Design

Four Great Things

Mini pizzas

Last Friday, we made pizza with the boys. Toby put pineapple on his, and sweet Anton went with anchovies because he wanted to be like Daddy but then realized he definitely did not like anchovies. Next up, I’d love to make mini ones with lots of different toppings. Eggs! Broccoli! Avocado!

Everlane underwear

Digging this new underwear made with supima cotton grown in the United States. They’re super soft and comfortable, and I like the pale pink. (P.S. An underwear trick.)

How to negotiate your salary

Nine words to avoid when negotiating your salary. Spoiler alert: Never say “sorry.”

Naomi Wadler

Edna Chavez

Most of all, bravo to the brave young people — including 11-year-old Naomi Wadler and Edna Chavez — who spearheaded the March for Our Lives. Here’s how to keep helping.

P.S. More fun things, and what are you reading?

(Top photo by i am a food blog.)

  1. Katie says...

    My Everlane undies and bodysuit are coming this weekend, and i cant wait!!

  2. Shaz says...

    Jo, it is so great to see you finally include a photo of a non-skinny woman! Pleeeeease include more diversity in size and shape in the future.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh yes!!! we work really hard to portray and celebrate different body shapes and sizes and have done so in the past, too. we’ll keep doing more! thank you so much xoxo

  3. Carrie says...

    The wonderful folks at Everlane need to include larger sizes! Those beautiful models seem a bit ….token-y without the sizes to back them up.

    • Em says...

      I’ve given this topic some serious thought lately and I disagree with you respectfully. Instead of every company trying to advertise to every size and shape, they should focus narrowly on the actual size and shape for whom their clothes are made. I myself am a seamstress and I know my body very well, I don’t want every store to cater to me because that’s unrealistic. Instead, I want to know the actual couple of brands and stores that cater to my body- short, high waisted, ample room in the butt. To try to accommodate everyone, while it’s a great ad campaign for diversity and acceptance, it’s not a great ad to sell clothes for specific sizes if in fact your clothes can’t accoomdate those sizes and shapes. My advice to any company would be to specialize and take advantage of the global economy since you can now specialize and get a substantial group within that specialized shape and size range.

  4. Those mini pizzas would be so deadly! I think I’d eat 10xs more pizza if they were bite-sized. I wonder why that it?!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      same with bite-sized candy :)

  5. I love all of the discussion that often happens on your blog’s posts, Joanna! This is one blog where I never feel anxious about reading the comments and actually look forward to it!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      so glad, amanda!!

  6. Katherine says...

    Very uplifting and needed. I feel reassured and inspired. speaking of great experiments. Two ingredient bread (self-rising flour + Greek yogurt)?! I am going to investigate.

  7. Beth A. says...

    Naomi lives across the street from me and goes to school with my daughter. So awesome!

  8. Alison says...

    I read The War That Saved My Life to myself and then again right away to my 11 year old twins. It was equally stunning the second time. It is a must read for all. Absolute perfection.

  9. Beth says...

    In the same vein as salary/job related advancement. I recently came across this article written by Pamela Anderson-Brulé. She is the co-founder of an architecture firm in San Jose, that I have worked with over the past few years. This article gave me great fuel and game-planning strategies for talking to my firm principles about my next steps/role in the firm. http://aba-arch.com/about/news/article/34 I hope others can find it as valuable as I did!

  10. DIANA says...

    Sorry Everlane,
    I do not wish to lead the revolution wearing my 4th grade Jockey training bra. Y’all sure put a lot of marketing into trying to sell women a real average bra and panty set and shame us out of our La Perla….

    • Anna says...

      SERIOUSLY. I appreciate that they are using a variety of body types to model it. But that bra (sized S/M/L not band/cup, and no underwire or adjustable parts) would be useless on me and I think, the majority of women. Hard pass.

    • Claire says...

      LOL!

    • Lisa says...

      As someone who generally dislikes extra padding and pushing up, I was intrigued by what they were going to offer. Would it be akin to Negative Underwear (which I love!). I think the Everlane bra is worthless except for wearing around the house and why bother?! What a disappointment.

    • Em says...

      Hahah. That made me laugh, Diana.

