Food

5 Ways to Make Better Scrambled Eggs

5 Ways to Make Better Scrambled Eggs

When I’m home alone, I’ll often make scrambled eggs for dinner. The catch? I wing it every time and have no idea what I’m doing. Seventy percent of the time they’re really dry; and when they’re good, I can’t remember what I did. This year, once and for all, I want to learn how to make really good eggs. Today, Caroline Lange, contributor at Extra Crispy is sharing five tips from the new cookbook, Breakfast


Scrambled eggs may be one of the first things we learn to cook as kids, but they aren’t one of the first things we master. The art of scrambled eggs is a delicate one, but a few very small shifts in technique can take a C-grade skill set to an A and ensure you a lifetime of perfect scrambled eggs. Here are a few tips to get you started on your path to scrambled-egg excellence:

1. Season the beaten raw eggs, not the cooked ones.
This is a matter of debate. Some say this breaks down the eggs, rendering them watery; others believe this makes them moister. I say that it simply seasons the eggs more uniformly, and since scrambled eggs should be served right away, there’s not much opportunity for wateriness to occur.

2. Start in a cold pan.
You know how a hot pan can set a thin layer of the eggs the moment they’re poured in? That interrupts your scramble’s potential for ultimate creaminess by cooking one portion of the eggs more quickly than all the rest. Instead, start the eggs in a cold pan (with a pat of butter) and set it on a low flame. Then go to work, stirring regularly, knowing that your eggs are cooking at an even rate.

3. Cook bacon first, then cook your eggs in the same pan.
Because your eggs will be creeeeeeamy and flecked in the nicest way with bacon fat (and will taste, you know, like bacon). You could also do this with fat that renders from cooking breakfast sausage. If you’re not a meat eater, use a generous amount of olive oil or, preferably, butter. Use a pat that’s not quite a tablespoon per two or three eggs. Never start in a dry pan.

4. Take the pan off the heat at least a minute before the eggs look “done” to you.
In fact, even if you like your eggs on the dry side, they should look almost wet. Both the pan you scramble the eggs in and the eggs themselves will hold heat even after they’re off the flame. This is called ‘carryover cooking,’ and it means that your eggs can go from runny to dry in the time it takes you to refill your coffee cup. When the scramble looks two hairs softer than you’d usually like it, take it off the heat, grab a plate, and they’ll be just right.

5. Add a little lemon juice before — or after — cooking.
Sounds strange, right? Reserve your judgment. A wee bit of acid encourages the egg’s proteins to hook up and be creamy and tender. You don’t need much juice — just about 1⁄2 teaspoon per two to three eggs. You can also add a touch of lemon juice right before serving. A teeny squeeze of lemon juice brightens a pile of buttery scrambled eggs.


Any other tips? What do you make for dinner when you’re home alone? Thank you so much, Caroline!

P.S. More recipes, including angel hair pasta and a Trader Joe’s breakfast hack.

(Top photo by Pixel Stories/Stocksy. Excerpted from Breakfast by the editors of Extra Crispy. Copyright © 2018 Oxmoor House. Reprinted with permission from Time Inc. Books, a division of Meredith Corporation, New York, NY. All rights reserved. This series is edited by Franny Eremin.)

  1. Steph says...

    Whisk the eggs, throw in plentiful salt and pepper, and a splash of milk. Slightly oil a pan, put on a medium heat then immediately pour in the eggs. Constantly stir for 30 seconds and take off the heat whilst the eggs are STILL runny. They will keep cooking but I prefer my scrambled eggs totally runny anyway. The few times I’ve been to the US I hate how stodgy and dry the eggs are, makes me cry >_< Serve with avocado and tomato and another scatter of ground black pepper!

  2. NEVER thought to add lemon. But it sounds like it does the trick. Will have to test that out for sure.

    -Grace

    • I haven’t tried lemon juice – but after years of lackluster eggs, I finally discovered my holy grail technique. A pinch of flaky salt, and a splash of white wine vinegar stirred in with the raw eggs. The science nerd in me knows this is something to do with proteins, acids, and enzymes. The perfectionist in me just knows this WORKS. Outrageously creamy, consistent, scrambled egg magic… another magic trick I’ve learned is that a dollop of cottage cheese mixed in while the eggs are raw will fluff up and extend a not-quite-enough egg crisis. This has saved me on many a morning when unexpected guests turned up/when the kids used eggs for an “experiment” the night before.

