Design

Have a Good Weekend.

jerry and elaine

What are you up to this weekend? The days all feel kind of the same right now, so it feels funny to ask about a weekend, but here we are. :) We’re having a family movie night and making s’mores over a candle. (It actually works!) Hope you have a good one — stay safe — and here are a few fun links from around the web…

A comedian explains the pandemic to herself from four months ago. Genius.

This headline made me laugh…

…so did this one.

The new movie The Half of It looks great.

Jamie Beck is creating a photographic poster for every day of quarantine.

Lo & Sons — the beautiful bag company founded by a mother and her two sons — is 40% off site wide. (I’ve used this bag for travel so many times!)

This man ran around his mile-long block once every hour to complete a marathon in a day.

A visualization of wealth shown to scale. Keep scrolling through the wealth of Jeff Bezos.

So compelling: Five nannies on working during the coronavirus.

Love these postage stamps.

Haha.

Plus, two reader comments:

Says Kathleen on would you rather, but better: “We play this with my little kids, and call it ‘This or That?’ We can always count on my 4-year-old daughter for ‘unicorn or kitty cat?’ but they also come up with absurd and beautiful ones too, like my six-year-old asking me ‘The real thing or the memory of the thing?'”

Says Mym on would you rather, but better: “I’m reminded of this Winnie the Pooh quote: ‘Well,’ said Pooh, ‘what I like best…’ and he had to stop and think. Because eating honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment before you began to eat it which is better than when you were, but he didn’t know what it was called.”

(Wealth link via Kottke.)

Note: If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission, at no cost to you. We recommend only products we genuinely like. Thank you so much.

  1. JoLynn says...

    I enjoy the blog so much and it brings me such joy! I look forward to it and treasure my time learning or pondering something new. Its almost like a luxury indulgence. With that said, I would never tell Joanna how to run her business. It takes money to offer a blog and support employees and their families -which requires ads and links. It seems hypocritical to enjoy a free, quality blog then complain how its funded.
    We as individuals can choose who to support with our buying choices. Our dollars are powerful. Should Amazon pays taxes? Absolutely and so should all Americans. We should all( including businesses) be contributing something towards all the services that our provided for us. Contact your representatives and let your voice be heard. But don’t wait on the government, we can make changes ourselves now. Look into a minimalist lifestyle. Its not about getting rid of everything you own. Its about only owning what you need, use or love. Let the excess go and perhaps someone who has less can use it? I loved the questions another poster mentioned. Ask yourself is it something you really need? Do you already have something you can use? Make choices on how products are packaged. Look for alternatives to plastics. Support companies that match your beliefs. Being mindful and meaningful in our purchases is life changing. Just something to think about. Thank you to all the COJ posters. I enjoy reading all the reader comments, Take care & Be Well.

  2. Lauren E. says...

    I work for a wealthy family and can confirm they asked BOTH their nannies to come in to watch their 2 kids during the stay-at-home order in NYC. When one called the agency who had placed her, the agency said, “70% of my clients have been furloughed so I suggest you do anything and everything to keep your job right now.” It’s absolutely abhorrent. Risk getting sick and dying (or infecting others who may die) or keep your job. What a world.

  3. Sasha L says...

    Amazon is one of those things where I can see every side of the argument. Jeff Bezos is gross. It’s deplorable that our economic system allows this kind of wealth inequality and abuse of workers and the environment. For everyone who boycotts Amazon, good.

    Also, we buy things like parts for our cars (husband fixes with Amazon parts, a fraction of what they cost elsewhere, and youtube videos), and washer dryer and dishwasher and yard gates and dog doors and chicken equipment…… Someone earlier stated that Amazon doesn’t sell things we really need – SOME of the crap they sell we don’t need, but my car does need side mirrors and my dogs do need a dog door. What I’m trying to say is that for working class people, and as small business owner myself, Amazon saves us probably hundreds (maybe even thousands with a few big purchases) a year on things we really do need. And hundreds is actually a lot for us. And it’s fast shipping and dependable, which matters when it’s a part for your washer. Or a snowblower.

    Do I buy new outfits or makeup or shoes or a new patio set or the latest cookbook?? No. And I don’t buy those anywhere else either. Because I can’t afford them. And also I don’t buy crap I don’t really need.

    For some people it’s not as simple as just buy it local or elsewhere. If it is for you, then please please don’t shop Amazon. As long as I’m going to continue earning not that much money caring for other people’s children (I job which I think is valuable and I love, but also has zero benefits and sometimes pays under minium wage), and my husband’s going to earn not that much money working as a state employee, we HAVE to.

    And I have a feeling Joanna’s affliate links and the income stream they generate are not a simple as you all think either. I would just guess that if she dropped Amazon, she’d be done. Do you think she LIKES supporting Bezos? Why do you think she included that graphic? Bezos is the problem (and the whole underlying system), not us.

  4. claire says...

    I was just wondering with all of the concern expressed here over supporting small businesses if it would be possible to do some sort of a small business feature? I often learn about small business owners or artists here, and I know I could submit a few for consideration. I have no idea how this would work for a blog, just throwing it out there. )

  5. Megan Merritt says...

    Those postage stamps are so touching and fun. I went to high school with Jason, and it’s heartwarming to see his sketches taking on a new life.

  6. I chuckled at the Timothée Chalamet title. I read « singlée » as if it were a French word, which sounds exactly like the actual French word, « cinglé(e) », meaning crazy/looney.
    I had to do a re-read because my brain was like « Wait, what?! »

  7. Samantha says...

    Would CoJ consider setting up a Patreon account? I would 1000% percent contribute, and would MUCH rather put my money directly towards the site than buy an item I don’t need so the team gets a commission payment.

    • Cheryl says...

      You don’t have to buy anything, you just click on a link.

    • Samantha says...

      i work for an ecommerce company and deal with amazon advertising quite often.
      they will perhaps get a small payment for a click, likely cents per click, but earn quite a bit more for a purchase- generally anywhere from 4 – 15% of the purchase price, depending on the product category.
      Also, if you read their disclaimer on affiliate links, it specifies that they earn a commission if you make a purchase;
      “Note: If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission, at no cost to you. “

  8. Syrah says...

    Loyal reader here: when will you cover the Tara Reade accusations? I remember how quick you were to side with Ford when she accused Kavanaugh.

