Empty piazza San Marco

An empty Piazza San Marco on March 6th in Venice, Italy. (By Stefano Mazzola.)

Every time I pass people on the street, they are talking about the same thing: the COVID-19 pandemic. It seems to be top of mind for everyone. As always, I’m wondering: how are you feeling?

Right now, for our family, life feels ominous but semi-normal. Toby and Anton are still going to public school. Alex’s department at the New York Times asked everyone to work from home, so he’s been writing on a laptop in our bedroom. Our Cup of Jo spring event was canceled, and we have started avoiding big public groups, including basketball games and movie theaters. We bought a couple extra boxes of pasta and cereal and toilet paper. We’re greeting people with elbow taps or waves, instead of hugs and cheek kisses. But we’re still seeing friends at the park and going to the grocery store.

I’m assuming that, in days or weeks, things will continue to tighten up. “Cancel everything,” says an Atlantic headline. “The bottom line: It is going to get worse,” said Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

It’s a very strange feeling — waiting to see what will happen. Will public schools close? Will subways shut down? Will we mostly be staying home? One thing that brings me comfort: I do believe that people are inherently good and we can work together to keep our communities safe.

A few things that are worth reading…

* Coronavirus in brief. The basics.

* COVID-19: Not just a bad flu.

* A reassuring comic for kids about the new coronavirus. Loved this (and it comforted me, too).

Please share: How are you feeling? Where do you live? I’d love to hear. Take care of yourself, and sending so much love to everyone. And keep washing those hands! xoxo

A professor tapes a lesson in an empty classroom on March 5th in Milan, Italy. (By Piero Cruciatti.)

Shelves that usually hold toilet paper and paper towels on March 2nd at Costco in Teterboro, New Jersey. (By Seth Wenig.)

An empty soccer stadium on February 27th in Milan, Italy, where fans weren’t allowed. (By Emilio Andreol.)

(Photos via The Atlantic.)