  3. Nina says...

    Nope.
    I used a 50 year-old well seasoned cast iron skillet, but the results were sooo disappointing. No cold skillets for me, all I got was a mess of stuck on eggs (I used 3) that yielded barely enough for one serving. I’ll stick to a warm skillet, a mix of olive oil and butter, and a wooden spoon to gently stir. Game on!

  4. Emily says...

    I buy good quality eggs! Full of flavor and color. ;)

  5. SB says...

    Just did this for dinner- butter in a cold pan worked flawlessly! I seriously ended up with the creamiest, silkiest scrambled eggs ever – and it didn’t hurt that I added some cheddar and TJ’s EBTB seasoning to finish them off :) Thanks COJ!

    • Nathalie says...

      Eggs + EBTB seasoning is a match made in heaven (I also add hot sauce because I love it). Going to try out these tips when I cook brunch this weekend!

  6. Steph Gilman says...

    thanks for helping me decide what to make for dinner last night. scrambled eggs on toast. Made me feel lots of warm feelings and miss the UK. How is something so simple so delish?

  7. aran says...

    gordon ramsay eggs (when i have the time)
    otherwise, low heat, only eggs (+a bit of butter for the pan), and go low and slow, only stirring now and then when the curds begin to form
    also, turn the heat off a wee bit before they’re fully done–the residual heat will finish them off

  8. Kelly says...

    I use butter to determine what to do with my eggs! The temperature at which butter bubbles but doesn’t sizzle or brown, I’m ready to pour in the eggs. I use a cast iron for its nonstick qualities, and I barely stir them. I’m very much a Tamar Adler with my eggs, meaning when I try to scramble, I end up with a perfect omelet, and vice-versa.

  9. Elena says...

    These are all great tips, buuuuuuuuut it’s Julia Child’s scrambled eggs for this house every dang time. Light and fluffy every time. My husband (who is the Egg Man) saw a video clip of her making eggs and never went back.

    The tricks are you pre heat your pan on a high heat, add your butter (or olive oil) and bring that to temperature. Then add your eggs (pre-beaten) and turn off the heat! The residual heat will finish cooking the eggs. Most importantly, Do Not Move The Eggs Too Much. Move the eggs once across the pan, then wait a bit. Then use your spatula to drag the eggs across again, then wait a bit longer. Finish with one final swoop and that’s it, they are done. You shouldn’t really move them more than three times. Season to taste. Making play by play comments in Julia’s distinct voice is optional. :)
    I will try the dash of lemon juice. Makes sense… acid to balance the fat. Samin Nostrat, can you hear me? I pay attention when you talk about food! ❤️❤️❤️

  10. Martini says...

    Yes! This makes for such lush scrambled eggs. I’ve made them in the past using just one egg. They always turn out so super rich that I can only eat half of it and end up sharing the rest with my husband. One egg! Unbelievable.

  11. Colette says...

    Am I the only kitchen sinner who doesn’t stir constantly? Even when stirring slowly, I find that constant stirring causes my scrambled eggs to trend toward a slop of grainy, low volume disappointment.

    Instead, I cook my (beaten, with a splash of water) eggs in a heated, buttered non-stick pan over medium, as if I were starting out with the intention of making an omelette. After a minute or two when it looks like the edges are bubbling, I drag a wooden spoon through the middle and help the uncooked top portion dribble out onto the pan to get some heat. Then I fold the eggs gently a few times, and as advised in this post, take them off heat while they still look a shade wetter than desired, allowing them to set from the residual heat. They finish as fluffy, creamy, cumulus clouds (rather than the grainy, flat, ragged affairs I seem to produce with constant stirring).

  12. Abby says...

    Use a spatula to NEVER stop stiring so that no part of the egg sits on the pan for more than a second, take them off when they still look raw and immediately transfer them to your plate as the article says, they will be perfect every time I promise.

  13. Pete C says...

    Break two pieces of American cheese small chunks in a micro safe bowl… break 3 eggs and whip above well…place in microwave for one and a half min. Wa-la done.

