Motherhood

A Funny Parenting Realization

Jeremy and Jean Goddard

This weekend, my dad came to visit, and while watching him with the boys, I realized something…

I am becoming my parents.

Now that I have two children of my own, I keep noticing myself using my mom’s and dad’s expressions and rituals, without even realizing it. Here are a few:

My dad (and now me):

  • While driving, now and again, he would reach one arm back to squeeze our ankles.
  • Calling everything an “adventure,” to make life (and grocery store runs) feel more exciting.
  • Taking us kids to bookstores for ages, just to hang out.

  • My mom (and now me):

  • She would warn us, “You’re skating on thin ice.” (Her expressions were amazing — if someone was being mean at school, she would say, “Tell her to go jump in a lake!” BOOM.)
  • When she meant business, she would give us THE LOOK: widened eyes, eyebrows raised, head slightly down, very still, looking straight at you. You would stop doing anything if you got the look.
  • Getting the names of movies, songs and celebrities slightly wrong.

  • Side note: Also, did your parents play the same songs over and over? My mom would crank up Total Eclipse of the Heart in our car on the way to school, the bank, Target, everywhere. (It’s now my go-to karaoke song.) And my dad played Lay Down Sally on the living room record player 845,239,751 times while we were growing up.

    Jeremy Goddard

    My dad with the boys this weekend.

    Do you find yourself using your parents’ old expressions? Do you parent in similar ways? I’d love to hear…

    P.S. More about talking to kids, and preparing your child for a new baby.

    (Top photo of my parents.)

    1. Mary says...

      If I was ever being naughty/annoying/whiny, my mum would say, “Pull your head in”.

      The other day I said the same thing to my 4yo daughter.

      Her response?

      “No, YOU pull your head in.”

      #karma #owned

    2. When I was little, I’d eye-roll at my mom’s propensity to say “we” in referring to things about me. “We’re a little nervous to be here,” she’d say, while looking at me, to my endocrinologist every time I sat in the examination room. Or, “we’re a little shy” when I’d hide behind her leg. I now think it’s the sweetest thing because I know what it’s like to feel someone else’s heart as an extension of your own. And I look forward to my someday-kids harassing me with annoyance, “MOM, I’M nervous. Not You.”

    3. Alina says...

      Yesterday I admitted to myself and my sister the way in which I am becoming my mom (gulp): I think everyone is on drugs. My cashier at Marshalls. The lady in the bathroom stall in front of me. Etc etc etc. Can’t believe this is happening?!

      • Mrs D says...

        This is excellent! I just laughed so hard. I can totally relate.

    4. Kelly says...

      i think i make a similar face to your mother’s when my daughter is misbehaving…she calls it my ‘hornet face’.

    5. One of the scariest realizations of my adult life was when I realized that I am becoming my grandfather! (I love him dearly and admire him greatly, there really are worst people I could turn out like.) Using his hand gestures, speech patterns, verbal pauses (“hmm”, especially to emphasis questions) and, of course, some of his sayings.
      “Keep it between the ditches” when driving
      “Damn it Earl!” (a farm hand on his family farm when he was growing up)
      The have “the personalty of a wet dish cloth”
      and many many others

      • Angela says...

        Damn it Earl…totally stealing that! I can’t stop giggling.

    6. Yes! I love this! My mom would play the same songs over and over again. I have a playlist called “homesick playlist where I play those songs over and over! Lots and billy Joel and Simon and Garfunkel

    7. Sanja says...

      I don’t know if these are general expressions, as I’ve never heard them anywhere else, but when my Mum pretended to be angry she’d say things like I’ll beat you up like an ox in cabbage, or when we ate well, she’d say that we eat like Peter the Blizzard (both roughly translated from Croatian). I often use these with my girl and we both end up giggling 😄

    8. Esther says...

      The timing of this post is impeccable. Tomorrow I am traveling with my five month old baby boy to meet my parents for the first time since he was born. I live abroad and had to wait a long time for his passport and my parents are too old to make the journey, but now they will finally get to meet their first grandchild.

      Over these last few months I’ve found myself singing songs to my baby that I didn’t even know I remembered from when I was growing up. It makes me teary eyed to think that my parents are probably not going to be around much longer, but I’m happy to realise I remember much more of what they said and did when I was a child than I thought I did.