  11. Tanith says...

    The whole Everlane new underwear campaign has been infuriating to say the least. Their marketing campaign is the worst I’ve seen in years; it starts out by insulting anyone who is not an A-cup, plain-underwear wearing person. They bash padding as if it’s something that is there as an insult to your breasts, and if you happen to be most comfortable in lace or bows, you’re a victim of “bullshit”.

    I was afraid I was alone in this, and then I saw Annabel Ly’s twitter posts (she used to work for Everlane, and is a fashion blogger who works in lingerie, and I also found her from Cup of Jo years ago!) I highly recommend you read her comments about it on Twitter: https://twitter.com/annabelaly

    She went on to voice her criticism to Everlane and they responded by thinking she was criticizing them defining femininity, but it’s not that at all, it’s about how the marketing team decided to kick off their underwear lines by insulting anyone who feels comfortable in something other than what they designed. Then, after she posted her conversation with them, Everlane went on social media to post only the positive reactions to their release (something I have noticed they have done to many product lines in the past, ignoring any criticisms). I love some of Everlane’s clothes, but their marketing team acted like a bunch of “mean girls” from high school with this and it’s been infuriating to see them continue to push it as if everyone is pleased as punch.

    As a woman who wears a 36 D, and who lost weight long ago, only to have less than perky boobs because of that weight-loss, I can say that I only feel comfortable in padded bras. It’s not bullshit, it’s the truth.

    • Em says...

      THIS. Thank you for sharing.

    • Meghan says...

      I don’t understand how they are using a plus sized model… yet… I can’t get plus-sized undies?

    • Agreed, 100%!! I used to respect them as a company, but after this, I just can’t. I left a comment on their Instagram which I will repeat here:

      Proper bras require both a band and cup size, which theirs do not have, they’re essentially crop tops. Everlane think they’re being so edgy with their “No bows, no frills, no bullshit” tagline, but the stuff they deem as “bullshit” is 100% needed for anyone who isn’t completely flat chested. The blurb on the website is also insanely hypocritical – “Underwear should be made for you. But for decades, it’s been designed with someone else in mind” – their underwear definitely has been made for someone else in mind – flat chested girls only. They have excluded everyone else.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      I agree about the bras/marketing copy. I’m flat chested, but I still need padding so my nipples don’t show through. I’m also a feminist who appreciates lace, frills and bows! Their marketing here seemed tone deaf, especially in this day and age.

      Still — the basic underwear is really well done and well priced. overall, everlane seems to be a great company with great practices; they treat their employees well and run their factories with care. personally, i’ll chalk this one up to a misstep, which everyone has once in a while.

    • Tess Williams says...

      Agreed!!! I still love Everlane’s clothes, but this overall trend away from underwire/padding/lace/bows has swung too far in the other direction, in my opinion- isn’t the whole point that every woman should be able to wear what makes her feel good? Even if that is a push up, underwire, lacy bra??? Not me, btw, #sportsbrasforever, but “empowerment” as a marketing tool is something we should all be so much more suspicious of.

    • Em says...

      Spot on with the mean girls comment. It turns me off of the brand too :-/

    • Tanith says...

      I agree, Joanna, I think this was, straight-up, a misstep by the marketing team. The damage is that their ads perpetuating this sort of “this is how you should like it” for their brand is exactly what makes people feel insecure about themselves. I’ll definitely give them more chances, but I wish they would acknowledge when they’ve made mistakes in a few their marketing campaigns, since a lot of what they do is excellent business practice.

    • MANDY says...

      AMEN TANITH!

  12. Everyone is saying ‘bravo’ to the leaders of the March For Our Lives. I think this creates a risk that we trivialise this teenage led action. We say Bravo to performers, let’s say thanks to our leaders. let’s say thanks that they are leading the country. Thanks for their leadership. Thanks for their bravery. Thanks for their incredible inspiring words and actions that are motivating people across America to rise up. ‘Thanks’ acknowledges that they are having an impact on us. I sure hope they are.

    • Amanda G says...

      THIS! Such an important distinction.

    • Sasha says...

