Food

Turkey Meatball Soup in the Instant Pot

All you need for good home cooking, cookbook author Sarah Copeland once explained, is a sharp chef’s knife, a wooden spoon, and a few good sturdy pots. In her new book, Instant Family Meals, she concludes: “I was wrong…”

Turns out there’s a reason everybody swears by the Instant Pot — who can’t get behind a dinner you can make with the push of a button? — and once she gave it a chance, she was hooked. I am just like Sarah used to be, but if something is going to convince me otherwise, it’s her latest book, all about family meals you can make in your slow cooker, pressure, multi cooker, and Instant Pot. At the height of the craze a few years ago, I bought an Instant Pot that I pretty much exclusively use to do one thing — accelerate the cooking of dried beans when I haven’t thought ahead to presoak — but to look through her book, there’s a world of one-pot main dishes that promise a ridiculously high return on investment when it comes to time spent and deliciousness delivered. Think: Coconut salmon, Shakshuka, Saucy Chicken and Olives, Cacio e Pepe Risotto, this Turkey Meatball Soup that looks like the perfect Sunday Night January Dinner.

What about you all? Where do you stand on the Instant Pot? And what is the best thing you’ve made in yours?

Turkey Meatball Soup

From Sarah: I was skeptical about trying our family’s go-to soup in the Instant Pot: Would the meatballs fall apart into a million pieces under pressure? But, in the name of research, I gave it a go. The result: the meatballs were exceptionally moist and tender, and they lent the broth a deeply flavorful finish.

1 pound lean ground turkey
½ cup panko bread crumbs
1⁄3 packed cup finely chopped fresh parsley leaves
1 teaspoon dried thyme or oregano
1 large egg, lightly beaten
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more asneeded
½ teaspoon black pepper, plus more as needed
½ cup finely grated pecorino or parmesan cheese, plus more for serving
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
8 cups chicken broth
1 cup macaroni
4 packed cups chopped baby kale
1 lemon, zested and cut in half
1⁄3 packed cup roughly chopped fresh dill or basil, for serving

Combine the meat, bread crumbs, parsley, thyme, egg, garlic, 1 teaspoon salt, ½ teaspoon pepper, and the cheese in a large bowl. Mix with a fork or clean hands until well combined. Gently roll the mixture into 16 medium (1¾-inch) or about 32 small (1-inch) meatballs.

Pour 1 tablespoon of the oil into the inner pot of the pressure cooker and set to Saute. Add half the meatballs and brown on all sides, turning them carefully, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer the browned meatballs to a plate and repeat with the remaining tablespoon oil and the remaining meatballs.

Once the second batch is browned, return the first batch of meatballs to the inner pot, and add the broth and macaroni. Lock on the lid and Pressure Cook on high pressure for 2 minutes. Release the steam manually (covering your pressure valve with a towel, as it may sputter, thanks to the starch in the pasta). Open the lid. Check the pasta for doneness; also check a meatball to be sure it is cooked through. If needed, put on the lid again (but don’t lock) and let sit on the Keep Warm setting for 2 minutes more.

Open the lid and add the kale and lemon zest to the pot. Stir once, replace the lid (but don’t lock), and leave on the Keep Warm setting until the greens are wilted, 1 to 3 minutes, opening the lid and stirring occasionally if needed. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste.

Open the lid and spoon the soup into bowls. Drizzle with a little olive oil and lemon juice. Scatter the cheese and herbs over the top.

P.S. Stovetop lasagna for busy weeknights and the ultimate crowdpleaser.

Photo by Christopher Testani. Reprinted with permission from Instant Family Meals by Sarah Copeland. Photographs by Christopher Testani. Published by Clarkson Potter.

  1. Emily says...

    I made this tonight and it was bomb. I didn’t have parsley, so I just chopped up extra greens for the meatballs. I drizzled in some basil infused olive oil and topped with extra zest, lots of lemon juice, cheese, and some fresh dill. This will be on heavy rotation in our house!

    • AMAZING, Emily! I love reading this–so glad your family loved this one! Thank you for taking the time to share that.

    • Jocelyne says...

      I had a hard time browning the meatballs on the sauté function. The meat kept on sticking to the bottom. Did I not use enough olive oil? Or maybe I should have left it sautéing for longer before turning? The end result was delicious even though I had meatball pieces floating around!

  2. Megan says...

    This sounds delicious! Do you think it could be modified for a slow cooker or Dutch oven? I can’t justify buying another appliance in my tiny studio apartment. I was thinking maybe if I add the pasta at the end, this could be made in a slow cooker. Any ideas?

    • Yes yes! I made it in the Dutch oven for years before I got an Instant Pot. Yes, add the pasta at the end (pre-cook and add it). I’ve never tried it in the slow cooker; I don’t trust meatballs in a slow cooker, but a Dutch oven or any similar heavy pot works great!