      My dad was always a gold mine for weird expressions. He would say things like (roughly translated) “tired as a stocking” and “ready as a monkey” and still to this day I’m not sure which of these were actual expressions in my mother tongue and which he made up.

    9. Alice says...

      Total eclipse of the heart is THE best karaoke song ever. Possibly the best song ever. Especially to dance out dramatically on the dance floor ;)

    10. Dinah says...

      Wonderful! “Adventures” and bookstores are my stay-at-home-mom mainstays! And I loved the ankle-grabbing as a child (my son does not appreciate it as much!). My mom is very playful and a bit dark and one line she’d always use if we were complaining about our stomach/finger/etc. hurting (especially if we were trying to get out of something) was, “Your *butt’s* about to hurt, in a minute.” My kids aren’t quite old enough to appreciate this one, but the other day when texting I was able to flip it back to her and winky, kissy emojis followed :)

      As for songs it seemed always Van Morrison greatest hits in the car, James Taylor greatest hits on Sunday afternoon and Dionne Warwick or Harry Belafonte while my mom made dinner. I think about this often when setting a musical tone for our days, it was so formative for me.

    11. Jessica says...

      I loved reading these comments, I do love a good saying and I picked up a few from my mum which I now use regularly. One is whenever my son leaves the door open, ‘Were you born in a tent?’ Cue look of confusion.
      Another is ‘better than a slap in the face with a wet fish’. The funny thing is that I get them wrong sometimes which is what my dad does. I was having an argument with my husband and indignantly said ‘well it’s better than a wet fish’! Who can argue with that haha!

    12. Gen says...

      My sibs and I gifted my dad a list we made of his (many!) regular sayings from our childhood for his 60th birthday. There’s a 15 year span between first and last kid, so the older ones and younger ones had several that didn’t overlap. But the classics – we all knew those and still say them to each other. ;)

    13. Claire says...

      These comments are gold and I’ve found a few to adopt! I lost my dad 6 years ago and recently had a baby boy. It makes me sad to know they’ll never get to know eachother because my dad was a really wonderful person. However, I’ll find myself using some of his funny sayings like “bedtime for bonzo!” when we’re getting ready for bed , “let me taste that to make sure it’s not poisonous” when my husband is eating something I want a bite of, “Dad Blammit!” instead of cursing. Whenever these things come out of my mouth I feel like he’s still here and I love that my son will get to hear these silly little phrases of my dad’s through me.

      Another I’ve adopted from my mom is “moving slower than molasses in January”. Something her dad used to say to her :-) Love how these phrases travel through generations!

      • megan says...

        My dad also always said “bedtime for Bonzo”!

    14. Luna says...

      Right now I’m in the Public Library and I walked up to a Senior Gentleman who was already sitting in a seat, while an empty seat is attached to his.

      “Is this seat taken?”
      “No dear. I can only sit in one chair.” (giggle)

    15. Sara says...

      Love these so much! I’m sure I’m turning into my mom in so many more ways than I realize and that it will come out even more once we have kids but for now there are two things that stand out to me. The first is that when we were out at a restaurant and we spilled or dropped anything my mon would say, “I can dress you up but I can’t take you out!” I say this to my husband now haha. The other thing (which drives my husband nuts) is that I will think I haven’t seen a movie and then realize 15-20 minutes in that I have seen it. As a kid I totally didn’t understand how this was possible – how could you not know from the description? From the actors? From the first five minutes? But now I know… It’s possible! 🤷

    16. Sarah says...

      My dad would do anything to embarrass us in public. He always used to threaten to sing “In the Good Old Summertime'” while in restaurants. Then he would sing the first word “IN” really loud!! We would just die!!

      • Casey says...

        My mom would threaten to sing “I love trash” from Sesame Street at the grocery store… And at award ceremonies or such, she’d start singing Mr. Rogers’ “I’m Proud of You”. Mortifying. But I miss it now.

    17. Shannon says...

      Posts like this always make me a bit sad. I remember commenting on a previous Cup of Jo post about a very difficult relationship with my mother, and many readers echoing the same sentiment. I hope I am NOT like my mother in so many ways. She wasn’t abusive (physically) but she certainly left a narcissistic, difficult mark. I would love Cup of Jo to explore this more, as I feel there are so many people in this boat.

