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The Women’s March and Beyond

Best Photos of the Women's March

Wow, what a weekend! Did you march on Saturday? What was your experience like? Our team was marching in D.C., Manhattan and upstate New York, and it was incredible to see people pouring onto streets around the world. Here are a few great moments (and we’d love to hear about yours)…

Best Photos of the Women's March

All that pink in Washington! I marched in Manhattan (the streets were packed like sardines!) and here’s Cup of Jo editor Megan on driving to Washington: “I could feel the magnitude of what we were about to do before we even got to D.C. On our way down, we stopped a handful of times — we were a car full of ladies, including one pregnant woman, and we had to pee! At each rest stop, the parking lot was PACKED with busses and caravan carpools, and inside we were greeted by a sea of pink hats. We were all in this together! The excitement was palpable.”

Next are a few awesome shots of the Women’s March on Washington by Cup of Jo friend and photographer Ana Gambuto.

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

One of Stella’s most moving moments was when a little girl climbed a tree with a megaphone and led the crowd in singing “This Land Is Your Land.” Plus, some other favorite photos from the weekend…

Women's March in Chicago

Women's March in Paris

Women's March in New York

Women's March in Antarctica

A very inspiring slideshow of marches all around the world, including Chicago, Paris, New York and Antarctica!

Women's March best signs

How cool are these signs of badass women, including Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan and Eleanor Roosevelt?

Women's March funny signs

Women's March funny signs

Made us laugh.

Women's March best signs

But our question today is: What to do now? Here are three things we’re doing today…

* Check out The Indivisible Guide, which lays out how to have the most impact. They also have an excellent email newsletter.

* Support great journalism and the freedom of the press. We’ve been subscribing to many, many newspapers and news magazines. A few ideas: The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, your local NPR station or your hometown newspaper.

* And, if you can, consider donating to organizations you believe in — perhaps the ACLU, Planned Parenthood or the Committee to Protect Journalists, which is dedicated to the global defense of press freedom.

Do any of these appeal to you? Do you have any other ideas or plans?

P.S. How to follow the news, and raising race-conscious children.

(All photos by Ana Gambuto for Cup of Jo, except: the pink overhead photo is a screen capture from an MSNBC broadcast; the Chicago, Paris, New York, Antarctica photos were from The New York Times; the photo of the historical women’s heads by Kirsten Luce; the introverts sign photo by Susan Kaufman; and sign guy photo by Amelia Kaheny.)

  1. S says...

    Hi Joanna,

    It would be so great if you (or one of the women on your team) went to a BLM protest and wrote about it. What if you went with a member and the two of you wrote the piece together? That would be even more informative, probably. It would allow women who usually don’t get to hear or think much about this kind of thing to read about it in accessible way, and then join in and get involved.

    • That would be great! I second this!

    • valentina says...

      I third it!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes!! great idea, thank you!

  2. Jo says...

    I marched with my husband, baby son, and 60,000 others in Oakland. Not one arrest nor any damage, this is what happens when women get together to protest. It was such a powerful experience. We also want to keep the momentum up and continue to be involved. So far I’ve signed up for the daily action message, but would love more suggestions!

  3. jen says...

    I marched in Oakland. A elderly man made a negative comment about my Hillary-esque sign which dampened my spirit but once I started walking, I was glad I went!

  4. Jen says...

    I made a bunch of extra hats and put a note in them asking that in exchange the wearer be kind and safe and maybe, if they could swing it, for a text photo of the wearer. Going to put them all together and post.

  5. Shayna says...

    While I was waiting for the march to start in Atlanta, I turned around to see my favorite high school teacher–the one who taught us to perform feminist critiques in AP Language–standing behind me. How many young feminists and activists she must have informed and empowered over her lifetime of service!

    What we teach our girls and boys is so important. When I start to feel like calling my representatives or volunteering in my community is futile, I remember the small things I can do dismantle the patriarchy for the next generation (even though I don’t have kids):
    -Steer away from appearance-specific compliments for children of both genders.
    -Give non-gender specific books and toys as gifts.
    -Practice generosity of spirit. Period.

    • Christina R says...

      I got goosebumps! What a small world, what a neat story!

  6. Sara S. says...

    I cried when Donald Trump won the election, but cried even more when I saw the stories of everyone marching this weekend. My sister marched in DC and my heart was literally bursting with pride when I saw her and so many other people marching together. It brings me hope for the future. I have never been more proud to be a woman. Thank you for all that you do.

  7. Ruth says...

    My first ever march was this Saturday in London. I have a 5 year old girl and it’s important to me that she knows how important she is!
    The crowd would roar in a Mexican wave and I got goosebumps EVERU SINGLE TIME.

  8. Jennifer says...

    I would love to put in a plug for another great organization to support: Girls Inc.! Girls Inc’s mission is, “Inspiring all girls to be strong, smart and bold,” and I am in awe of the fantastic mission-centered programming they do with girls in the community. In addition to their great after-school and summer programs, they go into local high schools to teach about pregnancy prevention/healthy sexuality and anti-bullying programs. The thing I love about this organization is that they are investing in young girls, and I believe that by doing so, they are helping to create strong, smart and bold women! Check it out here: http://www.girlsinc.org/

  9. Joanna, I love that you speak so much of social justice lately!

    I marched in Orange County (our little red bubble turned BLUE in November) and we had about 20,000 people, which was quite incredible. I live in a swing district so I’m going to act locally to elect someone with social justice values in 2018. Also my neighborhood has an amazing social justice committee and the county has a great branch of SURJ and I’m involved in both. And I’ll keep on reading, being aware, and walking with great movements that are trying to make things right (BLM for instance). Fired up, Ready to go -still!

  10. Katie says...

    Yes! I represented with 75-100,000 others in Madison, WI, with my 3.5 yo strapped on my back and my midwife and husband by my side. So proud to see such loving crowds of people all over the world doing the same!

  11. Kelly says...

    Thanks for this post! I marched in London with my boyfriend and it was incredible. I couldn’t believe how many people were there. They estimated 20k and it was 100k+.

