Relationships

13 Reader Comments on Relaxing

The past few weeks have been a little hectic, and I’ve been craving some time to unwind. We love learning about ways to de-stress and recharge, so here are 13 reader comments about relaxing

On quick fixes:

“My all-time favorite thing is to go through the carwash. There’s just something about being in this cocoon while all the whirly brushes are scrubbing and water and suds are flowing.” — Christine

“I don’t even knit but will go into yarn stores to touch and squish the yarn. The bright colors help, as well as just knowing that knitting relaxes people in general. I relax by osmosis.” — Miruska

“Wandering through the aisles at the library. Better than a spa.” — Conner

“Sitting on a bench and people watching. Last weekend, I took myself on a solo date, picked up a pressed freeze, and sat on a bench for a half hour. It was wonderful.” — Alexandra

“Listening to strangers’ pleasant idle chatter, e.g. on public transportation, in hair salons, etc.” — Alicia

On at-home routines:

“Listening to history lectures as I drift off to asleep. Diving deep into the Middle Ages or the ancient Greek world takes my mind off present woes, and also reminds me that people have come out of very difficult times before.” — Erin

“Every evening when I make it back to my studio in Harlem, I say aloud, ‘Hello, beautiful home!’ As an essential worker, I’ve found that my gratitude for a calm, safe and stabile home has deepened so much.” — Margo

“When I put my girls to bed, we do the senses game: name five things you can see, four things you can feel, three things you can hear, two things you can smell and one thing you can taste. My girls are three and five, and sometimes their answers are so funny! ‘I can taste my tongue. I can smell the wind.’ They love it and it definitely calms them down.” — Kelly

On one-on-one moments:

“On weekends, my dog and I are the first ones up, so I make a cup of tea and we check on all the plants. Sometimes that means watering and pruning, sometimes just sitting together and enjoying the peaceful greenness.” — Rachel

“I’ve begun whispering to my infant daughter when I put her to sleep at night: “Thanks for this day, for all birds safe in their nests, for whatever this is, for life.” It’s from Prodigal Summer, by Barbara Kingsolver, and maybe it’ll become one of our bedtime rituals.” — Megan

On delicious moments:

“This year, I started having a hot chocolate every afternoon while my baby napped. Homemade with 70% dark chocolate squares, Dutch process cocoa powder, and oat milk. Taking that time to treat myself made up for every difficult thing that happened throughout the day with a small baby. I’ve continued doing it every day, despite summer heat waves.” — Shira

“If I’m home alone and feeling lazy, I eat spaghetti hoops on toast with melted cheese. Then Ben and Jerry’s and a period romance my husband would refuse to watch.” — Cece

On getting away:

“My husband and I have a ritual of going somewhere, once a month. Even just for a night, it’s such an amazing way to reset without distractions. This weekend, we spent less than $200 on a cabin on almost 200 acres with horses, cats, etc!” — Daniela

What’s your favorite way to unwind? Anything that always does the trick? We’d love to hear…

P.S. More great reader comments and a bedtime meditation.

  1. Ellen says...

    I’ve been struggling with insomnia, and my dad–a decades-long insomnia sufferer–just recommended listening to history lectures when I can’t sleep in the middle of the night. I thought of that when I read Erin’s comment!

  2. Cherie says...

    Last summer I picked up a $7 watercolor kit at a local craft store. I found tutorials online and would paint out on our back porch on the weekends. Not all of them were good, and some were truly bad, but it was more about the doing – the meditative process of blending color and water and finding perfection in the imperfection of it. Then I took one of my favorites, put it in a cheap frame and hung it on the wall.

  3. Kamina says...

    Having a hot shower in the dark with one candle lit. Just do it. It’s transcendent.

    • Jessica says...

      Yes! I do this every night!

  4. Andrea says...

    Showering! Even if I put my hair up and just wash my body. Just *being* in the shower is so relaxing. I learned last night from Laura Lynne Jackson’s book, Signs, that showers give our bodies negative ions – which are a good thing! – and are the scientific explanation as to why our energy actually changes and we feel more at peace in the shower (around waterfalls and in forests too!)

    • Lisa says...