  3. Lucia says...

    We resisted buying an IP for a long time but were finally convinced by the possibility of cooking Indian food on a weekday. I had been trying to work in a more varied diet (esp for my kids) and this does the trick. We have used it almost every day, and our favorite recipes are at MyHeartBeets (butter chicken, dals) and the Serious Eats green chili pork or chicken. Looking forward to trying this recipe!

  4. Marnie says...

    Love my IP and use it a few times per week; always for oatmeal and soups, whole grains, dried beans and pulses. I recently had no kitchen for a few months during a home reno and discovered that it can cook almost anything. The best discovery was duck confit. Now I want the combo IP/air fryer

  5. S says...

    I just can’t pull the trigger on adding yet another appliance. There are definitely times I think wow, if I had be maybe I wouldn’t be scrambling to make something and eating late, but I do try instead to plan accordingly. Just not sold on adding an IP to my appliance inventory…

  6. NN says...

    I am an Indian/vegetarian and so had an assortment of pressure cookers and always thought the IP was hype/for new cooks. Then, the deal on the Duo Novo Plus (in costco) changed my mind. And I WONDER EVERYDAY WHAT TOOK ME SO LONG tO GET ONE!
    It is a wonderful wonderful appliance and for people who pressure cook a lot, the elimination of mental work of being near the stove or cooker to monitor it in itself was such a relief. I put things in (potatoes, rice and lentils, oats and even steamed veggies using the steamer basket), time it and I can freely devote my time to other things knowing the IP will time it and take care of it.
    The saute function is lightning fast allowing for very easy pilafs, quinoa, millets in one pot. It is so clean (no messes when steam releases) and has earned its top spot in my kitchen. I have also made noodles in the IP, pasta dishes (if you boil the pasta separately to remove the extra starch) and am discovering more and more using cookbooks. It is very easy to figure out if you are an experienced cook and if you are a new one, I’d recommend getting a few IP specific cookbooks to figure out the timings and low/high steam pressure for cooking everyday items. Also the new Duo plus has presets which makes it a breeze.
    If you have a tiny kitchen and need one appliance this is it. Go for it. It will make your life in the kitchen so easy. Cannot recommend enough!

    • I love all of this, NN. It is my dream to learn to make better Indian food in the Instant Pot. I’ve been making Dal and Tikka Masala in it for a couple years, but I have a LOT more to learn and very excited to tackle more. I recently got Archana Mundhe’s cookbook The Essential Indian Instant Pot Cookbook and am working my way through it!

  7. oh my gosh i LOVE sarah copeland’s books. didn’t know there was an IP one. thanks for this!

    • *BLUSHING*. Thank you, Rachel!

  8. NMR says...

    Love my IP and use it multiple times per week, especially for bulk cooking — shredded chicken to use for quesadillas, tacos, on salads, etc. But we also use it a ton to make rice! I am thisclose to getting rid of our pretty fancy rice cooker. The instant pot makes perfect basmati rice in 3 minutes (plus the time to come to pressure).

  9. Jenn P says...

    My husband works for months out of town, so I bought an IP specifically so that I could land at LAX at 2pm on a Sunday, stop at the grocery on the way home, dump food in an appliance, hit a button, have my lunches prepared for the week, and still get to bed by 8pm. And it does that perfectly. I’ve since used it for other things, especially during Covid times, and I do enjoy working with it. I’m going to look into this book to expand my horizons with my IP.

  10. Tawnie Bryant says...

    I purchased this book 2 weeks ago, and it has changed everything for me!! I’ve made 4-5 meals that have turned out so great. Kid approved!! Less time in the kitchen and easy cleanup. I’m so glad I found this book.

    • Hi Tawnie, Thank you for this amazing note! I’m THRILLED that the book has been a game changer for your family. Sending lots of love your way.

  11. Liz says...

    Love this post, and must admit I’ve always been curious about the IP. Two other kitchen appliances I’d LOVE some insights on:
    – air fryer – worth the hype?
    – vitamix – sooo expensive, but are they as incredible as I hear?

    • Emma says...

      No idea about air fryers. To me they sound a lot like a convection oven.

      I have been a professional cook, and used a Vitamix daily in that context–they can handle a lot of abuse. If you are making smoothies daily and your current blender breaks or something, they are the best blenders and will upgrade that experience. But if you aren’t already finding yourself blending stuff, it’s not a revolutionary machine. In a commercial kitchen you use them for everything–lots of purees, sometimes soup, liver mousse, large quantities of salad dressings, etc. At home I do most of that with my $30 immersion blender (I also used the same immersion blender all the time at work too–they hold up!).

