Um, okay, $8?’ We also use it to store blankets and toys in the house.”

A Week of Outfits: Dana Chehab

“Under my dress, I’m wearing Mimu Maxi skirt leggings — they’re a thing! If I’m wearing a dress that doesn’t go all the way to the floor, they keep my legs covered.”

A Week of Outfits: Dana Chehab

Sweater: Lauren Manoogian. Shirt: Eileen Fisher. Skirt leggings: Mimu Maxi. Water bottle: Purifyou.

“My sister and I are both into style. She lives in New York, but we’ll send each other dressing room pictures when shopping separately — you need someone’s opinion! Overall, I’m trying to have a more minimal lifestyle. I used to run into Target and grab whatever home or kitchen thing looked cute. But now I try to think more carefully about what I’m going to buy.”

A Week of Outfits: Dana Chehab

Jacket: Black Crane. Tank: Urban Outfitters. Pants: Ilana Kohn. Ring: Another Feather.

“Sometimes, when I’m with friends who aren’t wearing the hijab, I realize that people are treating me differently. Maybe I’m checking out at the grocery and the person isn’t that polite, but they’ll be overly friendly to another customer. But overall, most people are kind. Most of all, I have become more confident in myself and what I’m wearing. I really believe in it.”

Thank you so much, Dana!

P.S. More weeks of outfits, including a craft editor who loves Old Navy and a Toronto lawyer.

(Photos by Bri Costello for Cup of Jo.)

  1. Greetings from Amman, Jordan.
    Happy Ramadan, Dana!
    Many thanks, Joanna, for posting this beautiful and thoughtful article.

    This post nicely features an Arab Muslim lady’s honest thoughts and her life-style. Dana talks about her choice of wearing hijab and how it positively impact her spirituality, while the act of wearing hijab often misunderstood unfortunately. I’m sure that her genuine words and beautiful photos help readers to better understand hijab and its rationale.

    I also enjoyed reading the comments for this article. People from different background talk about fashion, faith, health, and life-style, and then start to deepen mutual-understanding. I love the inclusive and amazing community that Cup of Jo has created.

  2. Miriam says...

    I’m very inspired by the beautiful way Dana has chosen & combined colour in each of these outfits. So lovely!

  3. Jennifer Montezuma says...

    One of my favorite posts!

  4. Sydni Jackson says...

    Beautiful!!!

    • Melissa says...

      Why not include where Dana bought her beautiful hijabs in the photo captions? Would she not consider them part of her selection in each outfit?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Oh yes — she gets them all at alibaba.com and we put them in the interview text to highlight them even more than the captions. Thanks! Xoxo

  5. Jamie says...

    Yay Houston! Thank you for featuring Dana as she has a great aesthetic. I need to know where to find her baby’s head wear!

  6. Rachel Meynders says...

    So gorgeous and chic, I LOVE all that linen! I recently moved to the south, looks like I found the answer to surviving summer.

  7. marina says...

    Mashaallah you look amazing! The outfits look so comfortable and put together.

  8. Kat O says...

    Dana has such amazing effortless-cool style! Also I think hijab are so beautiful – they seem to highlight a woman’s face and just make her shine. When I was in Turkey, I often wore a head scarf, and I honestly thought it made me look so much prettier!

  9. Michelle says...

    Where is that crib from?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i’ll ask her! xo

    • Dana says...

      Hi Michelle! Our crib is from Ikea (like six years ago!).

  10. Elise says...

    I love her use of color in her clothing as a means of expression. Her palettes are lovely. I gravitate towards solid colors rather than print, and will definitely be taking some inspiration from Dana!

  11. Kelly says...

    I’m a Catholic woman who attempts modest dressing every few years, and there are so many beautiful Muslim, Mormon, and Orthodox Jewish women I look to for style inspiration! The founders of Mimu Maxi were my entry into modest fashion, and I am so inspired by other women doing the same. I don’t do it all the time, I love a short skirt, but I wear modest wear on Sundays. Veiling is really common for mass at my new parish, so I’ve been experimenting with wearing a lace mantilla. I just love the reverence of it. My favorite site for inspiration is TheModist.com, a high-end Muslim fashion retailer!

  12. MM says...

    Beautiful home, family, stye, interview!! I live in Lebanon–hi Dana!! We have the same tree right outside our home here. At first I only knew it by its Arabic name -akidineh – but it’s a loquat tree :) Loved this, and Ramadan Kareem to you!

  13. She looks lovely..cute baby too

  14. Reem says...

    Oh, Jo. <3

  15. Emily says...

    I so dig the respectful (and treated like totally normal, as it should be) feature of a beautiful hijabi on a big mainstream blog. Dana is a sharp dresser and her color palette is gorgeous. And I have to say thanks CoJ team for featuring someone from Houston!! We are a pretty rad city and the most diverse in the US. You will find every kind of person in Houston and I wish more blogs would move past Austin when they talk about Texas. HTX is boss.

  16. Kate says...

    Ramadan Mubarak, ya Dana! Such a beautiful life xo

  17. SB says...

    YES to breathable fabrics in hot, humid places. Thanks for sharing about your faith and your wardrobe and how the two intersect, Dana!!