    Just wanting to make sure you weren’t siding with Ford because his politics irritated you 😉

  9. JRay says...

    I shop at small stores, I shop on Amazon. I have Amazon Prime and it’s made my life a million times easier and better. Do I feel guilty about contributing to Jeff Bezos’s wealth? I feel guilty about many choices I make everyday–including the types of funds that my retirement savings go towards. Amazon saves me so much time and frustration that it frees up energy and effort so I can contribute more in other ways of my life.

    I’m fine with Cup of Jo linking to Amazon–it’s the high/low range of products and prices that make this site so appealing to so many people in a wide range of situations. It’s 100% the right of ppl who are asking for the Amazon links to be taken down. I just want the staff to know that I’m sure there are many of us who don’t feel that way.

    • Sky says...

      I agree. I’m starting to get tired of consumers (many of whom live paycheck to paycheck) being blamed for their decisions to purchase the most affordable option. There are better ways we (ahem, out government) can deal with wealth inequality than putting it on consumers.

    • Claire says...

      I agree with this. I am also fine with Amazon being linked to here, and I can make my own decisions about where to purchase. If I don’t want or need to shop there, then I don’t. The Saturday I spent 4+ hours driving around town with my kid in the car looking for vacuum cleaner bags, only to have a salesperson at Sears finally tell me to order them online because they “never carried those in stores anymore” was the day I learned to appreciate Amazon. I also used Amazon to have a heating pad delivered to my elderly mother, who is not supposed to be leaving her house. Besides, it seems a highly unreasonable demand that a blog with an international readership figure out a way to link to “local” businesses….what locality? Why can’t readers make those choices for themselves? We’re all adults, we all have the freedom to do that. In this current crisis, with 30 million people losing their jobs and filing for unemployment, I am ok with supporting any business that is able to keep people working. (I can’t imagine the difficulty of trying to get through this time having lost one’s job.) The Amazon problems are for sure serious- the business practices that are abhorrent, the mistreatment of hourly employees, the neglectful and destructive impact on communities and the environment, and the refusal to pay taxes are concerns that need to be addressed, but those are not crimes exclusive to Amazon. Change will not come by posting critical comments on a blog. We can’t outsource our political activism to a Cup of Jo. Those issues are better addressed by communicating with policy makers and industry leaders. Meantime, if linking to Amazon helps CoJ keep the lights on and food on the table, I say go for it.

    • Sarah says...

      Really appreciate Claire’s comment and want to add that the small business Cup of Jo is supporting is… Cup of Jo. Joanna has a team of people she needs to support with a living wage, and while we are all encouraged to be mindful of where we put our money, I do not believe Cup of Jo could continue to produce such great and frequent content, nor could it support the employees we love, without the financial support from advertising for Amazon, J Crew, Nordstrom. She can and does make an effort to direct us to good companies, and small businesses, so we can spend our money there, but those companies are not going to keep her employees afloat in a very expensive city. So I don’t mind the advertising, and can choose to spend my money on Amazon or elsewhere depending on the situation.

    • Christina says...

      Hear, hear!!!

    • HG says...

      Thank you Claire, for the thoughtful and reasoned comment!

  10. Amy says...

    Thanks for this blog; it’s getting me through this pandemic!

  11. Cynthia says...

    I only shop on Amazon if I can’t find what I want anywhere else because I’m leery of counterfeit goods. I shop locally as much as I can, because it keeps the money in the community. I realize I can’t buy everything locally, but I do support our local businesses. They often carry products no one else has, or I can buy a product locally instead of ordering on line.

  12. Becky says...

    Please do not assume that just because a person is a Cup of Jo reader that they are riding out this pandemic in comfort. I would have commented directly on that person’s post but did not want it to be buried in the thread.

  13. Hanna says...

    I spent weeks 21 through 37 on “bed rest” (aka house arrest) during my pregnancy with my daughter. It was a lot like this.

  14. Lizzie says...

    Wow Bezos is disgusting. He doesn’t even pay taxes! Meanwhile, the lines at food banks are longer than ever. It’s sociopathic at this point.

  15. Erin says...

    This Sunday is International Bereaved Mother’s Day. Sending love and prayers of comfort to the bereaved mothers who may be reading this. I’m so sorry for your loss and your pain. My nephew Wesley died 4 months ago at 1 month old and I write this as a tribute to my sister in law, Wesley’s mother, as well. xo

  16. Susan says...

    I watched The Half of It this morning, it was a delight.

  17. SarahE says...

    Toasting mini marshmallows with my dad over a candle in our living room in the winter is one of my favorite memories from childhood!! S’mores were taken seriously in my family; we had these old school extendable hot dog roasting forks(which were always used for marshmallows, not hot dogs) and would toast marshmallows over the grill/barbecue in the summer if dinner had been cooked on it. I always preferred one with Hershey’s milk chocolate but later in life I came to appreciate the merits of a dark chocolate s’more!😊

  18. Love this and also appreciate the wealth inequality map. It’s so disturbing! I wonder if his kids read this and ask him what he’s planning on doing with all his wealth.. or are horrified at this. I would like to decrease my purchases on Amazon and try.. but of course even if you don’t buy anything from them, Amazon Web Services power a large percentage of the internet. But regardless, really hope this pandemic changes the government and business structures that have created people like him. However, from what I’ve read, he isn’t pledging to give away his money or donating, etc. as much as others in his position and that’s on him. With all your influence (you know I want to buy everything you recommend), I wonder what ways you can influence society in pushing for more income equality that is in line with the delightful world you have created and that we all love.. and that supports you and your team continuing to create the content we look forward to everyday.

  19. Denise says...

    I love Julie Nolke’s explaining the pandemic to herself! I’ve watched it so many times and sent it to a bunch of friends. She nails it on the head. If you’re feeling sad, or down, or disgusted, this is just a few minutes of humor to lighten your day.

  20. Michaela says...

    The poster series reminded me of an artist Diana Zeng who is painting a work from home scene a day. I love her colors and creativity with these otherwise “everyday” moments (swipe on her photos to see the original picture). https://instagram.com/dianazeng_?igshid=7chwgwu87dpb

    • A says...

      This is so cool! Diana is a friend from college and my space is one of the WFH spaces she painted :) Worlds collide!!

  21. Kirstin says...

    Thank you for posting the wage inequality infographic. I love CoJ but I’ve felt quite uncomfortable with the affiliate link program with Amazon, given everything we know about the company and now in light of this infographic. Other readers have made very astute points about Amazon and Jeff Bezos’ wealth.

    Could you consider a) finding a more environmentally friendly / philanthropic / less tax evasion affiliate partner or b) posting a transparent blog about why you continue to use Amazon links almost exclusively?