  12. Amy says...

    I don’t use it super often, but I am a convert. I mostly use it for dishes where I haven’t pre-planned (still-frozen cheap cuts of beef/pork or cheap bone-in chicken, unsoaked chickpeas/beans), but it’s a lifesaver for those alone. Favorite recipes that both my 2.5 year old and one year old will eat include: stew (I use beef or pork and only .5 to 1 cup broth) https://thesaltymarshmallow.com/best-ever-instant-pot-beef-stew/#wprm-recipe-container-3717 ; butter chicken (I use drumsticks or leg quarters and add chickpeas, then toss in frozen cauliflower while shredding the chicken) https://www.jayssweetnsourlife.com/pressure-cooker-indian-butter-chicken/ ; and chicken tortilla soup (I doctor this a lot, but the base is delicious) https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/260515/instant-pot-chicken-tortilla-soup/ .

  13. Jenny says...

    Oh my goodness, Sarah Copeland of @edibleliving is my very favorite!!

  14. So funny! I just bought an InstaPot because of this book! Before reading Sarah’s cookbook intro I always thought that the IP was for people who weren’t “serious” cooks. But it was her dessert recipes that hooked me, especially her poached pears, which I made tonight as my very first IP recipe. Made them tonight and they were so delicious on a winter night–topped them with vanilla ice cream and some Trader Joe’s fleur de sel caramel sauce. I left the pears in a little too long but no biggie, will shorten the cooking time next time. I’m excited to try her flan and cheesecake recipes + all the basics that others have mentioned such as oats, eggs, etc.

  15. K says...

    on what occasions does a wooden spoon work better than a metal one (or ceramic one) ?

    • Amy says...

      Mainly when I want to avoid the sound of metal on metal, which is almost always ;)

    • Tovah says...

      Or if you are working with non-stick cookware that could be scratched by metal.

    • Emma says...

      They non-conductive property of wood is important around heat–if you want to stir something on the stove and leave the spoon resting in the pot, metal will burn you while wood stays friendly. Also gentler on your pots and pans (and essential for non-stick surfaces).

  16. Bb says...

    Like many of you I have switched to the instant pot for steel cut oats, black bean soup w dried beans, all rice, soft boiled eggs, etc. This week I added two more delicious things to the list:
    https://www.halfbakedharvest.com/instant-pot-pesto-zuppa-toscana/

    https://alexandracooks.com/2020/03/18/simplest-slow-cooker-chickpeas/ – made recipe in the IP and cooked the beans for 18 mins then made smitten kitchens hummus in the vitamix and an NYT turmeric chickpea coconut milk stew this afternoon for dinner.

  17. Mary says...

    This instant pot chili & this soup are both vegan, so flavorful and completely easy! Both are on my regular rotation (and I have the food stains on those cookbook pages to prove it!) for family dinner especially in the cold months but in the past they’ve also been great for guests coming over or for bringing a meal to someone! Also both work if you want to add meat, I just add already cooked meat like rotisserie chicken to the soup or ground beef for the chili in individual bowls, very flexible!

    Adobo Black Bean Chili from America’s Test Kitchen
    https://www.zavoramerica.com/recipes/vegetarian-black-bean-chili/

    Cozy Autumn Wild Rice Soup from Gimme Some Oven (the vegan coconut milk version is way easier and tastier and what I usually make!)

    https://www.gimmesomeoven.com/cozy-autumn-wild-rice-soup/

  18. diana k. says...

    Genuinely don’t understand the Instant Pot, and it’s not for a lack of googling. Is the main benefit that it’s self-regulating? Can I only use specific Instant Pot recipes? If I’m still doing all the prep work is it really saving me that much time? Is it only time-saving if you’re doing slow-cooked meats? I read that it prevents burning, but that you have to properly “layer” your ingredients. How intuitive is this layering/setting up in general? Is there ever a risk of overcooking veggies, like with a crock pot?

    Tell me if I need this in my tiny NYC apt.

    • Angela says...

      I don’t have a great answer to all your questions, but, no, you don’t need one! Especially in a tiny apartment! I find it does not save me a significant amount of time and is just one more thing to clean!! I love to cook, too!!

    • Amy says...

      I have one. I don’t use it for steel cut oats or eggs (and I eat those every morning). Part of the problem is that I’m not someone who leaves appliances on the counter, so pulling it out for that doesn’t seem worth it.

      But I use it regularly to make yogurt, brown rice, big batches of “refried” beans, and braised meats. I also pop frozen chicken breasts in it with some broth and then shred it for use in recipes; frozen to cooked in about 30-40 min and it’s hands-off. I love one-pot meals, but I don’t generally make them in the Instant Pot.

    • Hilary says...