  14. Debby says...

    Thanks for the tips! Another piece of advice– seasoning with black pepper before cooking makes eggs green/gray. Sprinkle with pepper to finish.

  15. Calla says...

    Kenji J Alt-Lopez does a really good experiment on salting eggs in the Food Lab cookbook (and probably the serious eats blog as well). The conclusion was that you get the best results re:avoiding “leakage” of watery stuff from the curds if you salt the beaten eggs 15 minutes before. I’ve been doing this ever since and it works really well!

    On a separate note I had no idea scrambled eggs could be good until my boyfriend made them for me and cooked them really slowly over very low heat; they turn out so creamy and delicious. I had only ever had them cooked over high heat and dry as a bone and never understood why anyone would eat them! Now I am a convert and we have scrambled eggs every weekend.

    Wow I had no idea I had so much to say about scrambled eggs…

  16. jeannie says...

    I know that chefs can be judged by their ability to make scrambled eggs. I make mine with butter, but have never started with a cold pan. It sounds as if you put the butter and eggs together in the cold pan, rather than letting the butter melt a little. Is this correct? Then do you keep the heat on low? I appreciate the tip of taking the pan off the heat before the cooking is finished. Creamy eggs are the best, but tricky to achieve! Can’t wait to try again.

  17. Julie says...

    My old flatmate swore by a tip that I think was originally from a Jamie Oliver show – “low and slow”. Cook your eggs on a low heat, stir/fold them the whole time and they take a while but are very delicious. Most of the time I can’t be bothered though.

    • Lauren E. says...

      Yes! Low and slow! I work for a chef and he said the same thing.

      My sweet husband offered to make dinner one night (he can only make Kraft mac and cheese) and I had to hold my tongue as I watched him cook the scrambled eggs over high heat. Bless his heart.

  18. Mandy says...

    When my friend lived in Spain, her host mom separated the egg whites from the yolks, and beat the egg whites until they were frothy before adding the yolks back in and beating everything together. She said it made potato and egg tortas fluffier. It works for me.

    • Justine says...

      This is how my father made scramble eggs!

  19. Lindsey says...

    Very interesting- everyone has such different ways of doing things! While I personally wouldn’t follow half of these tips, clearly they work for the author (and many others), so who’s to say? I think it just goes to show that oftentimes there really are so few foolproof tricks- it just takes practice to figure out what works for you, depending on your tastes and your abilities.

    I agree with the salting before tip- learned that one from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt in his book Food Lab. Seriously learned SO MUCH from him!! And the science behind it seems pretty non-negotiable. However, I would never use a cast iron, like in the photo, and I always use butter melted in the warm pan before putting the eggs in. I always heard people rave about eggs cooked in bacon fat and it just tasted like burnt bacon bits…if I’m having eggs and bacon, why would I want both things to taste the same? But that’s just me. :) However! Once I had some leftover garlic-miso-chive butter, from one of Chrissy Teigan’s recipes, so I cooked my eggs in that and holy cow!! Insanely delicious!! I’m also a fan of dumping an obscene amount of nutritional yeast in my eggs- gives that cheesy flavor, but without changing the texture of the eggs like real cheese often does. But like some of these tips, maybe not for everyone. :)

  20. Tracy Carson says...

    I thought the gold standard of making incredible eggs was adding a dash of milk and beat them into the eggs. My Aunts used to do this faithfully, counting quickly, “one-one, two-two, etc.” as they poured the milk for every egg that was cracked. They lovingly called the finished product “billowing clouds” because that’s just what the scrambled eggs looked like! I smile every time I think of the quick counts as they mixed.

    • Kate says...

      Yes! My mom taught me to add one splash of milk per egg. They are always creamy and delicious! My two boys love them and I have taught them to make them the same way.

  21. Lauren says...

    Several years ago, we stayed at a lovely spot in Inverness, CA (Manka’s) and have been recreating the delicious scrambled egg breakfast they delivered to our door ever since! Slow scrambled eggs with goat cheese and chives and baked prosciutto on the side/crumbled on top – it’s so good! I add a splash of milk/cream to the eggs along with salt and pepper before cooking over low heat in a buttered pan. Crumbled goat cheese gets added right before the eggs are done and chives sprinkled on top before serving. The baked prosciutto was the real revelation from this memorable meal – it’s so salty and delicious but feels a little lighter than bacon.

