Food

Weeknight Dinner, Solved.

One-Pot Baked Veggies and Halloumi

That crisp, fall air is finally here, and so is the craving for comfort food with extra cheese. So, to continue our month of weeknight dinners, we’re sharing this baked vegetable and halloumi dish from the new cookbook Mr & Mrs Wilkinson’s How it Is at Home. It’s delicious, savory and only requires one pot. Here’s how to make it…

Baked Veggies and Halloumi
From Matt Wilkinson and Sharlee Gibb’s Mr & Mrs Wilkinson’s How it Is at Home

We love this dish, as there’s very minimal prep involved but it tastes delicious. Below is a guide for vegetables and amounts but you can really use whatever veggies you already have at home that roast well and fill up your baking tray. I like to make sure there is a variety of color and that the veggies are all cut into roughly the same size so that everything cooks evenly.

Recipe: Baked Veggies and Halloumi
Serves 4

You’ll need:

3 potatoes
1 sweet potato
2 cups squash
1/4 cauliflower head, outer leaves removed
1 carrot
1 zucchini
3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 tsp salt flakes
2 garlic cloves, skin on and crushed
1 rosemary sprig
9 oz haloumi, cut into thin slices

Preheat the oven to 350F.

Cut all the veggies into rough 1–2 inch chunks, then throw them into a large ovenproof dish. Drizzle over the oil, add the salt, garlic and rosemary and mix everything together with your hands to ensure the veggies are evenly coated in the oil.

Transfer the dish to the oven and bake for 40 minutes, then lay the halloumi strips over the veggies and bake for a further 15–20 minutes, or until the vegetables are cooked through and the halloumi is crisp and golden. Divide among plates and serve as is or drizzled with pesto.

Thank you so much Matt and Sharlee! Your new cookbook is lovely.

P.S. More recipes, including sweet potato minestrone, and baked eggs on roasted tomatoes.

(Recipe excerpted with permission from Mr & Mrs Wilkinson’s How it Is at Home by Matt Wilkinson and Sharlee Gibb, published by Hardie Grant Books October 2017. Photo by Patricia Niven. This series is edited by Stella Blackmon.)

  1. Nieves Schehl says...

    When we first got married I roasted garlic cloves for a snack when my husband walked in from work. He walked in part way, then hurriedly backed out. My husband as it turns out was a garlic hater from way back! He didn’t like Parmesan cheese either. I sprinkled it on my half of the lasagna and he wouldn’t eat it because the cheese “touched” his half. Other than that, he put up with all my antics!

  2. Sandra says...

    I just tried halloumi for the first time and is it just me or does it taste exactly like Wisconsin cheese curds? Yum, but I was cracking up!

  3. My kids are crazy about halloumi and I have been making a version of this dish for the last few months. I serve it with tzatziki, pesto or hummus or some other quick dip/sauce to tempt them to eat their veggies…

  4. Karine says...

    I am surprised that this recipe doesn’t mention soaking the halloumi in water first to get rid of some of the salt. Since this cheese was eaten by nomads in the desert, it has A LOT of salt in it for preservation purposes, but no one needs to eat that much salt in one sitting. I cut the cheese into 1 cm (about half an inch) slices and soak them for a few hours before grilling them. The cheese is still salty, just not artery-hardening slaty. I never tried roasting it but this recipe looks awesome I’ll definitely try it this weekend.

  5. Beth says...

    I tried this tonight on a whim and all I can say is YUM! I forgot the potatoes (oops!) but it still was so tasty. I subbed dried rosemary for the sprig and it’s just fine. And it’s my first foray into cooking with halloumi – so easy and good!

  6. For all you Brooklyn locals, I used to be a waitress at Miriam in Park Slope, and they have a delicious haloumi salad on the menu. It’s what I picked every night for my staff meal!

  7. Mimi says...

    Trader Joe’s sells sliced halloumi and I happen to have a package in the fridge. Will be trying this soon!

  8. Great recipe!
    Just a note about the “Halloumi is also popular in Greece and the Mediterranean”, Halloumi is actually from the Mediterranean island of Cyprus ? if you get a chance to taste authentic Cypriot Halloumi you’ll enjoy and even more complex flavor that we Mediterraneans love ??