    I think it would be so powerful if you had a series of guest blogs by WOC and their experiences moving through the world in a meaningful attempt to foster allyship. White women need to use their privilege to stand up and fight for all women, all the time – not just when the world is watching. Building trust and community with all marginalized communities will strengthen us through these rough years ahead and beyond. Is that something you’d think about doing?

    Thanks for putting this on the radar, the work has just begun.

    • Kathleen says...

      Love this suggestion about the guest blogs. As a white woman, I’ve made it one of my goals for 2017 to read more works by women of color and I’d love to add some guest blog posts into the mix.

  12. Natasha says...

    I marched in London, UK with about 80,000 other women, men, children and dogs :) We’ve had a tough year (well, few years) here in the UK in terms of politics – with the vote to leave the EU, austerity measures and the gradual dismantling of our wonderful NHS. So it felt so amazing to see everyone come together with such a strong sense of hope and of unity. We are here, we are fierce and we are NOT going to sit back and let hatred win!

  13. There was even a march in Antigua, Guatemala. I cried when I saw it…especially when some Guatemalan women joined in (who have almost no rights at all).

  14. Maelle says...

    I marched in Paris, France and i really thought that there wouldn’t be too many people, but there was and it was amazing. At some point we were marching and the Eiffel tower was right in front of us and you could see all this pink crowd flooding and marching and singing towards it and the whole scene just felt unreal. I feel so grateful that so many people showed up to show their support, because although it is obviously about your country (i am French), it gave me hope to see the whole movement spread worldwide and that so many people feel concern and care, because it matters.

  15. Besides the birth of my children and my wedding day the March on Washington was the most moving, powerful experience of me life! Here’s what I shared via Facebook when I got home that night:
    Some of my Favorite things about our March:
    Seeing families out together, signs in hand, children ready to take on a long day in high spirits, fathers and mothers proudly marching with their daughters and sons to teach them their own power and potential.
    Crowds of people so packed they could barely move on the metro platforms and trains, chanting and cheering on our way to the rally, MTA workers and police smiling and showing support.
    Marching the streets, reclaiming our capital city and our country after the invasion of Trumps inauguration. Witnessing live the beginning of a strong resistance and a true shift in a people finding their voices and remembering their power.

  16. Kaydee says...

    I marched in Trenton NJ with my son. It was so inspiring – I felt hopeful for the first time in months. We all need to stay engaged and determined over the next 4 years.

    And for those for whom it is the first ‘activist’ experience, let’s remember, acknowledge, support and listen to our sisters – especially those less privileged than us – who have been fighting the good fight for years.

  17. Nicole says...

    I marched in philadelphia with my dear (male) friend and his three year old daughter. She carried my sign as we neared the beginning of the march – we didn’t intend to dress alike or step in sync, but I totally love that we somehow did:
    https://www.instagram.com/p/BPipWi_DLrw/?taken-by=fichedelphia

  18. Adding this post to my Twitter queue for the fantastic list at the end!! The story about the little girl in the tree is so sweet. I also love the t-shirt “Straight Outta Patience” and that guy towards the end definitely gave me a chuckle.

  19. Jess says...

    I was part of the solidarity march in Victoria BC (Canada). An amazing turnout from out little city (over 8000 people!!) It was electric, postive and purposeful. I think a lot of us up here (And other international people) aren’t sure what else we can do to create change regarding a government that isn’t our own. I’ve donated to PP and the ACLU but actually being present and making our voices heard helped to lift a weight that many of us had been feeling since election night.
    We stand with you! And hopefully we sent a strong message to our own political leaders that Trump-style politics are not welcome in our country.

    My friends decided to start an “Activist Dinner” twice a month to keep ourselves engaged and informed and moving forward. If anyone has suggestions for how international folks can help please share!

    Our best signs? “Canadian Beavers support American Pussies” , “We are not Ovary Reacting” and “Tweet Women With Respect!”

    • CP says...

      LOVE those signs!!!!!!!

  20. Thank you so much for using your blog in this way! I’m overseas with no marches in the area, but I loved seeing all the photos from the various marches around the world, and donated to Planned Parenthood on the day :)

  21. Laura Martin says...

    Thank you so much for using your blog for this! You are making a big impact! I marched in San Diego and it was amazing. My friend marched with her 2 month old son – she breastfed him while walking…GIRL POWER!

  22. I am that crazy fan from Texas that took a picture with you, ha!! Loved meeting you, Joanna!!! xoxo

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      megan, i loved meeting you!!!

  23. Meghan says...

    I marched in Boise, Idaho. Snow, families, and passion everywhere! What an incredibly moving and empowering day.

    • MG says...

      So inspired by marchers in the heartland. Thank you!

  24. This introvert went to the NYC march, and I’m so glad I did! It was peaceful, calm, and inspiring.

  25. Betsy says...

    Oh my gosh! The, ” I’m not usually a sign guy, but geez” picture says it all. Got the biggest chuckle out of that. Wish I had been able to march with everyone.

  26. Jess says...

    I marched in Bayfield WI, a little town in far northern Wisconsin. At the final count there were more marchers than residents of the town. It was an amazing group of people, including my own two little children. I was so proud to have them both there. We walked down to Lake Superior and gave thanks and prayers for the water, for our mother earth, and for the fight yet to come to save our rights, our resources, our children’s future. It was incredible. Started the day today by calling my senator.

  27. Van says...

    I didn’t get to attend my local march but seeing pictures from around the world was really touching. However, what happens next? While this was really uplifting to see so many come together, the Women’s March will be nothing but a spectacle. This is really pessimistic but I believe this article conveys my sentiment quite well.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jan/19/womens-march-washington-occupy-protest

    • Katharine says...

      Such a pessimistic view and one that really downplays what marches of this magnitude have done in the past. I don’t feel like MLK’s March on Washington was nothing but a spectacle, do you? For starters, the women’s march website has action items. https://www.womensmarch.com 10 actions, 100 days. That’s a good beginning. I know that personally I feel fortified by taking part in Seattle’s march and ready to look into volunteering with organizations and am considering looking into how to run for public office. You could also put some of the action items above into your life!