      Well said and good point. Thank you to these brave young people for leading the way. And thank you to the leaders of black lives matter as well, who have been calling for reform for gun laws and an acknowledgement of gun violence and the toll taken on black communities for a long time.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i have to say, i completely disagree here. bravo is high, high praise: an “exclamation used to express approval when a performer *or other person* has done something well.” i’ve said “bravo” many times about other role models and thought leaders, as well, of all ages. i agree that words are important, and “bravo” is a good one! thank you is another good word, but it doesn’t make bravo less impactful or meaningful here.

  13. Emily says...

    I have such a hard time with the salary negotiation topic. The one time I asked for a (well-deserved, long-overdue) raise, my boss laughed at me. Things got a little emotional and I eventually told him that if he wasn’t willing to consider it, I’d be looking for another job. His response? “Just some career advice from a man who’s been at this for 25 years longer than you. Never give your boss an ultimatum.” It’s been 10 years and I’ve since left that job and started two successful businesses. But that one still burns. It’s one thing to rally and advise women to step it up (of course that’s 100% on us, right? Ugh…) But please let’s be real, because I suspect what happened to me is what actually happens a lot. What are we seriously supposed to do about this?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      omg that makes me so mad at your former boss, emily! you weren’t giving him an ultimatum (what a dramatic word to use on his part). you were honestly and straightforwardly telling him what your walk-away point would be. that’s what business IS. you were completely professional to give him that information.

      i’m going to scout for more articles that talk about these issues. have you seen the site Ask a Manager? she is great and features lots of real questions/situations: http://www.askamanager.org/

    • Claire says...

      I think that articles like these assume a work culture that is not reality for most people. They make it sound so simple: all you have to do is say these magic words, or not say them, depending, and then you’ve got a bingo! But in real life there are too many other variables, like whether the person you are trying to negotiate with is a jerk, or whether there is any money in the budget for raises, etc. Congrats to you on going on to create 2 successful businesses (so awesome!!) and here’s to forging your own path.

    • DIANA says...

      Oh I’m so sorry, I really feel you on this one. It took me so long to even begin to be comfortable with asking for a raise. I found that negotiations only really worked for me when in my heart of hearts I felt OK walking away from a job that wouldn’t say yes to my request (or at least compromise). I wasn’t “putting it all out on the line” by asking my boss for more money, I was going in to gauge how valuable my boss thought I was. If my boss did not see the value (that I know I have), then this job is simply not for me and I’d start to consider my options (I know that not everyone has other options). This way, even a rejection would merely put me in better position for a brighter future.

      Framing it this way made me feel more confident asking and made me less emotional about the interaction. Also, there’s a great book out there: Secrets of Six Figure Women, that really opened my eyes. I only read a few chapters, but even just the tone is so empowering. It made me realize that I have no chance of being happy in a job that pays less than what I am worth.

      Sending you love!

    • Rashmik says...

      I stopped reading at point number one – don’t disclose your Salary!?!? I work for a bank and at the time of applying for any job, in this industry, you MUST state your current salary and the expectation. And I don’t see which industry will hire someone without having a look at their salary slips.

    • All the Ughhhhs for that boss. Negotiating your career / salary is a tricky subject for all women. We never learnt how to own our worth, let alone communicate it in an effective way. If we ask for more, we fear being seen as greedy etc. But the reality is that most of what holds us back is between our ears. That’s exactly why I made this presentation, that delves deep into the mindset changes we need to make in order to get the paid what we deserve: http://www.winwebinar.org. And you can join my FB group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/womeninnegotiationwin/ for tips and strategies and FB lives and allllll the fun!

    • Emily says...

      Thanks for the resource! I’m starting to hire my own staff now and will definitely bookmark this — I don’t want to repeat the mistakes of my past, terrible managers!

    • Em says...

      Oooff, that was bitter to read. I hope you can laugh at his false ego instead of letting his comment get to you. Just remember that people in a superior position at work are still human and can say mean and/or dumb things but it doesn’t mean that they are actually superior. Their ego usually comes from their position in the hierarchy within the company.

    • Nina says...

      I agree. It’s so out of touch with reality.

      I had a job I quit – all the men were making more than double my salary with less education and experience and I didn’t quit over money but because they treated me poorly. and they were like “we’ll double your salary” and at that point it was WAYYYYYYY TOOO LATE!