    As Kim points out anove, clothes often require so much thought from womxn – Lyz Lenz, Anne Helen Peterson, and Molly Priddy all wrote short pieces in their newsletter titled “What to Wear When You Don’t Want People to Hate You.” It’s interesting to think about an inversion of that – why does what you wear make people hate/be rude/etc to you? I appreciate this column as a more positive version of that, how and why do you choose what to wear?

  18. Thank you for featuring a woman in a hijab! She is gorgeous- It was refreshing to see especially for Ramadan! I would love to see the month of Ramadan featured on this blog! I actually wrote a children’s book called Lailah’s Lunchbox that is available on Amazon and most libraries if anyone is interested in explaining Ramadan to a teacher or a friend:)

    • Sara says...

      I love that book!

    • Heather says...

      Thanks for sharing the information about your book!

      I work in education and LOVE having books that reflect all of the special celebrations/ holidays my students and their families observe. When we share stories about special times of year for their families’ I can see their faces light up with joy and pride, and they are usually really excited to share more about their special traditions, food, clothing, etc…with the class. I’m going to add this one to the list of books about Ramadan to share with my students.

      I found this article that has your book and a few others in case anyone else is looking for resources or children’s books about Ramadan this month: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/parenting/wp/2017/06/02/teach-your-kids-about-ramadan-with-these-books/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.004f75f84be3

      Wishing you a blessed and peaceful month of Ramadan, thank you again for sharing!

    • I’m so glad you love my book Sara! :) Heather, thanks for sharing the article. If your students have any questions from reading, please send them my way. Would be happy to answer them! My instagram is @ReemFaruqi or you can find my email address from my blog http://www.ReemFaruqi.com ! I love diverse books for kids!

  19. Molly says...

    I love this post. It is so refreshing to see all the different types of people represented on this blog.
    I was really excited to see the tree in the background. I grew up in California and had a loquat tree in my backyard. It looked exactly the same as the tree in the photos. Loquats have smoothish edible skin and a larger shiny seed on the inside. I was wondering if the tree is a loquat or a kumquat (they are different).

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh maybe you’re right! dana and i were both guessing haha!

    • Sharon Rietkerk says...

      It’s a loquat! There was one right outside the window of my childhood bedroom…and my husband and I were married underneath it years later. :)

  20. I love seeing women who dress a certain way due to their beliefs shown this recognition and respect. It’s such a beautiful thing. She is stylish and beautiful and glowing and true to herself. Thank you!

  21. love everything about this. thank you for sharing your beautiful self and beautiful family, Dana!

  22. liz says...

    so beautiful! Also — that baby~ :o !!!

  23. Thank you for posting this beautiful woman and her family. Diversity matters <3

  24. Gemma says...

    She looks so chic and confident, absolutely love this post. I now have a Black Crane alert on my The Real Real app. And that baby is delicious!!!

  25. Shoshana says...

    I love her style! Also I’m glad you’re FINALLY featuring MimuMaxi. They are an unbelievable Jewish brand and I’ve been telling you about them for years. I would also love a feature of a religious Jewish woman!!!!

    • J says...

      We need a week of outfits from Mimi and Mushky of MIMU MAXI!!!

    • Donna says...

      Omg they are the bomb they dress to kill, we need to feature them, It would be amazing.

  26. Natalie says...

    So lovely! Her hijabs all have the most beautiful texture. I wish you had suggested some links for buying them, just like the other clothes she is wearing. Are they linen or a different fabric?

  27. What a beautiful post and woman and kids!!!
    My sister lives in Seattle while I live in DC area, and we always send each other photos of our outfits ;) #twins #teamidentical

  28. Ali says...

    Dana is gorgeous! Love the linen look especially in some of those colours. Ramadan Mubarak to Dana and family.

  29. Jody D says...

    Dana looks so so lovely!

  30. Abbi says...

    That last photo is stunning!

  31. Love this! If you ever want to do a week of outfits FROM LEBANON, I’m an American travel journalist whose been living in Lebanon for 6 years. I write for Playboy Magazine, AFAR, Forbes and Outside Magazine.

    Oh, and they DO have Netflix in Lebanon ;P

    • Dana says...

      Hi Alexandra! Thank you! That’s awesome — nothing like Beirut. I’ll be going there at the end of the month!

  32. Aimee says...

    OMG, Such a great profile! Great style and I am continually impressed when you all represent the vast array of style.

  33. Christie says...

    Obsessed with that white shirt in the last pic.

    Thanks for being so inclusive, CoJ!

  34. Alice says...

    Dana has such an eye for colour, beautiful, especially in the linens. Beautiful woman, beautiful woman, and beeeaaautiful baby!!

  35. Kristie says...

    Everything about this feature is stunning! Her choice of colours and texture is serene and fun all at once.

  36. Rosie says...

    Just beautiful! Love seeing the additional dimension the hijab adds to an outfit, especially in those lovely colours. Thank you for sharing this!!

  37. Elizabeth says...

    You and your family are beautiful, Dana. Thank you for sharing.

    I grew up Mormon, and as such had very specific modesty codes instilled from a young age. I’ve felt a kinship to Muslim women in this department (although obviously very different in details). Perhaps that’s why I find this subject somewhat triggering and can easily project my own feelings onto it.

    I always claimed it was my choice to dress modestly. I truly believed it was my choice. However, as I further dissected the messaging and the cultural implications that were in place in my religious culture, I came to see it differently as my own voice and sense of personal authority grew.