      • tracy says...

        I agree with Shannon! I feel the same and debated leaving a comment yesterday to such effect. I love my parents, and they raised my sister and me with good values and to take care of ourselves. But in so many ways, I aim to NOT be like them as I am now a mother of two.

      • Grace says...

        Agree with both Shannon and Tracy. I don’t have kids — a conscious decision largely due to my fraught/traumatic relationship with both my parents — but I’ve seen my siblings and cousins raise their kids in the opposite manner to which they were raised, or the way they wish they were raised.

        That is, instead of the authoritarian and brusque “because I said so!” brook-no-argument parenting style of our childhood that brushed us off and dismissed our feelings/opinions and robbed us of our agency, they now aim to be more of a warm approachable friend than a distant authority figure. I mean my parents did raise us to be upstanding members of society but they inflicted plenty of thoughtless, uncaring scars — borne mostly of their self-obsession and constant one- upmanship of each other — along the way. So I may be in the minority but I for one have certainly never experienced the selfless parenting so many other readers here have been blessed with.

    18. Marie says...

      When we would ask our dad something he didn’t feel like doing, he’d say:’That’s too bad, my religion prevents me from doing so.’ We’re not religious btw.
      When we would answer with ‘I think so’ he’d reply with ‘I need you to know so, not to think so’ ,used to drive me crazy, that one 😊
      When ‘tasting’ a snack he’d say ‘This is awfull, you’re not gonna like this, I’ll do you a favor and finish it myself’ 😊

      • Gemima says...

        Hahaha.

        I will have to start using ‘I need you to know so, not to think so’ especially with our eldest. He always starts with ‘I think…..’.

    19. My dad would always say, “Taxes…” and slowly fly his spoon over to our ice-cream sundae to take a bite. It was inevitable. It was unavoidable. And we would put our heads back, “Nooooooooo” and he would just laugh a genial, amused laugh.
      I find this hilarious now, as a tax-paying adult, and fully intend to implement it with my children!

      • Madie says...

        My dad did the same thing with our Halloween candy… He’d say, “Tax!” and snag his favorite piece – usually Mounds or Almond Joy, which was generally OK because what kid likes those anyway?? (Now, of course, as an adult, they’re basically my favorite…) But yeah, we also learned about Taxes that way!

      • Luna says...

        I’m borrowing “Taxes” only because our youngest son is learning about money & why adults have to work.

    20. Ada says...

      Neither of my Parents said these, but after having our 2nd child and noticing how different I had to Parent him from our first.

      If my Husband is getting himself cornered into an argument/situation with our youngest son, I will say 1 of 3 things to him:
      “Pick your battles.”
      “Remember now, he’s only 3 years old.”
      “Only one of you is gonna end up crying & it’s not my baby.”

      My Husband loves an argument/debate BUT you can’t do that every time with a 3yo child, who can scream & rant with a high anxiety Mum.

    21. Tristen says...

      I think the COJ community just wrote its first coffee table book.

      • Ada says...

        Yes!

    22. Luna says...

      In my culture it’s rude to stand or walk while eating. If we did this, our Mother would say, “Are you a peasant?” or “Who raised you?”

      If my younger brothers and I were fighting or if someone was crying from a fight, our Mother would say “Someone is going to eat the broom.” or “I’m coming in there and ALL of you will be crying.”

      If we didn’t finish our food, “We ate once a day until Sundays.” As Sundays after Church the whole family would gather for an elaborate feast & there would be leftovers to last 2-3 days.

      I use most of her sayings, because they remind me of her and my Grandmother.

    23. Penny K says...

      When eating baked potatoes as kids, both my mom and husbands mom used to say, “I scrubbed the skins” to let us know its safe to eat the potato skins. Now when we both eat baked potatoes we laugh and say, “the skins are scrubbed”.

      • Luna says...

        That’s never occurred to me! thanks for sharing.

      • This saved my bacon on my husband’s and my first trip to Europe together! A delayed honeymoon – 21 days – and absolutely none of the luggage we had packed! But, BUT. My swimsuit was in my carry-on. What more did I need? Your mom knows what’s up!