  22. Michelle says...

    The one and only piece of advice you need here is to buy pastures eggs from a farmer. We raise chickens and the scrambled eggs are so rich you’d think there is cheese in them.

    • Tori says...

      Yup!

  23. Steph says...

    Scrambled egg sandwich (made with milk) on toasted sourdough bread with a generous spread of Miracle Whip. Don’t judge me.

    • Amanda says...

      YES! My mom used to make us egg sandwiches before school and the miracle whip (or mayo if you’re a purist) is the secret to a delicious egg sandwich (I also put it on a grilled cheese and it ups the flavor!).

    • Denise says...

      Also delicious minus mayo plus mustard!

  24. Alice says...

    Grated nutmeg is great on scrammys, always take them off early as they will keep cooking, stir with a fork rather than a spoon and if it all goes tits up anyway, mix with Greek yoghurt or cream cheese …that stuff would rescue a rubberised ostrich egg.

    • Brittany says...

      “…tits up…”

      I love this expression! I’m laughing out loud over here as I read your comment, Alice.

  25. Lindsay says...

    Interesting about the lemon! My mom would always make bacon or sausage first, then once the scrambled eggs were almost done cooking, stir in the crumbled pieces of meat plus shredded cheese and maybe green onions. The cheese melts fast and each bite is delicious. But I never make scrambled eggs, I Love runny fried eggs too much.

  26. Anna says...

    For dinner eggs (breakfast eggs are sacred, s&p only:) I whisk a splash of coconut aminos/soy/tamari and a little coconut milk into the beaten eggs (!!!!) Weird and so good!

    • Abbie says...

      Oooh what a cool idea!

  27. Tiffani Green says...

    I whisk in some greek yogurt and this contradicts the cold pan tip, but I like to heat butter and olive oil in my pan until the mixture has browned a bit and then cook the eggs.

    • MJ says...

      Totally have a hot pan, then add butter until it turns a bit brown and add the eggs. I scramble fast and have yummy butter eggs.

  28. Callie says...

    Since I met my husband 13 years ago, we’ve made scrambled eggs probably more than any other single meal item. We’ve mixed it up over the years, but for the last few I always do a quick scramble in a bowl, add to a pan with low heat with butter, stir constantly, add a bit shredded cheese right at the end so it is juuuuust melted, and salt/pepper after. With GOOD EGGS! Those make such a difference. They are delish and I can guarantee my kids will end up eating them with their hands because their forks are too slow at shoving the goodness in their mouths.

    However, you CANNOT BEAT my mom’s Midwest classic of scrambled eggs with milk and loads of VELVEETA CHEESE.

    • Danielle says...

      We used to have velveeta scrambled eggs too! My brother and I would add bacon bits to them.

  29. I love scrambled eggs with a touch of black truffle salt – it takes them to another level :-)

    • Grace Koucheravy says...

      Agreed, after eating eggs with truffle paste in Italy, it has remained my favourite, most decadent way to eat eggs! A game changer for sure!

  30. Eva says...

    As the lede photo implies: use a cast iron! With that, I’ve employed both low-and-slow and high-speed, high-heat methods for cooking scrambled eggs, and I have to admit I prefer the latter (though prob best to use high-heat oil or ghee vs. regular butter). It’s so fast you don’t have time to mess it up—nor worry about timing. Toast the bread, set the table, pour the coffee, then 2 minutes of scrambling and breakfast is served :)

  31. Megan says...

    Never heard the lemon juice trick before!
    Other tips- low and slow as far as temperature for cooking scrambled eggs. And mixing in some crumbled chèvre never hurts! Mmmm.

  32. Megan says...

    My toddler has struggled to gain weight her whole life, so we’re constantly finding ways to up the calories. I’ve made these eggs for her, and I swear to gosh, they’re like eggs you’d eat in, I don’t know, the south of France or something! Whisk your egg with a tablespoon of heavy cream, scramble in a teaspoon or two of EVOO and towards the end, add a little cream cheese. Ahhhhhmazing.

    • Zoe says...

      Fresh dill takes cream cheese scrambled eggs to another level!

