Design

What’s Your Email Sign-Off?

Mary Tyler Moore

How do you sign your emails? This made me laugh…

“Contrary to popular belief, [XOXO] does not mean ‘hugs and kisses,’” Emma Rathbone wrote for The New Yorker. “If anything, it’s intended to convey light affection, like a pat on the butt from a Texan aunt… [XO] is like when you lean in to kiss your Texan aunt on the cheek but you both turn the wrong way and kiss on the mouth.”

What about idiosyncratic sign-offs? My friend David writes, “All good things,” which feels so elegant. “Love and other indoor sports” is the way a Judy Blume character signed all her letters. Writer Sadie Stein goes with “As ever.” An old crush once ended an email, “Yours and yours and yours,” and I almost blacked out from the romance.

I’ve written “xoxo” for so many years that it has now become a part of my name. My sign off, whether I’m writing to my husband or the exterminator, is “Joannaxo.” If it’s an important work email, I’ll sometimes leave it off, but a plain “Joanna” just looks SO RUDE.

Some people really stick with theirs. When Churchill declared war on Japan in 1941, he signed his letter to the Japanese Ambassador, “Your obedient servant, Winston S. Churchill.” When asked about it later, he pointed out, “It costs nothing to be polite.”

Do you have a signature sign-off? Do you ever sign “xo” in work emails? (Busted.)

P.S. The hardest tongue twister, and annoying words.

  1. Aj says...

    Lol, there’s always some “expert” that knows better, isn’t there. Don’t know of anybody with any “contrary belief” about xo. It’s always meant hugs and kisses. You’re the only person on planet Earth that is ever said anything different about it. This is exactly why we home school our kids.

  2. Emma says...

    The comments here rule and I need an info graphic for the correct signoff because I have always used different things for different purposes. I’ve always meant “Thanks” to be a quick, casual response to someone I know pretty well (but clearly need to reconsider now). “Thank you” is an old standby that I don’t think can go wrong. “Thanks in advance,” for when I am asking for help (though now should I start saying “Thank you in advance”????). “Best” is reserved for people that are being annyoing/rude/ungrateful but I still feel like I need to be polite. “-Name” is for the particularly dire circumstances where someone follows up with a question that is clearly outlined in the original message. “Thanks for all you do” is my go-to for sending updates to my team. But “Let’s keep talking” has become my very favorite! I think it welcomes a dialog and makes it clear that our conversation is just getting going.

    I imagine the work culture has a big role here. I work at a large museum where my immediate team of educators is often very informal and warm but working with other departments (curatorial or development for example) requires a different approach.

  3. Allie says...

    I always use Best. For whatever reason, Your Obident Servent drives me wild? It’s seems insincere to me! But maybe best isn’t that much better? Best, Allie

  4. Kim says...

    My normal sign-off is “Enjoy your day!” followed by a smiley face (sometimes) and my signature block. Today, someone shot back with, “Enjoy your afternoon and evening” which, for some reason, I took as a challenge. You went for the subtle win by tacking on “evening” but I’ll one-up you by closing my reply with “Have a great week!” Then I remembered this comment section and burst out laughing! Hope everyone is having a good MONTH! :D

  5. Courtney says...

    I have strong feelings about this! Someone in my office used to sign their emails “v/r,” which I had to look up and is apparently a military thing meaning “very respectfully.” But not so respectful that they’d spell it out! “Cheers,” to me, seems like you’re trying to be British. And “Best” always reminds me of Sex and the City when Samantha said writing “Best” is like saying “NOT Love.” I just saw an email from a colleague where he signed it “Grace and peace.” We are not a religious or spiritual organization …

    Generally, I don’t have a set signature. If I’m asking someone to do something for me, I’ll write “Thanks,” but otherwise it’s just my name or something like “Let me know if you have other questions.”

    • Courtney says...

      As someone in the military reserve, I completely agree that outside of military settings the “v/r” alone approach may not be the best choice. But among other military members or civilian colleagues who “speak the languauge,” it’s a huge faux pas not to sign off with “V/r” or “R/” (the difference depends on who you’re corresponding with and their rank). But I do catch myself sometimes accidentally using it in personal emails or at my civilian job – whoops! My personal go-to is “All the best.”

  6. I learned of using “Best” on a listserve, I’ve never seen it used before. This is going back to 2006 or so. I started to use it for fun, since that time, I’ve written to people who work for our state, tweeted someone famous and used it as well as friends and acquaintances via email. I thought I’d started a trend when I saw the term used on a sitcom-after I’d used it in a tweet. And have had State employees email me back using it.

  7. Suzannah says...

    Thoroughly enjoyed reading this post and the comments. How absolutely fascinating!

    I often use ‘Best regards’, which sometimes gets shortened to ‘Best’. I always just preferred ‘Best’ over ‘Kind’. I also use ‘Thanks’ or ‘Many thanks’, but have just switched to ‘Thank you’ after reading this :)
    It never occurred to me that anyone would find ‘Best’ or ‘Thanks’ irritating or rude – yikes!

    I am also guilty of using a lot of exclamation marks (and smiley’s) which I sometimes think might be seen as unprofessional. Ultimately I am just aiming to make someone’s day a little brighter, whether it’s via email or text or a face to face interaction :) so I can’t help but type with enthusiasm!

    My dear grandmother signs her letters and cards ‘with great love’ which I adore. ‘Great love’ just feels so huge/infinite/genuine/unconditional/warm/fuzzy/kind!

  8. Mine used to be “All the best”, then it was “Cheers” and now I have none. I only have my name and logo at the end of the email contents. Sometimes, I’d end my note with “thanks” or “have a great week/day” if it applies. I’m not against sign-offs, but I’ve resolved to just type the way I talk (or closest to the way I talk). Outside emails, we don’t usually have a sign-off anyway, so I thought to let all of them go. But that’s just me!

  9. SB says...

    Love the comments! PSA: capitalize only the first letter of whatever closing you choose (in the U.S. at least). “Best regards,” NOT “Best Regards.”

  10. Cas says...

    There’s a professor I work with who sometimes says “Best,” which I detest, but then other times it’s “All best,” … : |

    All best… what? Wishes? Regards? Cheeseburgers? You weren’t done, man. Love this guy, but the sign-off kills me. It’s like a TV show with a cliffhanger—you’re just wrapping it up on a sentence fragment!

  11. For notes to dear friends I typically use “Hugs” or “Rooting for you.” I’m a hugger, so my hope is they can sense me wrapping my arms around them even from afar!

  12. Belen says...

    I’m loving all the comments on this post, I didn’t realise we all think so much about this. I usually sign off with ‘thank you for your time’ if I’m sending anything that needs an answer and ‘have a lovely day/weekend’ if I’m the one answering. I find that the first one works great with teachers or students that don’t expect to be thanked for their efforts (I’m a teacher too) and the second one is warm while still being professional. My boyfriend says goodbye on text by sending kisses to my cat and then to me with a funny reference to something in the conversation or something that we did each day, ie ‘good night, sleep well. Ps: send kisses to Tom ps2: send kisses to the girl who reads in the hammock.’ It melts my heart and makes me look forward to read what he’s came up with each day.

  13. Rebecca says...

    My dad, who passed away at 70 years old when I was 25 and pretty much never used a computer in his life, would “sign” his voicemails to me as if he were writing me a letter. “Love, Dad” or “Thanks! Dad” or “Call me when you can. Dad.” Always made me smile. Regretfully, I never saved these voicemails. Folks, save at least one voicemail from each of the people you love.

  14. Molly says...

    This is such a fun post! I have worked in finance for my entire career which tends to have a formal communication style, particularly with client interactions. I typically match my email sign-off to the tone/purpose of the email, but I have a personally bugaboo against “Thanks” and particularly “thanks”, the un-capitalized derivative. It feels terse, rushed, and not at all thankful to me. Why not, a full “Thank you” if thanks are warranted?!