      Hi Diana-

      In short, no you don’t need one. However, I use mine so frequently that it’s one of my fave appliances. I put it off for a long time but took the plunge when my slow cooker broke. At the start, you should only use recipes designed for the IP. Once you get a better understanding of how different things cook, I think it’s a lot easier to play around with things yourself. I don’t consider it a major time saver for a lot of foods (pasta, chicken, etc.), but I like that it’s a “set it and forget it” kind of thing. Sure, I can make chicken noodle soup on my stove and saute the mirepoix, cook the chicken, add broth, boil noodles, etc. but then I need to be by the stove and kind of paying attention. With a toddler and work, I don’t really want to do that. With the IP, I pop everything in, it cooks, and keeps warm all on its on. I just consider it a faster slow cooker.

    • jen says...

      You certainly don’t need one. But it is an amazing appliance. I’m not one for lots of gadgets and have no interest in air fryers and never use my crock pot. But I use this ALL THE TIME. I have kids and even in quarantine I need a quick dinner without a lot of fuss some nights. I often just google the ingredients I have with instant pot. We have chicken burrito bowls, sweet potato lentil stew, white bean chicken chili, lemon orzo with chicken on rotation! It’s quick, one pan cleanup, hand’s off and delicious. It’s also great for oatmeal, rice, hard boiled eggs (they peel like a dream). If you need some time saving and easy clean up I would highly rec!

  19. Jane I. says...

    I, like Sarah, first turned my nose the Instant Pot for a very long time. But the recent Black Fridays sales had me saying, “What have I got to lose?”

    Fast forward a few weeks later and I am hooked!! The sauté function alone made me so happy I could cry.

    I’ve only ruined one meal so far… tried to steam some broccoli and asparagus. Apparently 2 minutes is too long?? It got disintegrated. Any tips for this??

    But other than that. I’m team Instant Pot and also now, thanks to BF sales, team Air Fryer.

    I still want to preserve cooking techniques and skills… nothing beats a butter-based steak, but when it comes to feeding my family and meal prep – the set it and forget it life feels good! So jazzed for more recipes!! Putting this book in my cart!

  20. sarah says...

    IP is perfect for beets. 22-24 min on manual and then they peel perfectly.

    • Jenny Rosenstrach says...

      That is very good to know, thank you! I hate prepping beets, but love eating them.

  21. Sarah Gulley says...

    Seconding Melissa Clark! We have NEVER had a bad meal from Dinner in an Instant, and we’ve cooked from it A LOT.

    Also seconding Nom Nom Paleo!

    The things that have been revolutionary for me:

    1) being able to sauté before adding liquids
    2) all the beans, no pre-soaking
    3) perfect rice
    4) yogurt with little fuss and none of the plastic packaging
    5) being able to cook frozen meat without thawing it (just, you know, up the cooking time and check the temperature once it’s out)

    • Darby says...

      I just got an instant pot when my rice cooker died. So far I have made 2 pots of rice and a pot of beans- everything turned out great. I’m excited to try some actual recipes too… I really like the Half baked Harvest and there are a lot of Instant pot recipes in the Website so I thought I would start there. So far I am happy with my purchase… I really like to be able to push a button and then not worry about it, especially on weekdays.

  22. Betsy says...

    I bought a pressure cooker when my slow cooker broke. I’m gluten free/celiac and it’s a good way to prepare rice, beans, eggs and potatoes. It’s not faster than stovetop but I like that I can leave it unattended unlike a hot burner.

  23. katie says...

    I’m not on the Instapot train yet but man you all are convincing! When I did look a few years ago I was very daunted by the different size/capacities. I married a vegetarian and he’s interested for beans, and my toddler is looking to be a carnivore through and through, so braised beef success would thrill me. Counter space is a premium so I don’t want to go huge, but also fret I’d get too small for it to be worth it. Wisdom?

    • Mary Wallace says...

      Lorna Sass has written several classic cookbooks for the pressure cooker and I’m sure her recipes can be converted to the IP. Great Vegetarian Cooking Under Pressure is awesome. Plus, the recipes are actually vegan (she wrote it before vegan was a thing).

    • anne says...

      I got a 3 quart IP as a gift, and I did not want it at first. Now, I use it all the time. I make beans, rice, and yogurt very regularly, and now in the winter I make steel cut oats basically every morning. I love being able to set everything up the night before, dump in the water, press go, take my dog for a walk and come back to a hot breakfast. I’ve also found it to be super useful in these days when my brain seems to be all over the place. If I leave the rice in the instant pot for a few hours, it’s all fine, but if I put it on the stove and forget..

    • Hi Katie!

      I’m the author of Instant Family Meals so wanted to chime in here with my thoughts–I always tell people for a family of 4 or smaller, or a family of young kids, the 6 QT is plenty of room. That’s the only one I use most of the time, and only pull out the 8 QT (which I had to buy to test recipes for the book….) to make large quantities of stock or yogurt. I hope this helps!

    • Amy says...

      I’d go with the 6qt mostly because it’s the standard, and most recipes are written for it.

    • karla says...