    I do understand that content has to be paid for somehow, and you offer this website to us for free. I appreciate that Amazon probably makes affiliate linking easy and pays well. I appreciate that you have an international audience and Amazon ships globally. But I think the time is ripe to challenge affiliate marketing and expect (and demand) better for businesses and their customers!

    I don’t buy from Amazon, had been shopping on the high street as much as possible before lockdown, and still try to buy from smaller independent shops – they need our custom even more now! Let’s create a better future for small businesses, the environment and support companies that pay their taxes together, CoJ!!

    • Vero says...

      I agree 100%. I appreciate the links to independent bookstores being included as well but I would love to see COJ find a way to maintain their website without contributing to the issues that exist around Amazon. I don’t think it actually aligns with the brand of COJ, which seems to be pro-people, pro-worker, etc. The stands we take individually (and especially a website with as much sway as this one) really matter when more and more of us start to live our values. I would love to see that kind of strong statement by COJ which I have loved for so many years! I think now is not the time to be half-assed in our intentions and actions, it’s the time to be bold and create the kind of world we want to live in.

    • Yes yes YES! That wealth inequality graphic blew my mind, and trying to grapple with the unconscionable inaction of Jess Bezos has me sputtering with outrage. He can’t even pay his employees a decent wage?

      I’m guilty of buying stuff on Amazon, especially no with so many local shops closed, but this is a sobering wake-up call to choose differently.

    • Alex says...

      I too am frustrated and disappointed that Cup of Joe and nearly every blog I follow links almost exclusively to Amazon for items that are available on Amazon – books, kitchen utensils, toys, gadgets, and on and on. Linking to Amazon must be especially profitable, because when given the choice between Amazon and anyone else that sells the same product, bloggers seem to choose Amazon every time.

    • CS says...

      The government needs to change it taxation laws, it needs to create better labour laws. That is what needs to change. Systemic change is needed. Lobby the government, support and vote for candidates who represent change for the better. It’s an uphill battle, and we need to use our energy to help make real change happen. If the laws don’t change, nothing will really change. It it isn’t Amazon, some other mega giant corporation will take it’s place and behave just as badly or worse. CofJo and a link to Amazon is not the problem. The system is the problem. Unchecked, completely out of balance capitalism.

  22. Mouse says...

    This is the headline that made me laugh:

    ‘I Will Never Lie to You,’ McEnany Says in First White House Briefing

    It was a dark and bitter laughter, but still…..:)

  23. Thanks for posting this wealth inequality infographic! It is shocking indeed. I’m really happy to see you guys post it and indeed, like other commenters above, I’d like to ask you again to stop placing affiliate links to Amazon on your website. In reply to a comment of mine about this under a “week of outfits” post a little while ago, someone explained that in these cases you try to keep the source the same when linking to products or alternatives – makes sense, but maybe you could just ask for a different outfit to be presented? And for the rest, there are so many alternatives to Amazon and I would be delighted to see you do your bit by seeking out and promoting smaller, ethical and local businesses. Leaving these comments in the full belief that the people running this website care about these things :)

  24. Andrea says...

    It’s not so much that Bezos is absurdly wealthy, it’s the business practices that brought about that wealth:
    -Tax avoidance, which is stealing from all of us.
    -Unfair competition driving other businesses out of business.
    -Copying successful products on Amazon and selling generic versions of the item to put that seller out of business.
    -Not paying for the cost of environmental degradation his products and shipping incur.
    -Not paying workers a living wage or making working conditions safe.

    I try and impose a hierarchy on buying things: 1. Do I need it? 2. Can I make or modify something I have or borrow an item? 3. Is there someone locally that I can buy the item from? 4. Is there a small retailer online where I can get this? 4. Is it on eBay? 5. Is there a more ethical larger retailer I can get it from?

    • Rachel says...

      I love this comment and your hierarchy of questions! Thank you!!

    • Rae says...

      Andrea, thank you – I really appreciate your hierarchy for purchases.

    • Vero says...

      I love this. Thank you.

  25. Jane says...

    Unrelated to this list, but I just wanted to tell you that the post on the “food-would-you-rather” kind of sparked my creativity to come up with my own food game. So now I send a foodie friend who is sheltering at home with their elderly parents and thus can’t leave the house at all a photo of either today’s ingredients or, if that is too vague, my kitchen in various “prepping/cooking stages” and they guess what I am making. It’s called “What are we having for dinner today” 😂😂😂 and while really easy and not that earth-shattering, it has proven to be a nice conversation starter and way to connect in a small way.

    • CS says...

      Oh fun!!! 😄

  26. Amanda says...

    I 100% agree. It’s nice to know that I am not alone in this thought.

  27. Emily says...

    Does this mean we can finally convince the CoJ staff to stop linking to Amazon all the time?

    Especially in these times, we need to be supporting small businesses.

  28. anne says...

    I couldn’t even make it past halfway on the wealth scroll. Wow :( What can he possibly be thinking???

    • Neha says...

      I know!! Me neither!! Makes no sense…

      And also, really really liked the selection this weekend!!

  29. Diana Boss says...

    The infographic on wealth should galvanize all COJ readers from the comfort of one click convenience shopping to intentional spending in support of local and smaller businesses. One tragedy of this pandemic will be the significantly reduced local options available and the tyrannical monopoly of a billionaire who doesn’t care about your community.

    • Neha says...

      The thing they buy competition… what we need is anti-monopoly laws!!!

  30. E says...

    I don’t buy from Amazon, but am always perplexed at the intense rage directed at Jeff Bezos. He became inordinately wealthy by providing Americans – and then the world – with exactly what they wanted: the cheapest, lowest-quality product, typically made and delivered by exploited people in an environmentally-degrading manner and delivered as quickly as possible in individual shipments with lots of unnecessary packaging. Sixty percent of American households have an Amazon Prime account; with some very casual math, this works out to nearly two hundred million people, or roughly two-thirds of the U.S. population. Clearly Bezos and Amazon offer a service people are willing to pay for, and I don’t expect their numbers to decline much even in the face of the crushing recession we’re about to enter.

    I’d like to hope that there might be some soul-searching done during this pandemic, and I think it’s high time that we collectively take responsibility for our choices. Amazon sells things we want, not things we need. We made Jeff Bezos the wealthiest man in the world, and we should acknowledge that – not blame him. We get the businesses (and the leaders) we ask for, or more accurately the ones we deserve.

    • Mouse says...

      Amen. It’s about the structures we allow and vote for.

    • Change says...