  15. Amy says...

    My Grandma always singed her letters to her children “Love you madly”. Wouldn’t fly for work obviously, but we all throw it in on family correspondences.

  16. Alice says...

    I had a coworker recently who was new with the company, and when he first started, signed off with “Be well.” A little unorthodox in a technical industry, but perfectly fine. A few weeks in, though, he transitioned that to “Be good,” which seemed very strange and a little condescending. That’s what people say to their children. That’s literally what I say to my dog as I leave the house. Thankfully, he didn’t last long.
    Also, it drives me absolutely up the wall when people use an acronym as their sign-off. Not everyone knows what it means! I had a coworker who used “BR” as his sign-off, and I kid you not it was six months before I realized it was short for “best regards.” Really? You have such great regard for your recipients that you can’t even be bothered to type it out?

  17. erica milsom says...

    I used to write Cheers…. but then it felt drinky.
    So I changed it to “Best!” Which, in my mind, means BEST WISHES FOR YOUR DAY YOU WONDERFUL PERSON.

    But I’m not sure that comes through. I always sign ‘e’.

  18. “Enjoy the day”. I use it for everything. It’s simple, to the point, and makes me smile.

  19. One of my favorite podcasts “Dispatch to a Friend” they always sign off their letters by ” Mind where you go” I really love it.

    My sign off-s are: Have a productive week if or have a restful weekend.

  20. Kate says...

    This differs around the world. I’ve been working a lot recently with colleagues from the US and they all say “Best”. This is considered way too casual in South Africa. I now work in Venture Capital but have worked in some form of financial services my entire career. It’s a very formal industry! In South Africa we are trained from Day 1 to say Kind Regards. Internal emails we can get away with just Thanks.

  21. Lauren says...

    My husband and I are both corporate attorneys. I asked him what he says and he said “thanks” for those of you worried that men don’t sign off thanks. Maybe he’s just as special and lovely as I think he is, but maybe it’s not just a woman thing!

    I’m a “warmly” in writing, but idk if I’m a person whose personality makes that well received.

    I am a superior to someone who always addresses me with a formal “Lauren:” in her emails and it drives this millennial up.the.wall. I can’t take it because idk if she’s being condescending (she is prone to this generally) or just being more formal as is often appropriate given the environment. I address my superiors with a comma, or really nothing at all.

    • Paula says...

      that is funny to read from a non-millenial. I ALWAYS say that in work emails
      “PERSON NAME:”
      TO me that just signifies that I’m talking about work and I don’t really know you to get chummy with you. A colleague that I’m closer with, I will say: “PERSON NAME,”

    • Sarah says...

      One of my former work friends always started her emails with name, hello. As in Lauren, hello. We all made massive fun of her but she wouldn’t stop. Years later, we’re great friends and i always start my texts to her that way.

    • Jessica Garrett says...

      I am a 33 year old high school teacher and cringe every time a student sends me an email with no intro (i.e. Dear Mrs Garrett or Hello Mrs. Garrett or even JUST Hello). But reading this helps me understand them a bit more. I’ve interpreted it as disrespectful, but maybe I’m misjudging. Thank you for the insight.

  22. Alexandra says...

    My husband and I are both counselors (me in higher ed doing crisis intervention, he’s a school counselor). We both use “Be well” as our signature. For me, it’s a nod to the work I do, and my intention for us all to take better care of ourselves.

  23. Ellen says...

    So many interesting answers in these comments! At work I usually default to “Best” (which I never knew could be negatively interpreted!). My workplace has a culture of rapidly firing off emails, so oftentimes a “Hi/Dear/Hey Ellen” and then a signature will be left off entirely in a reply or further along in the email chain, and THAT really annoys me.

    Sometimes I’ll switch it up and say “My best,” “All my best,” or “Many thanks,” especially if I know I’m asking a lot of someone. Another thing I’ll do is:

    “Many thanks again, and happy Friday,

    Best,
    Ellen”

    Not sure if that’s extra bothersome, but I like using it. I hope it conveys that I really am grateful and wishing them the best.

  24. rebecca says...

    I like using “Stay Cozy”.

  25. i used to get asked about my all lowercase type and “xx cass” sign-off in work e-mails, but now it’s so predictable people actually point out when i’ve capitalized something or ended an e-mail without my sign-off. it makes work acquaintances a more intimate part of my life.

  26. I work in a school and for the most part, I just use my initials in lowercase both for work and in personal e-mails. If I use a closing, it’s always “carry on” my version of the very Jersey “take care.”

    sm

  27. Tricia M says...

    My brother in law, whom I love to bits, always signs off “me” which I find very irritating for some reason! Rather confusingly he sounds just like my husband on the ‘phone.

  28. Tiffany says...

    I need a chart of the responses, what to use, what to use, gah!

  29. Michelle says...

    For me it’s always been “Regards” for work email, and just my name for personal, unless there is some emotional context in which case I might write “Love” or, if it’s not a close friend or family, “Take Care”.

    I recently started working with someone who signs off “Respectfully,” which I think is perfectly appropriate for work and makes me want to communicate with her very respectfully!

  30. Sally says...

    I laughed when I read this and relate to it to a tee! I also sign off with ‘Kind regards’ at work, but if I’m particularly irritated I sign off with ‘Regards’ (it’s the closest I’ll get to shaking my fist at someone, not that they would know!). Glad to know I’m not the only one!

    • Sophie says...

      Same!! Not sure people notice but there is a real intention in dropping the “Kind” indeed 😂

  31. Lori says...

    Anything not work related is: Lori xx
    Anything work related is just “Thank you, my full name”, boring! I’m going to steal some of the suggestions I’ve been reading here. Particularly like “Onward!”.

  32. Deb says...

    OMG. I dread to think the consequences of XOXO in my hideously inappropriate office (I need a new job!). Ha.

  33. Mara says...

    I recently got an email from a vendor I work with you signed off with “blue skies.” He’s a location scout and I thought it was very uplifting.

  34. Lillian says...

    To one of my dear professors, I’ll sign off with “BK” every time for “bless and keep,” whose longer version is then “bless you and keep you.” I’ll sometimes get poked fun at in response, with “Burger King to you too!” even though he knows full well I mean :)

  35. KM says...

    My best friend, Anne, always signs her emails with Sincerely followed by a play on her name, depending on the context. For instance…

    When she’s experiencing a bout of anxiety…ANNExious or ANNExiety

    At Christmas time…SantANNE.

    Leaving for a trip…VacatiANNE

    Makes me laugh every time :)

    • Jo says...

      This is BRILLIANT! Might adopt. My name is Jo too. Help me think of some?

  36. it's ok clay says...

    “Best” is the worst to me. Anything but “best.”

  37. Ann Marie says...

    It may be the mother in me, but I always sign off with a “Take care”. Sweet and applicable to everyone!

  38. Lisa says...

    I usually just say “Thanks” if there is anything anywhere in the message that is worthy of even a small bit of thanks. Never hurts to be polite.

    For emails between my work group who is constantly emailing, there is neither salutation nor signoff.

    And if you write “Best” or “Cheers” or write y’all anywhere within an email, yeah, I pretty much want to slap you. Sorry not sorry.

    • Paula says...

      I legit am just here for the comments looking through anyone who will rip on Best and Cheers! Those two signoffs make me CRINGE and I judge so hard the people that use them.
      When my sister, for some odd reason, started to sign her emails with Cheers I called her and made her stop. Unless you show me a British passport, GO AWAY.
      my favorite work emails are just those that you describe-back and forth, no need for salutations and signoffs; I wonder if it’s generational.

    • Sarah says...

      I’m curious — what is it about “Best” that makes it so abhorrent to you?? It implies goodwill, which I think is generally the most important aspect of a sign-off. Also, I am from Texas and use “y’all” unapologetically. So you would pretty much want to slap me silly if you ever received an email from me.