      That’s so funny – I hate showering 😅 It is so stressful to me – either trying not te get my hair wet or having to use lotion and dry my hair later. I could go on, but this article is about relaxing, after all ;)

      However, I love the woods and all (other) bodies of flowing water – always feel like I have to get in <3

  5. Lori says...

    I’ve done a few virtual sessions of meditative drawing which has been wonderful. It starts with a short meditation. Then we do some breathing while “drawing” our breaths – either up and down lines or the infinity sign to mimic inhales and exhales. Then we are shown an image and are asked to draw it without looking down at the paper or picking up your pencil – just continuous drawing for short periods of time. It is incredible how relaxing and insightful it is. And it completely forces you to give up control and just be present in the moment.

    We close out the session by spending a few minutes writing a continuous note of gratitude to someone. During today’s session, I thanked a writer I’ve never met but who has motivated me to try new experiences, think differently, has made me laugh out loud and cry and generally feel more connected to the world. She is moving out of my area and for some bizarre reason – it is making me feel sad. I guess because I’ve harbored fantasies that I’d run into her in the grocery store sometime and become friends – totally silly I know.

    • jules says...

      Who is it??

  6. jdp says...

    that spaghetti hoops comment = everything.

  7. Kate says...

    Naps. Even if I’m not sleeping, laying down for 20 minutes can feel extremely luxurious. Listening to the sounds of the day, having my sweet kitty somewhere near me on the bed, turning off the constant train of thoughts, just being there… gives me a little giggle of pleasure.

    Also… being ALONE is relaxing. Something I only realized since this pandemic hit.

    • Ditto…. being ALONE after a long loud day outside or at work!!

  8. Jen says...

    Knitting. It’s creative, meditative, relaxing. It connects me to the long line of women makers that came before me and it connects me to millions of knitters around the world. Thank you Jess and Cassidy for creating Ravelry!

  9. Emily says...

    I bought an adult paint by number set — of Venice — and it’s so calming and relaxing. It’s my version of knitting. I’ve been painting and listening to Taylor Swift’s Folklore – which is honestly a brilliant album. Those two things together – so relaxing.

  10. Laurel says...

    This year I’ve gotten really into mountain biking. I grew up in Washington state and did a lot of snowboarding in high school and college, but kids/life took over. When my eldest discovered bmx racing, our family dived into all things bikes. The same peace I felt on a snowboard I feel shredding down a mountain on a bike. I love that I can be with my guys but completely in my own head.

  11. I have struggled with anxiety for nearly a decade, and one of the best self-help books I’ve read (Don’t Feed the Monkey Mind, by Jennifer Shannon) suggests that before you do anything that needs to be done, practice 5 minutes of self care. For me that might mean drinking a big glass of ice water before doing a chore, taking the time to prepare a good snack (peanut butter on a slice of sourdough toast), putting on a pair of comfy socks (Bombas!) or my favorite gold hoop earrings. I’ve been struck by how even these very small acts of self care make me feel more relaxed.

    • M says...

      Wow. Love this. I’m going to try it. Thanks for sharing.

  12. Sarah says...

    Imma need that hot chocolate recipe real quick here :)

    • S says...

      Yes!! Hoping!

    • Amy says...

      Same!

    • Shira says...

      Basically I break up two squares of Lindt 70% dark chocolate in a saucepan, add a mugful of some kind of milk, and two spoonfuls of a high quality Dutch-processed cocoa powder. I don’t add sugar because I’ve found it’s sweet enough for me without, but you definitely could. Then just whisk it over medium high heat until the chocolate is all melted and the milk is steaming. Make sure to scrape around the pot to mix in any last chocolate bits. :)

  13. Cat says...

    When I was feeling particularly untethered mid-pandemic I rediscovered the joy of taking a bath (to the point where they became a daily source of self care). Since I didn’t have much work on my favourite time to take a bath became late afternoon, right before my partner comes home from work. I fill the tub with bath salts, pop a silly sitcom or rom com onto my tablet, light a candle, pour a cup of tea or alcohol free beer and just lay there. It is bliss.

    A couple of weeks ago my partner surprised me with a handmade bath board to put all of my various things on. No more balancing my tablet on the toilet – I didn’t even realise it could get any better but it has. Now it’s summer I also keep the window open slightly and let the cool breeze wash over me. It truly is my happiest place.

    • Kate says...

      This sounds incredible! Especially with that breeze blowing in!

    • Andrea says...

      What a beautiful gift!

