1. Beautiful

  2. I also love “schadenfraude” from German meaning “damage joy” literally (I think) but referring to take joy in others’ misfortunes. Also “gezelligheid” from Dutch meaning coziness/welcoming/friendly – like walking into a warm café on a chilly afternoon.

  3. This is very interesting! made me think of Tagalog words that are untranslatable as well!

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  5. I love these. And the moments they are describing are awesome. Sun filtering through the trees? I love that.

  6. In Spanish we use “sobremesa” all the time and I never thought it doesn´t have an English translation. Great post!

  7. –> Waldeinsamkeit: I study German literature. Waldeinsamkeit is a key term in Romanticism (lit epoch). It was, for example, the favourite motif/subject of the poet Joseph von Eichendorff.
    Also Heinrich Heine wrote a poem with that title. Google it! :) Nowadays the word is not being used (in everyday language) anymore.

  8. –> Waldeinsamkeit: I study German literature. Waldeinsamkeit is a key term in Romanticism (lit epoch). It was, for example, the favourite motif/subject of the poet Joseph von Eichendorff.
    Also Heinrich Heine wrote a poem with that title. Google it! :) Nowadays the word is not being used (in everyday language) anymore.

  9. I love Japanese. I have this three words sentence always in my mind: Yokubara na mainichi, wchich means: Find and enjoy the small beauty around you day by day. Lovely, isn’t it?

  10. Great post. :) Romanian “DOR” it’s the feeling of missing someone. Also untranslatable.

  11. This is so fun! How silly.

    Thanks for sharing these types of things. Your blog always makes my day a little happier :)

  12. How about the Dutch word GEZELLIG.

    It’s so untranslatable that I’m not even sure how to explain it here! It’s an emotion – one we don’t recognize in English. It’s kind of like ‘fun’, kind of like ‘friendly’, kind of like ‘good company’, kind of like ‘better than being alone’, kind of like ‘cozy’. . . OR it can mean ‘a roaring good time’, ‘such a good night out’, etc. — it’s an expression of the opinion “I’m glad I know people and can enjoy being in the company of others – whether it was the super fun or even if it wasn’t that fun afterall”.

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  14. When referring to the light coming through the trees … we always refer to that as “dappled” light

  15. I am writting from Spain and we can the lovely word of “Sobremesa” but perhaps in my opinion the most beatiful word is “morriña” that mean you live in other place or country and you have a special sense of sicken for your family or place where you born.

  16. Aww I LOVE this. In Scotland we have the word ‘haver’ which means to talk nonsense, always found it funny that we have a specific word for that – think it’s inevitable in a country with so much whiskey!

    Suzanne

  17. Love this !

    As spanish, love sobremesas, they are the best part of meals!

  18. So funny to see all the comments about “saudade”. Something only brazilians say they “feel”. And as a brazilian living in the US, specially spending most of my time in residency, “saudade” is a very, very real word for me.
    Loved this post, always love your blog. Makes me company on call nights. :-)

  19. Hello, I’m from portugal and we also use the word ‘sobremesa’ but in my country sobremesa equals dessert :-)

  20. What a lovely lovely post. These really made me smile :) the illustrations are fantastic too!

  21. Such a great blog to be inspired and read.

    Kisses,
    Sofia

    stylishlyinlove.blogspot.com

  22. jm says...

    I think “la rentrée” in French may have come about because the tradition in France has been that almost everyone takes the month of August for their vacation. Big cities seem to empty, except for tourists, for example. So, in September there is a huge swell as everyone comes back and gets on with regular life! In the states people vacation for a week or two anytime during the summer. It is really only school that starts for everyone as a group in September (or late August).

  23. I love this. Especially the German word for taking a walk alone in the woods, one of my favorite things to do.

  24. There’s a word in French that doesn’t exist in English, and that I terribly miss every single time… It’s “la rentrée”. It designates the time, in early september (and which I guess extends to a undetermined amount of time – i’d say it stops at the end of september) when kids (and everyone in general) go back to school/work/their routine schedule, after the vacation. “Rentré” literally means to come back in. I know in English people say “back to school”, but it’s not quite as practical and concise !

  25. Tagalog (Filipino): Gigil
    Tagalog (Filipino): Kilig

    We, Filipinos, always have trouble explaining these two words to our foreign friends because we just cannot explain it.