  33. Jeri says...

    Stirring regularly needs to be its own tip and is one of the most important. Don’t let those eggs be still even for a second!

    I also remove the pan from the heat every once in a while, continue stirring and then put it back on. No need for cream or milk by doing this – they come out perfectly fluffy/creamy every time!

    OH – and use salted, cultured butter on your toast. GAME CHANGER!

  34. Keegan says...

    When we are feeling indulgent on the weekends, I had a small dollop of sour cream to the eggs before whisking. It makes them super fluffy!

  35. Tori says...

    My method for the best eggs is to buy better eggs. Pastured eggs (i.e. the chickens aren’t fed grains) from a farm make a HUGE difference. I used to add all kinds of stuff to scrambled eggs (onions, peppers, tomatoes, basil, salt & pepper) until I started buying pastured eggs and they are so good that I just cook them plain in a bit of olive oil.

    • Lana says...

      Agreed! Also, doesn’t “start with a cold pan” and then “cook your eggs in bacon fat” kind of seem contradictory? Lol!

    • Lindsay says...

      Yes, I am very picky about the quality of my eggs. Need the bright orange thick yolks.

  36. Olivia says...

    Best secret – add a splash of heavy cream. The best. Agree with salt and pepper beforehand.

  37. Carrie says...

    Garlic salt + eggs + heavy cream, whisk together until velvety smooth. Melt butter on low heat in pan. Add eggs and let them start to cook just slightly, then add a couple tbsp of salsa and finish cooking them. So yummy.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      suddenly i’m STARVING.

  38. Gabriella says...

    Big yes to the low flame! I always add a tablespoon of milk for every egg I’m cooking and then cook it on pretty much as low a flame as possible, stirring constantly. They come out fluffy and soft.

  39. Courtney says...

    Agreed! Also, I have tried the Gordon Ramsay eggs, and while my husband loves them, I think they were the most disgusting eggs I have EVER had!

  40. Dee says...

    Don’t use oil or bacon fat, use unsalted Irish butter! If I am feeling fancy I add chopped fresh chives and a pinch of sea salt. Drool time.

  41. Rebecca says...

    GREATEST, MOST IMPORTANT TIP ever, in my mind: add 1/8 tsp salt to the raw eggs and let them sit for 15 min (at minimum, but no less). Crucial step discovered by food scientist J. Kenji Lopez-Alt. I’ve been doing this ever since I heard him on Freakonomics a bunch of years ago. Makes them SO much fluffier! Some more info on it here:

    https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/04/does-pre-salting-eggs-make-them-tough.html.

    Whew, glad the coj world knows now. 😄🤗

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      wow!!!! never heard this and soooooo fascinated. thank you for sharing, rebecca!

  42. Kristina says...

    I always add a spoonful of cream cheese right before I pull them off the stove. It makes the eggs really creamy and I like the subtle cheesy flavor. And I agree: cook them with butter, low and slow!

  43. At my house, we all make our own eggs for ourselves because we all like them how we like them!! Eggs really seem to be individuals’ preference. Personally, I like firm but not rubbery eggs, so I cook over gentle heat with not much stirring. I add a splash of milk to beaten eggs to get soft scrambled eggs.

  44. Diana K. says...

    MAJOR TIP:
    Find Gordon Ramsey’s scrambled eggs tutorial on Youtube and TRY not to fall in love.

    • Susie says...

      YES! I only use this method now and it makes all the difference. Delicious. Lift the pan on and off the heat, super creamy eggs. Yum. I add a dash of Trader Joe’s onion salt after cooking, perfection.

    • Helen says...

      YES!!!!!! All other scrambled eggs pale in comparison. Life changing. On top of his cooking method, adding creme fraiche is a game changer.

  45. P says...

    Whisk the eggs in a bowl before you pour them into the pan, this will help them cook more uniformly. Whisk hard and fast, whisking air into the eggs will make them fluffier. Once they’re in the pan, keep them moving. Stir, stir, stir. This makes them creamy and evenly cooked, instead of dry and curdy.

  46. my husband adds seltzer – makes them so fluffy!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh wow!! never heard of this!! just a splash?