  14. Kimberly says...

    Hey! How timely for me–just this morning, my kids and I scrapped our plans and drove straight to the mountains. I kept thinking about something I read (here on CoJ! I think just in the comments, too!) of the Japanese concept of forest bathing, and without being totally certain what it was, we tried to walk extra reverently and breathe extra deeply. All we did was wander, but I left feeling so refreshed. Thanks for planting that seed, relaxy readers!

  15. Katie Lepine says...

    To the lady eating cheesy spaghetti on toast: you go, girl

  16. AN says...

    Wandering around a nursery is truly magical. A plant one, to be clear.

    • Jenni says...

      HA!

    • Meghan says...

      !!! LOL

    • Jen says...

      AGREE.

  17. Rue says...

    The Black-women owned company Frigg makes incredible CBD cosmetics & edible supplements, and the packaging is gorgeous. A moment of topical or edible CBD really does feel like an oasis to me.

    I also think everyone should have some grounding quotes, poems, photos, songs, art, creative STUFF from other humans. Things you can keep with you or easily access (for real or in memory). It has been so valuable to me to have a few snippets of poetry I love, song lyrics, and melodies from classical music pieces, to basically keep in my pocket and touch whenever I need that talisman. It can be so personal, I don’t want to sway anyone about their choices, but I feel like if you’re open to the idea of collecting them, these things kind of magnetize themselves to you. For me there are some Mary Oliver snippets (of course), some Beethoven and Bach, and both the music and the lyrics to a piece by a group called Roomful of Teeth. I can imagine if someone is more visual than aural, a painting or photo might have a similar effect.

    Oh and in a pinch I definitely pull up the website https://unsplash.com/ and search for something like “porch” or “rainforest” and just go for a virtual forest bath.

  18. Sarah says...

    After a bad day, I love of cup of Tetley tea with milk. The trick is not to scald the tea. Let your kettle stop boiling before you pour the water. On particularly bad days I’ll add a slice of toast with butter. If I’m truly feeling indulgent, I’ll add raspberry jam and sharp cheddar cheese.

    I’ve learned to pack some Tetley when I go to Texas to visit my husband’s family. They cannot understand why I want hot tea with milk. I find it hilarious. I grew up in Newfoundland, an old British colony that is now a part of Canada. It how’s my grandmothers and aunts did self care. It feels like home and it’s literally always accessible.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      my British dad always shows up at our house with a ziplock bag full of black tea bags! it makes me laugh every time. he doesn’t trust us to have the right kind.

    • Cecile says...

      I live in Belgium but my mum’s family has a British connection and a strong love for all things British, so for me too, black tea with milk equals home, care and comfort. I take black tea (the right kind, haha!) everywhere except when I travel to the UK.

    • M says...

      I also have beloved British roots and never travel without my PG Tips and correct tea cup. The proper tea cup really is just as important as the tea itself!

    • SB says...

      Sarah, your comment warmed my heart in soooo many ways. When I read that you pack your tea when you travel – I was like “omg, just like my mum used to” (and now I do!). And then you said you grew up in Newfoundland – JUST LIKE MY MUM! My grandma always had a pot of Red Rose tea ready to roll and my mum was the queen of comfort via hot beverage (hot cocoa as kids, tea as we go older).

      Anyway – from this very proud half-Newfie – bringing your own tea with you when you travel is a game changer. Now if only it was possible to buy Purity mints elsewhere…

    • Anna says...

      So funny – I lived in Northern Ireland for a year and developed a tea + milk habit. I now also travel with my Tetley tea bags and proper 400 ml teacup.

    • Nat says...

      This is so great! I’m an American living in NL and the tea love is real! Do you ever get some carnation for it?

    • Di says...

      I’m a fellow Canadian who grew up drinking black tea with milk after every meal and when we got home from school or work as well. It’s my instant reset button. I remember a tea commercial on tv a few years ago that showed people drinking tea in various settings and the voice over was something like “it will warm you up..it will cool you down…it brings people together…it’s a moment to yourself” and it always made me tear up haha. Now that I’m on mat leave with a little guy my number one self-care priority is just to sit down and savour a cup of tea each day.

    • Kiera says...

      Newfoundlander here and YES team Tetley all the way! Preferably steeped in a pot.

    • Susan says...

      A bit off the main topic, but as an Australian I’m wondering – is black tea not an every day thing in America? I’m from Melbourne where we’re crazily obsessed with good coffee, but everyone drinks tea as well.

    • K says...