    Gigil is basically the gritting of your teeth. For example, seeing an extremely adorable baby, and you just basically can’t control yourself but squeeze the heck of the baby because it is so darn cute.

    Kilig is more of like a giddy feeling, butterflies, overjoyed when you are in love or someone is trying to court you and you find them sweet so it gives you the ‘Kilig’ feeling.

    The Art Of Everyday | Twitter | Bloglovin | Instagram

  26. Dutch: gezellig

    cozy/friendly/comfortable/relaxing/enjoyable/gregarious…and everything inbetween! :)

  27. Love these, but this post is missing my favorite of all!

    (Japanese) arigata-maiwaku: An act someone does for you that you didn’t want to have them do and tried to avoid having them do, but they went ahead anyway, determined to do you a favor, and then things went wrong and caused you a lot of trouble, yet in the end social conventions required you to express gratitude.

  28. very interesting! and I like the word chosen for Spanish was “sobremesa”, such a wonderful enjoyable time!

  29. These are lovely and wonderful words. And when I first read just the title of this post, in my RSS feed, I got excited, thinking, hey, here’s a new illustration idea for me, as I do this Japanese folk art called etegami that combines words and images… only to find that this artist at Maptia has already done it! Bravo.

  30. I JUST spent a half hour laminating these for my classroom and first day of school tomorrow! (I’m an English teacher). I’m going to have the students also make up their own words of an ‘untranslatable’ idea, and invent a new word.

  31. I JUST spent a half hour laminating these for my classroom and first day of school tomorrow! (I’m an English teacher). I’m going to have the students also make up their own words of an ‘untranslatable’ idea, and invent a new word.

  32. Wouldn’t “culaccino” be a ring? You know, like..”use a coaster or you’ll leave a ring on the table!!!”
    And “jayus”….isn’t the English word “dad joke”? :)
    I do love these though, and the ones in everyone’s comments!

  33. This is so great. Oddly, though, “Inuit” is not a language.

  34. This is so fun! Here in Spain we have so many different ways of saying things. The amount of local expressions, the CONTINUOUS use of irony… It’s quite complex!

    The word that I use everyday that doesn’t have a translation is “madrugar”! It means “to get up early”. I guess I hate to “madrugar” so much that I miss having this word in English :D And my favorite English word without an easy translation would be “heartwarming”. I just find it so lovely and expressive! We have words with similar meanings but they can’t compare to the beauty of your word!

    Fun fact: Spanish doesn’t have a word for “toddler” either. For us, they are babies or children-nothing in between!

  35. This is so cool!

  36. This pin has made me smile multiple times. Who cares if no one has ever heard of them? Makes them more special and dreamy in my opinion :D

  37. it’s incredible, i was just going to talk about saudades. it’s the most beautiful word.

  38. Definitely missing saudades in Portuguese. Such a lovely word.

  39. “gezellig” in Dutch and “saudades” in Portuguese!

  40. That’s interesting, I’m italian and my grandpa use to call ‘culaccino’ the bottom (crusty) part of the bread. I bet it’s a tuscan word.

  41. there’s one special portuguese word missing in this list: “SAUDADE”
    It means the feeling of missing something or someone.

    I’m portuguese and we also use the word “sobremesa” to refer to the last dish you eat ina meal, like a chocolate mousse or a apple pie. Sobremesa it’s your dessert :-)

  42. They missed Saudade, a Portuguese word for that feeling you have when you say “I miss you” it’s a kind of longing, but different.

    You can feel saudade of someone, somewhere, something, anything!

    It’s both warm and sad. It brings good memories but also the certain that you’re not having it for a while.

    I can´t explain…

  43. I’m reading this as my kids are banging their corn on the cob on the table. It’s a total mess but this post is so cute I didn’t want to get up from my chair. Also I followed the link posted by another reader about the motherhood in italy post that was taken down. I loved it! Love the series. Keep’em coming!

  44. Here’s another one for you and its particularly beautiful. Its a Welsh word ‘hiraeth’, pronounced here-aye-th (with emphasis on the middle syllable). It means the longing or homesickness one feels for Wales, and all things Welsh. It is the deep yearning for a connection with the land of Wales. It is the ‘pull’ that draws one home. It is a mix of longing, nostalgia and wistfulness. All Welsh people understand the word hiraeth. Lovely isn’t it?