    24. Millie says...

      I lost my dad at 20, and have been struggling to find a balance between remembering him and trying to move on from the loss.

      Your post made me smile because I had completely forgotten that my dad also used to squeeze my ankle while he was driving. Thank you for giving me this memory back.

    25. Brooke says...

      My father-in-law is a riot, and Otto’s only living grandfather, so I love to see him through my husband’s parenting style. A favorite, when wiping Otto’s mouth after eating, he hums “huuuum bob a dooba dooba” (sp?), and our boy squeals with joy.

    26. Naomi says...

      This was like a trip down memory lane. So many little things that get forgotten in the day to day and pop up unexpectedly! Thank you so much!

    27. Hathie says...

      I do this all the time.
      My Mom just died recently and more than ever I realize that I use her funny old-fashioned expressions, maybe just to keep her with us. I am just as laid back and have a laugh when the kids come home with a bad grade. That always showed me that she had utter faith in me, never doubted my abilities and I try to pass this on to my daughters. And it’s getting worse, the other day, when running my errands, I saw my reflection in a window and it felt like it was her. I’m starting to look like her. It’s as if she had died and slipped into me to some extent. Utterly weird but also utterly comforting…
      But then again, there are also things that I deliberately do differently. For my parents it was always difficult to have me invite friends over spontaneously. Today, the doors to my house are wide open.
      It’s great to know that they live inside us while being able to add new elements to the recipe…

      • Lana says...

        I need to work on being more laid back and welcoming to kids dropping in! You sound like a wonderful parent and I’m sure your mom is proud of you.

      • Polly Hitchcock Sage says...

        love that. adding to the recipe. I find myself even using phrases my grandparents used to say, and i think everyone says until my husband looks at me funny. I’m sorry about your mom.

    28. When my sister and I were dragging our feet or defying instructions, my dad would say, “when I say jump, you ask how high on the way up.” I used that with my son when I wanted instructions followed and it’s real go-to in my work (I’m a middle school assistant principal). Every time I say it I am reminded of my dad. The follow up to “when I say jump” is “straighten up and fly right,” which is also useful on its own and in frequent rotation in my world! There is (I think) a Geico ad with parents in a support group bemoaning the fact that they’ve become their parents that makes me laugh every single time I see it.

    29. These comments are golden. So nice to read the loving comments people have about their parents!

      A few of my dad’s sayings:
      – Do the math. (Whenever he thought we should be able to figure something out.
      – Don’t let the rascals get you down. (When leaving for school, or after we had a hard day.)

      My mom always says
      -I put it in a special place. (When referring to something she can’t find. – What’s funny is she has no idea we all giggle when she says this – because she really thinks she did put it somewhere special!) When I can’t find something now, my husband asks, “Did you put it in a special place? :)”

      • KylieO says...

        Whenever my mum would give us something yummy to eat, she’d take a bite first, saying “I’ll just try it first in case it’s poisonous.” I find myself doing this all the time with my kids!

    30. Sarah says...

      I had triplets two months ago. My parents have been coming over when they can to help, and I noticed they talk to the babies in a sing-song type voice, it’s really soothing. Yesterday I stopped in my tracks as I realized I have been doing the same thing the whole time- this lilting, lullaby style of talking. My parents would say, “How big is Sarah?? She’s sooooooo biiiiig!” and lift our arms up over our heads. I find myself doing it every time I get to cuddle one of the babies.

    31. anon says...

      I’m the opposite as they did a terrible job.

    32. Elizabeth says...

      I don’t have kids yet but I’m already fully prepared to embarrass them with the bizarre little dances and songs my mum would burst into around the house when I was young. They made me die of shame as a teenager but now I can’t stop them from coming out!

    33. Carter says...

      Listen to Jill Andrew’s cover of total eclipse of the heart… it’s awesome!

    34. I don’t even have children and I’m turning into my parents at 24!

      • Rebecca says...

        Exactly the same!

    35. samantha says...

      whenever we would go to my dad for advice on a tricky situation (like, didn’t study for a test and it’s the morning of), he’d say, “well, you’ve got one foot in the grave and the other on a banana peel”. hahahaha. it was always hilarious and totally not helpful. thanks, pop!