      Would love to see a post on how to make a proper cup of tea! :)

    • MB says...

      When I read these comments my initial reaction was – does everyone not take their own tea with them when they travel?! I love when something you take as standard turns out to be a little quirk

    • M says...

      @susan I would say American tea drinkers are in the minority. Many people don’t drink it at all. I also travel with tea everywhere and when we visited England I was so delighted to find a kettle and good tea in EVERY room we stayed in. Like, I have found my people!

  19. Toni says...

    My toddler is obsessed with keys. I was sitting on a bench with my baby in her stroller dangling keys as she giggled. Two little ones passed by with their adult and I overheard their conversation. The younger one asked the older one why the baby liked keys so much. The older one’s reply was incredible: “Because they’re magic. One minute they’re silent and the next they jingle and make music. Anything that makes sounds can be magic.” Mind blown.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      awwwwww <3

  20. Niki says...

    omg this sounds perfect :)

  21. Brooke says...

    My husband finds it “strange” and my sister calls them my “suburban mom car rides,” but during the pandemic the only time I was ever alone was in the car. So I started a ritual, that two nights a week, after getting my son in his pjs, I would leave my husband to do bedtime, fire up my Venza, put on a true crime podcast and drive around the surrounding towns. Although some things have gone back to normal, I’ve been sticking with my ritual. Sometimes a mom needs murder and the wind in her hair.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      “Sometimes a mom needs murder and the wind in her hair.” = amazing.

    • Catherine says...

      Oh gosh, I’m convinced “suburban mom car rides” save lives.

  22. ARC says...

    Swimming – in the evening when the sun goes down, I slowly dip into the cool water and swim, however slowly or clumsily for 45 minutes. No phone, no noise, no distraction. My gym has an outdoor adult-only pool that is pretty empty in the evening. Just me and my breathing. Super-relaxing and I sleep like a baby afterwards. Also, as a Californian, I enjoy the unduly long hot shower afterwards …
    Bookstores – wandering the isles at a bookstore. I sometimes buy something, sometimes, the wandering has to suffice. I remember the time (about 20 years ago) when the huge bookstores were around with their long opening times and coffeeshops included. They would let you buy coffee and read a book without buying it first.
    Walks – after these past 15 months, I know my boring suburban neighborhood like my pocket. It’s very relaxing to walk without a phone, noticing the birds, roses, any changes that neighbors are making to their yards, chatting the neighbors.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes walks!!! my evening walks have been such a balm.

    • Tonje Meland Øverland says...

      The beginning of your comment reminds me so much of one of my favourite poems! Not because I think you are feeling like Kath, it was just something about the routine, I think. Hope you don´t think this is super weird, I just really love the poem and wanted to share it. :)

      Don’t Tell Anyone
      BY TONY HOAGLAND

      We had been married for six or seven years
      when my wife, standing in the kitchen one afternoon, told me
      that she screams underwater when she swims—

      that, in fact, she has been screaming for years
      into the blue chlorinated water of the community pool
      where she does laps every other day.

      Buttering her toast, not as if she had been
      concealing anything,
      not as if I should consider myself

      personally the cause of her screaming,
      nor as if we should perform an act of therapy
      right that minute on the kitchen table,

      —casually, she told me,
      and I could see her turn her square face up
      to take a gulp of oxygen,

      then down again into the cold wet mask of the unconscious.
      For all I know, maybe everyone is screaming
      as they go through life, silently,

      politely keeping the big secret
      that it is not all fun
      to be ripped by the crooked beak

      of something called psychology,
      to be dipped down
      again and again into time;

      that the truest, most intimate
      pleasure you can sometimes find
      is the wet kiss

      of your own pain.
      There goes Kath, at one pm, to swim her twenty-two laps
      back and forth in the community pool;

      —what discipline she has!
      Twenty-two laps like twenty-two pages,
      that will never be read by anyone.

    • Yulia says...

      Tonje, that is a gorgeous poem. I love Tony Hoagland with all my heart and guts. I’d never seen that one before. Thank you for sharing!

  23. Elizabeth says...

    Needlepoint or jigsaw puzzles do the relaxation trick for me. I think I could happily be incarcerated if I just had enough of either of these to keep me occupied.