      I have the 8 qt and for our family of 4, i usually feel like it’s too big. in hindsight, I wish i would’ve gone with the 6 qt.

    • katie says...

      Thank you all! So helpful. 6 qt it is…the oatmeal also sounds glorious.

  24. A says...

    I am a vegetarian who eats mostly vegan, and my experience with the Instant Pot has been…meh. I really want to like it, but everything I make tastes very bland. Maybe I’m not trying the right recipes?

    • Monica says...

      Same here, We have friends who enjoy eating meat dishes regularly and love the Instant Pot. We eat WFPB and just never got into it. I use the crockpot once a week or so.

      Then again there are vegetarian/vegan
      Dishes that can Be made in an Instant Pot. To each their own, I say. The discipline of meal planning, soaking and cooking legumes and rice, even with a handful of little kids around, is good for me. It’s not for others and that’s ok.

    • Di says...

      I thought that too ! However found if you sealed ( as in) fried off the ingredients first things were better .So fry some onions or peppers after dusting them in a little seasoned flour , get some colour into them and see how you go . Best of luck

    • BeckyB says...

      Fellow vegetarian here…

      101cookbooks.com has a good round up of vegetarian instant pot recipes. The taco soup has become a staple. And I’ve been recently working my way through The Vegan Instant Pot by Nisha Vora. The mushroom and veggie broths, plus the millet morning porridge have been made multiple times in just the past month. Hope this helps!

    • Meghan says...

      Me too, both my husband and I are vegetarian (with me often vegan). We actually ended up selling ours when we moved recently. We bought it two years ago with high hopes. My husband and I love to cook and we haven’t missed it at all.

    • Nikki says...

      Hi A, the Instant Pot is really excellent for Indian foods – dals (lentils), curries, etc. that would take ages on the stove. Most Indian recipes are vegetarian! I suggest checking out blogs like veganricha.com and chutneylife for flavorful vegetarian recipes in the Instant Pot.

    • Hi A,

      Such a good comment! I think a lot of vegan or vegetarian IP recipes (and IP recipes in general) can be Meh, which is exactly why I wrote this book. I wanted people to hit a home run each and every time they pulled out their machine.

      My husband is a long-time vegetarian and my daughter is as well, and most of our family meals are plant-based. I’ve learned over many years of cooking for them that adding seasoning like soy, harissa or hot pepper paste up front, especially when cooking an instant pot, yields great rewards in the flavor department, and quickly.

      There are also at least 60 + vegetarian recipes in Instant Family Meals that I think are deeply flavorful, fun to serve and eat and repeat winners (soups, stews, porridges, shakshuka, and so much more) . There’s a Special Diets Index in the back of the book that will point you to every Vegetarian, Vegan, Gluten Free or Diary Free recipe in the book (many!).

      Thanks for asking–and I hope you find something here you love!

    • K says...

      I think the trick to liking an instant pot is to cook how you like to cook with it. If you’re a try a little this and that, adjust the recipe for what you have type, do that in the instant pot. I found a basic recipe for things I normally eat (soups, curries, Dahl) and just add whatever. If something is too thin after the cooking time, I use the sauté function to thicken it up. I also love to use a taller trivet (I have the egg cooking one) to rest a Corning dish on top to make pot-in-pot rice or grains while I’m making a curry or Dahl or something like that underneath. I love it for veg cooking because potatoes are very quick. A soup with potatoes has to simmer for a while, 12 minutes does it in the IP. Also pre cooking baked potatoes in the IP and then crisping them in the oven makes baked potatoes quick and easy. Our local health food store cooks all their soups in an IP and they are always delicious!

  25. Diany Zirtilides says...

    I cannot believe this is today’s post!! I have been debating whether to get an instant pot for a while and just yesterday posted a poll on instagram to see what my friends thought. The answers I received was mostly that people use it a lot at the beginning but the hype fades and then just sits there.

    I thought I had made up my mind not to get one, but if COJ recommends I might have to reconsider!!

    • cherry says...

      I had the opposite experience! I bought it and it sat there for a long time… almost a year… where I just couldn’t think of why I would use it. Then little things started creeping in! I was like oh, rice is so easy in it. Oh and beans are great! Oh man, buying cheap stew beef is great for my wallet but it takes so long to get tender but the IP makes it so fast. When I forget to defrost my chicken thighs, I can cook them FROM FROZEN in the IP! Tonight I’m experimenting with making my own yogurt in it.

    • Emma says...

      Can confirm: Bought one because of the hype, barely ever use it. I don’t generally find it to be a time-saver. Worse, I bought the air-fryer lid to go with it, also never used. Now there’s two big bulky things taking up kitchen space. :(

  26. Lizzie says...

    I’ve had an instant pot for a few years and use it weekly for a short list of things that its super helpful for (farro, all rice, lentil soup, beans from dried, chicken breasts for my spoiled dog). But this makes me want to get more creative with it! Will give this a try for sure and excited to check out the cookbook!