    • Anu says...

      I also want to note that most of us who marched, are not only marching. I put a lot of effort into being politically active, and part of that is the march and part of it is other things (donations to causes like the ACLU, calling people, trying to drum up support from others). Don’t assume that everyone at the march is only marching and nothing else. For a lot of us it was an affirmation that there were a lot of us feeling the same way out there and that gives us renewed energy. If you feel the march is not enough, what else are you doing?

  28. JenMarie says...

    I marched (well, mostly stood) in NYC with my mom, brother, and sister-in-law. I fell in love with about 400,000 people that day. Amazing. And though I didn’t bring my 5-year-old with me, my favorite sign was:
    RAISING OUR CHILDREN
    TO TEAR DOWN YOUR WALLS

    • Natasha says...

      Yes!! Fantastic sign :)

  29. Bridgette says...

    One of my favorite moments was on the way down to DC. At a toll plaza in Delaware a sweet woman, maybe in her early sixties took our ticket, she smiled at us and asked where we were headed. We we cheered that we were on our way to march on washington. She whooped loudly with excitement, called “YES!!” and threw her fists in the air. She must have seen thousands of cars headed to DC that night.

    One action we’ve taken is hosting dinner parties where we write to our elected representatives. Asking for action on specific topics and thanking them. We got the idea from Grace at design sponge.

  30. Giulia says...

    Thank you. A ray of light. Let’s keep fighting with kindness and resilience.

  31. Shannon says...

    I marched with my daughter and neighbor in Atlanta. As we left our homes to walk to the MARTA a slap of thunder boomed so loud it made all of us jump. We stood in the rain with our signs and our already wet shoes, we looked at each other and smiled. No storm was going to keep us from this day.

  32. Amy says...

    I participated in the NYC march with an incredibly diverse, energetic and supportive group of women and men. It was energizing and inspiring and different from other marches I’ve done. During the W years, I marched in protest of the Iraq War. I have to admit that I became complacent during the Obama administration. I trusted the intelligence, diplomatic prowess and integrity of the President, and I knew that he would treat every person with respect and dignity. I don’t feel any of that now. I feel that I must do what I can- even if it’s limited- to be vocal and always questioning. The march was important. Now I’m working on a strategy for making my voice loud again. My poster read – Do not be afraid. Be LOUD! Credit to a quote by Jennifer Lawrence in a post-election interview.
    One last comment – I love love LOVED the creativity behind every sign. They were all different and representative of each woman there. I wish I could’ve read each one. Thank you for your presence and voice online.

  33. Caitlin says...

    Couldn’t afford to go to DC so marched with friends here in Vermont–it was worth it, because Bernie made a surprise appearance! As long as we have him on our side, we’re going to be OK (I hope…)

  34. Rosie says...

    My birthday was on Friday, and all day I was depressed. Then seeing all the images trickling in on Saturday of all the different marches around the world made all the depression of Friday go away. Now the sadness and despair I felt for feeling helpless has been replaced by excitement and motivation to go out and make that change that we want happen. I truly believe we will “Make America Great (Again)” – it just won’t be how Trump envisioned it. Instead America will be great despite him and motivated because of his hatred and ugliness to our fellow people.

  35. I rallied in Indianapolis. Home to the State Senator that decided to call us women fat and share a meme. I rallied for a number of reasons and respect was one of them. I am moving forward with support of the organizations I know make an impact. Have you heard of Support the Girls? How great would it be if your readers organized a bra and menstrual products drive?

    • Katherine says...

      Yes!!! Let’s do it!

  36. Regina says...

    My sister and I drove down to D.C. from Philadelphia armed with multiple turkey and cheese sandwiches, large foam board signs and my battery-operated breast pump. I gladly shared the battery pack with another pumping mom in the lactation tent whose pump plug wasn’t working. The woman, a Brooklynite mother to two boys the same ages as my children, wore red lipstick and a beret with a level of confidence and glamour I had never seen.

    We marched with friends (another set of sisters), their 71-year-old mother and an endless sea of similarly-minded peaceful, respectful and optimistic-yet-angry women (and men). We saw so many amazing signs we lost count. It was exhausting but exhilarating.

    This is just the beginning.

  37. Megan says...

    I marched in Nashville and was so comforted by the huge turnout (10-15K) in this red, red state. Planning to attend a League of Women Voter’s workshop on how to effectively communicate with your representatives.

    • Jenny says...

      I marched in Nashville, too! My hubby and our daughter (who will be 16 later this month) joined me along with several people from my church. It was a powerful and energizing experience. On Sunday I met with some folks from Nashville Organized for Action and Hope (NOAH) to learn more about getting involved in some of their initiatives – affordable housing, economic equity, and criminal justice.

      Onward and upward!

  38. Laura says...

    I marched in Los Angeles with (reportedly) 750,000 fellow feminists. My favorite chant was when women would chant “My body, my choice!” and the men would respond “her body, her choice!” I loved seeing so many kids marching alongside their mothers. It’s empowering to see the promise of a bright future ahead of us. One of my favorite moments was actually afterward when I got to reflect on it over the phone with my own mom, and she told me about the marches she used to go to in Mexico, and how she understood the feeling that I couldn’t put into words.

    • Margaret says...