  24. Lauren says...

    I, a middle-aged lady, walk to the greenmarket while playing Pokémon GO. My favorite battle buddies are all named after my favorite artists, and there is something immensely comforting about strolling the streets of Manhattan with Eavan Boland, my Leafeon, kicking ass and taking names. (She’s cute, but she’ll peel you like a grape in PVP combat.)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      haha this is wonderful!

  25. Tammy Sutherland says...

    I have a nightly reading ritual where I place a pillow so it will be under my knees, giving them a comfortable bend, and a heating pad for my back before climbing in with my e-reader, which has a built-in reading light so I can turn off the lamp. It feels so comfortable and indulgent that I am often happy to abandon the fruitless internet scrolling that can eat up an evening, so I can get there faster.

    • B says...

      I love this so much. I prefer to read physical books, so would need the light, but the concept is the same. May be time to find a book light.

    • Amanda says...

      Ok damn, this sounds amazing. Need to try this exact ritual! The internet scroll is becoming physically painful at this point (my poor neck).

  26. Coffee and the crossword puzzle on Saturday morning when I’m up early and the rest of my family is still asleep is something I look forward to every weekend. I skip the rest of the newspaper and go straight to it. Both the satisfaction of filling it in and starting the day with something enjoyable instead of rushing to keep everyone on schedule is a nice, little treat.

    • Michelle says...

      Aaah, mine is coffee and the Sunday crossword puzzle on the patio. :)

  27. soama says...

    A 2.5mg edible (have to quarter the ones I have because they are a ridiculous 10mg’s – way too strong), meditation while it kicks in, then a bike ride on a nature trail under that mild influence, which is delightful. In that order. A crispy apple when I get home. A nap if I’m lucky.

    • Meg says...

      Yup, this sounds perfect.

    • BeckyB says...

      Yes to the edibles! I, too, quarter mine and they’re part of my nightly wind down. I just started using them in January, and I will never give them up. They are my most favorite form of self care right now. A gentle, warm hug for my insides and brain.

  28. Steph says...

    Before bed I browse clothing catalogues. It doesn’t matter where from. I’ve done it since I was a child. The content is impossible to get worried or angry or sad about (unlike books and magazines), and the spreads with all the colors available are soothing to look at (unlike a screen).

    • MB says...

      Have you ever seen the movie Best in Show? “We are so lucky to have been raised amongst catalogues”!

  29. Katie says...

    Yes to the car wash! There’s a new one around the corner called The Bubble Down and I adore it. It’s quiet and dark and colorful. I made my husband take me through on my birthday!

  30. AH says...

    Can Erin recommend any good podcasts for history lectures? :-)

    • Mallory says...

      Mike Duncan’s The History of Rome. My husband listened to all 73 hours during a month of funemployment this past Winter and loved every minute.

    • Jenny says...

      Backstory Radio

    • Ann says...

      +1 to History of Rome. The History of Byzantium is just as good, and mind blowing that we never really learned about Byzantium in school.

    • Jenny by the sea says...

      Not Erin, but if you can get Natalie Haynes Stands Up For the Classics podcasts on the BBC, they are a hilarious take on Ancient Greece and Rome but also incredibly informative. She is a bona fide classist, Mary Beard was her supervisor at Cambridge.

    • Tawnya says...

      I also recommend Tour Guide Tell All which has all women hosts. They just have a great chemistry and an accessible, engaging way of discussing history.

  31. Faza Mahirah says...

    It was during the pandemic that I discovered the magic of cycling. I decided late last year that I wanted to work at my fitness in a fun way, in a way that wouldn’t be too intense and make me quit the next day. Little did I realise how relaxing cycling was. Don’t get me wrong. I’ve lost 10kg through cycling. It’s quite a powerful workout, especially once you’ve built the stamina to cycle long distance. But by far, the best thing about cycling is that it frees me from any mental and emotion burdens. When I cycle, when I get into the zone, my mind is FREE and I’m in my happy place. 🥰

  32. Diana says...

    Oh I love that quote from Prodigal Summer – I read it for the first time during my junior year of high school when my boyfriend dumped me and I was heartbroken- was such a balm and I return to that book when I need to be soothed.

    Also Shira that sounds like the perfect afternoon treat – do you mind sharing the recipe?

    • Shira says...