      All true – we absolutely have the power to make choices – not only of where we shop, but also who we vote for. Because the government needs to put laws in place : laws that force gazilionairs like Bezos to run their business(es) more ethically, tax laws that spread the wealth back (at least a bit!!) to the society that made him so rich. That would make possible things like universal healthcare, good education that pays teachers fairly, affordable universities… government has a role that it can play. Life can be better, and it can be done by tempering rampant capitalism with Laws that protect people, the environment. No one needs that much money.

    • mridula says...

      We can blame both – Bezos and the people who use his services.

    • sophe says...

      It’s not that he’s wealthy it’s that it was gained by unethical exploitation of those who work for the company and dispicably rapacious business practices. These are not the early days of capitalism when errors in judgement “might” be excused, we are centered in the era of the expansion of ethical and humane behavior.

  31. Kate says...

    The 5 nannies story made me cry and then made me angry. How dare these people not realize the value of their employees. But then again, if they did they would realize how little actual value they have themselves.

    • E says...

      It also made me super angry! And then I was wondering who the first family is … I wonder if they’re celebrities we would
      Know.

  32. Charlotte says...

    I read a book about math errors a while back (Humble Pi, by Matt Parker) in which the author described how poorly humans conceptualize numbers and scale. He used the example that 1 million seconds is 11 days, while 1 billion seconds is 31 YEARS. Understanding that really helped me grasp how truly deplorable income inequality is. Jeff Bezos could spend $1 each SECOND for the next 4278 YEARS. And while he’s the richest, there’s many more people who are similarly (and unjustly) endowed. That graphic is helpful too. The statistics on malaria are heartbreaking.

    And “The real thing or the memory of the thing?”! So beautiful and wise. Kids are wonderful.

  33. Ana says...

    The nanny article was infuriating!

    • A says...

      Agreed. Modern-day servitude.

    • Cynthia says...

      I agree. The people who employee these nannies obviously could pay them to stay home and stay well. My youngest daughter was a part-time nanny a few years ago, and the families she worked for loved her and treated her well. She is still friends with last family she worked for and the children still love her. The families she worked for were not extremely wealthy, but just needed an extra hand. The last family she worked for grew up in modest situations and worked hard to have what they have. My daughter reminds me of Mary Poppins.

  34. Kara says...

    The wealth visualization website is breathtaking, jawdropping….wow. Sharing widely!

    Reiterating another commenter but instead being sad Elizabeth Warren is no longer in the race. She is able to explain these unimaginable concepts in a way that makes our brains understand it. That’s why all the billionaires were scared of her!

    • Kate says...

      AGREE ON EVERYTHING. Thank you so much for sharing that visualization site. I am just floored.

  35. Julie says...

    If you are shocked by Jeff Bezos’ wealth, I would challenge Cup of Jo to divest from Amazon entirely. As recently as yesterday you included affiliate links to them. I understand the need to support the blog, but every link to Amazon puts more money in his pockets too…and lord knows he does not need it.

    • Kirsten says...

      This, please and thank you

    • Elle says...

      Agreed! Perpetuating Amazon as the default place to buy things is what creates this massive inequity. Please, please, please stop linking to Amazon. I know you need affiliates to keep the site running, but doing business with someone who allows this inequity to exist is being part of the problem.

    • E says...

      Agreed (esp bc amazon slashed the affiliate program lately). Even if it’s temporary, that would be such a good example. I am an amazon user but my partner and I agreed to stop using them for the next three months as a trial.

    • katie says...

      And I challenge all of you to support CupofJo by offering monthly donations for the content you apparently enjoy. That way, she won’t have to rely on affiliate links or Amazon to support her staff.

      It’s really that simple. Either those who read CupofJo pay for the service she provides. Or they receive free content, but have to see links to companies they don’t agree with.

      I’ve already said I’d be happy to pay or donate.

    • alexis says...

      I would also pay a subscription/donation fee in exchange for dropping amazon. Thank you cupofjo for the articles and for providing the space for the discussion.

    • Hannah says...

      Support this completely, would happily pay a subscription fee for Cup of Jo to avoid Amazon.

  36. Dawn says...

    Wow, I loved that article about nannies. It breaks my heart that so many domestic workers face unsafe and cruel working conditions. I’ve nannied first the same family for seven years. We have always been close, but this situation brought our relationship to another level. I graduated from college today and because I can’t be with my family, the family I work for are throwing me a tiny graduation party with just them and my husband on the guest list.

    • Kelly says...

      That is so lovely! Congratulations on your graduation, Dawn!

  37. Sophie says...

    I have nothing against wealth or the rich. But wow, scrolling through the wealth scale has left me disgusted, infuriated, depressed. What is the point? And what do we do?

    • Rae says...

      Vote your values. There are candidates at every level of government running on a platform that addresses economic disparity

    • Change says...

      Sorry , I already commented above (“Change”), but it answers exactly this question. We need to rethink the role of government. We need a government that Will pass LAWS that change things. That is the key. Fairer tax laws, fairer corporate responsibility laws…. it is possible. That can be the role of government. A fairer and “just” society. We are straying so far from that.

  38. Anna says...

    I am troubled lately at the movement in the national conversation – illustrated in The Cut article and the wealth graphic in this week’s roundup – around the very casual and accepted linking of wealth and being a person with poor intentions.

    I admire COJ because of their large diversity of perspectives, but the inclusion of these two pieces (both of which have anti-wealth angles and have chosen to illustrate the failings of some wealthy individuals while largely ignoring their contributions) is disconcerting.

    My family is part of the 1% – not the .0001%, but still. We both grew up poor, my husband is an immigrant. We weren’t born rich, but that is not to say that we ‘earned’ everything we have either. Much of wealth building is luck, privilege and having the opportunity to live in a country like the United States where I as a woman could be educated and work in a lucrative field.

    As someone who is actually part of the one group that now feels acceptable to hate in liberal America (and as a liberal myself), it is scary to feel this negative energy – not against policies or taxes – but against individuals. Potentially against my family.

    I am not saying the nannies’ perspectives are not valid, or that Jeff Bezos couldn’t pay workers more, but rather that there is a growing trend of ‘it’s ok to hate rich people because they’re bad and mean’ that I had previously felt was blessedly absent from COJ.

    • Alison says...

      I don’t think this is about hating rich people because they are “bad and mean.” The people in the nanny article are taking advantage of people and breaking laws. Such actions are unacceptable regardless of class or political affiliation.

      As a privileged person myself, I find it very concerning when fellow wealthy people portray themselves as victims or potential victims of a society that specifically caters to their needs. Money brings power (and healthcare, and educational opportunities, and so much more), and to suggest otherwise is naive.