  9. Julia says...

    I make a variation on this recipe. Love it! It also works with sausages in the pan. And if you have left overs mix in a load of cous cous to bulk it out.

    • Katherine says...

      Ooh love the idea of adding sausages too! Thanks.

  10. Katie Larissa says...

    My husband would look at this and say “umm, where’s the meat?” Haha. But I will definitely make it as a side dish! I’m always eager for a new way to roast veggies. I’ve only tried halloumie once before, but I loved it.

  11. MrsD says...

    Googling haloumi……….

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, it’s the yummiest cheese — really melty and chewy and so, so good. i first discovered it when alex and i went to berlin a thousand years ago, and street carts were selling amazing halloumi sandwiches. excited for you to try it!

    • Sandra says...

      Ha ha…that was the first thing I did too. Hope I can find it near me! I am SO making this soon. Yum!

    • Jessica says...

      Could you sub this for a more common cheese?? My small town grocer has limited options.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      here are some ideas that might work, below — hope this helps!

      https://www.nigella.com/ask/substitutes-for-halloumi

      Halloumi is also popular in Greece and the Mediterranean area so if you have a Middle Eastern or Mediterranean deli locally it is worth trying there. It is also available in some Whole Foods stores… If you live near a Latin American store it may be worth trying Queso Para Frier (or “frying cheese”) or Queso Blanco. They have similar cooking qualities to halloumi and do not melt when heated so can be fried or grilled.

    • allison says...

      lol i thought the same thing.. i was like is that a fish?!

    • C.J. says...

      I find queso panela a very good substitute, if you are in Mexico or anywhere with a large Mexican community. It is less salty so you need to make sure to season the rest of the dish well when using this.

    • Talia says...

      I had to google it as well!

  12. Lily says...

    I love halloumi! Thanks for this recipe!

  13. AH this looks so easy and wonderful. And you can just throw in whatever extra veggies you have! Making this week.

  14. Elizabeth says...

    This looks *so* good and is perfect because I just got a block of halloumi from my Greek mother-in-law last week! I have what might be a rookie question, but I’m curious to hear the reasoning behind keeping the skin on the garlic cloves. Do you eat the skin once it’s roasted? Do you remove the garlic cloves before serving (like a bay leaf)? I’ve never come across something that involves eating garlic skin before, but I’m intrigued!

    • Hey Elizabeth, I was introduced to this not too long ago either and it’s so delicious – I don’t eat the skin (but perhaps you can?), I just kind of squeeze the garlic out of the skin (you can use the flat part of a knife to press it out) after it’s roasted. It gets deliciously soft and tastes amazing on toast! Ailish

    • I would also like to know this. I would think that leaving the skin on would hint at using it just for flavor?

    • Rona says...

      Hi Elizabeth – as someone who makes roasted veggies + garlic on a weekly basis, I feel somewhat qualified to answer your question. I would not advise eating the skin, but you definitely can eat the soft inside. For some people it is too strong a flavour, but I think it is delicious! So, go with whatever you think is tastiest :)

    • Meaghan says...

      Hi! I think of the skin as like a little steamer jacket. If you remove the skin, the garlic loses more moisture and becomes more crispy – also good. When you keep the skin on, it helps to keep the moisture in the garlic, making it more like a spread with a more rounded flavor profile. In a dish like this, you can spread the roasted garlic on the vegetables when you serve them for a deeper dish. And yes, you take the garlic out of the skin after it’s been roasted. I’ve never eaten the skin, I would think it would be too papery in texture (but not harmful overall).

    • Elizabeth says...

      Thank you all for your replies! That makes total sense – I loooooove roasted garlic (and love eating it plain too!) but couldn’t see how the skin would taste yummy. So appreciate the clarifications!

    • Elizabeth says...

      (Also Meaghan, “little steamer jacket” haha!)

    • Lisa says...

      There’s a restaurant near where I live that serves a whole roasted garlic with the ribeye steak, and as others have said – you just squeeze it out and treat it like a spread. Amazing! You get a very mellow flavour