      I think my recipe is an amalgam of several recipes that I’ve seen over the years. Basically I break up two squares of Lindt 70% dark chocolate in a saucepan, add a mugful of some kind of milk (at times it’s been oat milk, other times cow milk…and I’ll admit to using cream a few times when that was all I had available), and two spoonfuls of a high quality Dutch-processed cocoa powder. I don’t add sugar because I’ve found it’s sweet enough for me without, but you definitely could. Then just whisk it over medium high heat until the chocolate is all melted and the milk is steaming. Make sure to scrape around the pot to mix in any last chocolate bits. I somehow never get tired of this treat! It’s soooo good.

  33. Jay says...

    Oh I LOVE Prodigal Summer. Such a beautiful quote, going to start saying it to my baby son as I put him down to sleep. Thanks for the idea Megan :)

  34. Amanda W. says...

    Might sound weird, but I love wandering through peddler’s malls and indoor flea markets here in town. I don’t even have the goal of buying anything, and rarely do. I love rooting through the messy booths, and the musty smells of old books and furniture. Pre-pandemic, I’d grab a cup of coffee and get there early to avoid the crowds. The best!

  35. Lynn says...

    Megan, before I even finished your quote I found myself reading it in Barbara Kingsolver’s voice (she reads that audiobook). LOVE her and Prodigal Summer!

  36. K says...

    Yes to Conner’s library comment. I’ve been missing my library so much, but at least I can get new books from their front door again. I’m planning to take an afternoon walk today (down my favorite street in San Francisco, Page St) to pick up two books I have waiting.

    I also almost burst into tears over Daniela’s comment — the ritual of going somewhere once a month. My husband and I are so fortunate right now — both have good paying jobs, him for the first time in a long time (the pandemic really hurt his industry). The problem is, his new job also means there’s almost no time off, not even weekends. There’s work to do, being on call, every single day. I’ve been feeling all kinds of jealousy (then feeling guilty for that jealousy because I want people to be out there having fun/relaxing, so why this jealousy — oh the human condition) at seeing people taking trips, because after this year, we need a trip too. But, unfortunately, we’re at the point where the money needs to come first. I love Daniela’s idea though–we actually took a tiny trip last month (a wonderful one even though we were working remote, but I hadn’t thought…why not every month). This is something I really hope we can make happen. We need that. It seems much more possible when you think of it as one day per month. Thank you for the suggestion. You have given me light on how we can relax within our current norm.

  37. jules says...

    Maybe it’s the deep tissue massage I got yesterday, but that Kingsolver quote got me weepy in the eyes.

  38. Megan says...

    I read the comment about whispering the Barbara Kingsolver quote at bedtime and thought–oh! Another fan of this line! And then I realized it was my own comment, haha. My daughter’s 14 months old now and I still say this to her. Thanks for the memories of this time a year ago, when I would still snuggle her to sleep every night.

  39. Lauren says...

    I would love to know what history lectures Erin listens to! I’ve found podcasts the secret sauce for falling asleep / falling back asleep but am always looking for content that hits the sweet spot of interesting but not too interesting (no murder mysteries for me!)

    • MN says...

      I love “Story of the World” audio books. It’s *technically* meant for kids, but that means I can learn something without me brain going into overdrive or getting bogged down with details that don’t interest me.

    • Birdie says...

      I listen to the “sleep stories” in the Calm app and would really recommend them! I listened to “The Ocean Moon” narrated by queen Laura Dern all winter and don’t even know how the story ends because I always fall asleep first :)

  40. taylor says...

    I relate to Conner’s comment so much. Wandering the aisle of a library or bookstore makes me completely forget what time it is and how long I’ve been there. It’s just me and the books and relaxation.

  41. Emily says...

    Love these! For me it’s going out to the garden. Even before the seeds are up there’s just something about it that’s deeply soothing. Also making a point to spend a little time staring off into the distance. I read somewhere that staring out into in indeterminate distance with a soft gaze (not necessarily looking at one thing in particular) actually lowers your stress hormones. Whether it is true or not I find it is a nice break from staring at things that are only 12 inches away from my face (phone…)

    • Karen says...

      I’m always so surprised how much a garden changes from day to day. I like to touch the plants and make sure everything is in good place. . . keeps me in a good place :)

  42. Meredith says...

    Shira’s comment made me think of this recipe I saw the other day from Smitten Kitchen (has dairy, but I bet some experimentation could lend itself to dairy-free options?). I don’t have a small baby, but I so love the idea of an afternoon treat to settle thoughts and regroup! :)
    https://smittenkitchen.com/2015/08/frozen-hot-chocolate/