  45. I love these illustrations! Great minds think alike – I posted 11 favorite words that don’t exist in English a few months ago (http://the-wonderist.com/2013/05/29/wordsthatdontexistinenglish/)

    #9 on my list – I thought this was a uniquely Brooklyn phenomenon – Kaelling (Danish): You know that woman who stands on her doorstep (or in line at the supermarket, or at the park, or in a restaurant) cursing at her children? The Danes know her, too.

  46. Ha, ha, Google translate translates sobremesa as tabletop

    • It means that too. Sobre means over or on and mesa is the word for table. So it can mean on the table or refer to this conversation you have with someone after the meal is over. I think in English you would say, after dinner drink. I’m not sure.

  47. I also like Fernweh – the contemporary German equivalent for the “English” word wanderlust, (which means a desire to hike, specifically) Fernweh is used in the sense of “crave for travel”, literally meaning “an ache for distant places”. Beautiful!

    • yes, i wondered which german word is unique (i am german) and “fernweh” is totally unique! and on the contrary to “waldeinsamkeit” (wtf?!) it’s often used!

  48. Sobremesa is also the word for dessert in portuguese.

  49. Saudade definitely should be here! :)

  50. I love these! Thanks for sharing.

  51. Love this!

  52. I wonder which words are unique to English and are not translatable to other languages.

  53. In portuguese (I am Brazilian), we also have an untranslatable word: SAUDADE. It is the word for the feeling of missing someone you care ou love.

  54. These are fantastic!!!

  55. So intresting! I’m italian and I’ve never heard about the word “culaccino”… but I wish we had the word “sobremesa”!! It’s such an italian concept as well!

    Linda

  56. Funny post but definitely missing the Portuguese word “Saudade” which means missing someone or something so bad that it just presses your heart. Also though it was quite funny the meaning of “Sobremesa” as in Portuguese this means dessert :)

  57. These are great! There is also the portuguese word SAUDADES which is the feeling you have when you miss someone, it’s a very special word. Love, Ana

  58. I’m so surprised that “Jayus” is there. Jayus wasn’t even a word until probably early 2000s, and it is still a slang word (you wouldn’t find it in formal documents for sure). Legend has it, that a teacher at one of the top high schools in Jakarta, Mr. Djajusman (nicknamed “Jayus”) often makes corny jokes when teaching in his class. So, whenever someone makes unfunny or outdated jokes, the appropriate response is “Jayus…”. Somehow, this inside jokes leaked out from the school to the outside world, first Jakarta, and then the whole country. Source: I’m an Indonesian native speaker who grew up in Jakarta ;)

    • ok I’m indonesian, have heard of this word and I did not know of this legend hahaha but good to know!

  59. I saw that on Pinterest the other day and absolutely loved it! They are so fun. I love the “iktsuarpok.”

  60. what happened to the parenting in italy post that was up on monday? the mother featured had mentioned on her blog that it was scheduled to go live monday and it did but then disappeared! disappointed…

  61. My personal favorite is:

    Meraki: (pronounced may-rah-kee; Greek): Doing something with soul, creativity, or love. It’s when you put something of yourself into what you’re doing.

    That actually may the coolest word ever.
    -Angelina
    http://www.the360woman.blogspot.com

    • Mine too! It is actually the title of my blog :)

  62. There should be a word for the way sunlight filters through the trees in every language. It is such a lovely though.
    thekittchen.com

  63. As a spaniard I love the custom of “sobremesa” and I really miss it when visiting a foreign country! it is such a nice and pleasant moment, when the stomach is full with great food and you enjoy the companionship… I’m so happy it was included in this list!

  64. In Spanish we use “sobremesa” all the time and I never thought it doesn´t have an English translation. Great post!

  65. I have to disappoint you, but “Waldeinsamkeit” is not a word we actually use in Germany ;-)
    Practically is is a word. The translation is correct, too. But it’s simply not a word we use!

  66. Omgoodness! I love these… Sobremesa and Iktsuarpok are my new two favorite words

  67. Love these! They’re missing my favorite, though: the Danish hygge, meaning “relaxing with good friends or loved ones at home or a friend’s house, often while enjoying good food and something to drink and lighting a few candles.”