  27. Thank you, Jenny and Joanna, for sharing my book and this recipe–one of our family’s all-time favorites!

  28. Marcella Reyes says...

    i’ll have to check out this book! my dad bought my mom the insta pot (he’s the impulse buyer lol) and we don’t use it THAT often, but it does help to have recipes. i just feel intimidated by all the buttons sometimes, ha. it’s also sometimes misleading because yeah, it only takes 20 mins to cook, but that doesn’t include the 15 mins or whatever to get up to pressure so sometimes it cancels out. I did try it more this year with the bolognese recipe in Pamela Salzman’s “Quicker than Quick” cookbook – she has a lot of good instapot recipes on there.

  29. Lora says...

    The InstaPot is my saving grace with two toddlers (and another baby on the way) – it’s the best way to cook dinner since they can’t burn themselves with it and I can prep/start dinner during nap time and it will stay warm. InstaPot days are the only days I don’t feel completely frazzled at 5:15 when I’m trying to figure out how to chop veggies while they freak out.

    Favorite recipes include:
    -veggie curry
    -beef stroganoff
    -kale, potato, sausage soup
    -broth

    I’m excited to look into this book and the other resources mentioned in the comments. Thanks!!

    • LORA–

      I love how passionate you are and can totally relate to this statement: “InstantPot days are the only days I don’t feel completely frazzled at 5:15….” Especially with kids at home around the clock. I hope Instant Family Meals gives you some new inspiration and relief!

  30. Emily says...

    I go on and off my instant pot (and all appliances), but I found myself obsessed with it this summer. We don’t have AC and during heat waves my kitchen is a miserable place. The IP is such a lifesaver during those times because it doesn’t heat up your kitchen!

    • Krystal says...

      We bought an instant pot before we moved last summer (E. Lagasse’s, because it was also an air fryer, I think). When Covid hit, we found ourselves in a new state with no housing prospects. We ended up living in a suite in my office building that was meant for short term guests and this machine saved our sanity. We had delicious, hot meals every day with little effort. When we move into our RV full time, it’s one appliance that will come with us.

  31. C says...

    We live full time in a small (by modern standards) 70s motorhome with a small oven and two burners, and the Instant Pot is a life saver–I use it constantly!
    1. Nom Nom Paleo’s roasts: Kalua Pig, Magic Pork, Short ribs, carnitas
    2. Quick cooking root vegetables: Roasted sweet potatoes, spaghetti squash
    3. The best beans — I don’t even eat canned anymore
    4. Bone broth (often using bones from above roasts)
    5. Quickly braising vegetables–I love cabbage in leftover jus from roasts; in 3 minutes, cabbage is perfectly tender and flavorful
    6. My secret weapon for any and all soups — it concentrates the flavor like Jenny says!

    And there are always tons of instant pots on OfferUp and FB Marketplace–when my partner and I moved in together I gave mine away for free because there were so many listed I couldn’t sell it at a price worthwhile.

    • Krystal says...

      Ooh, I we’re planning on eventually living in our RV full time too. Glad to hear it’s working for you!

  32. s says...

    Just gave mine away. My husband bought it for me (unasked for) and I tried it a few times but never caught the bug. I’m a slow cooker girl for sure, though!

  33. Nikki says...

    Oh no I may have to finally get an instant pot! Not only to try this recipe, which looks amazing, but because if there is one thing I have discovered during the pandemic is that legumes of all kinds are life! I can no longer go a week with black beans in tortillas; spicy dal and rice or crispy chickpea in my pasta. I understand why so many of the world’s cuisines use the legume in their daily cooking.
    @Jenny do you have any legume recipes you would highly recommend?

    • Marnie says...

      Food52 olive oil braised chickpeas. THE BEST

  34. Jess says...

    I JUST ordered this from my local indie bookshop a few minutes before reading this! I finally replaced my 4 year old broken IP. I didn’t realize how often I used it until I didn’t have it anymore. Think I will try this recipe tonight!

    • *hands up glee face.* Thank you, Jess! I hope you love the book!

  35. Thora says...

    I stood on the fence about getting an instant pot for a few years, worrying that it would end up being a large and mostly useless appliance. Now I have had one for the last five years, and I use it multiple times a week (sometimes multiple times a day!). I think the “instant” is misleading, because it does take time to come to pressure, and in most recipes you have to let it naturally release as well for a while, but I love that it is hands off, can keep food warm for hours, and never boils over onto the stove. My husband and I make:
    1. Steel Cut oats (4 minutes at pressure)
    2. Perfect spaghetti squash (7 minutes at pressure)
    3. Brown Rice (22 minutes at pressure), white rice (5 minutes)
    4. Soups and stews and chilis
    5. Beans
    6. Mashed potatoes
    7. Quinoa
    8. Pot roasts, pulled pork, Lamb
    9. Boiled eggs (only 3 minutes at pressure for medium boiled and they peel easily and perfectly!)
    I have had a rice cooker before, but we usually make brown rice and that took 90 minutes in a rice cooker, but in an instant pot it takes about the same amount of time as cooking the rest of dinner does. And I never used my slow cooker much at all, but the instant pot does have a slow cooker and I have used it a few times. Anyway, now I sound like I work for the company, but really, I love it as much as my kitchen-aid.