  39. I just read through all the comments and was surprised no one uses Sincerely. Am I the only one still using it? I like the alliteration with my name. But does it imply something that I’m not understanding? ‘Cause now I’m second guessing it. lol
    Sincerely,
    Cynthia

    • Cat says...

      Sincerely here for me too. It’s classic and always appropriate.

  40. L8Blmr says...

    I work with a guy who signs off “wkr” for some reason it took me forever to realize it was “with kind regards”! Because he’s in one of our overseas offices, I just assumed it was some fancy cultural sign-off, but it’s plain ol’ English!

    • Laura says...

      This would not read well in England 🤣

    • Alice says...

      Laura, I’m from England and it did not read well!!!!

  41. Mollie McAuley says...

    To anyone I’m close with, it’s always XO-M

    Love reading everyone’s responses!

  42. Ramona says...

    I have been receiving emails at work from a woman I have never met and have had only minor contact with that are signed “love.” Even though I know that she probably signs all emails this way since I can’t fathom what about our brief and perfunctory correspondence could possibly have led her to love or really even particularly like me, I have to say that it does make me feel special!

  43. AM says...

    To classmates or my professors in Hawaii, I’ll write ‘with aloha’ or ‘best’ (though I’ve never liked ‘best’, but everyone seems to do it!).
    To friends and family, it’s ‘xo’, ‘peace in the middle, and ‘smooches von booches’…

  44. Em says...

    I think I may be one of the few people in the world who likes passive aggression. It gets the point across without a fight and whether I’m dolling it out or on the receiving end, it ALWAYS makes me laugh.

  45. Jana says...

    I often use “thanks” for internal work emails because whether I’m asking for something or I’ve done something, I ought to be thankful for the person on the other end. In very professional emails I use Best Regards. Anything with a more personal touch gets “Take Care.” I also like “Have a good weekend!” and “See you soon!” where appropriate.

    I am very guilty of overusing the exclamation point.

    • megs283 says...

      Same to all of the above. So obviously, I think your email style is perfect! :-)

  46. Karen says...

    Reading the comments on the ‘Cheers’ sign-off I was reminded of a VP years back who used that as his sign-off; he was a complete jerk in every way. Though I like it, it’s tough to use that one ever. I still like,’ kind-, warm- or best regards’ to be bit more formal. ‘Best’ is good for frequent back and forth with colleagues and to be sure its not too casual in saying nothing.

    Veering a bit off-topic, I’ll admit to using ‘duly noted’ when the receipient is being awkward and I need a safety reply. That’s it, a ‘duly noted and thank you!’ will convey I understand and I’m moving on now . . . Saying thank you makes my mother-in-law’s words ring- “good manners are free, anyone can have them”

  47. Catherine says...

    “Kindest, Catherine”

    • Ellen says...

      “Kindest” … what? regards, thoughts…seems you need a noun here to clarify. Same goes for “best”.

  48. Jess says...

    Whenever I see “Cheers” I think “down the hatch” and associate the email with a task that needs a chaser.

  49. Alyssa says...

    I stole “warmly” from a former coworker I admired. She was the kind of person who could turn any negative conversation into one where the offended party was thanking her by the end. In some small way, I hope to channel her professionalism, skill and kindness. Hoping that email signature works!

    • Lauren says...

      Another vote for warmly! I’ve been complimented on it by both male and female colleagues.

  50. Karla says...

    I read way too much into email sign-offs and generally hate motivational ones (onward & upward! -or- keep moving forward!). I like simple, kind, to the point ones, so I use “warmly” but now saying it out loud, it may be just as annoying. hmm…

  51. Laurel says...

    Reading comments and apparently I’m an asshole for using ‘Best’. Switching immediately!

    • Erin says...

      Same, although now I’m thinking, maybe we just need to add a word. “Be best” has a real ring to it, don’t ya think? :-)

    • Julia says...

      I use Best, followed by my initials. What’s wrong with ‘best’?!!

    • Julia says...

      Just changed my ‘Best’ to ‘Best regards’. Never knew ‘Best’ was bad! :-(

    • Rachel says...

      Good lord, if you like “best” then keep using it? Who made anyone in charge of making you feel like an asshole! If anything, make it more “besty” by adding stuff to it… “Always the best…” or “Y’all are the best…”

      My mom, who is in her 70’s has a tagline, “Only one life, t’will soon be past” which I HATE because, well I don’t know why, but I do. But I’m not gonna call her on it.

      Best it up, ladies.

    • I agree with Rachel–don’t let strangers in this thread make you feel bad. I’m getting a chuckle over everyone getting so up in arms over it all LOL

      If it makes anyone feel any better, I only learned LAST WEEK that we’re not supposed to use two spaces between sentences #old. It’s been very challenging writing this response properly ;)

      I’ve been using “Best” or “Thanks”…I really like “Warmly” or “Kind Regards”, but it sounds a little stuffy.

      Fun read!

  52. Autumn says...

    At a place I worked at years ago, when we were really upset with someone we’d sign off “Yours in Christ” or “Have a blessed day”. So passive-aggressive

    • Lisa says...

      Amazing!

    • E says...

      “I lean in this direction but am moving away from it after contemplating the gendered use of “thanks.” I don’t know any male colleagues who default to thanks. ”

      I can’t stop thinking about this comment above! Wow. Never crossed my mind yet SO TRUE! I always default to: Thanks.

      My male colleagues sign off with just their name. Is can seem rude or abrupt at times. Is it just a sensitivity for me, but preferable?

    • Joanna Tsay says...

      Oh, how I live for the comments section on Cup of Jo…

      My dear sweet husband always, always, always signs off with Sincerely. He could have just written me a sonnet and it’s still Sincerely. I’ve made fun of him because I think it sounds kind of stuffy but after a while I’ve accepted it as who he is- polite, somewhat curt but respectful, no matter the situation or context.

      I switch mine up all the time depending on who I’m writing to but I think my most used sign offs are Thanks, Kind/Warm/Best Regards, and Love if it’s family or close friends.

  53. I want just a hint of irreverent so at work my outgoing signature defaults to:

    Erin Zieske

    Graphic Designer
    (*•̀ᴗ•́*)و ̑̑

    • Regula says...

      Haha, that‘s super cool! I‘m a designer too, can I steal it?
      LG Regula
      (German for „Liebe Grüsse“)

  54. Rebecca says...

    I’m a college professor and one of my students always signs off emails with “Always a student.” It never fails to make me smile.

  55. A Martin says...

    I always sign off with “Warm regards” but may switch over to “All the best” or “All good things”

  56. Eliza says...

    My boss, no matter if the news is good or bad, always signs off “Onward!” which I find as a nice touch. Even if something feels horrible in the moment it reminds you to work forward. Alternatively, if it is something good, it’s also nice to be reminded that there is still work to be done.

    • L8Blmr says...

      oh my gosh…is your boss’s name Lamar by any chance? I worked with someone who signed off like this and he’s the only one I’ve ever seen do it. If so, small world!

  57. Aileen says...

    Work emails are always signed off with Kind Regards. If I’m angry then it’s just Regards. It’s a British thing! If its to friends, its Ails xx, if its to acquaintances then its Cheers or Ta Aileen. Goodness I have too many rules haha

    • Stacie says...

      After living in England for a few years, I still sign my emails and texts with “xx” and “kind regards.” I will forever, I think. xx

    • Agnes says...

      Me too! My friends here in Canada don’t do the xx and it always seems a bit of a letdown for some reason! We do heart emojis instead. xxx

  58. Jennifer C. says...

    I reply to so many e-mails on a daily basis that I sign: “Thanks, Jen” because it’s the shortest/nicest/most acceptable thing I could think of. I’ve been using it for so long that people at work call me Jen. I’ve never gone by that nickname in my life!

    • Sarah says...