    • Amy says...

      Agreed. It’s a socially acceptable form of self righteousness. It’s all relative, too; most of the clothes/products I see promoted on this blog are so far out of my price range, I feel like many of the blog authors and readers are what I would call excessively wealthy. And then my neighbors in my city probably feel I am excessively wealthy because I have air conditioning and access to a safe outdoor area for my kids. And then how would many people in other countries view even the poorest Americans? I would guess that none of us are being as ethical with our money as we could be, not just Jeff Bezos.

    • Mb says...

      This is such a weird take on COJ posting these articles. You are fortunate to be part of the 1% but that doesn’t mean there is no structural inequality built into US society. The idea that one single person (Bezos) can accumulate such wealth and with that, gain access to influence politics and policies should concern everyone who wants a functioning democracy. I hope that with your great luck, fortune, wealth you are able to look at these links with some objectivity. The ultimate criticism is that those who have a lot can do more to help even the playing field for everyone else. There is no reason why 1% of the country should hold almost 40% of the country’s wealth. No matter how hard one works for the money—it just speaks of a tremendous imbalance in the system

    • Kirsten says...

      Please don’t tell me we have to add “rich fragility” to the lexicon too.

      My family (and especially my husbands family of origin), is also within the 1%. Also not the 0.001%, but that doesn’t matter. I, like you, and I would wager to guess many many of the CoJ readers here are riding out this weird time in relative comfort. At a time when other people are fighting for their survival, don’t have stable housing or income, aren’t sure how to pay their grocery bill/feed their kids or take care of their health while being forced into unsafe working conditions while the rest of us continue to buy things from their employers. I’m sorry, but give me a break. No, not all people with wealth are horrible monsters bent on abusing their staff, but there are studies demonstrating that people with more wealth are generally less generous. People with relative wealth can and should do better in this moment, myself included. If you’re feeling bad Or attacked then you might want to reflect on why that might be.

      I would also encourage anyone here who comes from or has achieved wealth and is also dedicated to equitable resource redistribution to check out the organization Resource Generation.

    • Q says...

      As a member of the 1% – do you believe you should be paying more in taxes?

    • Kirsten says...

      Wow. Actually just looked up the net worth requirements for the 1% and need to edit my post. My family is not part of the 1% at all, not even the 10%, but I always felt we were since our lifestyle fit within our means and we don’t usually have financial worries. So yea, sorry, but if you do actually have a net worth of more than 10 million then I think it’s pretty hard to argue that people with no resources at all shouldn’t look at you with hungry eyes, even if you’re a delightful person.

    • Kate says...

      I am like you so I say this as a friend. I think it isn’t about “hating rich people” as it is questioning how this country treats people who aren’t in the 1 percent. It’s also important to think of people other than your family.

      By writing “I am not saying the nannies perspectives are not valid” you are diminishing their lived experience. They are risking their lives and DYING for people who could easily allow them to stay at home and still pay them. But gosh forbid some rich people can’t take care of their own kids like everyone else is doing in the country. The NANNIES, HOUSEKEEPERS, AMAZON WORKERS, DRIVERS, HEALTHCARE WORKERS, TRASH PICKUP, and GROCERY STORE employees are DYING. Show some respect. We need to pay them hazard pay, a better living wage, health insurance, PPE, sick leave, etc. Many of these companies could easily provide this to their workers and we as a country need to demand that they do.

      You are making this about YOU personally when it isn’t about you. It’s about capitalism and how we as a country treat one another. I think it would be good to look back before you were in the 1% for perspective. Personally, I think back to when we lived in our car and didn’t know where our next meal would come from. You and I aren’t the victims here. We know where our next meal will come from and we don’t have to worry about the bills.

      Again people are DYING to do jobs where they are not making a living wage let alone receiving hazard pay or health insurance. People are angry because these are the people who should be making the most money. These are the people who should be protected by our country and all we are doing is calling them “heroes” and giving them a $2 raise. What does that say about America?

      Please get some perspective. It is scary to go to work and not know if you will die but you need to go to feed your kids; feeling ‘negative energy’ because people are (rightfully) angry about the wealth gap isn’t the same thing.

      Good luck to you.

    • Elle says...

      The graphic takes no issue with the 1%, it in fact seeks to create a distinction, and say that grouping the 1% and 0.0001% together is what is stopping us from addressing the real problem. Your comment feels like a symptom of the exact problem the graphic seeks to break down. People who feel attacked for being wealthy when they read about Bezos’ wealth, and then in turn want to shut down conversations about the problem with the 0.0001%, are missing the point that an attack on Bezos is not an attack on all wealthy people. He is in a different class. This isn’t just comparing apples and oranges, this is comparing an apple to the earth.

      There are many of quotes in the graphic explaining just that:

      “Even the fortunes of very rich people are dwarfed by the incomprehensible wealth of the 0.0001%.”
      “But many have not fully grasped the enormous gulf between themselves and the super rich.”
      “These people may see themselves as fabulously rich, and often oppose policies aimed at reducing inequality.”
      “We can have a world in which wealthy people exist, without handing nearly all money to the super rich.”

      To your point that the articles “illustrate the failings of some wealthy individuals while largely ignoring their contributions”, I would point out that Bezos’ contributions are a drop in the bucket, and have not created a net positive, given the amount of taxes that he and his company have avoided. According to The Washington Post, “Amazon, the e-commerce giant helmed by the world’s richest man, paid no federal taxes on profit of $11.2 billion last year”. This is not the first year that they have paid nothing in taxes, according to Fortune, “Amazon actually reported a $129 million 2018 federal income tax rebate—making its tax rate -1%”. Market Watch points out that Amazon has also avoided paying sales tax, Amazon “would have collected a total of $20.4 billion in sales taxes from its founding in 1994 through 2015”.

      Any contributions that Bezos has made don’t come close to balancing out how much he has avoided in paying any part of his fair share in taxes, not to mention the less easily quantitated amount of human and environmental exploitation by the company. Amazon workers are striking today because Bezos is earning more than ever during this pandemic and not keeping his workers safe.

      I won’t get into the second article, because that’s whole other conversation, but I will say that it may be necessary for privileged people (myself included) to sit with discomfort in order for difficult conversations to be allowed to happen. Difficult conversations that need to be had to address true suffering, inequality, and exploitation.

    • Katie says...