      So proud of so many women and men brave enough to stand against injustice, disrespect, and the completely unacceptable attitude towards women, minorities and the disabled of our unfit to lead President Trump. Speaking out about what we know is wrong is the way forward! I commend you joining those whose voices are not so loud alone to shout out about what we all know is wrong. In the same spirit, and with respect, I must say that it is wrong and hypocritical to align the “my body, my choice” attitude with this movement of equality and respect. In every way, it agrees with the wrong mentality that a child who is a person – no matter the size or cognitive ability or ability to survive on its own – isn’t worthy of respect, rights and life. Isn’t a premature newborn infant a person? Isn’t a mother on life support a person? What is it about the few inches down and through the birth canal that makes a fetus a person? Isn’t a miscarriage a death? Isn’t the murder of a wanted unborn child called murder? The only difference is whether or not one woman, the one carrying him or her, wants the child or not. The power to oppress any child should never be equated with justice, equality and human rights. It is never the right of one human to decide the value and worthiness of another human to live. Shouldn’t the movement be for men changing their attitudes toward taking responsibility for the people they co-create, as opposed to women abandoning their responsibilities toward the life they have co-created? Or shouldn’t we march against a culture that cares so much for their own personal ambitions, desires, comforts and convenience, to the point that killing a human life is acceptable? Is reproductive “freedom” making us more free, or is it propogating the oppression of the powerless and voiceless? Aren’t we saying to culture “you have oppressed me with your lack or respect, your lack of compassion, your selfish disdain for taking responsibility for so long, so I will join you in your oppression for the sake of ‘equality’ as opposed to standing against it.” Martin Luther King, Jr said “True peace is not merely the absence of tension: it is the presence of justice.” The tension of having to support women as they raise children, grow their careers and experience a meaningful life requires a lot more selflessness and genuine concern for justice and the rights of others than to simply eliminate inconvenient children. “My body, my choice” is the epitome of the selfish, oppressive attitudes we women need to stand against.

    • Melkorka says...

      LAURA, That was one of my favorite chants too :-). It is so wonderful to hear men as well as women loudly & vocally support our reproductive rights. Having control over our own bodies is a human rights issue – and I was glad to be marching with others that feel the same!

  39. JP says...

    Thank you for sharing the photos!! I am so appreciative of companies (for lack of better word) like yours that have significant presence on the internet and garner attention easily, participate in events that promote gender equality, women’s rights, really, human rights in general. Thank you!!

  40. Cara says...

    Thank you for another great post! I wrote last week that I felt disheartened, and I’m happy to say that Saturday was invigorating. The sheer number of women participating was so rad! I loved all of the creative posters and the love and support that was palpable among the crowds. We can get through this together.

  41. Allison says...

    Thank you for using your blog in this way!

  42. Stephanie says...

    So grateful that you and your blog exist. What a maginificant message you consistently send.

  43. Marched in Dublin, Ireland! It was sombre but uplifting! It was organised by a number of feminist groups in Ireland so there was lots of representation from pro-choice groups, but loads of men, women and children coming together to show solidarity with those who are scared in America right now.

  44. Kathryn says...

    The Women’s March also has a 10 Actions/100 Days campaign going. You can learn more and sign-up here https://www.womensmarch.com/100/

  45. Beth says...

    I marched in Portland, Oregon, with my 5-year-old son (his sign read: “Dear Trump, My mom says you need a 4-year time out!” on one side, and on the other it read: “I’m 5, and I’m a feminist!”) I was so proud to show him what democracy looks like, and so proud of my city—100K of us braved the bone-chilling pouring rain for this historic march!

  46. As an American living in London, I was initially bummed I couldn’t march in DC (where we lived for eight years before moving here) but marching in London was magical. It drove home that these issues aren’t just American issues, they are GLOBAL issues. I was surrounded by 100,000 other women, men, and children who were just as riled up as I was and it felt awesome. Check my IG for two pics from the march. One when we reached Trafalgar Square for the rally, and one of the most British protest sign ever!
    http://www.instagram.com/hungermama

  47. anna says...

    I was in Denver with my kids (6 & 3) and parents and a great inter-generational group of friends. It was massive (100000+) and amazing! Let’s carry it forward!

  48. clare says...

    THANK YOU for not shying away from this & for posting ways people can get & stay involved.

  49. Sara says...

    I marched in the deep red state of Oklahoma and it made me feel so relieved to see so many more than I thought there would be! I brought my littlest one with me too, 3 month old little boy! It gets lonely in Oklahoma sometimes.

    • Ashley says...

      You’re not alone! Fellow Okie here who didn’t march (crowds worry me) but was keeping up through social media. Thank you for getting out there and letting your voice be heard here!

    • Jeanne says...

      This will get lost but thank you Sara. You are so brave!!!!!

  50. Rosie says...

    I marched in DC with 3 close friends, one of my friend’s mom and several of her friends. As soon as we descended upon the Mall my eyes filled with tears. It was truly powerful and moving. There were hundreds of incredible signs and everyone was so encouraging and happy. In the Metro on the way over, we sang “This Land is Your Land” and cheers erupted like a crowd wave throughout the entire day. One of my favorite moments was toward the end of the day walking passed the Department of the Treasury and looking up to see a large banner featuring the new $20 bill with Harriet Tubman. My eyes immediately welled thinking back to everything she stands for. It was almost as if she was there, looking down on the thousands of women pass her marching and continuing to fight for equality and justice. I felt so proud and honored to witness such profound solidarity.

    I also loved seeing so many men join the cause. One of my favorite signs was “Men of Quality Support Gender Equality”. Rock on!!!!!

  51. It was truly a special day. I marched in Manhattan with my husband, toddler son, both of our mothers, my sister and some friends (and their kids!). One of the most moving moments was when church bells played the Star Spangled Banner. Tears all around. Ever since Saturday, my little guy has been saying “Equal rights!” and yesterday asked me, “Are we marching with all of our friends again today?”

  52. Madeline D says...

    I’m 39 weeks pregnant with my second daughter and marched in Philly with my two year old strapped to my back. It was a powerful day and I hope that we can use this momentum!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      wow, you are a force, madeline!!!!

  53. MaryMargaret says...

    We rallied with a friend whose transport to DC fell through and joined a mini march in Grosse Pointe, Michigan. My husband and three sons joined us — such a powerful movement. I was glad to be able to participate with my entire family. We have to keep the momentum going!

  54. Laura says...

    I was marching in Atlanta. John Lewis led us and it was a huge and incredibly diverse crowd. I almost didn’t go because there were sheets of rain in the morning, but I am so glad I did (with my two little feminist boys). Now it’s time to roll up my sleeves and get involved in local politics. Yes we can! Fired up! Ready to go!

  55. Marie says...

    Joanna, he signed an executive order to defund PP – what do we do now!!? And as always, THANK YOU for this post.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      it’s terrible news — i think today he signed an executive order order to defund *international* planned parenthood (that funds foreign abortions) – not the domestic planned parenthood. reading more now…

    • Arin says...