      I lean in this direction but am moving away from it after contemplating the gendered use of “thanks.” I don’t know any male colleagues who default to thanks. Half the time I’m doing something either for or on equal footing with the recipient, and so why am I thanking them? That said, I’m still working on a replacement that conveys a similarly mild and anodyne bit of warmth, so this post is timely.

  59. Erin says...

    I am in the boring (but maybe offensive?) category of ‘Best’ users. Based on your feedback I’m promptly rethinking that.
    But nothing, nothing could be worse than my colleague who signs off with, “Your buddy, Peter”
    No. No. You are NOT my buddy, Peter. Go away.

    • Leah says...

      Bahahaha!
      No, Peter. Just no.

    • Laurel says...

      Your buddy?!?! I use ‘Best’ for friends and ‘Best Regards’ at work. But never xo. Maybe it should be ‘Hugs’ for friends – I like the sound of that!

    • Jana says...

      Go away, Peter!

    • Em says...

      Haha, I always use “best” but I like “your buddy”. That’s hilarious.

    • Tiffany says...

      At least it’s not “Your warm buddy…”

  60. Lauren says...

    For personal emails I always sign xx L. For work emails, I have a sliding scale. I usually write “My best,” then, if someone is annoying me a bit, shorten to “Best,” then no sign-off, then, if I get really annoyed, I switch to “Cordially” which everyone I work with knows is my codified way of saying “GO F__ YOURSELF.” I don’t know if that comes across to recipients, but it makes me feel a little better!

    • Oh, and there is someone awful I correspond with at work who is incredibly difficult and sends terrible, haranguing emails, but signs every note with “Onward.” Now when I see that word I’m filled with rage.

      I don’t mind ‘cheers’ but I have a colleague that gets annoyed whenever someone who isn’t British uses it as their sign-off.

  61. Rue says...

    I used to use “cheers” because I was mimicking my boss at the time and that seemed like a safe bet, but it turns out he is a terrible person, and since I figured that out, I have knee-jerk avoided “cheers,” not because it’s inherently bad, but because it has negative associations for me. (It’s kind of like when you’re brainstorming for baby names and you’re like, “No, can’t be Julia, because Julia in my fourth grade class was mean to me once, and I can’t go with it, even though Julia is a beautiful name that I’d otherwise be excited about.”)

    So now I use “Kind regards,” which is what I used to use before I worked for the terrible former boss.

    • Jennifer Sills says...

      Hahaha my current and terrible boss uses cheers and I despise it because of her, but also she is full on American but “identifies as British” (don’t ask…) so with her it has the added eye-roll inducing implication that she’s using it as a British sign-off.

    • E says...

      I have the same reaction to Best and Cheers. : (

    • Agnes says...

      Cheers always sounds SOOO cheesy and sycophantic to me. I hate it. It’s cringeworthy to the max!
      Cheers, Agnes (just wanted to see how it felt to sign my name that way. Yep, awful).

  62. Sarah says...

    I love “All good things”! Definitely taking that up. My husband signs his emails to close friends and family “Hearts and farts” and no matter the mood I’m in, it always makes me laugh.

    • Brooke says...

      Oh my gosh Sarah! Love 😂.

  63. NN says...

    I passionately *hate* it when people sign off with “Best.” (I used all my willpower not to all caps that sentence, haha). I know it is meant to be short for “best wishes” or “my best to you” but … why not just write that? “Best,” followed by your name, conveys a certain smugness to me. I can’t help but wonder if the writer is secretly saying “Dude, I am awesome,” but with a secret wink, which just pisses me off. Most people I know who use “best” are assholes, too. Having said that,I also know a complete angel who signs her work emails “best” and she is literally…well, the best.

    Also, while we’re on it, another work colleague of mine–someone quite high up in the hierarachy as it turns out–signs her emails with, it seems, whatever her last thought is. We’re talking about long bodies of text followed by a terse thought, a comma, and her name. For example,

    “Tomorrow seems fine,
    Lara”

    or

    “Not how we should proceed,
    Lara”

    or

    “Makes sense,
    Lara”

    • Lara says...

      I didn’t know you had a problem with this,
      Lara

    • Lilly says...

      Lara’s response cracked me up. I’ve got tears running down my face, and I am at work!

    • Sara says...

      HAHA

    • Nora says...

      I actually really love this,

      Nora

    • Susan says...

      OMG. Dying.

    • Cas says...

      I late to this thread but I agree whole-heartedly about “best” and was scanning the comments to see who agreed! Smugness is really just all it exudes to me. Came to gripe about “best” but stated for the “Lara” stuff. So so funny <3

  64. Mouse says...

    At work I default to “Best”, which I hate but it’s short and basic. Personal emails get XXL. My name begins with L and I am about 5 feet tall, so everyone laughs when they read it as Xtra Xtra Large……

  65. Mary says...

    This is so interesting. I’m from Ireland and have lived in the Uk too where the style of signing off seems different to the American way of doing things, although there is much variation there too. What I find really interesting is how some consider ‘ best’ to be positive and others negative. I’m definitely in the latter camp but it’s not used in Europe very often if at all. I usually use ‘kind regards’ as a formal send off. I like it because it seems warmer and more caring than ‘regards’ but lots of people use ‘regards’ and perhaps even more use nothing at all. I use ‘thanks’ and ‘hope you have a lovely weekend/Thursday etc’ as well. On occasion I use ‘cheers’ but that, contrary to what some here seem to think, has nothing to do with clinking glasses and consuming alcohol! At least outside the US. I guess when sayings travel they take on their own meanings. I find it funny too that a couple of people think kind or kindest regards is too formal. I think of it as an everyday sign off to someone I don’t know in a formal situation. I definitely wouldn’t use it all the time but I can safely say I’d never use ‘sincerely’ unless it was a very formal situation (feeling uptight just thinking about it) or ‘best’ and indeed ‘respectfully’ or ‘yours’ ever! What does ‘best’ even mean?! Yeah, that one just has negative connotations for me and I only belong to myself especially in professional situations. It’s funny it’s all so subjective isn’t it. Much like choosing a child’s name, what sounds perfect to one person sounds very off to another. ‘Thanks’ seems to be the only one everyone is ok with. We all like to thank and be thanked. Makes sense. 💖

    • Tilly says...

      Another Irish commenter.

      I also tend to use “Thanks” and “Cheers” (with “Cheers”, like you say, meaning “Thanks” and not “Down the hatch”).

      Another word that seems to have lost its true meaning when used outside of Ireland is “grand”!! Molly Shannon wrote the following on Instagram the other day:
      “I love this photo of us. As the Irish say, oh it was grand!”
      No, we bleedin’ don’t! I assume that she wants to say that it was great? But in fact what she has said is that it was only “all right” and possibly even a bit “meh”.

    • Jamie says...

      Cheers is fine if you are Irish or English, like from there, and it is part of your normal day to day language. One of my biggest pet peeves is when American’s (and I am one) use it because they think they are being cool or sophisticated or are parroting someone else in the company they are trying to impress. It’s even worse when people actually start SAYING it as a sign-off for phone calls.

  66. Veronika says...

    I always sign off with Cheers! – but I work for a craft brewery so it seems fitting!

  67. Libby says...

    Side note: I think 3 question marks in an email or text are the slightly politer version of saying WTF. “You said it’s been posted but my package has still not arrived?”

  68. Sarah says...

    I’m English, so I write, in my too many to count work emails: ‘With Kind regards’.
    If I’m annoyed with the person: ‘regards’
    Super annoyed, hide if you see me: just my name. (that’ll show them!)
    I love Churchill’s sign off- as he says: “But after all when you have to kill a man it costs nothing to be polite.” (!!)

    • Pru says...

      English as well and I do the exact same as you. Although I always hover over just using my name as I never want to appear rude (but then go ahead and just use my name only!)