    • Christina says...

      *pulls Instant Pot out of cabinet. Screenshots entire comment from Thora.* Thank you for sharing this!!! I need to be better at using the Instant Pot for DAILY use rather than soups/stews once a week. We make rice probably every-other night.

    • marcella says...

      the brown rice sounds like a game changer!!!

    • THORA–

      So many favorites on this list! Especially easy-to-peel eggs, soups, pot roast, broths and steel-cut oats. Overnight porridges (with oats, and all kinds of grains–from amaranth to brown rice)– are highlights of my Instant Pot life, and heroes in this book.

      I love how passionate you are about the IP! (I was a TOTAL skeptic pre-Instant Pot, too–but it won me over)!

  36. Isahrai says...

    I use it every day to make the perfect steel-cut oats for my daughter and me, twice a week to make beans, at least once a week to make brown rice, and often for perfect soft-boiled eggs. But the real winner is making soups such as a cauliflower curry-spiced stew or minestrone. The impact of the flavor of spices from the high cooking pressure is a real wow factor. I usually saute the aromatics (in the pot) for 3-5 minutes and then throw the rest in and let it all cook and when it’s done, it tastes like something I’ve worked on for 3-5 hours instead of minutes!

  37. Caitlin says...

    this book looks great. We use our instant pot for all sorts of things, but it is really best for making broth (totally clear, no smell in the kitchen, no monitoring for the simmer breaking into a boil, no worrying about having enough time to make the broth properly if you’re going out, etc. etc.) and making yogurt. We make yogurt straight in mason jars that can go directly into the fridge. Making your own yogurt is ½ the price of store-bought and can be done over night.
    Of course we also use it to cook beans several times a week, and cook hearty stews and so on with minimal fuss.
    I’m going to check this book out at the library!

  38. CD says...

    I love my instant pot but have hard a hard time finding healthy recipes that don’t feel like the belong at a super bowl party (NYT cooking has been a good resource too!). Can’t wait to buy this cook book.

    • CD, his made me laugh out loud, and I agree. Exactly why I wrote this book! It definitely steers healthy-ish but with indulgent-feeling flavors and textures. I hope you enjoy!!

  39. Hannah says...

    I have a question for long-time Instant Pot users. 10+ years ago, upon a recommendation from Cooks Illustrated, I bought a Cuisinart Electric Pressure Cooker. It did everything that the Instant Pot does, looked just like it. I spent $100 on it, loved using it, but I found that I had to change the seal ring on it every 2 months or so because it would get slack and not seal anything. After a year, I tossed it because it was getting too frustrating to have the seal ring stop functioning mid-cooking.

    I loved, loved, loved the electric pressure cooker when it DID work. But because of my experiences with it, I’m too skiddish to spend good money on an appliance that I’ll be disillusioned with. So my question is this: Does the Instant Pot hold up? Have you had issues with needing to replace parts, get repairs, etc?

    Thanks!

    • K says...

      I’ve had mine for 3-4 years and have had no issues!

    • K says...

      re: last comment, to clarify – I’ve had my *instant pot* for 3-4 years and have had no issues :)

    • Isahrai says...

      I have had my small Instant Pot for 2 years and use it probably 10-14 times a week! If you research how to properly clean out the steam vent so it won’t get clogged — and cleaning it also makes sure it’s aligned properly so it won’t let steam escape and dry out — then you shouldn’t have any issues. I haven’t need to fix or replace anything.

    • Thora says...

      After five years of heavy use I have not had anything wear out. I know some people buy a second sealing ring and use one for sweet/neutral flavored things and one for strong flavored things (like curry), but I have never done that – I just wash between uses and it has been fine.

    • Amy says...

      I’ve had mine since January 2015, and no issues other than replacing my main ring once after about three years as it got a bit slack and didn’t seem to seal as well anymore. I would say I’m a moderate user (2-4 times per week). I also have a blue sealing ring that I use for making yogurt, because yogurt that tasted faintly of bell peppers or roast beef was not my thing.

  40. court says...

    I do not have an Instant Pot but I don’t plan on using one because I don’t think anything tastes as good as using a Dutch oven. I also just bought Dinner a Love Story cookbook and I think Jenny loves the Dutch oven too!

    • Noreen says...

      YES! That is a really solid cookbook. The sweet potato pot pies are a crowd pleaser at my house!