      Thank you for sharing! It is so very important that we defend the most vulnerable of women: the unborn.

    • Suz says...

      Apparently, all Republican presidents do this on or near their first day. It’s not just Trump. (I heard this on NPR today.) One important thing to note re: funding for abortions and PP. In the past year, I have talked to two women who have had miscarriages and they needed to have surgical procedures to remove the fetus. On their medical forms, the procedure was labeled as “abortion,” and both women were horrified by this. They had to fight to get the terminology changed. I am not a doctor, but I think this is probably common. I think we have such a narrow-minded view about what abortions are in this country–failing to see who exactly these laws impact and their circumstances. For many people, abortion is a sin. End of story. What a shame!

    • MK says...

      It is actually a big deal. As an aid worker who has worked all over the world “The Global Gag Rule” is really awful. Even if an NGO (or UNFPA) use their own funding separate from funding received by the US (USAID, State, OFDA, etc) to even discuss all options including abortions with women their funding from the US will be denied, revoked, etc.

      The US taxpayer does not pay for abortions overseas for beneficiaries (just like federal funding for PP has never been used for abortions), but by not allowing organizations and doctors to help their patients and give them all options is awful.

      When I was in Afghanistan I knew so many women who were in their 20s and 30s who had 8,9,10 children each. They wanted options and yes birth control works, but for many of these women getting to a doctor to get the birth control can be difficult and it is also looked down upon in some situations. Also try hiding birth control from 10 kids when you live in 1 room with those 10 kids and your in-laws. Some wanted sterilization, others just wanted to talk, but many women I knew or heard about through others wanted to learn about their health.

      And in Iraq with many different people including women who had been raped by IS. What do you say to them when they want to know all their options?

      I am not saying either way whether the US should fund abortions overseas, but to threaten organizations who try to do the best for their beneficiaries usually with no money and limited resources is disgraceful! And it also circles back to all of these children who many times then can’t be educated and then are put in the street to work or worse.

      The NY times link above I think is well-written and gives some important facts on it.

      Thanks and apologies for my long rant!

  56. Marie says...

    The Des Moines, IA March was well over 26,000. So proud of our heartlanders!

    I’m loving DailyAction.org for information about cabinet hearings and other legislative events. They send a daily text with a link to a brief recorded overview, and will connect directly to your reps’ offices. I call every morning while my toddler has breakfast, and he gets to listen in on civic engagement. Win – win – win.

    As others have said, so many thanks for using this platform for positive political activism.

    • Veronica says...

      As an Iowan myself, I was inexpressibly proud of Des Moines! I was in DC marching, and admit that I loved seeing the car and busloads of Iowans on the way back. They were sharing hats, offering encouragement, and just generally being supportive. I’m so happy that our state is a part of this movement at a noticeable level.

  57. m says...

    I am thrilled for all of you (of us) that participated in this important event.
    But, please let us not rest on our laurels…. not even for a single moment.
    Have you seen what has been signed away as an “executive order” with Trump’s pen today Jan. 23, 2017 ?
    This action is the definition of “The Male Prerogative”.
    What do we do now???????
    Educate. Communicate. Donate.
    We can become EVEN louder.

  58. Abby says...

    Reading about the little girl singing “This Land is Your Land” brought me to tears at my desk. I marched in NYC and held the Glossier poster with all different colored hands holding each other. Highlight of the march was definitely seeing all the children, even newborn babies! Incredible.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes the newborns! all the heart emojis :)

  59. Nina says...

    Marched in Boston – and like everyone else said, it was felt so good to be around so many nice, considerate people. The mood was electric – I felt like it was the first time people felt truly hopeful and happy since the election. I think it was the affirmation that we’re not alone.

  60. Anna says...

    Portland, OR was 100,00 strong! My favorite signs: “IKEA makes better cabinets” and “Watch out Donald, we are syncing our periods”. A husband that held a simple sign that said “my wife deserves respect, period”.
    Beautiful marches across the world!

  61. Jo,

    I just want to thank you for using your platform to talk about this. I’m a full-time blogger, too and I’ve been so, so disappointed by how many of our peers have acted as though things are Business As Usual. Silence protects no one and those of us with privilege and a platform owe it to everyone else to amplify the message. <3

    • Amy Madeline says...

      Yes! I too wholeheartedly approve and appreciate this message amplified through this blog and others I enjoy. They are a valued source of information, encouragement, and inspiration for me. And the comments here on A Cup of Jo are particularly personal, open and make me feel truly connected.
      I marched in San Jose, CA with 25,000 others and am so grateful for those who organized these events. We march foreward and together!

  62. Katie says...

    I marched in St. Petersburg, Florida and it was incredible. I was reminded that there are rational, caring, likeminded people in this world. It gave me hope. But then, I made the mistake of perusing social media only to see people grasping at straws to criticize our efforts (and the WH arguing about crowd size in a way that seemed to only want to steal the spotlight away from us). Sigh. It’s going to be a long 4 years, but I am ready to keep up the good fight!

  63. Tina L. says...

    I marched in Los Angeles and was awed by the turnout and the commitment of everyone there. It was wonderful to be in the company of so many like-minded people, and to realize we will show up, and we can do the hard work! Ready to support what I believe in again, and again, and again. Thank you for highlighting the human rights issues at hand.

  64. Auste says...

    My 4 year old daughter joined me in Seattle. I was a little nervous to bring her at first, but she was SO into it. Clapping and dancing to the drummers we were walking behind. The love and kindness and energy filled me right up. What an incredible thing to be a part of.

  65. Alina says...

    I live in a suburb of Boston – about 45 minutes North of the city. We are the first stop on the commuter rail. Every seat on the train was FULL before we left the station. We stopped about 3 more times but then got too full to take on additional passengers. I was in tears sitting on that train. I don’t think I’ve ever truly understood the word MOVEMENT before Saturday. Also heard a lot of “we, the people”…. indeed. We have the power, we can’t forget that.