  69. Jo says...

    I read this article last night, and the use of Warmly and Kindly really stood out. Fast forward a few hours to my first email in the office this morning – and I just couldn’t do it! I typed Warmly and deleted it twice before returning to to my standard “Kind regards” …I’ll have to give Kindly a whirl in my next email to friends!

    • chelsea says...

      you could throw “warm regards” in there too. I alternate between warm/kind regards ;)

  70. Ceridwen says...

    I received an email recently that was about an important course I’m doing that includes an internship in leadership. The sign off from the coordinator was “cheerypop” which I found both surprising and immensely comforting. It stopped me being so nervous about the course!

  71. “Cheers” when I’ve said thanks already in the email (Thanks for sending! Thanks for the quick reply! Thanks for reaching out!). “Thanks” for everything else, especially if there’s a request. Also, only one exclamation point per email ;)

    I’ve also finally gotten over not even having a sign-off, and just ending with “Bethany.” I communicate with people (male and female, but mostly male) who do this all the time and I never even notice, so I’ve forced myself to not care. If I’m not thinking about it when I read theirs, they’re probably not thinking about it when they read mine.

  72. Julie says...

    And here I was thinking ‘Cheers’ for close colleagues and ‘xoxo’ for family and friends was unique. Or maybe all the ‘cheers’ people happen to read this same website and we really still are unique flowers?

    xoxo, J.

  73. Ellie says...

    I really only write emails for work and pretty much always use Best Wishes, unless I’m annoyed it angry in which case it’s Best, it even more brutally, Regards. So cold! It’s interesting some of the cultural differences here. I’m British and really think that some of the American workplace sign off are so informal! The XO thing you don’t see here so much, it feels like something a teenage girl might use.

  74. Meg says...

    I work for the VA, and one of my favorite docs always signs off “to your continued good health” and I love that.

  75. E says...

    Cheers, a lot, since living in Ireland. Brevity is not my strong suit but I’m working on it – now I also do a lot of this:

    – E

  76. Krystal says...

    I love these, and will be stealing some of the friend/partner signatures for sure.

    I vary my professional signatures, but often write “Hoping you are well,” …possibly because of Harry Potter?

  77. Ari S says...

    I once worked with a woman whose text message auto sign-off was, “Money and Power”, followed by her name. Feel like I’ve stood at the mountain top and it’s all downhill from there.

    • Deb says...

      Ha :-)

  78. Callie says...

    I sometimes sign off with “Stay tuned”, but that’s usually to old friends or when I’m being flippant. I personally would love to receive a work email with a sign-off like that, but I don’t have the guts (yet) to send like it.

  79. I use “Best,” “Best wishes,” “Best wishes for your future success,” “Regards,” or “Thank you!/Thanks!” depending on who I’m talking to.

  80. Genevieve says...

    I am genuinely stunned that anyone would use xoxo in a work email!! If I got that I would be weirded out before concluding that it MUST have been a mistake/reflex haha. But, I think this varied loads by industry (I work in tech consultancy) and also I’m English so cultural differences.
    I use “thanks” every time, sometimes it doesn’t really make sense with the email but I mostly email the same people so I figure they will get used to it as my signature. I don’t really like it and read every comment on this hoping for a better option but alas no epiphany moments. Also at the very least it’s “thanks for reading”. And I’ve realised I end every conversation in person with “thanks” as I walk away so it fits!

    Love everyone’s cute ones for personal emails though and will definitely adopt some of those!! :)

  81. Dani says...

    To one specific friend, I got in the habit of summing up my current mood in my sign-off. Now all three of us in a never-ending email thread do it and its great:
    Love your sleep-deprived friend, Dani
    Love your friend who misses you from 3,000 miles away, Dani
    Love your currently very tan friend, Dani
    Love your friend who is drowning in work, Dani
    Love your cold and hungry but very satisfied friend, Dani
    AND, if I’m feeling bold:
    Love the most amazing person in the entire universe, Dani

    • Helen says...

      Love this! I have a very specific friend where we just use a heart and any random word instead of our names to sign off our emails. Our last email exchange:

      <3 curtains
      <3 red
      <3 bootstraps
      <3 aloe
      <3 myxomatosis

  82. I just moved to Australia last year and a common sign off is “kind regards” but I just can’t get used to it. It feels so formal!

    My auto-signatures is “xo, n” and I mainly only ever email women because of my work. But when I email men I feel the need to change it. And actually just yesterday I was exchanging emails with a man I’ve just met and felt the need to explain/apologize for the overly-warm/unprofessional sign-off. He responded with “no worries!”

    • Karli says...

      Haha I am from Australia and love kind regards. As a teacher it feels gentle enough as a daily sign off to colleagues and kids but stern enough to end a conversation if a parent is being rude.
      No worries is the most classic Australian remark of all!

    • tash says...

      Yep, from a fellow Aussie, we use kind regards alot!

  83. Mairsy Doates says...

    I always sign off work emails with “Best,” and my name. My secret is that it can mean a variety of things, from “Best Regards” to “I’m freaking doing my best here!” to Have the best day!” No one knows but me and I love that.

    • Jenn says...

      “All the best,” is my go to!

    • Alice says...

      I was telling a coworker this earlier this week: If I ever received a business communications signed “Best,” I would end the business relationship. That is the epitome of rudeness in a business communication.

    • Susan says...

      I’ve used “Best” often over the years. “All the best” sounds a little stiff to me but this is in fact my sincere salutation in signing off. I’ve seen a few negative comments – both here and on similar social media posts in the past few months – which have made me aware that “Best ” is oddly controversial. I can fully understand that everyone doesn’t love it and that’s ok.
      But I am really taken by surprise by your very strong feeling, Alice! The epitome of rudeness?! Worthy of ending a business relationship because you didn’t love the way a business associate signed their mail? I’m hoping your half-joking in your extreme position on this. Surely there must be other things you’ve encountered in business that are ruder than someone trying to offer their best regards to you in a way you don’t find appealing?? I’m wondering why you have such an extreme position on this – a bad experience with someone who used this sign-off and now you can’t separate the word from your experience with that person? Not trying to offend Alice, I’m truly baffled by this!

  84. Melody says...

    My 7 year old writes lots of letters. Her current sign off is “Laugh with happiness”. And I do, every time I read it.

    • Peggy says...

      Your 7 year old sounds fabulous!

  85. Alanna says...

    In work emails I often write
    Cheers,
    Alanna

    but I am trying to be more conscientious of the fact that some people are sober/working on sobriety so I dont use it with clients or people I dont know well.

    I work in government, with First Nations communities so I write
    Respectfully,
    Alanna

    and my email signature includes a territorial acknowledgement of the traditional territory where I live, work and play.

    • savy says...

      i want to know more!!

    • Diana says...

      Your work sounds fascinating, Alanna! I love the consideration you extend towards those who could be working on sobriety. I hadn’t thought of that but I’ll be mindful from now on.

    • Liv says...

      These comments are great :)
      For work I always sign off with “thanks a million”’, name.

  86. Personal is always, without a doubt, “Love Always,”.

    Professional can be a mixture. We have a mandated signature block that I have set to show up only for emails I originate, but if it is someone external, someone I do not interact with often, or if someone would probably action quicker if they know my position or department, I add it in. A fall back is “Regards,” or “Best regards,” but I’ll often only put my name/the signature block. Or nothing!

  87. Emily says...

    My Dad signs his letters (not emails) with: oceans of love, Dad

    I have always loved that!