      I do freelance writing and I hear all the time that women don’t negotiate. Yeah, because we are seen as bitches if we do. And we get told “we can get someone cheaper.” I read an article yesterday about leadership in Norway, all women. You know what they said “we aren’t trying to make this a female led culture, it just happened.” when the fuck has that ever been said about men. NEVER. No one questions when men are leading but when women are it’s something to talk about and dismiss and say “when we get men in here we’ll all be happier.” why is that?

      This really makes me annoyed that we are still at this place. and its okay to oh so many people.

  14. Joanna, this blog is one of my favorite things about the internet. Somehow you always tap the pulse of the spectrum of things that matter. Thank you.

    P.S. The first time I read the underwear trick, I totally slapped my forehead too. It had always been one of those needling little problems that took up too much brain space. Now I treat myself to a dozen pairs of black underwear in my favorite style whenever they start getting tatty. It streamlines my daily uniform and does something satisfying for my mental health I can’t quite put a finger on. I love it! I share it with girlfriends anytime the subject of undies shopping comes up! ☺️☺️☺️

  15. Em says...

    Would love some advice about how to bounce back after a failed negotiation. I asked for a raise at work last year (nonprofit worker here) and it did not go well. I was turned down and found the whole experience rather demoralizing. So what next? A lot of the articles frame it as if the problem is just doing your research and asking, but I would love to see ideas about how to deal with various outcomes.

    • Mara says...

      Em, I come from the nonprofit world myself, so I know how difficult it is. What I suggest is going to your supervisor for a serious discussion about your goals in this role and what it would take to reach your desired salary. Bring ALL your research and talking points along — have more information than necessary, including data on the average salary in your industry, for you level of experience and education. A supervisor can’t dispute facts like those. It may be that you need to take on more responsibility until then, and prove to your supervisor that you’re indispensable. Once evaluation time rolls around, make your case again for the raise.

    • Dear Em, so sorry to hear you had this discouraging encounter. Please don’t let it stop you from negotiating your worth in the future! And also please don’t let the assumption “I am in non-profit and therefore am inherently limited in my earning power” hold you back either! I hear this so often in my FB group Women In Negotiation (which focuses exactly on this subject) and it’s utter BS. My clients have done very well negotiating their roles and salaries in education / non-profits / government agencies / start-ups! Please watch this webinar on the subject – it will be absolutely worth your time, I promise: http://www.winwebinar.org!

  16. Hannah says...

    My best friend and I attended a salary negotiation workshop at our college this year put on by AAUW. I learned so many great strategies that made me feel empowered to know my worth and speak up for myself. The volunteer who led the workshop commented that it is such an important skill to know as a college senior because your first salary can affect lifetime earnings. Knowledge is power!

    • Couldn’t agree more! Being a negotiatior vs shying away from negotiating your worth can make a difference that ranges between the hundreds of thousands and MILLIONS of dollars over the course of your career (due to the fun effect of compound interest). I am so glad you took that course. It is my personal mission to kill the gender pay gap and negotiating your worth is the first step for women! If you want, join my FB group http://www.facebook.com/groups/womeninnegotiationwin/

  17. Morgan says...

    The underwear model featured here is everything. Everything.

  18. Heather D says...

    Love that Everlane is using real, non-super skinny women to model their clothing, but I wish it came in a sizes bigger than XL! Can we petition them?! lol

    • Meghan says...

      Exactly… I was excited to see this model… and was hugely disappointed when I couldn’t get my size.. :/

  19. Andrea says...

    I loved all the signs at the March for Our Lives NYC! There were so many of them and they packed a punch! A veritable sea of handmade posters! You could tell that people had often thought long and hard about their signs. I feel like there is so much pent up anger around our casual acceptance of a deadly gun culture in the US that the March has helped unleash.

    FWIW, my husband thinks the March for Our Lives was sponsored by Michael’s, since everyone and their brother seemed to be queuing up for sign supplies when he went.

  20. Denise says...

    I’ve never tried egg on pizza. In theory it sounds pretty good, might be worth a try, but I’m a die-hard pineapple & cheese pizza fan. Toby has good pizza taste! And YES to the black underwear all the time. In books: I just finished sci-fi gold. Bourne by Jeff Vandermeer is fantastic and everyone should read it. Now I’m reading something totally different so as not to spoil the last read or compare. It’s called Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun by Sarah Ladipo Manyika. I’m liking it SO much and it’s a nice short one so it’s a literary sweet treat like eating an ice cream treat on a sunny day. Yay books!