  66. terry says...

    Amy Siskind, President & Co-founder of The New Agenda and former Wall Street Exec. Advocate for women’s & LGBT rights, & equality is keeping a record of the weekly events (complete with links!) because “experts in authoritarianism advise to keep a list of things subtly changing around you, so you’ll remember.” it’s an AMAZING resource and i’ve subscribed to her updates.

    https://medium.com/@Amy_Siskind/week-10-experts-in-authoritarianism-advise-to-keep-a-list-of-things-subtly-changing-around-you-so-7b0dc11fa8c#.u487t5yn1

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you so much, terry.

  67. Emma Bee says...

    If you live in a deep blue district like me, check out SwingLeft.org to see how you can make an impact in Republican held districts in 2018.

    • amanda says...

      I just signed up for this today! Great idea!

  68. Jessica says...

    I marched with my 6 year old son in Portland Oregon. There were 100,000 marchers here marching in the pouring rain. It was amazing!!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      amazing!!

  69. melissa says...

    Thanks Team CupOfJo. This aint going to be easy but here are 3 more things we can do!

    1) Mark your calendars for Saturday April 15 – Tax day – when we will march again demanding Trump disclose his taxes. Taxes are due April 18.
    2) “Wake up, brush your teeth, make coffee, walk the dog, and call congress.” Michael Moore has set up http://www.100daysofresistance.org Everyday, he’ll suggest what you can tell your congressperson: 202 225 3121
    3) if you want to weigh in on ObamaCare, Paul Ryan is taking a poll now. It takes 2 minutes and you only need to push 2 buttons. Call 202 225 0600 (there’s a long silence but hang on!). Press 2. Listen to shpiel. Press 1 to support continuing the Affordable Healthcare Act.

    • Courtney says...

      Thank you for providing this info. I tried calling but its been busy. Hopefully because so many are trying to call and support in favor! :)

  70. Thank you for outlining some next steps… we were out in force in Chicago!! It was beautiful to see … and great to see so many men showing support

  71. Kari says...

    The best part is, because of all the pink pussy hats they can never use these photos and pretend they were some other event. #alternative facts

    • Klara says...

      Good point! Big cheers to everyone who marched, from Belgium! I’m with you. xo

    • Katy says...

      Had not thought of this! love it.

  72. MK says...

    I was in Washington, and it was unlike anything I have ever experienced. One of my favorite parts was actually after the march was over, and we all went out to dinner. The place was flooded with marchers, and each time they showed the coverage on CNN, we all started whooping and cheering. It was really at that moment that it started to fully sink in about what we had just done (cell reception was spotty the whole time, so it wasn’t like we had been on Facebook or anything!)
    As we ate dinner, we noticed a group of older ladies at the bar next to us in their pink hats, and they were dancing. Before long, we all leapt up out of our booth and were dancing with them. They shouted out “Show me what dance party looks like!” and we shouted back, “This is what a dance party looks like!” And we danced and danced.
    The mood was angry yes, but also celebratory. I still feel high from it.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      omg that sounds like an incredible experience MK!!!

    • Jules D says...

      This gave me chills! Dancing is power! <3

    • courtney says...

      and now im crying at work <3 <3 <3

  73. Jessie says...

    I marched in D.C. With my brother, SIL & 4 friends. Everyone was kind, courteous. I had a small panic attack at one point (the crowd was bottlenecking, I’m short, couldn’t see & felt pinned in). My friends helped me get out & told everyone surrounding us that I felt faint & needed to get to the side. Everyone was so supportive & kind, they helped out of the crowd. Also. D.C. Police were awesome, Metro workers were terrific with crowd control & helping people get around. A truly awesome, exhilarating, moving experience.

    P.S.: my favorite chant: “We need a leader, not a tweeter!”

    • brianna says...

      Eek, so sorry you had a panic attack. Those are yucky even when at home or some other safer space. Glad you powered through.

    • Suz says...

      I was in DC too and I also was panicking for the same reason. I’ve never been in a crowd that large and I couldn’t breathe and I didn’t see any end to it–everywhere I looked there were more and more people–it seriously never ended. I felt like I was going to have a heart attack. I was thinking there were other people who had to be feeling the same way. My friends helped me find a space to breathe and I was so sad because I couldn’t join the march that formed toward the end–which was happening EVERYWHERE. But all in all it was still one of the best and most exhilarating experiences of my life. Definitely taking an anti-anxiety med next time, though!

  74. Lauren says...

    We went to the march in Asbury Park, NJ. The whole family went! Don’t forget to text COUNT ME to 89800 for your attendance to be counted!

    • Emily says...

      I’ve heard mixed things about texting that number as it’s a third party collecting data. Is there an official endorsement from the Women’s March?

  75. Erin G. says...

    I marched with a group of female friends (all of us with our small kids in tow) in St. Petersburg, FL. Our organizers expected 500 when they started organizing the event and got over 20K – the largest protest/march in our city’s history. It was one of the more profound experience of my life. If I could be more proud to be female, I would…

    • Abbie says...

      I was there too Erin. It was magical.

    • That’s awesome to hear about St. Pete! I’m from FL, but now live in Chicago so I attended the march downtown. It’s great to see so many people in FL go to St. Pete!

    • Katie says...

      I was there too! It was awesome!

    • Katherine says...

      This gives me chills!! Wow! So incredible.

    • Katherine says...

      This is incredible and moving to read. Over the weekend, it wasn’t the large crowds in cities that spoke loudly, but rather the crowds in smaller and more rural places. That feels so uniting to me.

      As a non-avid reader of your blog, your converted me when I saw your political voice. Thank you so, so, so much!!!!

      We’re in this together.

  76. Annie says...

    I was so happy to be a part of the march until I heard that pro-lifers weren’t welcome. I’m pro-choice, but why should we exclude so many women in a “women’s” march? There were so many signs about respect and coming together, so I’m feeling conflicted about whether I was apart of a hypocritical movement? What’re everyone else’s thoughts?

    • Liz says...

      i felt the same way and i am pro-choice.

    • MB says...