      • Luna says...

        Hahaha

    36. Amy says...

      If one of us kids was complaining, our (optimistic, fun-loving, often quite goofy) mother would always tell us, so nonchalantly, “Well, life sucks, then you die.”

      I do feel myself becoming more like her, but never was it so apparent as earlier this year when I was having breakfast with her and my dad. My dad started to ask some distance related question, but only got as far as “How many feet—” before my mom and I said in unison, with the same exact tone of mock importance, “Oh, I have two.”

      • Grace says...

        Haha I love her sarcasm.

    37. Colleen says...

      My Mom would always sing, “Time to get up, get moving. Time to get up, you’ve got school today.” I have no idea where this came from. She would also sing while doing our hair, “Pony tail, on the side, makes me want /to abide.” I have no idea where she got these but they are hilarious.

    38. Emily says...

      “If wishes were horses, beggars would ride”. “Cross that bridge when you cone to it”. “Sinners in Hell want ice water, but they don’t get it.” Just a few of my southern Mom’s sayings.

      • Luna says...

        I am going to use “Sinners in Hell want ice water, but they don’t get it.” 😅

    39. siri says...

      Joanna! I used to hate my mom’s corny «mom» expressions, like…FOR CRYING OUTLOUD! She passed away 2 years ago and now I love hearing her voice and expressions coming out of my own mouth when I use them on my 3 little boys. It’s funny and bittersweet.

    40. Jessica says...

      My dad puts on a fake Southern accent and says, “Well, I’ll be dipped in kitty litter!” and “Well, aren’t you just as cute as a fart in church?!”

      So weird, but I totally say those things today.

      • Kate says...

        These are amazing!!

      • Lily says...

        LOL

    41. Bonnie says...

      My mom grew up in Arkansas. She had lots of sayings for “Oh my gosh.” …”Land a’Goshen” … “I’ll swan to my time” … “Well, I declare”… “Heavens to Betsy.”

      When we had a tantrum or acted up, “Do you have fever with those fits?”

      My dad’s favorite expressions:

      When planning what time to leave to go to the airport, “Always leave time to hit a dog and have a flat tire.”

      When traveling, “Never pass up a chance to use the john or take a nap.”

      When parking, “Park in the shade.”

      • Kate says...

        Heavens to Betsy, goodnight shirt, off like a dirty shirt, and the ubiquitous Bless.your.heart.

      • katie says...

        I LOVE ALL OF THESE SO MUCH! Esp. the ones about leaving for the airport. Parents have the best thoughts on that – usually involving a 2 hours prior arrival…so great. Thank you!

    42. Bren says...

      I laughed out loud because I always reach one arm back and grab my children’s ankles while I’m driving! Just a little love squeeze to say “hi, I’m still here.”

      • Joanna Goddard says...

        so sweet, bren :)

    43. CC says...

      At night, I often ask my partner what he ate for lunch that day. It’s a way of learning more about his day without asking a million little questions, and there’s usually a story. I realize my mom always used to ask my dad this same question and, as a kid, I was always like– why does she care what he ate for lunch? Now I realize it’s just another little way to connect. <3

    44. I find myself realizing the same thing, that I’m becoming my mother. In some ways I cringe but in so many mores I find myself smirking and thinking: it could be worse. Also, related to getting celebrities wrong, I had a friend whose mom forever thought Hall & Oates was Fallen Oats. I think about that occasionally and laugh out lout.

    45. I find it a little annoying and SUPER comforting that my mom comes in and gets herself busy in my house — tidying, doing projects, changing diapers, reading stories — super comforting and wonderful because of course, she does it *exactly the right way* (haha, having learned from her!), and annoying because I want to be like, “just sit down a minute!”
      This past weekend, my friend’s daughter cut her thumb really badly and I dashed over to get the littler babies dressed and do fold some laundry; I was halfway through the tasks before I realized I was BEING my mother!

    46. Jamie says...

      um YES – a huge fear as a teenager, now not so scary. A few of my mom’s golden phrases: “oh my blazing stars”, “colder than a witch’s tit”, if you ask what’s for dinner – “cat shit and vinegar”. I had a baby 1.5 years ago and keep saying to my mom, “I can’t believe you love me as much as I love my baby!”