      I think it’s interesting that your perspective on this is worry for yourself and your community. We are not part of the 1% in the States, but last year we lived in Colombia as teachers. We probably still weren’t in the 1% there, but close it with our Americans dollars and a terrible exchange rate for the Colombian peso. Reading the nanny article just makes me grateful that we’re still paying our nannies during the pandemic even when they’re not working and grateful that we have our valuable American dollars that we can use for the benefit of others during this time. If your perspective is concern for youself…I just don’t know. It’s a hard time for everyone, but maybe it’s time to choose generosity and gratitude rather than worry about yourself.

    • Mouse says...

      I think the problem is that we see over and over how the wealthy, whether or not they are “good” people personally, vote for the continuation of structural inequities and bad government that deeply affect the rest of us. If you use loopholes to avoid paying your taxes, you are part of the problem. If you vote for a party that demonizes government you are part of the problem. If you don’t hold accountable the people you vote for you are part of the problem. I am doing fine, not wealthy, but I have enough. I want others to also have enough and that is how I vote. I see it in my best interests and in the best interest of our democracy. I have no idea how you vote and what politics you support, but I think you should look how our democracy and society are structured. It isn’t personal.

    • anni says...

      Anna, I know underneath your initial response of defense and fear of being attacked, you MUST be HEARTBROKEN and shocked and horrified about workers dying because of their work. Would you die for your paycheck? For your boss? Please look at your own lineage and think about the people in your own family who had to do shitty jobs that hurt their bodies and were treated with disrespect and as invisible. before you say “yes, but, rich people are being attacked”— really, you want to shut down the voices of the most voiceless? surely that can’t be what you really want?

    • Vero says...

      There are a lot of stereotypes about wealthy people that are very negative. I think we need to change these stories we tell ourselves about wealth and wealthy people being bad, amoral, etc. But we also need wealthy people LIVING their community and social values, if they have them. We need more wealthy people speaking out, loudly, like Abigail Disney’s efforts. We need wealthy people to push and vote to close loopholes for tax evasion, offshore accounts, etc and vote in favour of liveable wages, proper healthcare for ALL, etc. I don’t see enough of that. I think if you’re wealthy it’s could be challenging to decide to live your values since you see how many others manage to maintain and grow their wealth by taking actions which hurt individuals, families and communities. But we have to start somewhere, and that starts with individual actions AND advocating for widespread policy changes.

    • Sarah says...

      Anna, I think your generalization that people think rich people are “bad and mean,” is problematic in the way that most generalizations are problematic. Some of them are! And it feels more egregious for a super rich person to be selfish because they COULD HAVE done SO SO SO SO much good. A poor person being “bad and mean” did not have the opportunity to help in the way that the rich person did. With privilege comes responsibility.

      Warren Buffett, Bill and Melinda Gates… Exorbitantly rich people who are aware of their good fortune, and are using their wealth and power to effect positive change. Warren Buffett has challenged the worlds billionaires to donate half of their wealth to needy cause. https://givingpledge.org/Pledger.aspx?id=177
      Of course the Gates are on board and many others, and they are not against high taxes on the rich, and are using their power and money for good. The Gates do so so much for this world, and still have so much leftover to have a very fancy life, which I do not begrudge them at all, because of all the good they are doing.

      Bezos’ ex-wife has joined the pledge. Jeff Bezos has not. I do not hate rich people, but I do have a lot of ill will towards those who are fortunate enough to end up in that position, and don’t use that position to help other people or needy causes. Bezos recently pledged $10b for environmental causes. But I think it’s fair for us to say, “you need to do more, starting with your own company.” Not everyone has financial wiggle room, but for those that do, I think that is a reasonable expectation.

    • Anna says...

      This is Anna the original commenter. I appreciate all of the perspectives shared here, and I thought a great deal about each of them over the weekend.

      If I may add to what Amy said (who said what I was trying to say in a better and more universal way), everyone posting here is exorbitantly wealthy compared to most of the world. But the plain fact is, we don’t all give away all, most or probably even half of what we have to the poorest of the poor. Why is that? And since that is the case is it reasonable to assume that if any of us found ourselves in the .0001% that we might not act a bit like the billionaires we love to rag on? I believe it is. We’re all just human, after all. And because we are imperfect humans, we have policies to guide our behaviors into what is fairer and truer and more just that we might act if it were just up to us as individuals.

      There are very important discussions in this country to be had and changes to be made around wealth inequality and how to address it. For Q, who asked if I believe I should pay more taxes, yes in fact, I do. I think Trump’s 2017 tax cut was ridiculous, unnecessary and a step in the wrong direction. I also think that if you want private industry to continue (which I suppose we could put up for debate…I would fall on the side of yes, absolutely it should), people who risk their capital need to be incentivized to do so to push forward those private activities. There is a push and pull between these two needs that currently is wrongly imbalanced, but there is a tipping point at which wealthy people say, “You know what, I’m going to pay 90% of the next dollar I make to the government, so maybe it’s not worth all the work and headache to launch AmazonPrime.” (for example).

      I also agree with what Sarah said – people expect more from the rich, because the rich hold outsized influence – their good works can amplify just as much as their poor works can. This is a reality I didn’t fully appreciate until I read Sarah’s comment but makes 100% sense. Unfortunately, being rich doesn’t suddenly make you a better person or a worse person. Being rich makes you a person with money. Which, again, is why policy is important.

      But when it comes to these discussions, which again, should and must be had, I stand in my original opinion that articles like The Cut’s are not additive – what is the action item here for myself and all of the women reading the stories and feeling their hearts break? Where should that heartbreak be funneled? There is no remedy in the article and so we are only left with righteous anger toward their nameless, faceless and conveniently rich employers. There is also no counterpoint of people like myself and my friends, who couldn’t imagine treating any person, let alone a nanny, even close to the way described. Not only would it be wrong, but it would be plain stupid, as these women’s job is our children’s care and wellbeing.

      And as for Jeff Bezos, it’s not surprising that someone who 2/3 of Americans pay to help them get supplies they need at a compelling price and speed for their families is insanely and unfathomably wealthy. But to peg Bezos and other billionaires as the choreographers of America’s tax policies is simply not a complete picture.

      Again, my point was yes, let’s fix the wealth gaps, but please can we stop demonizing the wealthy in the process. I get that the wealthy are not a sympathetic group and that in many ways the bulk of the responsibility falls on us to help enact change. So if the answer in your mind is no, go fix it and then we’ll talk, I understand. Regardless, I appreciate everyone who took the time to read my comment and reply back in such thoughtful ways.

    • Sarah says...

      Anna, I appreciate your thoughtful and reasoned response to these comments. It is hard to be disagreed with graciously.