    I believe in taking a woman’s word for it when she states something is her choice. You, as a woman, should always have the final word on what/why/how you dress. But I also believe in asking tough questions too, and for me the questions looked like this:
    What will my community think of me if I choose to wear this? (insert the code breaking article I’m secretly aching to wear – for me it was a tank top in the summer)
    What summer family BBQ will shut down awkwardly when I show up with my shoulders showing?
    Who will stop speaking to me?
    What will the whispers be?
    Who in my family will feel ashamed of me?
    What assumptions will be made about my faithfulness?
    What assumptions will be made about my worthiness before God?
    Will I lose my honor?
    As I answered each of these questions for myself, I came to realize that there were so many other factors that really formed the foundation of “my choice”, and so much of this choice stemmed from of a deep seated fear of rejection, abandonment, condemnation, shame, and judgment. I’m not saying this is any other woman’s experience, but I have often wondered if Muslim women have felt the same? Just because it is “legal” to be uncovered, doesn’t mean you’re actually free to do so. The implicit social/relational penalties can be so high, and it’s often only those inside of a specific culture who really know how painfully inflicted those ramifications can be.
    Most non-Mormons laugh at the idea of a tank-top shutting sparking a tsunami of whispers and concerns. They can’t even believe it’s real. But most Mormon women would know exactly the unspoken penalties of which I speak. Some would be the most ardent enforcers of the relational penalties themselves.

    • Kim says...

      I don’t think this only applies to the devout. Most women are faced with judgement for the way they dress. It might not be about a tank top, but sometimes it is!

    • Lauren says...

      Really interesting (and respectful) post, Elizabeth,

    • Maria says...

      Elizabeth, I really appreciate your comments and I think this is a valid conversation to have. I only wish people could be open minded enough to do so on the internet…

    • Thank you Elizabeth for your comment. I cannot speak for all Muslim women, but as a Muslim woman myself, who doesn’t wear the hijab, I think all the questions you ask have a lot to do with the beliefs and values instilled by the small family circle of the person, and how they were passed on from one generation to the other. Islam can be practiced with varying degrees of differences (in the details) from one country to the other and even within the same country from one family to the other, even though the 5 pillars stay the same. There are many Muslim women who do not wear the hijab and do not have any external symbol to show their religious belonging to the Muslim faith, just like there are many Jewish or Christian women who cannot be identified as such from their external appearance. In the end, it comes down to personal choice, and I believe all choices should be respected, provided they don’t hurt others or interfere in the expression of the free will of others, even if the choices are not purely personal, because we humans are complicated…

    • Kay says...

      CoJ is one of the few places on the internet where these questions and comments can be discussed and raised so thoughtfully, thank you!

    • Elizabeth says...

      Hello Meryem!

      You make such important and great points. Thank you for sharing with me! Again, I feel an affinity for the complexity of which you speak. Even though Mormons comprise probably .00001% of the religious populations (ha!), even in our small subset the modesty imperatives differ from family to family, state to state, etc. – just as you pointed out with Muslims. I’m sure this complex reality is only compounded in history and scope when talking about a religion as large in scale as Islam. Which reminds me that, more than anything, respecting and getting to know the individual first before you make assumptions about their religion goes a long way to promote better understanding for all.
      I tend to get most nervous when choice isn’t being protected, as in any compulsory religious state. But if I’m sure the state respects a woman’s individual human right to choose for herself, I can get behind any way a that woman chooses to demonstrate her faith: be it clothing, ritual, lifestyle, etc.

      Again, thank you for your respectful and insightful response. Best wishes to you!

  38. Dana is so beautiful and chic! I love her palette and the linens and her commitment to her spirituality… and HER KIDS ARE SO CUTE.

    Also – another vote for a C of J podcast!

  39. Allie says...

    GORGEOUS! Thanks for featuring!

  40. Marlena says...

    Thank you for featuring more and more voices on this blog! Also, that baby is the cutest baby ever!

  41. Hilary says...

    Beautiful home and mama!

  42. Calli says...

    I am surprised that Dana didn’t talk more about her choice of brands in her closet. Judging by the brands she buys from, it’s clear that her closet is very carefully curated and that she is a fan of sustainable, ethically produced fashion. I love that! All those gorgeous linen pieces, the seemingly causal yet stylish way they were combined…beautiful!

    • Justine says...

      I had the same thought! Love the ethical brands featured here and wanted to hear more about her choices as well.

  43. Keri says...

    That Lauren Manoogian sweater looks dreamy. I never wear colour, maybe I will have to branch out, Dana does it so wonderfully.

  44. Rn says...

    Stunning woman!

  45. Lesley S says...

    Love Dana’s style! Great colors and fabrics. Really wanting that babaa cardigan – so nice! Beautiful babies too – both are precious. Thanks for sharing!

  46. Muna Meerwali says...

    As a hijab wearing Muslim it’s nice to see this representation. Love her looks!

  47. Mims says...

    I love all these outfits, especially the last one. I am a fan of loose flowing styles, I think so elegant and to pull it off so prettily as a busy mom is an achievement. As a physician it feels remiss to not mention gettign Vitamin D levels checked yearly may be in order and supplementing if low. It is just good evidence based medicine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25156789

  48. Matty says...

    how useful! As an international development professional, who travels to Muslim parts of the world – I really appreciate the tips on how to feel comfortably pulled together!