      • Emmie says...

        “i can’t believe you love me as much as i love my baby” – gold

      • Samantha says...

        I got a teary eye with that last comment

      • Grace says...

        “Colder than a witch’s titty” is so priceless. My husband has been saying this forever and I love it.

    47. Michelle says...

      It was just my mom and I after my dad left, so we were this really chummy little duo. She was my best friend growing up and the person whose company I enjoyed best of all (still is). She affectionately called me “Pigeon Poop.” It was said so lovingly and regularly, that it wasn’t until I was a teenager that I questioned its origin or how weird it was (There’s a story there). I loved when she simply called me “Pij” for short.

      She wouldn’t EVER swear. One time while driving a group of my teenaged friends someplace she asked if anyone had been to a local restaurant – The Pheasant Plucker. Except she reversed the beginning sounds of the words and said, “Pleasant F****r” instead. 15 years later, we still sometimes say, “Have you ever been to the Pheasant Plucker?” (Always taking GREAT care to prounounce it properly ; ).

      I look nothing like my mom and am the spitting image of my dad. When meeting people for the first time, my mom would introduce us and say, “This is my daughter. She’s pretty like her dad,” or “She looks like her dad in drag.” Horrifying when you’re a 12-year-old, but endearing to me now.

      Thanks for this post. I’ve loved reading the comments and thinking about my mom’s funny sayings.

      • Luna says...

        I like “Pij”.

        I call our youngest son, Bum Bum, because for 2 years he loved running around butt naked.

      • Sara says...

        Luna! My nickname is Bum Bum (short for Bully Bum Bum, sometimes further shortened to just Bum 😂). Both my parents called me that growing up but now only my dad does (my mom usually calls me Sav, which sounds different in her Danish accent than how it’s spelled). I’m so used to it I don’t really notice but sometimes when we’re out somewhere and get a side-eye I remember how weird of a name it is (especially since I’m 31 now). Apparently I used to say “bum bum!” when I fell down while first learning to walk. The “bully” is supposedly because I would (literally) butt heads with my dad all the time as a toddler and thought it was hilarious. So happy to hear about another Bum Bum out in the world!

      • Luna says...

        Aw, thank you Sara.

        It’s so sweet to know that an adult doesn’t mind it so much. Our son is now 7yo and still enjoys hearing it, but not in front of his Classmates. If I accidentally call him Bum Bum in public he will flash me THE LOOK but quickly come up to me and snuggle me.

      • Joanna Goddard says...

        we still call my cousins “bear” and “squirmy” and they’re in their mid 30s. i love a lifelong nickname :)

    48. Jenna says...

      Oh boy. I have recently unconsciously adopted some of my mom’s Canadian maritime-isms (“frozen stiff as a tommy cod” and “better than a kick in the arse with a frozen boot” are a couple of standouts). They get some funny reactions when they slip out now, but I remember being so mortified by my mom when she would say them when I was a teen. Looking forward to carrying on the family legacy ;)

      • KKRvF says...

        Cape Bretoner here: “Jesus Wept”, “Useless as tits on a Nun”. And many, many, more

    49. Kate says...

      My mom used to have us list what we supposed to avoid doing in public, on her hand. To this day, my sister and I know them in order by heart: Baby chatter, controversy, screaming, fighting, and personal comments. For years growing up my sister would look at people and ask: “are you making a personal comment at me?” :) :)

      • Amy says...

        This is amazing!

    50. Laura says...

      My favorite thing my mom used to say – every time we pulled up at the house after being out she’d say, “Home Crap Home!” (as in Home Sweet Home), from that old Tom Hanks movie The Money Pit. I realized I wanted some sort of welcome sign for my mudroom the other day and I’m totally making a ‘Home Crap Home’ sign now.

      • Luna says...

        My Husband and I loved “The Money Pit”. I will use it and see if he remembers where that line came from.

    51. Alyssa says...

      I’m not a parent but I absolutely am my mom. And because she’s an amazing person, I’m good with that!

      I realized one day that I was judging kids running around without coats and I literally heard my own judgment as the same things my mom said growing up. I laughed, realizing that I’m becoming her after all!