    • I totally agree! my dad is danish and we live in Spain, but we haven’t found a translation to it yet! love that you bring it up :)

  68. So cute! Just shows how ungraceful the English language can be. I wish I was bilingual.

    bwaterloo.wordpress.com

  69. These are simply delightlful! I think my favorite is Komoreb. :)

  70. I am German and I’ve been living in Germany almost my entire life. This is the very first time I read the word ‘Waldeinsamkeit’. It might have been used in earlier times (it’s nothing more than the words ‘forest’ and ‘loneliness’ written in one word, so it’s not really a word but only a combination) but it’s most definitely not used in everyday language today.

    • I am from Germany, too and have never heard of the word ‘Waldeinsamkeit’ either. It reminded me of the word ‘Wanderlust’ which is Middle High German. We hardly use that word anymore but it seems to be used in English more frequently. Is that true?
      Very interesting :)

    • Hello :) I am also German and have never heard the word Waldeinsamkeit. I study German and the word has never crossed my path.

    • hey, i am german as well and just can repeat your words! i have NEVER heard of waldeinsamkeit.

    • i would like to have an illustration related to the word “egal” – because there is no 1:1 translation for it although its meaning is quite simple and when i am talking english, i am searching for a fitting translation for it so often!

    • This comment has been removed by the author.

    • Haha, so funny. I´m German too and also have never heard the word Waldeinsamkeit.

    • agree!

      instead, how about “doch”- could use that in english every day

    • once i learnt how to use doch in german, i didnt say any other word! hehe. just love it, it expresses the german way of being, if you have an idea, you defend it no matter what. i love how languages can express things that are related to our idyosincrasy. i love doing sobremesas, i am from spain of course :)

    • I study German literature. Waldeinsamkeit is a key term in Romanticism. It was, for example, the favourite motif/subject of the poet Joseph von Eichendorff.
      Also Heinrich Heine wrote a poem with that title. Google it! :) Nowadays the word is not being used in everyday language anymore.

    • I study German literature. Waldeinsamkeit is a key term in Romanticism. It was, for example, the favourite motif/subject of the poet Joseph von Eichendorff.
      Also Heinrich Heine wrote a poem with that title. Google it! :) Nowadays the word is not being used in everyday language anymore.

  71. jm says...

    Sobremesa! Love that.

  72. These are absolutely fantastic! It’s interesting how it sort of reveals what the other cultures value.

  73. love these. wish “saudade” was part of it! that’s my favorite.

    • I also missed “saudade”. :(

    • Me too. “Saudade” is such a beautiful unique word.
      Lovely post and illustrations.

    • Yes, I was looking for saudade too.

    • “Saudade” is the portuguese word that expresses the feeling of missing someone or something you love that is in the past. As a portuguese woman I think that is a shame that they forgot to mention it.

      By the way…”sobremesa”, in portuguese, is the same as dessert. :)

    • I was hoping to see “saudade” too! I lived in Brazil in college and it was a favorite word!

    • we also have saudade in spanish :) (anhelo)

    • I, as a Brit who lived in Spain for years, tend to throw words into conversation I learnt in Spain that I cannot translate back into English, like sobremesa, but also there are words that simply get lost in translation!

  74. These are great. As a Spanish speaker, it always baffled me that there was no English word for “sobremesa” (literally meaning on or over the table.) It’s such a useful concept! :)

    • It baffled me too! The sobremesa it’s so intrinsical to our lives (I’m half spanish half italian), that I cannot remember a meal without it.

      It’s the moment of the day when you just chill with your loved ones, talk about each other’s day, have monumental discussions about everything… and plan the next meal :)

    • I am Spanish and live in Ireland. All the time I want to say something really Spanish it’s not a translation to English! haha, I laugh a lot about this with my boyfriend. He is trying to learn Spanish and he is so annoyed with the fact we have a thousand ways to say everything!

      Something I discovered in the last weeks is that is not a “proper word” to say one-eye or one-leg person. We use “tuerto” o “cojo”. But are not as nice as sobremesa ;)

    • And I´m baffled, too, but regarding the German word “Waldeinsamkeit” – I thought about if I really use this in my daily speaking but I think if when then very seldom. I think this word isn´t very common nowadays in Germany, may be in the past it was more usual :)

      Many thanks for this great post!

      xx from Bavaria/Germany, Rena

      http://www.dressedwithsoul.blogspot.de

    • can you guys explain it to me… I’m Mexican American and I’ve never heard that term before. Would it be too much to ask if you write an example in spanish?

      THanks!

      Cristina