      I want to follow up that while I continue to feel what I wrote above, if I am honest with myself, I do have immediate negative feelings in response to learning that someone is very wealthy, well before I know how they spend their money or how they treat their employees. I teach private high school students and often assume their parents will be entitled and rude before meeting them. (They are almost always completely lovely.)

      I mentioned to my husband today that a CoJ comment mentioned that rich people are vilified, and his immediate response was, “They are!” And we are not rich people. But he is right. And although the 1% are spared a lot of pain and suffering, it is not fair for me to make immediate judgments about them, or women, or people of color, or any particular group. I once had the thought looking out our little apartment window when I was having a bad day that even if I was looking out of a beautiful window at an expensively maintained garden in a big old house that we owned, I would still be human, and I would still be having a bad day. So you are right, we are all human, and are all deserving of the benefit of the doubt and grace as we make our way through our individual circumstances.

    • Lizzie says...

      I’m sorry but these comments trying to humanize the ultra-rich are so misguided. They are a predatory class and their wealth is based on a massive amount of exploitation. It is just is. They continue to behave appallingly and we can not condone them. Charity does not absolve them. The only way for a billionaire to be a marginally good person is to renounce enough of their wealth that they become a humble millionaire. If you’re really rushing to the defense of the class that fails to live appropriately in accordance with the rest of humanity, you need to reassess your values. People with less privilege understand that this is class war. It is shameful to pick the wrong side, when the evidence could not be more clear.

  39. Ashley says...

    The real thing or the memory of the thing. ❤️ Children are the most underestimated beings.

  40. My husband and I have always loved to make s’mores using candles. Once when we were dating, we were making s’mores this way while watching the movie Saw. At one point, the movie had one of those scary, surprise moments that made us both jump. But I was holding the candle in one hand, and I splashed hot wax all over my face! And of course, it quickly dried and formed a mask that we had to peel off. Luckily it didn’t burn me, and it ended up being one of our funniest memories together. Anyway . . . always leave the candle on the table! :)

    • CS says...

      I would worry about the chemicals on the candle! They would get absorbed by the s’mores! I could be wrong, but this sounds unhealthy!

    • jules says...

      Our candles are all beeswax, so I feel like those would be fine? BUT one day we got rained out from camping and decided to pitch the tent in the livingroom and made smores in the oven and the marshmallow actually turned out well! Maybe that would be a more comfortable option for you :)

  41. Amelia says...

    Random thing but I’m always confused when people say the weekends don’t feel different now – my family is super privileged but we’re still two parents trying to wfh and take care of a kid – the weekends feel like an amazing respite from trying to work and parent simultaneously, and are the only part of the week when my partner and I get to really see one another. I love it!
    Anyway, I’m so glad it’s Friday and I always look forward to this round up to ring it in! Thank you so much, CoJ team for the sweet content which is so helpful these days! (Oh and post idea: favorite drinks (alcoholic and not) these days to make the end of the day feel special?)

    • Jax says...

      Absolutely agree! I also cannot relate to all the complaints about boredom and finding enough hobbies or cooking projects to do! I feel even more busy now staying at home as a working parent. Every day I have to figure out which assignment I’m not going to be able to hand-hold and push my kid to finish. Every weekend I have high hopes about taking on some project or catching up on laundry, and end up laughing at my high hopes. I empathize, but can’t personally relate.

    • Betsy says...

      I love weekends even more now because of the much needed break from homeschooling.

    • Amy says...

      THIS. I am working full time while trying to take care of two children and their schooling at the same time. The work week is absolutely manic now plus with added work of sourcing food, meal planning, cooking, washing up, cleaning and laundry, etc etc.

      I’m flat out exhausted at the end of every day and just want to crawl into bed. At least I am fortunate to log off work – and my kids’ school schedules – on the weekends.

      Of course I am fortunate to be working. Just not able to relate to those who are taking up multiple hobbies or finding lots of spare time at this time…

    • Amy says...

      Absolutely- I appreciate the weekends so much more than I used to! Such a nice break from trying to juggle conference calls and emails with two little kids.

    • Katie says...

      I am with you. I was just going to post the same thing. Maybe it’s from people who aren’t working right now? Or who have jobs that are allowing flexible hours/more time off right now? Weekends are extra special and our only relief right now too. I am hyper aware of what day of the week it is because the weekends are so essential to my survival!

  42. Nicki says...

    Lovely quote from Winnie the Pooh. In German, we do have a word for that moment, and it’s called “Vorfreude” (literally pre-joy, but perhaps better translated as anticipatory joy). It’s frequently said in German that this kind of joy, or anticipation is the “best kind of joy”. (“Vorfreude ist die schoenste Freude.”)

    I’m one of those people who LOVES planning holidays, and vaguely recall reading that there is scientific evidence that the overall joy you derive from a holiday increases if you take the time to plan and picture the experience in advance. Here’s to stretching out our joyful moments a little bit longer!

    • Rae says...

      Thanks for sharing that Nicki – that’s my favorite kind of joy and I am so happy to have a word for it!

  43. M says...

    Nannies need to unionize. I’ve been a pediatric home health nurse for 27 years. I make sure my clients are taken care of and that’s it. I have never felt like I was part of the family or even loved the clients I have cared for. It has nothing to do with protecting my heart, I am naturally this way. I am lucky in that the few tiffs I got into with families resulted in the administration having my back. There is so little job security in being a nanny and way too much disrespect in light of whats going on. Kudos to the families that are letting their nannies stay safe and paying them. This article has strengthened my resolve to retire sooner than I had planned.

    • M says...

      Good to hear Anni! Thanks for the links!

  44. amy says...

    My heart is breaking for those nannies. We ended our relationship with our nanny last year when my husband stopped working. I think we had a great relationship but I always wonder how she spoke about our family. It’s a complicated, but special relationship.

  45. D says...

    This Elaine and Jerry meme is everything right now

  46. ANDREA says...

    We are attending a virtual wine tasting tonight! We ordered the wines and tonight we are Zooming the tasting! Quarantine date nights have been interesting.

  47. L says...

    Damn that wealth scale…there are no words. I knew it was extreme but to see it visually represented like that is truly shocking. Happy Quarantine Weekend, everyone!

  48. Lea says...

    I love love Jamie’s work! It’s vulnerable and beautiful. She also shares dreamy behind the scenes videos of how she puts together her photos on her instagram.

    I bought her Day 26 poster and love it! https://jamiebeck.co/collections/day-twenty-six

  49. Daniela says...

    The wealth scale is insane. Who needs that much money, especially when so many have so little?

    • Cynthia says...