  49. Nur Azlin says...

    This is wonderful CupofJo and right at the beginning of Ramadan ❤️

  50. Amanda says...

    I love this so very much. Thank you for showing the beauty of diversity. Thank you. Thank you.

  51. a a says...

    She looks so much like Anne Hathaway, in my opinion.

  52. Andrea says...

    Another strong, confident woman who also happens to have fabulous style! Bravo!

  53. Shifra says...

    Mimu Maxi is my favorite!! I actually gasped when I saw the term “skirt leggings” on the Instagram post because I knew it had to be them. I have three pairs of skirt leggings and yes, I had to size up majorly to be able to walk (I’m a S but buy them in L) but now they are insanely comfy.

  54. Sheila Mary says...

    Very inspiring style. I always reach for patterns in stores because I find them the most visually appealing. Dana proves that ‘simple’ fabrics are as much an elevated style.

    Also, LOVE her adorable kids (the chubby cheeks!!!) and her radiant beauty.

  55. Naima says...

    Wow! Beautiful family, beautiful pictures, and a wonderful treat to see this in Ramadan. Cup of Jo, you nailed it.

  56. Leah says...

    Love this post! Thank you, Dana, for sharing your lovely style, home and family!

  57. sc says...

    omg are you kidding me with this GORGEOUS LINEN???? loooove love love these looks.

  58. Lauren says...

    Beautiful style! I love that she has a color palate and look that is her own and seems so comfortable and organic.

  59. C. says...

    Really pretty – from the hijab and colors, all the way down to the shoes. I love the slippers! ( I’ve always wanted a Black Crane dress too)

  60. Lisa says...

    You are beautiful! That last photo is just stunning! I love your confidence and your thoughts on living more simply. I strive to do that and it feels good not to buy more stuff just because.

  61. Quinn says...

    Love everything about this! Dana is gorgeous with great style — and such cute kids! :) (And I have the exact same babaa sweater – high five!)

  62. Emmie says...

    Thanks for featuring Dana. I have many friends who wear hijabs on and off, throughout different periods of their life and are really underrepresented in fashion circles despite wearing cute stuff!

  63. Kathryn says...

    Love this! Such beautiful colours and what gorgeous children. I have my fingers xd for a house tour as well!

  64. Maggie says...

    Dana, thanks so much for sharing your style with us. Your clothes are beautiful – and your daughter is adorable! Thanks CoJ for sharing Dana’s perspective – it makes me so happy how you highlight diversity, and in doing so, reinforce what makes us all similar :)

  65. Allyson says...

    She’s gorgeous. I love breezy linen styles. Her kiddos are SO cute. Thanks for featuring a woman in a hijab. CoJ is a total sisterhood.

  66. J says...

    I love the palette in all of these photos and how airy and minimal her clothing is, truly something to aspire to! That last photo is absolutely stunning!

    • Claire says...

      Agreed, that last photo sort of took my breath away,

  67. Kristen says...

    She chooses such gorgeous colors! The shades are both soothing and uplifting at the same time…I’m inspired.

  68. Lauren E. says...

    Seconding the podcast idea! You nailed the newsletter (it’s literally the only newsletter I open and read on a regular basis) so I have no doubt you’d nail the podcast, as well.

    • Heather says...

      I’m so glad to see this comment on here! I keep searching through the podcast offerings certain I will one day come across a Cup of Jo podcast!

  69. Christine says...

    I love seeing different women in these each week. The more diversity you give us, the more I see how much alike we all are and how connected we are as women, mothers, wives, sisters, friends, etc.You may say it’s about what they wear, but it is SO so much more. Thank you Joanna and thank you to all of the beautiful, unique women who have participated. This one really moved me, and OMG that baby! I just wiggled in my chair of sheer joy when I saw that little face!!!

  70. Cynthia says...

    She is stunning!

  71. ali says...

    I think the hijab looks really beautiful. I wear a bandana type
    scarf if I leave the house not because I am a Muslim but
    because I have alopecia. If I wear it in the house, after awhile
    it becomes way so hot and uncomfortable that I have to rip it
    off. It was my understanding that Muslim women don’t have
    to wear the hijab in their homes, only when they go outside,
    Am I wrong about that?

    • Nat Ben Aba says...

      From my experience from my husband’s muslim family – You are correct! She is probably wearing hijab in these photos because she it’s a public forum, rather than truly being in the privacy of her own home (without cameras!).

    • Nur Azlin says...

      Hi Ali, Muslim women are not required to wear hijab in front of their Husband, father, brothers, grandfathers and direct uncles. Hence, if she’s in the house and there are other males that are not her direct family, she’s required to wear one.

  72. Kate says...

    Omg a skirt that feels leggings??? So genius…am buying :-)

  73. Amanda says...

    I don’t have (and don’t want) children, but I must admit my heart skipped a beat when I scrolled to the second picture and that sweet, sweet baby seemed to be looking right through the camera into my soul!

    Dana seems like such a radiant and joyful human. I love her style and color palette!!

    • annie says...

      Saaaaaaaaaame! That look on her face! Babies are hilar.

  74. Shona says...

    This is just so wonderful, in every way.

  75. Lindsey says...

    I loooove her style! I don’t wear a hijab but really appreciate the diversity you show on this blog. Her color palettes are so pretty and calming.