  88. Andie says...

    I often use, “Many Thanks,” or “Thanks again,”. I’m a teacher, and it’s important to show appreciation for support. When writing friends, I often leave an “old-fashioned” sideways smiley face by my name. :)andie

  89. ZM says...

    When its with people I collaborate often I rotate between “cheers”, “onward”, and “thanks”. To get a quick response I usually indicate the need for turnaround with “(quick response requested)” much in the subject line. For everyone else it’s “best”. At happy hour this fall a group of folks jokingly chided a close colleague of mine for only signing off with is name and he was horrified that he’d made a surly first e-impression. I’ve been watching him switch up sign offs for the last few months with great amusement

  90. Cynthia says...

    It is standard to sign all military emails with “Very Respectfully” (v/r). This has translated over into my nonmilitary life as well. Like Churchill said, it costs nothing to be polite. It sounds a little kiss ass and I think people like that.

    • Nikki says...

      OH MY GOSH I GET FAMILY READINESS EMAILS EVERY WEEK AND I HAVE ALWAYS WONDERED WHAT THAT MEANS. I FIGURED IT WAS CODE FOR SOMETHING WITHIN THE SYSTEM. MIND BLOWN.

      In our deplyoment emails I sign my emails: stay safe and come home to me, yours. He just signs his with his name lol. For work he says he usually signs it rah, name (short for oorah).

    • J says...

      Was wondering if I’d see another V/R here! I use it so often, even on personal email, that my autocorrect recognizes it. Some of my peers use /R for those lower in rank but it’s always seemed excessive to me. Similar to putting just a rate instead of a salutation to begin an email. I prefer the standard email signature block (“privacy act included” bit too!) and then no sign off after that.

    • Victoria says...

      Prior military and “Very Respectfully” is my go to. Never v/r for me though. If it’s saved as an auto signature…what’s the harm in typing it out that once. I think the message seems more genuine when left in tact. I was scrolling to see if there were other v/r’s.

  91. jade lees says...

    For work I send and receive hundreds of emails.
    To colleagues I end in Cheers. To Clients I end in With Thanks.

    Texts are a whole different kettle of fish. Most of the time I am texting family or friends so ALWAYS end with an X.
    My family has always been a kiss hello/goodbye family so it translates to digital hello/goodbye’s too.

  92. A says...

    I worked in customer service for years and had a Lot of time to consider various email sign offs (for the hundreds of email replies per day we would do). Ultimately on ‘Sincerely’ – it’s a nice reminder to myself that everything I write should in fact be sincere (or it gets deleted!)

    I still use it, figuring its kind of like smiling when you’re on the phone – people can sense it in the other end. If I’m really trying to be kind I’ll say ‘Most Sincerely’.

  93. Shelby says...

    I work in student conduct at a university. Generally, my emails to students either take a disciplinary tone or a supportive tone so depending on where the email falls on that spectrum they either get no sign off and just my full signature – name, title, office – (disciplinary) or “take good care” (supportive).

  94. Candice says...

    I’m so happy for this post! I struggle every time I end an email, my default is just “best,”
    It’s so hard to find the balance between sincere and professional.
    I love the sweetness of xo!

  95. Bella says...

    I used to use
    -B
    cause my first name starts with B but i realised that looks like a tiny penis and so i dont do that anymore. Ha!

    Tell me if im being crazy or if you can see it too?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Hahahaha I *never* would have thought so but now I can’t unsee it!

    • Mary says...

      Can’t unsee this one! Hahahaha

    • K says...

      Hahaha crying from laughing so much!

    • J says...

      I’m in the tub with a glass of wine and absolutely cackling right now. My best friend has this sign off, too, and I will never, ever unsee this hahahahaha.

    • Lauren -B says...

      OMG, it’s like the arrow inside the FedEx logo….now that you’ve pointed it out, I can’t unsee it!

    • Karla says...

      oh man, this is so funny. hahah!

    • Bella says...

      Bella here. I used that sign off on YEARS of emails! *cringe*

  96. Gina says...

    I just had to go back to my email to see how I sign off! I don’t! I’m a technology specialist in a school district and I send/receive about 200 emails per day. I only close emails with “Thank You” when I initiate the email. Come to think of it, I think I stopped signing off on emails when Cup of Jo posted a long time ago about how much time we spend with greetings and closings on emails. I also have asked colleagues to stop responding “thank you” when I complete something for them! I have strong relationships with the staff so they always crack up when I tell them, but you can only imagine receiving 100 thank you emails in a day! I know they are grateful!

  97. Andrea Feniak says...

    Judy Blume of course! My husband and I have been using “Love & Other Indoor Sports” to one another for years and I long ago forgot the origin of the phrase. Thanks for the memory jog!

    Professionally, it’s almost always “Thank You” or, if I really need a prompt response I will sign off with “Thank you in advance for your response”.

  98. Nicole says...

    I’ve been signing off with “cheers” FOREVER, since I saw my uncle do it once and he is honestly SO cheerful and I always wanted to be just like him. I write one million emails per day sometimes and it always brings a smile to my face (and I hope others too!).

    • MN says...

      My landlord signs every message “cheers” including rent increases, notices about the exterminator, etcetera. It drives me nuts. It is a completely charming send-off, but only in the right context.

  99. Megan Lec says...

    I’m a therapist and when emailing clients I take to heart what the ending of an email can mean to someone who might not be having their best day.
    “Be well” was a standby of mine for many years but I usually try to gear my sign-off to something we’ve spoken about or that will remind them that I care. An email as simple as an appointment reminder can help a client in need when ended with “Always here”

    • Sarah says...

      I really relate to your comment, Megan. I also work in the mental health field, and tend to personalize my email sign offs when writing to clients, though I also frequently use “Be well” or “Warmly.” One thing I really love about working with other therapists is our thoughtful communication with each other. Nothing is too loving or cheesy. One of my colleagues signs off with “Peace and all good things” another says “With affection and deep respect” and another signs off with “You look marvelous” (which I’m told is an SNL reference I’m too young for.) All feel wholeheartedly genuine to me.

    • Elisabeth says...

      Therapist here too. I also use “warmly,” or sometimes “take care.”
      I genuinely love my clients, and some days it feels heavy to know they may be gleaning a lot of meaning from my words, so I try to convey warmth and caring in every interaction, even quick scheduling emails.

    • Lena says...

      Elisabeth, do you accept Skype patients or new clients? (Not joking!)

  100. Sara says...

    I appreciate the humanity and creativity in your posts.

  101. amanda says...

    My stepdad always signed of with “All the jolly best.” I’ve adopted it since his passing. Makes me smile and hopefully has the same effect on the recipient.

    • Megan says...

      <3

    • milania says...

      love this.

  102. Karin says...

    “Thanks!” works for just about every situation–Even when I’m the one that should be thanked (“Here’s that project you asked for. Let me know if you need anything else. Thanks!”) it doesn’t hurt to be polite.

  103. My boss always signs off with “Stay Warm!” even when it’s super hot out- which I like for consistency (and don’t you wish that for everyone, regardless?). I don’t like a bland “best” on a work email so I’ve been using “Happy Thursday!” or whatever day of the week it is. Fine, until I get the days confused. Luckily we are not terribly formal. For friends and family I always sign “love”.

    Happy Thursday!
    -Grace

    • Jenny says...

      And it’s kind of like “stay alive” too, which is a minimum but an appreciated one

  104. K L says...

    Haha, the xoxo thing is a joke and definitely does mean hugs and kisses! I am not a fan. When I lived in England I had to deal with all these really stodgy British people who weirdly signed their emails “name x.” I’m like, “You act like you can’t stand me in real life but then you want to air kiss via email!?”

    If I want someone to know they really ought to respond to me, I’ll say “Thanks in advance.” If I’m being formal, it’s “Best.” If I want to convey something less formal but still not super intimate, I’ll say “fondly,” which I stole from my MIL. Friends and lovers––all bets are off.

    • Lauren says...

      One of my dear friends, who is welsh, writes xx after her name and all the time! even in text (well, whatsapp), she’ll be like ‘off to the market xx’ for most of the texts. Not sure if she does it at work but I doubt it. It’s funny, but I didn’t realize it was a ‘thing’ that other people did too!