      I’ve often said the same thing. The very wealthy could do so much with their money to make the world a better place. My husband and I often talk about what we would do if we were very wealthy. We have a long list of friends, family, and organizations we’d help. As it stands, we help out wherever we can, whenever we can. We received our stimulus money and gave it all away. To us, it was found money, like finding a $5 bill in your jeans pocket. Some of our neighbors are retired and struggling financially, and we have taken them dinners and breakfast items a couple of times a week. My husband cooks, and I deliver. Just to see the joy on their faces when I arrive with a hot meal!

  50. Adel says...

    I have to say, I found the article about the nannies to be very upsetting. I have had nannies for 15 years taking care of my five children. No, I am not wealthy or anything close to that. My husband is a principal and I am an educator, and the only way for both of us to work full time, is by employing a nanny. We always pay fair market prices (which comes out to about 40% of my salary after taxes), give bonuses, and treat them as a part of the family. Some have been amazing and lovely, and some completely unappreciative, no matter what we do for them, and consistently sour about what they seem to view as “class inequity.” We have had experiences of stolen money, abused children, and people quitting without notice. As with the perspectives shown in the book “The Help” (which I loved!) there seems to be a notion that all people who are employed as domestic help are kind, G-dly souls and most “employers” are entitled, abusive people. The reality is that there are good and not as good people in this world, on both sides of any equation. My nanny did not come for a month; I paid her, as did most others I know who employ nannies. We (most of us, not all obviously) send them home with food for their children, drive them home in the snow and do the best we can to take care of them, not just because they take care of our children, but because they are people. There are definitely some valid points in this article, but let’s please see the whole picture.

    • Mary says...

      Unless you are getting paid in the six figures giving your nanny 40% of your salary AFTER taxes isn’t enough for watching your 5 (!!) kids!

      Where I live a fair living wage for nannies and babysitters go up per child. 5 kids would be a lot of money.
      Do you normally give them paid time off? Paid sick leave? Health insurance?

      Also if they do more than just nanny like do your laundry, housekeeping, etc that is more money as well.

      Don’t do the cheap thing do the right thing by your kids and by your nanny.

    • Amy says...

      The article was not about stereotyping or making broad generalizations about nannies or their employers–it is actually about shining a light on actual class/wealth inequity and how that manifests in this particular sector of work. Families of many income brackets employ nannies and while most probably do get treated and paid fairly, it is an industry that is extremely prone to exploitation/abuse at all levels, and the pandemic has laid bare how far the mistreatment can go. Caregiving roles in this country–for children, the elderly, etc. are absolutely essential yet somehow the least respected. The tone of your comments and the lengths you go to show how well you treat your nannies and how didn’t seem to reciprocate that make it seem like you view nannies as beneath you, desperately in need of your charity and benevolence, and that you deserve some kind of recognition or validation just for not being a horrible employer like the ones in the article.

  51. Carla says...

    Hi!
    We watched this movie last night: « Adidas Vs. Puma: The Brother’s Feud ».
    It is very good! I didn’t know about it.
    I will read « red at the bone » . Have a good weekend!

  52. Liz says...

    Holy crap, that infographic on wealth inequality is infuriating. I’m glad the Amazon workers are striking.

  53. Megan says...

    What’s your movie for tonight? We are trying to decide and the adults in our house are rooting for a non-animated movie :).

    • Meg says...

      A non animated movie that our whole family enjoyed the other day was Pete’s Dragon.

    • Jenna says...

      The best two kid friendly non-animated movies I have watched recently are Big Little Farm (on netflix) and Troop Zero (on Amazon).

    • Erin says...

      We’ve been debating one of the Charlie and the Chocolate Factory movies (with grade-school-aged kids) or maybe Matilda. Highly recommend the latter if you haven’t seen it — Rhea Perlman and Danny DeVito are very funny as Matilda’s terrible parents.

    • Erin says...

      Based on your wording, I assume it needs to be kid-friendly? What age?

      I think my husband and I enjoyed Onward (the new Pixar movie) even more than our kids. It’s animated, but there’s a lot for adults (or maybe people of a certain era?) to enjoy. Could be a good compromise.

      Christopher Robin was a live actor film we all enjoyed. It gain acceptance from the kids for being based on something they know, and I got to look at Ewan McGregor, so we all won. Similarly, they liked the live action Cinderella and Beauty & the Beast. Aladdin is on our watch list.

      Princess Bride, of course.

      My husband and kids are working through all the Star Wars movies in order. He’s relieved to have finished the ‘first’ three episodes from the 90’s.

  54. Sammi says...

    The wealth to scale is so interesting & infuriating. I wish we could implement wealth redistribution simply. I’m afraid it will be a long, difficult journey to get even a tiny bit more equal. Do you have the source for who made this?

  55. katie says...

    Yesterday, my husband said it feels like “Groundhog Week” as opposed to “Groundhog Day.” It’s true. We’ve settled into our stay at home routine. Saturday’s, he picks up a coffee and pastries from the local bakery across the street. And we clean. Thursday’s we grocery shop. Nothing changes. I no longer know what day of the week, let along what month we’re in.

    Also… Lo&Sons Catalina bag is everything. I have it in two sizes. It FITS SO MUCH! All I need is that, a small crossbody purse and my small Away suitcase and I never have to check luggage. I look forward to the day I can both again.

    • Erin says...

      “Groundhog Week” is perfect.

      Last week, I went most of an entire day thinking it was a different day of the week and missed several work meetings.

      And – because these are the weird times we are living in – everyone felt that was a completely reasonable explanation.

    • Marianne says...

      The wealth scale is so infuriating. I don’t know what it will take to even reduce this inequality by even a little.

    • Katie says...

      Erin, I feel you. Earlier this week, I presented a schedule to a group of colleagues to meet a tight deadline, due next Friday. When I finished, someone pointed out I was on the wrong month. It was easy to adjust, still, embarrassing. I seriously have lost all concept of time during this pandemic.

      On the bright side, since my schedule had the 8th on Wednesday, I bought myself two more days.

    • Jules says...

      Katie! Which size bag do you like most for say a long weekend trip? I have been so close to buying this bag in thistle for probably 4 years. Every time I go to buy it, though, I cant decide on small or large and then don’t buy either! Youre the perfect person to ask though if you have both sizes.

  56. Andrea says...

    Omg, the wealth scale. (Just holding back tears over here wishing Bernie weren’t out…)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      so shocking, right?

  57. kate says...

    I love Mym’s Winnie the Pooh quote! I feel that way about coffee.

    • Amy says...

      And wine!