    • Court says...

      Noreen! I haven’t made those yet!!! I received it for Christmas and my New Year’s Resolution was to cook one new recipe from the cookbook each week. I have made the cabbage pork loin this week, the pork ragu, and the chicken cutlets so far. All amazing.

  41. Theresa Bernard says...

    My partner makes stock in the instant pot quite often. It takes 90 minutes as opposed to many more over the stove and tastes great!

  42. Sarah says...

    I’m obsessed with Melissa Clark’s two Instant Pot cookbooks and use them weekly. I also use the Instant Pot about once per day, sometimes twice. I set up my steel cut oats to be ready when I wake up, I’ll make tough grains in there, soft boil or hard boil eggs, make beans, and it is the exclusive method by which I make rice. It’s also the main way I braise stuff like short ribs or even bolognese. It’s almost confusing to me when people chain themselves to long cooking times in the oven when the Instant Pot exists (though when I use the cookbook All About Braising, I stick to Molly Stevens’s instructions). My feeling is if it’s good enough for Melissa Clark, it’s good enough for me! Her books are killer!

    • Kelsey says...

      Yes that Melissa Clark book is a great resource! Also all of pinch of yum’s instant pot recipes are flawless!

  43. Tatiana says...

    I’m intrigued! I love my instant pot but also use it almost exclusively for legumes. Are there many vegetarian recipes?

    • Isahrai says...

      I belong to a few FB Instant Pot Vegetarian groups… some are almost exclusively Indian recipes (fine by me!!!) and others are a more hodgepodge of cuisines. Last night, I made a red lentil curry from a recipe I pulled from one of those groups that was at least twice as good as the local delivery and probably 4 times as healthy.

    • Hilary says...

      I love my IP for soups, and I think soup is generally very veggie-friendly-

      – Ambitious Kitchen best chicken soup recipe is delicious, and you can leave out the chicken and add chickpeas: https://www.ambitiouskitchen.com/the-best-chicken-soup-recipe/

      – Veggie chili
      – Chickpea noodle soup (or just noodle soup!)
      – Corn chowder
      – Wild rice soup
      – Potato or cauliflower/potato soup

      A lot of recipes might not be made for the IP, but I’ve found that people often try it anyway and leave instructions in the comments!

    • Hi Tatiana,

      Thought I’d jump in here since this is such an important question. YES! We are a house full of “mostly-vegetarians”–we eat plant based for most meals, with only meat once-a-week or less–which is one of the reasons I wrote this book (I’m the author).

      So while there are many incredibly delicious braises and stew (an instant pot is brilliant at breaking down meat, quickly), there are also at least 60 + vegetarian recipes in the book. There’s a Special Diets Index in the back of the book that will point you to every Vegetarian, Vegan, Gluten Free or Diary Free recipe in the book (many!). Thanks for asking–and I hope you enjoy!

  44. katie says...

    Several Christmas’ ago, I bought my mom an instapot for Christmas. She has yet to use it. I might need to steal it. Or buy her this cookbook.

    In other news and speaking of a Sunday night pot of soup, I was planning on making turkey meatball, orzo and spinach soup this Sunday. I’ve tried about four different recipes in my pursuit to perfect this soup. I use Smitten Kitchen’s as my base but have altered it, pulling in elements from a couple of other recipes I liked. It’s really pretty simple and fairly easy despite not having an instapot.

  45. Emily says...

    I love trying cookbooks from the library before committing – I’ll give this one a try.

    I have an Instant pot, but my first attempt was a disaster – somehow it kept releasing steam until it was all dried out. User error for sure.

  46. janine says...

    I have been making ALL THE SOUP lately, and I already own an Instant Pot, so I’m definitely going to try this and will check out that book!

  47. Mary W says...

    I have a pressure cooker and my favorite recipe is porcupine meatballs. You make meatballs with rice and the pressure makes the rice pop out. It’s fun and old-fashioned. I just looked and you can find IP recipes for them, too.

    • Agnès says...

      I want to make these!! Thank you for the idea Mary!

  48. celeste says...

    I had a rice cooker that broke, and while a full-blown IP is out of my budget, I did get the Rice & Oats version ($39) for making lime cilantro rice, hot oats in the morning, etc. I was the kind of person who’d burn Minute Rice on the stove (forehead slap) but it’s much easier to clean too.

    • Dee says...

      Check your local neighborhood sales group. My daughter just bought a brand new instant pot for $40 from a neighbor who got it as a Christmas gift and didn’t want it.

  49. Maya says...

    I could have written this (not as well!). I had an instant pot for a long time and barely used it UNTIL THIS COOKBOOK. I borrowed it from the library and after exceeding renewals, bought my own. Loved everything I made so far – this recipe was delish.

    • Thank you for these kind words, Maya! I’m thrilled the book has been a win for you!