      Great point, I’ve been thinking about this too. For me it ultimately comes down to a basic point: although you may be personally pro-life if you want to embrace feminism you have to legally advocate for pro-choice. This is because the system that regulates women’s bodies is ultimately engineered to create a trap. Within this trap women cannot exercise their independence, moreover the importance of their personal “entity” is overruled by what their bodies carry. For me it comes down to distinguishing between personal choice and prohibition of even having access to make a choice.
      I’m sure there’s better ways of explaining it, I mean there’s stuff like this:
      http://theslot.jezebel.com/on-the-issue-of-abortion-theres-no-such-thing-as-unity-1791340863

    • Interesting – I was under the impression that pro-life protesting was discouraged at this march. I did not realize that pro-life women in general were not welcome.

    • Andrea says...

      I felt sad to be left out of the march, although I saw some people went.

    • hannah says...

      There was a large group of “pro-life feminists” at the DC march. They may have *felt* excluded from the larger group because that position was in the minority on Saturday, but you can’t physically exclude anyone from an open march on public streets. And comparing feeling excluded because planned parenthood was a major presence and many marchers were openly pro-choice is not the same as the real physical and legal barriers into the workforce, housing, legal marriage, etc. etc. for women, immigrants, LBGTQ folks, POC, etc.

    • Sara says...

      I felt extremely welcomed and I am most certainly pro-life. I’m sorry you felt that way, but I got an all are welcome response.

    • melissa says...

      My understanding is that one of the pro-life organizations were removed from the list of supporting organizations. Pro-lifers were still welcome. though I personally agree with MB. While I may chose pro-life for myself, I don’t think the government is well placed to regulate this choice.

    • Missy says...

      Thank you so much for this! I am pro-life, and felt so rejected and even reviled, that I couldn’t bring myself to join the march in my city.
      Lots of love to you and everyone who marched because of a call to their hearts, whatever it was.

    • Maggie says...

      I think there’s a flawed premise here – that all women should be encouraged to attend because it’s a “women’s march.” The march wasn’t just a gathering of women, or even just a gathering of people against Trump. It had a whole platform – people who agreed with that platform were encouraged to join, and those who didn’t weren’t. There are plenty of women who are anti-ACA, or anti-immigration, or anti-gay marriage, who didn’t attend the march because and we don’t worry about excluding them.

    • Julie says...

      I think that Rebecca Traister’s article, see below, lays this out well. Supporting women means supporting abortion rights. If we consider that these laws disproportionately impact low income women and women of color, can we truly say we are feminists if we support policies that don’t allow other women access to reproductive health care?

      WARNING: Abortion’s Deadly DIY Past Could Soon Become Its Future: http://nymag.com/thecut/2017/01/reproductive-rights-abortion-access-in-america.html

    • caligirl says...

      I know several pro-life women who marched but it would make no sense for someone who advocates for denying all women the right to choose to participate in a march with women’s rights as a central issue.

    • Megan says...

      Annie – Thank you for speaking up on such a taboo subject. I happen to be pro-life and a feminist. Personally, I have such an issue with how the abortion issue is addressed from both sides. To me, the fact that so many women have to choose between their life and the life of their offspring is the real societal issue that seems to be getting ignored. While I may not have been welcome by every person there because of my beliefs, I still hold that the march was very important and necessary. I wish my daughter and I had been able to participate in my city.

    • Katie says...

      I agree! It actually makes me feel really discouraged to see some of the responses below that say they agree pro-life voices shouldn’t be welcome at a Women’s March. If we can’t come to together and agree to disagree about abortion, but AGREE to work together against Trump and for our country, it makes me worried about if we’ll actually be able to make this thing happen. The beauty of America (that we’re all fighting to keep!) is that we can disagree vehemently on one or more issue and still agree on the value of democracy and other issues. This is our chance to tell the White House that they can’t keep us divided by issue and that our strength together is the strongest thing out there. I hope we can have some more conversations (maybe here?) about what activism and friendship can look like across our views on abortion. No one out there think Donald really cares either way about this issue, but we know he will absolutely use it to divide us. Let’s make sure we don’t give him that satisfaction!

    • Kaydee says...

      No one banned individual women who are anti-abortion – it’s just that anti-abortion/anti-choice organizations were not allowed to be official partners of the march. That makes sense. You may be anti-abortion in your own life and personal choices – and no one should criticize you for that – but if you advocate restricting abortion access for other women, that is not a platform that is compatible with feminism, women’s rights or gender equality in any meaningful sense of the terms.

    • Kate says...

      Annie, I find your words incredibly encouraging. As a woman, I was (and am!) so excited by all of the buzz and support the Women’s March generated. As a pro-life woman, I was taken aback by the idea that I would not be welcome at this march; maybe it was fake-news stuff, maybe it was real, but either way it dampened the joy just a little. However, I and many of my pro-life friends engaged with Saturday’s events (because it’s important to STICK TOGETHER!), which resulted in incredible sisterhood and conversation with people on either side of the issue. Anyway, I guess my point is that your comment brought further (encouraged) tears to my eyes; thanks for noticing and saying something. #sistersunite

    • Sophie says...

      Not true. Each individual’s reason for marching was different. Yes there were people who supported a woman’s right to choose but that was not a prerequisite. All were welcome.

    • Jan says...

      Love Katie’s comment!

    • Summer says...

      Hard core pro-choice here, but I’m only chiming in here to say this is the most civil discussion I’ve ever read between pro-life and pro-choice women, and I’m getting emotional and proud all over again reading it. :)

    • Veronica says...

      Although I found signs like “Keep your rosaries off my ovaries” somewhat divisive, I thought Sister Simone Campbell’s inclusion as a speaker might have been a nod to us pro-life feminists.

    • Anna says...

      The Women’s March was explicitly pro-choice (see this tweet: https://twitter.com/womensmarch/status/821112766052401153/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw). One of the board members (I cannot find the quotation now!) said that if you attend, the presumption is that you are pro-choice. Of course there was no one checking someone’s stance at the door, so to speak, but when you read something like that from a board member, how can you go and be counted? I couldn’t. I saw so many signs that villianize those who stand with our sisters in the womb. Such a bummer. In the spirit of this civil conversation (go, CoJ!) does anyone out there who is pro-choice see the beauty of a cause that tries to protect them?