    52. My dad and I had a call and response *every night* at tuck-in:
      Night, night
      Sleep, tight
      Don’t let
      The bedbugs bite
      If’in they do
      Get a shoe
      And knock them
      BLACK AND BLUE! BOINK!

    53. Erin says...

      My mom said “Giddy up, Trixie!” when she wanted us to get moving. Trixie was the name of her childhood horse.

      • Courtney Mathew says...

        I giggled, what a great horses name and Mum!

    54. Amber says...

      This is so great! I’m excited (and quite nervous) to see what I do when I start parenting this baby. <3

    55. janine says...

      Oh my goodness, I can relate… I actually JUST wrote a humorous essay for a local publication about how I’m turning into my mom because I can’t remember any names of movies.

      • Samantha says...

        I don’t know who sings anything now a days! Just like my parents lol

      • Luna says...

        Movies, I’m good.
        Songs, lost on Year & Performers Names.

        But for my Husband, it’s reverse.

    56. Ellen says...

      Hee hee, this is a fun thread. “LORD LOVE A DUCK” was my mom’s token phrase of exasperation. Also, “I’ll bet you dollars to doughnuts [that something will happen]” and “Ok kids, it’s time for B-E-Double D!” Not sure why she was spelling it “bedd”? If we had strict orders to go straight to a destination, she’d say “Do not pass go, do not collect $200.”

      • Laura says...

        Haha! Your mom was a trip. How can I incorporate LORD LOVE A DUCK into my daily life!?

      • Ellen says...

        @Laura, “Lord love a duck!” pairs well with a nice slap to the forehead. Any time you find yourself wanting to say “Oh, what the fuck!”, you can say this instead. For example, “Lord love a duck, did I leave my wallet at home AGAIN?” or “Lord love a duck, this room is a PIG STY!”

      • Luna says...

        Instead of… What the f***!
        I say… What the fudge!

        But happy to use… Lord love a duck.

    57. Kristie says...

      I love this! Whenever we would complain about something being unfair/bad, my dad would say “better than a poke in the eye with a burnt stick!”. Whenever my 4 brothers would make gross jokes and erupt in laughter my mum’s voice would come floating through the house “Are you being rude?” She also sings good morning in an outrageously cheerful voice, and I find I do the same to my preschool class :)

      • Jamie says...

        Haha, my mom says “better than a sharp stick in the eye” :)

    58. Hanging out in bookstores has got to be one of life’s loveliest small pleasures :-)

    59. Carol says...

      These are so funny to read!
      My dad was always worried about us being impertinent or arrogant, so some of his favourites were “don’t push your luck” or “don’t you get smart with me,” and “you’re getting too big for your boots,” all of which could be emphasised with a sharp “missy” at the end.
      My nanna, who is English, had some funny expressions like “close your mouth, you could drive a lorry through it,” and whenever she was driving and another driver did something stupid, she would yell “you bloody prawn!”

    60. When I was little, I was a very active child and battled to fall asleep at night. My mom would tell me to just ‘lie down, close my eyes and have a little rest,’ and then I could play again if I wanted to. As a child I found this so comforting – I didn’t have to sleep (which I rebelled against), I just needed a quick rest! Invariably, I would drift off.

      I found myself telling my very active son this the other day, and realised while doing it that it was a ruse all along. I called my mom and told her I am finally onto her tricks after all these years!

      • Agnes says...

        Oh my gosh, hahaha this is my dad! If we ever couldn’t sleep, he would say, ‘It doesn’t matter, just rest your eyes!’ and we would always fall asleep. I have no stress around falling asleep to this day :)

    61. Laura says...

      As a kid, whenever I had friends over to the house to play, my dad used to ask them ridiculous questions to get to know them- “So, Susan, are you married? Any kids?”. He managed to keep a straight face. The look on these 7 or 8 year olds faces was usually pure confusion. He thought he was hilarious of course. Or he’d make up a pun on the spot like “Nice to meet you Lydia, is your last name Bin?”. My friends would look at him, then look at me as if to say “is there something wrong with your dad?”.
      Recently I found myself doing this too. Just like my Dad, I’m the only one in the room laughing. Learned from the best, I guess.

      • Carrie says...

        hahah this truly made me laugh out loud!

      • Eliza says...

        Hahaha! I love this.