  105. Libby says...

    I had a boss that signed “peace in the process”… She was the biggest narcissist and least peaceful person in the world… I always laughed at her sign off and disregarded the majority of her emails because they were so disingenuous.

  106. Kaitlin says...

    I feel like this should be on the Proust questionnaire for the 21st century!

    It really depends on what I’m trying to convey. You will know when I’m about to eat you alive if it’s a long email and I just sign my name. Mostly, I opt for the kindness of “regards”, or the casualness of “cheers.” Usually, I just end emails with “thanks”

  107. Katie says...

    I was just noticing today how my colleague (who likes to travel) always says “Happy trails!”

  108. Ali says...

    I sign off work emails with Kind Regards… unless they’ve pissed me off in which case they just get a Regards. Passive aggressive emailing at its finest haha

    • H says...

      Yes! If you get a regards from me, I’m livid.

    • Midge says...

      My aggressive email signoff is “Hope that helps!” (Unwritten: Because I’m not spending one more minute on this).

    • Helen says...

      Me too! And be really glad you’re not in the same room/country as me if I only use my name!

  109. Amy Singh says...

    My daughter’s teacher used to sign off her emails “in partnership”. I always loved that she viewed teaching that way.

    • Erica says...

      I LOVE this so much!

    • E says...

      CUTE! My daughter’s Montessori teacher signs off “In Appreciation,” even though she’s the one helping us. I love it :)

  110. ana says...

    I’m British so its:
    ‘Kind regards, A’

    unless i’m livid then its simply a savage sign off of:

    ‘Regards. A’

    • Sarah says...

      Hahhaaaa! YES!

    • Michèle says...

      Ha! Quite savage ;-)

  111. kat says...

    My husband signs off on all his emails to me with “Without Limits.” It makes me feel cherished each and every time.

    • Joanna Mulvey says...

      That is so lovely!

  112. Courtney says...

    Ha, this reminds me of the great debate I had with my Italian partner and his mother: I’d been editing one of her work emails that she was sending to colleagues in England, and I suggested changing her sign-off to “have a happy and healthy holiday season.” My partner and mother-in-law could not get over the ridiculousness of wishing for someone’s health in a professional context, and I couldn’t persuade them that this is a totally normal and quite touching thing to say to someone in English! This was years ago and I still point out when someone does this to prove that I was right…

    • Genevieve says...

      Haha, I’m English and I would find this an odd email sign off!! I don’t think wishing people health is normal here. And “happy holidays” is very rare and seen as an American thing to say. We all say merry Christmas at that time of year.

    • Mary says...

      I’m Irish, lived in the UK for 14 years. This is definitely a very strange sign off. The holiday part sounds very American and it would make me wonder why you were bringing up someone’s health.

  113. Brooke says...

    One of the faculty at my graduate program always signed off “cheers” and I loved picturing him raising a toast every time he sent an email off! Still gives me a little grin to this day remembering.

    I usually write “warmly” but sometimes, if its work, its nice to just sign off “best” or my name and let that person survive without my warm loving caretaking, ha! ;).

    • I always sign off “Cheers” too!

      I’m not sure how it started or where it came from, but it’s a totally ingrained habit now!

  114. Kate says...

    One of my vendors signs his emails “Yours very truly”, which is so inappropriate that it makes me laugh every time. But don’t do it, please!

  115. Dani says...

    Mine is ‘Best’ or ‘ All the Best’. I still do ‘Sincerely’ (mostly if I am sending a resume or trying to create a work connection) or ‘Yours Truly’.

  116. emily says...

    wow, really interesting options. for emails in which I am requesting something or delivering bad news, I often use the old standby “sincerely,” if it’s an email to someone new, I’ll use “best regards” and just about everyone else gets “Thanks!”

    :)

  117. Hope says...

    I sign off “Yours,” or “Thanks,” but then I always have to check if I have already said thanks within the body of an email.

    I sent ~200 emails a day and worry about my sign off every time.

  118. EmilyD says...

    I’ve always loved a simple:

    Cheers,
    Emily

    • Vanessa says...

      Yes! Same. I learned this from an Scottish friend and it feels right for me, most of the time.

      Cheers,
      Vanessa

  119. Julia Helene says...

    I sign my emails like this because it feels the most sincere.

    :),
    julia

  120. katie says...

    I’m teased at work for always signing off, “Best Regards” at work. I teach middle school, and I’m not 74 (on the outside, anyway). I regularly write this to my students when they email me and the first time they see it, they’re like, “WHAT?!?” but I would rather err on the side of being formal or overly professional than not. Especially when a lot of my students engage in mostly social talk – but are expected to know and use more formal/academic vocabulary on standardized tests and beyond. Plus, it’s a holdover from my previous career in footwear and athletic apparel marketing where I worked closely with colleagues all over the world. ‘Best Regards’ was widely accepted and used by colleagues for whom English was another language; it kept things polite and clear, and I like modeling this globally friendly sign-off to kids.

    • Alexandra says...

      I agree that it’s good to learn for students how be more formal. I am trying to help my kids with that, and it’s not easy, as they don’t understand the purpose of formality in e-mails yet, but I think in a professional setting it’s important to know. I work in the legal department of a tech company, and “Best regards” is the accepted language. I also use “Dear” to an outside person, and that’s also very common.

    • Rae says...

      Katie, you are a treasure and your students are so lucky to have you. Warmly, Rae

    • Kile says...

      My 4th grade teacher signed everything “Fondly” and all these years later, I still remember, fondly!

    • Molly says...

      I’m a teacher, too, and I always sign my emails “warm regards.” It feels appropriate and formal, but also kind. However, I once signed “warm regards” and my first name in reply to a student and nearly died I’d embarrassment.

    • Deb says...

      I use “best regards”! I was hoping someone else would mention it because no one else I know uses it but I don’t really like “kind regards”, it feels weird in a business context although everyone else seems to think it’s just fine. Kind regards feels like something I might say in a get well soon card for a colleague. My client who’s asking me for something accountancy related doesn’t need my kindness, I don’t think. Anyway, I’ll keep reading the comments to see if I can find anything that strikes a chord with me!

  121. Kristyn says...

    I was a “Regards,” devotee for many years but recently switched to “Warmly,” after reading Meg Wolitzer’s novel, The Female Persuasion. Something about it just struck me, like it’s a bit more personal yet still professional. (I hope?)

  122. LM says...

    Unless I am emailing a brand new contact, I avoid writing a sign off in my of my emails. It’s not a letter. The reader already knows who I am and hopefully can figure out why I’m emailing them in the first place before they get have to figure out what I meant by my sign off.

  123. Katie says...

    My dad would sign every text message “LOL.” “See you at 8, LOL.” “How was the meeting? LOL.” He thought it stood for “lots of love.” When we finally broke the news he decided he liked it and kept doing it anyway. Still makes me laugh (LOL).

    • Vanessa says...

      My dad ends every sentence of every text with an exclamation mark. It’s the sweetest thing.

    • Sarah says...

      Hahaha my dad did the same thing!!

    • EBeth says...

      My mother did the same thing for years! My (grown) children were so upset when my husband finally broke the news to her – they loved getting texts wishing them, for example, a “happy brithday, how grateful she was for them and how much she loved them! LOL!” They would screenshot it and send it around. Mom’s such a good sport that she still uses LOL, too! At 85, I’m just thrilled she texts all of us regularly!

  124. Mylene says...

    I planned events at a hotel in the Caribbean for about three years. My sign-off there was always, “warm regards.” Even though I’m back in the northeast now (and no longer working in hospitality), I’ve kept it for work emails because, in fact, I am *always* wishing warmth, in every sense!

  125. Rachael says...

    I teach university classes, and I have a special spot in my heart for the student this semester who always signs off “with greatest appreciation for your time.” At the beginning of the semester it seemed SO over the top but now in comparison to all the other surly emails I love it!! 😂

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that’s so sweet!