    • Andrea says...

      Otto in NYC has a savory cheese pizza (thin crust, thin, salty cheese) that they top with an egg and then broil until the white is set and the yolk still runs. When you cut the pizza, the yolk runs out and is amazing with the salty cheese.

    • Lane says...

      Ooh, tell me about Bourne!

  21. Mara says...

    As someone currently applying for jobs, my biggest pet peeve is when salary negotiating articles like this Fast Company one don’t address the fact that most job applications these days require you to enter a desired salary, or you cannot continue with the application. Literally 30 minutes ago, I filled in a desired salary was that $30K below my ACTUAL desired salary (!), just so that their algorithm “notices” me. My hope is, if I’m asked to come interview and the process goes far for me, that I can then negotiate a much higher salary (close to real desired). I hate lying like this, but, man, it’s still so difficult to be “seen,” given that so many employers large and small have online application systems and algorithms that quickly weed people out. I’ve heard from recruiters that skipping a number and entering “flexible” or “negotiable” instead is a quick way to get eliminated. I wish the article’s author had a comment section so that I could submit one similar to this!

    • Claire says...

      Yes, I agree. This article seems really out of touch to me too.

    • Laura says...

      ah same! I’m so discouraged by job applications. Is there any article out there that helps outsmart the “desired salary” field? It’s so vague, yet probably very critical if being considered.

    • Vanessa says...

      Not sure what state you are in – or if you’re in the US even – but more and more states are making it illegal for employers to ask candidates about their salary histories (NY and CA I know for sure, more coming this year and 2019)….this includes online forms. Definitely check!

      It’s a positive step in the right direction aimed to mitigate against that cycle of inequity/discrimination that perpetuates lower salaries and will hopefully get more employers thinking about paying based off skill/qualifications/market competitiveness.

    • DIANA says...

      Ugh I know! When I read that I was like “That’s on every page of every clipboard in every HR office!!!” NYC just passed a law making it illegal for a company to ask what your current/former salary is/was. That’s pretty cool. In my last negotiation within my current company, I told my boss that I felt constrained by the salary I came in with and that I would like to be compensated in proportion to my value to the company, rather than as a percentage of what I already make. I was shocked, but it worked and my salary jumped to slightly above the average for my position.

    • The issue here is that in states where the “past salary” question has been banned (THANK GOD!), the question has simply become “what is your desired salary”, as was the case in the OP’s situation. However, when asked for our desired salary, we tend to self-censor as we don’t want to take ourselves out of the competition before the game has started.

      My general advice when job hunting, is to not go down the online form route. The chances of actually getting a job that way are slim, plus you have to deal with all that online form crap. So here’s what i’d recommend you do instead: if you see a job you love, call up the company and ask to speak to the hiring manager directly. You get boatloads of information, that you can use to tailor your cover letter accordingly, then send it by email to that person. Et voila: you’re on top of the pile with the perfect letter, escaping algorithms entirely. Second piece of advice: start digging for roles in your network. It has been estimated that 90% of the job market is hidden, ie not advertised. Find companies you love, where you’d be thrilled to work. Check your network to see who works there or has contacts there, ring them up and FEED THEM. You think i am kidding? i am not. take them out for lunch. People love being fed. And they’ll talk. So you learn if this is indeed the environment for you. perhaps they’ll even know about opportunities there. if not, ask them for the three people they think you should meet in their networks, plus contact details. Rinse and repeat with those. Within weeks, you’ve bagged yourself a host of opportunities, REAL opportunities, not algorithm-based ones. Hope this helps! Thinking of doing a webinar on this in my Women In Negotiation FB group soon – thoughts? https://www.facebook.com/womeninnegotiationwin/

  22. Lenneke says...

    I just wat to say hi from the Netherlands! I love your blog and all the lovely inspiring things that you point out to me! Xx

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      hi lenneke! that is the sweetest, thank you :) nice to meet you!