  76. Olivia says...

    Beautiful family :)

    Perhaps does Dana recall the type of paint she used in her kitchen? We’re looking for a peachy color for our daughter’s nursery :)

  77. Darcy says...

    I admire her lovely smile. Head coverings always sadden me a bit because they obscure a part of one’s individuality, and I love noticing the different ways we’re all made (including all the mad hairstyles we conjur up! ha) .

    • Lisa says...

      Or perhaps they allow a person to express an aspect of her or his individuality? Just a thought…

    • Amanda says...

      Darcy – I personally believe a woman’s choice to wear a hijab or other head covering speaks just as much about their individuality and personality as someone who chooses to wear their (visible) hair in a pixie cut or dread locks! I wouldn’t call it obscuring their individuality as all, merely presenting it in a different way…

    • Hannah says...

      This comment is judgment thinly veiled…all clothings obscure parts of our bodies and therefore I guess our “individuality”, but there is no sadness expressed that we’re not able to see others’ parts that we’re socialized in the west to consider private…I mean are you a even a tiny bit sad that you don’t know how I choose to style my pubic hair? Instead of feeling sad I feel incredibly proud of women who own their own privacy.

    • Opal says...

      seeing other people’s hairstyles is that important? It’s hair… whether one choose to showcase their hairstyles or not shouldn’t be a factor in how we can get to know that person on an individual level. It’s about the soul, mind, essence of a person. Hijab doesn’t erase or hide any of those things in my opinion.

      It is beautiful and personal in its own way for the women wearing it.

    • Karen says...

      I do understand the intent of this comment. The fact is that in many cultures (not just Islam) women who cover their head (or face or body) do not have much say in the matter. And the roots of this tradition are not about empowering women at all— but rather objectifying them. Kudos to Dana for owning this and making it a choice— but it is important to remember that millions of women are forced to cover themselves under much less ideal circumstances— ones that don’t really allow them to question, to consider, to make a choice at all…

    • Akasha says...

      It’s funny because when I was growing up my parents were very strict (we’re not muslim) and I wasn’t allowed to wear tank tops, skirts or shorts after I hit puberty so I wore what I was allowed which were baggy pants and big t-shirts (big, unclingy clothes overall). If you had seen me in the street you would not have been sad because you would have assumed that I was given a choice in how I dressed myself.

    • Dot says...

      Karen, I sometimes wear things that women who have been trafficked and forced to work as sex slaves are made to wear; would you urge people to remember that if you saw a photo of me on a week of outfits? My feeling is that you wouldn’t, because it’s irrelevant. Dana is an individual. Having a conversation under her beautiful pictures about women who don’t have choices is treating her as other; like she has to represent all Muslim women, and answer for all Muslims. I can’t imagine anyone expecting that from any other woman who has done a week of outfits.

    • AR says...

      This is, at best, islamaphobic. Such a beautiful share by a beautiful woman and all you could conjure up was, “hijabs obscure women’s personalites. How tragic!”? Ugh.

    • Nur Azlin says...

      Hi Karen, I appreciate your comment. Islam is a religion and way of life. Not so much just about cultures and traditions. The intention is that we cover to obey our Creator as it’s revealed in the Quran. While there are cases where it appears that the law in that country forces women to cover, most Muslim women have a choice to dress modestly or not.
      I’m not sure if the laws were instilled to objectify women. I’m not qualified or have enough knowledge to discuss this issue. While we’re aware of such cases, it will be good to recognise that a women choosing to dress modestly has as much right to do so as another women who chooses not to and that to us it’s not oppressive .
      It is heartening to see comments from other women embracing this choice. ❤️

    • Gemma says...

      What an offensively silly comment. What you “love noticing” isn’t important. She made it clear she chose to start wearing the hijab, and that’s her individuality. Please remember that in all Western societies we also modestly covered our heads in public until fairly recently.

  78. Daniela says...

    Thank you for showcasing different women from all kinds of different backgrounds. As an immigrant, I feel like I’ve never fit in anywhere but I feel like I fit in on this blog.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, that makes me so happy, daniela.

    • I felt all warm-hearted looking at this post at the start of Ramadan, sister. Happy Ramadan to you 🙂
      You are so beautiful!
      And i love your house photos.

  79. Lourdes says...

    Beautiful!

  80. Carolyn M says...

    I need her skin care routine. Gorgeous!

  81. N says...

    Can we have a beauty routine? I cannot look past her fabulous skin.

  82. janee says...

    She does look inspiringly strong AND gorgeous in that last photo… and very beautiful in all of them. Her joyfulness shines through! Love the natural linen and soft colors too, aaand will be trying the manakeesh recipe, thanks. : )

  83. Alyssa says...

    She is really lovely! One question I have…
    I sweat A LOT! Like in the winter, I can’t wear grey because I’ll sweat through it. So I’m curious how she combats being overly warm while still keeping her arms and legs covered? (And maybe she is blessed with not being an sweaty human like me.)

    • Kate says...

      Linen!

      I used to live in the Middle East, and loose, billowy linen clothes are the BEST. It actually feels way hotter to have the sun beating down on bare skin.

    • nadine says...

      I’d add loose clothes too! It took me more than I’d like to admit to realise that I sweat more when there is friction between the fabric and the skin. Actually if it’s really really hot having loose longer sleeves/pants or long skirt seem to be the best solution for me. It almost creates a breeze on the skin. :)
      Anyway what a beautiful choice of colors Dana!