    • Julia Helene says...

      Stealing!

  126. Ivy says...

    I have a variety I tend to use! Typically in a work email, I just go with the standard “Best” and move on. I do love “All the good things” and think I’ll put that as a sign-off from now on!

    Sometimes I use “In Christ” because I’m not religious at all and find the sarcasm funny.

    My FAVORITE to use with friends and family is “Peace and blessings,” which sounds really nice and warm, but I’m pretty sure I got it from a Glo-Zell video. (https://www.youtube.com/user/glozell1?disable_polymer=true) Not saying she’s not nice and warm, but I think she was applying lipstick in her car or cussing someone out… who knows!

  127. jeannie says...

    I use “xoxo” or “Love” for family, but often use “Best” (as in Wishing you all the best) for regular emails. My neighbor signs off “Fondly.”

  128. Nigerian Girl says...

    For work emails and emails to strangers, I sign off with ‘Regards’, followed by my first name. For emails to my siblings and my very close friends, I sign off with either ‘Take Care.’ or ‘Love,’ and close it with my first name initial. I really like ‘Yours and Yours and Yours’. It’s so dreamy and romantic. I might just steal it.

    • Leah says...

      I use ‘take care’ as a sign off for some work emails – if it’s a person I email frequently or with whom I have an established relationship. I also say ‘take care’ when ending phone conversations sometimes. My standard more business’y sign off is ‘kind regards’ or ‘sincerely’. For family and close friends, ‘love’ or ‘love always’. For some reason, I detest ‘Best’ as a sign off. It seems so short, and dare I say it, lazy? Best regards, best wishes, all my best… just finish the sentiment! Ha!

  129. Jayne Hattaway says...

    I’ve always used “Thanks,” no matter the recipient or the content of the email. Winston and I are of the same mind – it costs nothing to show gratitude. Using this every time eliminates one micro-decision I would otherwise have to make a million times a day – I like not having to wrack my brain about an appropriate sign-off for every message. And who doesn’t like to be thanked?

  130. Haley says...

    My hilariously direct ex-roommate would sign all emails with “Love and Light,” no matter the context.

    “What asshole forgot to unplug the heater?

    Love and Light,
    Hannah”

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      hahahahahahaha

    • Victoria says...

      Hahaha

    • kaela says...

      LOL. This is my favorite.

  131. nora says...

    This made me think of an article I read about women being so much more pressured to be seen as polite in the workplace. Can you imagine this comment string between men?
    I am always trying to walk the line in between being seen as professional, but not come across too harsh. Along this vein, I have adjusted my signatures to more closely match what my male colleagues use. At least in my field, men are not nearly as focused on sounding nice or agreeable.
    In general: “Regards,”
    When I am asking for something: “Thanks,” I strongly feel that this should not be the default, and truly only be used when the other person(s) owe you a follow-up.
    On Fridays: “Have a nice weekend,” because everyone needs a nice reminder that it’s Friday!
    Thank you COJ for starting this conversation!

    • AK says...

      Yes! I use “Have a nice weekend,” too – with co-workers, once we get to Friday. I tend to think everyone likes a reminder that the weekend is almost here. It’s my favorite sign-off. I’m an attorney, so external emails are typically “Regards” or “Kind Regards” – especially when dealing with recipients outside the U.S. I’ll also use “Thanks” externally/internally when I am asking for something. Last but not least, if an opposing party is getting a stern email from me: NO SIGN-OFF FOR YOU! Only an impersonal signature block. I like to think it serves as a reminder that they haven’t acted in a manner deserving of a sign-off. If they do something to get back into my good graces, I’ll start “rewarding” them with a sign-off (usually of the “Kind Regards” or “Regards” variety). Now that I’m writing this, I realize I have a more complex approach to sign-offs than I initially realized. Fun topic!

  132. Jamie says...

    Sometimes I jokingly insert the ultra-formal, “Regards” to shake up our ultra-casual office banter.

  133. I actually… don’t usually sign off emails! I feel like my name is right there in the header, so a formal sign-off is redundant and a vestige from letter-writing days. For work emails, my emails have a few signature lines and I usually just leave it at that.

    • Katie Muncie says...

      Same here.

  134. Sarah says...

    My go to is-

    Kindly,
    Sarah

    • Megan says...

      I’ve gotten a few “kindly”s and always wondered about it. Honestly, I find it slightly condescending. Aren’t you just sort of bragging about how kind you are, or how kind it was for you to respond to my email, lol? Reminds me of when our cousin visited and called themselves gracious guests! Of course, I use “thanks” as a sign off under all circumstances (whether they deserve it or not), so I am not a winner in this one!

  135. Em says...

    If I am requesting something:
    ‘Thanks in advance’ or ‘I look forward to hearing from you’ or ‘I appreciate your time’

    Friends get:
    ‘Lots of love’ or ‘Love you to pieces’ or ‘big hugs and kisses’

    Husband gets:
    out,
    WOTY (Wife of the Year)

    • E says...

      LOL WOTY! That’s too good.

  136. For years, since college I think, I’ve signed off with my name ending with a period, and all in lowercase:

    -polyana. or -poly.

    I used to think it was cute, and now I just don’t think about it?

    And that’s usually preceded by either a best, or best regards.

    However, I run a travel agency that works with Brazil travel. Once clients have booked, or I’m speaking to an partner company we’re friendly with, I’ll start signing off with “abraços” – which means hugs, in Portuguese.

    This is usually to start to get the client in the mood for the warm welcome they’ll be getting in Brazil, and to reassure our partners we’re here for them and their clients :-)

    abraços!
    -poly.

  137. Dana says...

    Enjoyed this thread!

    Swimmingly yours,
    Dana
    p.s. I’m a swim instructor

    • hahahahaha

    • Deborah Robinson says...

      Love it!

  138. Kara says...

    This is a fun post! In most cases, for work emails, I’ll sign off with a simple ‘Thank you, Kara’. I am usually requesting something from the recipient so this seems appropriate. I also think I receive a quicker response when I sign off with ‘thank you’ rather than the sign off most in my office use – ‘Best regards,’
    I definitely mix it up with personal emails – ‘Love you’, ‘Take Care’, ‘TTFN’ (Ta Ta for now).

    • Steph says...

      Ttfn! Love Tigger!

  139. Madie says...

    To friends and family it’s always XO, or xo, or xoxoxoxox…
    At work (medical profession) it’s usually Best, or All the Best. Some comments above have me questioning Best though! I know it’s boring but I really do mean that I’m wishing them the best! I also use Thanks (plus or minus an exclamation point) or Many thanks, but cringe at “Thanks in advance”, as I find it so presumptuous! It’s like saying, “I know you’re going to do this for me…” How is that polite?? Or even worse, the dreaded, “TIA!”
    Slightly off-topic, but there was an administrative assistant in an adjacent department whose outgoing voicemail said ” …and I’ll call you back at my earliest convenience” which made me LAUGH OUT LOUD every time. I think she heard someone once request a call back at her earliest convenience, which is the appropriately polite request, and then got it backwards. Thanks, Sheryl… call me back at your earliest convenience!

    • Riley says...

      I totally agree about the “Thanks in advance”! It really rubs me the wrong way. I had a roommate who used it like so: “I took the liberty of buying 3 months worth of toilet paper for the whole house — you each owe me $23.46. Thanks in advance!” LOL

      I use “warmly”. I’m a therapist, and it’s the most honest yet professional option I could land on. I don’t love it, so I’m always on the hunt for a new sign off!

  140. Paige says...

    I work as a concierge on Hawaii, so I sign off work emails with “With Warmest Aloha.” But for informal emails, I sign off with “Cheers.” And to emails to my family and loved ones, I write: “Love, Me.”

  141. Susie says...

    I loved the detail in Jia Tolentino’s piece about Outdoor Voices that at least one of the employees there signs her e-mails “doing things” !!