  23. Kirsten says...

    We always had homemade pizza night growing up and my dad always put anchovies on his pizza (also, carrots, but that baffles me to this day)! When we got a bit older than your boys my brother and I would compete to see who could eat a whole one in one bite without spitting it out, Fear Factor style. We found them so disgusting! I will say, however, that now that I’m grown I actually really like them. Maybe dad-exposure has a long term effect or something–I don’t think I would ever have thought to try them all on my own!

  24. Tanya P says...

    What a joy to see Everlane employing models of varying sizes and shapes! Thank you for bringing attention to them!

    My son and I are reading Farmer Boy by Laura Ingalls Wilder right now and it’s reigniting the desire for land and farm animals and a bearded husband who makes shingles!

    • sonja says...

      we are currently reading farmer boy to my boys before bedtime as well… and also dreaming of urban farming etc! <3

  25. Lisa says...

    I find this house example so helpful for salary negotiations. You bought your house for $200k two years ago; the market exploded and the house is now worth $400k. You wouldn’t entertain an offer of $250k simply because you’ve only been in the house a short time; you would refocus your counter on the market.Do your research on asking for money. Base your request on the market and think of your own value based on the market.

    Re books, I found The Power so thought-provoking; also loved Motherest. About to start Little Fires.

    • I like that house analogy! Especially as someone working in the LA area…it’s like, I don’t care if I’ve been here for only a year, I need to be able to pay my rent!

  26. Em says...

    I picked up Little Fires Everywhere on Sunday because it was on one of your book lists. I’ve been wanting to read a really great book before my second baby arrives in April (haven’t read anything but a baby sleep book since my son was born 2 years ago!). I was worried I would hate it, or wouldn’t have time…but I’m really loving it!! I’ve been reading while my son plays with his trucks, and I’m already halfway through. I read somewhere it’s good for your children to see you read your own books so I feel like I’m just doing him a favor ; )

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      “I read somewhere it’s good for your children to see you read your own books so I feel like I’m just doing him a favor ; )” = love that!

    • Hilary says...

      YES! I’m a middle school teacher so I obviously work with older kids, but we’re really working on creating a culture of reading. A large struggle we’re having is that parents aren’t modeling reading for their kids. Our kids need to see that adults read, both for pleasure and maybe also for work/professional development. So many parents come to us asking how to make their kids into “a reader” and that’s always our first tip. They need to see that people just read. Regularly! For pleasure!

  27. Lisa Gray says...

    Among my favorites since the new year is a book called I Found My Tribe by Ruth Fitzpatrick. Her prose and story inspire me to daydream and to say and do what I need when I need it and to make no apologies. Among the many jewels in the book is this:

    “”My very best friend in the world is a tree. Hello, Tree. Tree is a beautiful birch. She sits outside my window. Her boughs rattle in winter and sway in spring. Tree is also a she because I need her to be. We share deep thoughts over coffee. ‘Shhh! Momma is talking to her tree!’ my five ducklings hiss. They creep in and fold themselves around me but know not to interrupt. I have trained my ducklings well. Daydreaming is a valued skill in our home. Dare to interrupt it. ‘Momma, you just broke an important daydream,’ Raife, my eight-year old will scold. ‘Sorry, I will say, with real regret.”

    • Sasha says...

      Lisa, this book sounds wonderful!! Thank you for the excerpt and recommendation, it’s going on my list.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that’s beautiful, lisa.

  28. Sarah says...

    Tiny pizzas are fun! Growing up my mom used English muffins to make individual pizzas for a quick lunch. Easy to accommodate different tastes. I keep a bag of English muffins frozen now for when I need a fast lunch for my son before naptime. (Or myself, let’s be honest.)

    • Sasha says...

      Adding these to my preschool menu! I think they will be a hit.

    • Katherine says...

      I grew up eating tiny personal pizzas using English Muffins but about a month ago when I wanted to make some, I didn’t have any on hand, so I used naan from the farmers market and they were PHENOM. Still small and personalized and the thin crust was just perfect!

  29. Elisabeth says...

    Thank you for highlighting the inspiring young women of March for Our Lives.

    • Jenna says...

      LOL loved the whole thing! My favorite was the “woman power activate!” I’m definitely gonna start using that with my husband :D