  84. Mindy says...

    I would be interested in a CofJ conversation around choosing modesty in clothing. As a high school teacher, I have had so many conversations with girls in my school swirling around the dreaded dress code and all that is loaded there. It would be interesting to hear more from women who choose modest dress for religious, cultural, or other reasons about what motivates them, what their experience is, etc. . Plus, maybe I would have a new fresh angle for discussion when it come to those terrible dress code conversations!

    • Lourdes says...

      Love this idea, Mindy!

    • janee says...

      I like this idea. When I realized I could just dress beautifully without the discomfort of showing skin when I didn’t feel like it, like at the beach, or at work, it was revelation. Men at work wear suits and ties – they show NO skin. I’ve realized that I feel best in similar environments when I do the same. I mean duh, what took me so long to figure that out? lol It is so much easier to be confident that way for me.
      On the other hand when I do feel like showing skin for fun – (thinking elegant, silk sundresses in chic little beach towns) I want the absolute freedom to do that safely without having to think about it.

    • Rosalie says...

      Hi! I’m a 17 y/o Dutch girl and we don’t have dresscodes at any high schools here, so I thought I’s give my opinion on them. Even though we don’t have a dresscode at my high school, no one wears really ‘naked’ clothes. Maybe one or two people wear crop tops but that’s it. If you let the students decide for themselves what they want to wear, you’ll see that almost no one wears clothes that are really inappropriate. In the summer, however, on the rare days that it’s hot here in Holland, all the girls wears shorts or skirts or dresses and often you can see parts of bras/brastraps. But is that a bad thing? All the teachers & guys at our school know we wear bras. Why should you tell girls it’s something that you aren’t allowed to show? Also, please tell me what is inappropriate about a girls bare legs. Why can’t girls in the US wear shorts to school? I feel bad for them, and I am happy I don’t live in a country where dresscodes are a thing at schools.

    • YES! I’m a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, I choose to dress modestly as a way to show respect to my Creator. Sometimes the island of modestly feels so lonely and isolating. It’s often seen as a repressing side effect, instead of something to be celebrated.

    • A says...

      Rosalie, I don’t think there are too many restrictions on what girls can/can’t wear to school (unless it’s private or charter and requires a uniform). I think people are just asking about modesty and dressing for those who might be interested, not because it’s required. Plenty of bra straps showing in a high school.

    • Anon says...

      This. Teach high school as well. The minute the sun peeks out it’s very short skirts and shirts (like I can see your butt cheeks going up stairs short), and tank tops w the thinnest strap known. Our dress code is poorly written, it only talks about shoes.

    • Tis says...

      To be clear, Rosalie is not far off the mark. There are plenty of high schools that have extremely detailed dress codes, and often they are aimed at girls more than boys. For example, the school I’m familiar with says girls’ tank tops must have straps of at least 4 inches wide. And it doesn’t mention anything about the boys’ underwear hanging out. It sounds like dress codes run the entire spectrum from “do what you want” to “we’re going to make absolutely ridiculous rules”.

  85. Libbynan says...

    As an older woman in the South who prefers long, loose, cool layers that cover as much of my sensitive “old lady” skin as possible…..thank you, thank you, thank you! I will be using many of Dana’s sources for my clothing choices from now on. If she can be comfortable in them in Houston, I can be comfortable in them in Arkansas.

  86. Corinna says...

    Beautiful! I love your style! And I love that Cup of Jo is profiling a hijab-wearing woman!

  87. Lindsey says...

    All of these pictures of Dana and her family are beautiful, but the colors and light in the top picture with the oranges/rusts/reds are just stunning! What a lovely profile.

  88. Emilie says...

    HOUSTONIANS ARE AMAZING! Maybe I’m biased, but I love this city and it’s diversity. Thanks for sharing x

    • ks says...

      I had the same reaction when I saw when she was from. thanks for highlighting both the city & it’s beautiful quilt of stories and cultures. xx

    • MelTown says...

      I came here to say the same! I love this city and it’s people SO MUCH! It’s lovely to see one of us represented here!

  89. Those colours and shapes are just stunning! I’m not a hijabi but would definitely wear Dana’s style!!

  90. Nigerian Girl says...

    I’m stoked to see a Houston resident featured here. Your outfit in the last picture is giving me life, Dana. And your kids are beautiful, as are you. Ramadan Kareem.

  91. m says...

    She is gorgeous! I love her dainty rings–can she share where she gets them from?

  92. Stacie Martin says...

    Any reason why her scarves/headcoverings weren’t included as parts of the outfit? (She mentions buying them on Alibaba.) I’ve always been curious about hijabs – what do women who wear them look for in the fabric or cut? I’d love to learn about that, if it’s not insensitive to ask!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      of course! in our interview, she said she buys different colorful ones on alibaba.com and aliexpress.com. she looks for lightweight breathable fabrics, like linen. she said it took her a while to learn how to tie them easily — she wants to be able to cover her head, ears and neck without needing a pin (because of babies!). xoxo

    • Hi Stacie, your hijab choices depend on how you were raised, your age, where you live now, how able/willing you are to stretch your comfort/ habit level and your confidence as a Muslim woman in hijab, etc.
      Hijab is so much more than covering your head though. It means modesty in your looks, your words and in your actions. HTH.

    • Katrin says...