  47. Gill F. says...

    I used to think I made some good eggs, but really I was just adding a ton of veggies to hide the fact that the eggs themselves weren’t too great. My girlfriend makes the best eggs. They’re super fluffy and soft and so simple, but so good. She beats them with a dash of milk (someone said don’t do this, but we do and it’s great so?? though we use almond milk which is pretty much water so I don’t know) and salt and pepper. And I mean she beats them! When she watches me do this she makes me really put my anger into those eggs. Then she cooks them on low low heat, stirring occasionally and pulls them off when they’re still soggy. Mine aren’t as good as hers still, but I’m getting better!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      “When she watches me do this she makes me really put my anger into those eggs.” = hahahah love it!

    • Carrie says...

      I thought everyone added milk before whisking scrambled eggs?

  48. liz says...

    Add a splash of kefir (you can find at Trader Joes) instead of milk to make your eggs unbeleivably fluffy. trust me on this one.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oooh alex always drinks kefir for breakfast. going to steal some to try this;)

  49. b says...

    Can we get some tricks for fried eggs? I like mine a little well done with a slightly runny yolk, but can’t ever get them to turn out the same from one time to the next.

    • Cindy says...

      OMG, yes please to this!

    • Eva says...

      I like my eggs like this too, and learned a trick that works for me. Sprinkle water on the egg white after the egg is in the pan. The steaming off of the water droplets help cook the egg white a little faster while the yolk stays runny.

    • Olivia says...

      I am drooling over having runny yolks again after this baby comes out in June. Damn salmonella! Also I think my first meal will be a chicken Caesar (egg yolks in dressing).

    • Tori says...

      You’re not supposed to eat fried eggs during pregnancy? Oops.

    • Melody Bergey says...

      I second Eva’s tip! I add a splash of water to the pan after the egg is in it (1 TBSP is plenty!), then cover it. Makes the perfect firm/runny yolk without having to flip it.

    • b says...

      Thank you!

    • Ann-Marie says...

      I third Eva’s tip! I eat 2 eggs for lunch most days. Warm up some olive oil on medium, break the eggs in. Once the whites have mostly solidified, lift their edges gently so they’re detached from the pan, add a few drops of water in the pan, set to low/med and put a lid on top. You can visually gauge when they’ll be to your liking. So good, especially with pastured eggs!

    • Rachel says...

      Second this!

  50. Ellen says...

    I like my eggs VERY dry–“hard scrambled” is the term, I recently learned. Can’t deal with eggs that most people think are cooked to perfection.

    • Courtney says...

      Agreed! Also, I have tried the Gordon Ramsay eggs, and while my husband loves them, I think they were the most disgusting eggs I have EVER had!

    • Elisabeth says...

      Agree! I can’t deal with runny moist scrambled eggs.

    • +1 for team hard scramble! Not a fan of super fluffy scrambled eggs, and soft-loose scrambled eggs? Deargod no! It makes me nauseous even looking at the loose, runny scrambled eggs I see hailed all over IG and food publications.

  51. Laura says...

    Reading this as I eat my standard work-from-home lunch: sautéed greens and scrambled eggs. Thanks for the tips!

  52. These are all great tips – though I’m still torn on the lemon! Starting in a cold pan makes sense but I’ve never tried that. Next time!

  53. Emily says...

    Just wanted to say that I realized I sent out links to your site to friends/family three days in a row. It’s rare to find consistently good-quality writing. Thanks for always creating the kind of content that prompts that “I’ve always wondered that!” kind of response. :D

    And when it comes to eggs, I always try to remember low and slow — keep the heat low and slowly stir them. And Everything but the Bagel Seasoning from TJ makes them (and, basically, everything) taste so much better.

    • Lily says...

      Love TJ’s Everything but the Bagel seasoning! My go-to (but still super satisfying) weekday lunch is soft scrambled eggs + avocado + EBTB seasoning on top of a (surprise!) sliced bagel.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you so much, emily:) that’s really nice of you to say; i’ll share with the team!

  54. Audrey says...

    I cook mine in a small cast iron with coconut oil. Low/medium heat the oil first, them add the eggs. I also usually top with avocado and salt/pepper. Even my toddler gobbles them up!

  55. Frankie Rose says...

    My mom makes the best eggs and she adds a bit of water to the bowl before beating them. Lots of butter and taking them off the heat when they still are wet. Also lots of fresh cracked pepper just before serving. Even though I can recite her tricks, I still can’t make mine taste like hers!