      Joanna, if I may add another question to your reply: Does wearing a hijab mean you also wear it at home when alone with your immediate family or only your children? If so, as I suppose, how come the babies don‘t pull at it at all times, making it tight around the neck? I couldn‘t even wear necklaces or dangly earrings when my kids were babies, they were always pulling at my things;-)! I even had to wear my hair in a ponytail at all times, because they pulled at my hair really hard and it hurt! That asked, I think it‘s wonderful you include a woman who dresses differently than our mainstream for religious reasons and I love the colours of her clothes and the beautiful fabrics!

    • K says...

      Since there are others with questions, may I add a suggestion in this section? I learned a while ago that it is my responsibility to learn about differences in others, not their responsibility to educate me. However, I do find myself in the same boat as others wanting to raise questions when there seems to be an opportunity as I’ve found not very good, respectful sources for educating myself. Could you guys consider a post with good sources for learning about cultures, religions or even political things, or maybe adding a source at the end of articles (like you did a while ago with the immigration posts?) I’ve learned so much that way and I’m sure others would find it helpful. Some I’ve been studying up and would love to understand better/have better sources: Muslims, African American rights/history, Mormons, immigrants, Jews, any other minority group or religion. Or if anyone has any recommendations, please do share!

      And thanks Dana for sharing your beautiful self and life with us!

    • Kohinoor says...

      Hi Katrin! Women who wear hijab don’t have to wear it at home in front of their children or other male relatives such as husband, father, brother, nephew etc.

  93. Michelle says...

    Wonderful choice to feature at the beginning of Ramadan! And love seeing a Houston gal here. Beautiful colors and philosophy.

  94. Lori says...

    Love her style! And those babies are beautiful!!

  95. Frankie Rose says...

    Gonna add another vote to the CoJ podcast! Loved hearing Jo on Forever 35 and this would be an awesome extension of the blog!

    • Hilary says...

      AHHHH I would LOVE a CoJ podcast! It feels like every pod for women out there is a motivational speaker who is constantly talking about “living at this level” (whatever that means?) or beauty. CoJ is the most well-rounded place for thoughtful conversations on the internet that I know of, and I’d totally listen to a podcast about…whatever you gals wanna talk about!

  96. Maryann says...

    Really loved seeing hijabi represented. Love Dana’s style – that last photo is so striking!

  97. Emily says...

    As another Lebanese-American woman from Texas, so pleased to see Dana here! I’d love to hear more about her beauty routines–love her beautiful skin and eyebrows!

    • Dana says...

      Hi Emily! Nice to meet you! Thank you so much! I use Aesop products to moisturize, cleanse, etc. I also use Glossier boy brow on my eyebrows!

  98. f says...

    So lovely and chic! Love her palette and conscious choices.

  99. Sanaa Murray says...

    love you cup of jo for your wonderful posts showing ALL of us. can’t tell you how much this post meant to me.

  100. Bonnie says...

    Cup of Jo Podcast Please!!
    This is a beautiful feature. I love her linen and quest to live simply.

  101. Amanda says...

    So lovely! Very much appreciate all the different stories being told here :)

  102. Beth says...

    Thank you for sharing a hijabi woman in your style section! Dana, you’re beautiful. Ramadan Kareem.

  103. Hilary says...

    Love this! Like her, I’m trying to be more minimal when it comes to my wardrobe. I’ve realized I wear the same handful of clothes 99% of the time, so now I’m just trying to buy things that I absolutely love. As Sandra Bullock says in The Blind Side, you always love it most in the fitting room! I’d love to see more posts on sustainable fashion vs fast fashion- my wallet says fast fashion, but I’m wondering if even reducing my consumption is enough.

    • Reducing your consumption is a great thing to do – even if you could afford to buy all “sustainable” fashion, buying a lot of it all the time would still be a major problem! The most sustainable clothing is what you already have. Repairing things to keep them going longer makes a HUGE difference (lots of tutorials online now).

  104. RebeccaNYC says...

    I actually had to click on the skirt legging link, because “skirt legging”? I love wearing leggings under my skirts because: modesty and comfort. Am I missing something, or is this garment just a long, very tight pencil skirt?

    Love her style and attitude, and oh my goodness the babies. Thanks for the visit.

    • cg says...

      It totally looks like a super tight, but stretchy pencil skirt. I read through a bunch of reviews, most folks really seemed to like it, but a number of them mention how difficult it is to walk in it, as it doesn’t have a slit anywhere. I am a fast walker (and take wide strides) so I think this wouldn’t do it for me.

  105. caroline says...

    Even those of us who don’t dress modestly for religious or cultural reasons have a lot to learn from those who do — color, cut and proportion, of course, but also how to cover up comfortably and stylishly to avoid sun exposure in a world of rising temperatures and a depleted ozone layer!

    • Jeanne says...

      Excellent point!! As I get older, my skin is having a harder time tolerating the sun.

  106. Di says...

    I love this, and thank you for making sure lots of people are included in this series.

  107. Jackie says...

    what a beautiful family! gorgeous style. more profiles like this, please!

  108. Bethany Cantor says...

    Where are her baby’s little turbans from!?

    • Ashley says...

      Yes! Please share. In fact, I’d love sources for ALL of her little one’s clothing — she could have had her own little week of outfits. And, the coordination with her mama, Dana, is so spot on.

    • Dana says...

      Hi Bethany! The turbans/top knots are from a company called ‘Top Knots’. Here’s a link to their website: https://www.topknots.co

  109. Anna says...

    This was lovely and it’s such great timing to feature a great Muslim lady as the month of Ramadan begins…

  110. Asia says...

    Beautiful style. Now, I’d love to see more pics of her gorgeous house! Also, I am totally going to try making Lebanese-style pizza.

    • Julia says...

      I know – I’d love a house tour! I basically want to know where she got everything her house haha. She has a great eye, both for her interior design and personal style!

  111. AK says...

    Visiting Lebanon was one of my life’s highlights so far, not least because of the food. Dana, I wish I could beam myself into your kitchen for manouche or three, and some beauty tips — your style is ممتاز!

  112. Sylvia says...

    I am also trying to do fewer Target impulse purchases and more intentional clothing/houseware picks!! It’s hard to resist the siren song of Target … I LOVE your style, Dana! Your kids are beautiful.

  113. Angel says...

    Skirt leggings! I have never heard of them. Are they hard to walk in?

    • Marina says...

      They’re a really cool piece, and weirdly they’re not hard to walk in. I have a pair. They’re made by a women owned company in NYC (the two owners are observant Jews but the company caters to women who want to dress modestly in general).

    • Dana says...

      Hi Angel! I actually sized up in my pair of skirt leggings so that they aren’t hard to walk in! They are from Mimu Maxi. :)

  114. Melz says...

    Perfect timing as Ramadan begins.

  115. Emily L says...

    Love seeing these variations in style! I also really appreciate seeing some people not from NYC (don’t get me wrong, I love ALL the week of outfits, just really like mixing it up).

    • Rue says...

      Agreed! I grew up in NY and love love love it, but I’ve lived in almost every region of the US as an adult and it means a lot to me to show women who live in other places. I get frustrated with friends in NY or CA who think lives in other locations must be less real, less beautiful, or less stylish. I say this with love, having had to shed many of my NYer prejudices while living in places I never would have pictured calling home.

  116. Maggie says...

    Great feature! Would love to know where her rings are from in the last photo!

    • Dana says...

      Hi Maggie! Thanks for asking! My arch ring is from Another Feather (I wear it everyday!), and the other rings I’ve custom made in Beirut, Lebanon. :)

  117. Jenna says...

    The colours she wears are perfection. So muted and tonal but also happy and comforting. I want to paint my whole house in her clothes colours!

    • Jenna says...

      And also, my goodness those babies!

  118. Stunning and stylish. Love this!!

  119. Amanda says...

    Is anyone else learning about skirt leggings for the first time? What a revelation. I. Am. Shook. Thanks, Dana!

    • Yes!!! ahahahah – I had no idea!

  120. Amanda says...

    She is GORGEOUS! I love all her flowy layers, it’s so chic.

  121. Marnie says...

    So lovely and breezy! Love her mindful approach to shopping.

  122. Emielie says...

    So happy to see a hijabi represented! Great style and love your perspective on life, Dana!

  123. Nora says...

    I always appreciate how you feature women of all shapes and backgrounds on your site and discuss the way their personal fashion choices make them feel. Maybe this is a little silly, but it gives me a feeling of sisterhood :)

    • Kristen says...

      I agree completely! My world has contracted since having children (I mainly go from home to school to work to school to home and back again), but this blog makes me feel connected to all sorts of women outside my little bubble. And hopefully I’ll meet some of them as my kids grow and our world starts to expand again!

  124. Annis says...

    Really nice post to see, especially for the start of Ramadan today.

  125. Meegs says...

    Thank you for featuring a variety of cultures and ages in this series. Dana has great style!

    Also those chubby baby thighs… yum!

  126. Connie says...

    Thanks for including so many different perspectives with these interviews. I love each and every one of them. Dana, that last photo of you is fiercely gorgeous! Strength and light.

    …And those house slippers are fab. :)

    • Adrienne says...

      Totally agree about the last photo – strong and beautiful! Love Dana’s philosophy on shopping and how much she believes in her representation of herself. Lessons for us all! Thank you.

  127. Mary says...

    So much warmth and colour from these photos!

    Also love the diversity, Cup of Jo Team!

  128. Brittney says...

    Such a perfect blend of chic and laid back – her mindfulness shines through!

  129. lisa says...

    she is beautiful! can we hear more about that cool chalkboard wall?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes! here’s a quote from Dana, from our interview transcript:

      “When we moved to the house, my sister and I did this as a DIY. We got paint at Home Depot. The kids love it. We use it to learn the alphabet and play games. It’s a bit messy but overall really cool.”

      xoxo

    • laura says...

      interview transcript?! like audio interview possibly? like maybe CoJ can possibly have a podcast sometime??????????

      PS – I’d definitely be a listener.

    • Steph Gilman says...

      OMG I second this podcast idea. What a fun thing to hear women’s voices we see featured. I think I’ve heard Joanna’s voice in little videos she’s posted of her boys on here before, but those were just little snippets! :)

    • Andrea says...

      100% support a CoJ podcast!!

    • Kelly says...

      I am glad that someone asked about this chalkboard! A black wall softened with the brushed chalk? Hello! What a great idea! That living room sofa and pillow combination! Wonderful style!

  130. Justine says...

    Goodness she is beautiful!