  56. Erin G says...

    I’m confused about the cold pan technique: If I put the pat of butter and the eggs in a cold pan at the same time, the butter will not be able to melt and cover the pan to prevent the eggs from sticking. What am I missing here?

    • katie says...

      I had the exact same thought. Would love to know the answer.

    • cori says...

      I had the same thought!

    • Same thought! My technique is just to keep the heat low – in fact, I keep the heat low for fried eggs, too.

    • Diana says...

      came here to add that same question!

    • Franny Eremin says...

      Hi everyone! We reached out to the editor of the cookbook and here’s what she said:

      “The butter and eggs can be added to a cold nonstick pan at the same time! The butter here is for flavor, not greasing the pan. As long as you’re using a nonstick pan the eggs won’t stick. As the eggs cook, their residual heat will melt the butter and add that much-needed richness.”

      Hope that helps! Thank you so much. x

  57. Ariana says...

    Hm, starting in a cold pan makes your eggs much more likely to stick all over the place. A hot pan, with fat added just before eggs is the best trick I’ve learned to not having your eggs stick to the pan. Just heat and then scramble over low heat, and stir pretty constantly after adding the eggs. Or, better yet, scramble your eggs in a stainless bowl over a pot of simmering water (bain marie) for the softest, creamiest eggs ever–start with a buttered/oiled bowl, then whisk in a bit of cream and truffle oil to the eggs during cooking–utter heaven.

  58. I make the worst eggs – never come to me for advice 😂

  59. kash says...

    My tips!

    1. My dad would always sautee some green onions in butter for a minute before adding the eggs, and it’s still my favourite way to have eggs

    2. Low heat! I don’t know if I have the patience for a full cold pan, but low heat and slow scramble will make for much better eggs.

    3. Trader Joe’s everything but the bagel seasoning is great if you mix it in with the beaten eggs :)

  60. Ki says...

    Here’s what works for me: be super hungry. I seem to only make scrambled eggs when I’m absolutely ravenous–and they always taste AMAZING!

  61. Kim says...

    My husband’s a former chef and he makes the best scrambled eggs. I believe he uses butter and eggs and nothing else.

    Whatever you do, don’t add milk.

    • Dee says...

      Absolutely agree. No milk!

  62. Shaina says...

    “Reserve your judgment” – love it!!

  63. I add a small dollop of yogurt to the raw egg mix. I also beat the eggs for a couple of minutes to get it really orange and creamy before pouring it into the pan. They have consistently been the creamiest eggs.

    My only other trick is to have the pan warmed up to low-medium heat (3 or 4 on the dial). Once I melt the butter and pour in the egg, I let it sit until it gets pancake thin, then I swirly it around. The yolk thickens on the plate and its soooo good.

  64. Paula says...

    scallions and hot sauce make all the difference

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      my aunt also adds mustard powder, and her eggs are incredible. i want to try all these things at home now!

  65. Joslyn says...

    How timely! Dinner tonight is eggs, toast and peas. Maybe I will offer to cook :)

  66. Mary says...

    This may be a silly question, but how would you cook bacon in the pan first and also start in a cold pan? Do you wait for the pan to cool after you take the bacon out?
    I’m definitely trying the lemon juice trick! Scrambled eggs are one of the few foods in my dad’s kitchen arsenal (which seems like an almost universal dad thing?) but he never did this! Just added loads of pepper and cheese :)

  67. My tips: 1) Add heavy cream while you’re beating the eggs. Bon Appétit taught me this trick (after I dismissed a coworker who mentioned it) and it really is lovely. 2) If you like adding cheese to your eggs, make sure you do it very late in the cooking stage. Cheese added too early ruins the texture somehow; added too late it doesn’t get melted in enough. Add it when the eggs are between 75% and 90% cooked, but incorporate the grated cheese fully before you plate. 3) Don’t both trying to scramble duck eggs. (If you are like me and your fridge always has a mix of duck and chicken eggs—duck eggs are glorious for hard boiling and can be nice to add structure to certain baked goods like a layer cake, but I don’t care for how they fry or scramble.) You can get away with a ratio like 1 duck egg to 4 chicken, but no more duck than that.