    • Liza says...

      I hate to be reductive, but you simply cannot be pro-life and a feminist. You can support some progressive issues and not others, but that means you are not a feminist. I think that some people confuse the concept of being pro-choice and pro-abortion. If you could never ever possibly have an abortion, but don’t have a problem with someone who needs it exercising their right to choose then you are pro-choice and you are a feminist. If you believe that all women should be denied the right to an abortion then you are not a feminist, even if you think you should be paid the same as a man. Being a feminist is entirely about providing equal opportunities to everyone. Making choices that uplift women is feminist. Opposing access to abortion does the exact opposite.
      I believe that women get to make their own decisions even if they aren’t directly in line with the feminist movement. I don’t think that the fact that men don’t shave their legs mean women can’t shave. I don’t think every woman or man has to want a career or to be more powerful than their partner. It is up to us as human beings to decide what our priorities are and they can be staying home to raise a family or they can be a full-time job. They can be making a lot of money or they can be working at a non-profit. They can choose not to have an abortion when they find themselves pregnant unexpectedly or they can exercise their legal right to choose. It is all about everyone having the right to make their own choices. Standing in the way of that is not feminist.

  77. I love these posts so much.

    My husband and I marched with a group of friends in NYC- SEVEN hours later we reached trump tower. It was an unbelievable show of humanity and resistance- and now our real work begins.

    I too echoed steps we can take on my (personal) blog: maisonsheik.com . Lots of actions, great and small, will be needed by all of us in the days to come.

    This is not a moment but a movement.

    So much love for our fellow marchers, tall and small. xo

  78. Cassie says...

    If possible, I love your blog and your team even more since the election. My husband and I marched with 5,000 people in Birmingham AL. It was completely uplifting to be there and to see everyone coming together around the world. A truly amazing day. Now, the real work begins! xoxo

  79. Katie says...

    First – I adore this space and you and THANK YOU for every single one of your posts. I went to the march in Riverside, CA with my Mom and twin two-year-old boys. It was inspiring, beautiful and faith restoring.

  80. Angela says...

    I marched in NYC. My favorite part was on 42nd street at the Hyatt (right next to Grand Central). There must have been some kind of dance competition happening at the Hyatt because the big windows that overlook 42nd street were lined with young girls dressed in their dance outfits. As we marched by, the girls would smile, wave and give us the thumbs up. We all cheered and waved back and said, “we’re doing this for you.” It was amazing, and of course I cried.

  81. Ellen says...

    In Cambridge, MA we saw that the T (subway) was too crowded for us to get on, so we decided to walk across the Longfellow Bridge to Boston, along with hundreds of other people who were headed down to the Boston Common, where the march was held. That in and of itself was a powerful and energizing experience.
    It was while we were crossing the bridge that my best friend explained to our eight year old sons the significance of the pussy hats. I felt in that moment we had crossed a metaphorical bridge where there was some loss of innocence for our boys but also an awakening and really an opening to further discussions around feminism we could have with our sons.

  82. Ruth says...

    I marched with my husband and 15 month-old-daughter in Rochester, NY and it was great! We had about 2,000 people all rallying together for peace and equality. Good speakers and great inspiration. Let’s keep it up!

  83. I marched in Dallas, and it was so powerful. My husband got up early before he had to go to work to make me coffee and cook me breakfast so I’d be fueled up for the March (it’s the little things). I’m grateful for my woke husband and all of the kick-ass women that I met at the March!

  84. Amanda says...

    I marched in Pittsburgh with my 9 month old baby!

  85. I’m so proud to have had friends marching in New York, D.C., Paris, Orlando, and San Francisco! The Antarctica march has to be my favorite though. That sends a pretty loud message if you ask me.

    Briana
    http://www.youngsophisticate.com

  86. My family (myself, my husband, and our 2 sons aged 2.5 and 8 months) marched in our local sister march in Westfield, NJ. Before the march began, the organizer stood up to say that as of last Monday, the expectation was 30 woman. Estimates of 2,000 were reported later in the day. I would guess that the majority of the people there were actually young families with strollers – it was a truly inspiring and positive vibe amongst the crowd! And as we took up one lane of the roads for our march through town, the best part was the vast majority of oncoming cars with their windows rolled down, horns honking, cameras up taking videos to cheer us all on. The most amusing part was one car with a man calling out ‘what a bunch of babies’ and driving ridiculously slowly, just hoping to engage with someone. Of course no one took the bait. It was so satisfying and entertaining to see how enraged he was getting that no one would give him the time of day. A truly comical moment for us. When they go low, we go high!

  87. Julie says...

    Thank you so much for this post! I marched in St. Louis and it was a beautiful experience to be surrounded by friends and strangers supporting each other and the other sister marches. I’ll never forget the energy of the crowd as we marched towards the Gateway Arch! I’m fired up and taking action!

  88. Cara says...

    I marched in Lincoln, Nebraska. My fiance and I actually rescheduled our three-year-old’s birthday party so we could march as a family! As we rounded the corner to the college campus where the march began, I started to cry — I had expected maybe a few hundred people and there were thousands! It was amazing to see women (and men) of all ages, backgrounds and walks of life march together for equality in this red state. I was caught off-guard on Friday by how melancholy I felt as I followed along with the inaugural events online. Saturday was a big, beautiful reset button.

    Since the event, my Facebook feed has been flooded with news of letter writing events and other calls to action, and some friends and I formed a group (it’s cool to see that other commentors on this post have too) to write letters, make phone calls and learn to be advocates for the causes we care about. I’m sure there will be many more ups and downs over the next four years, but what I saw on Saturday, and what I’m continuing to see among like-minded men and women in my relatively conservative community, is what democracy looks like.

    PS….a teensy community in central Nebraska organized its own women’s march and 150 people — more than five percent of the population of the entire county — showed up. Amazing.

  89. Emily says...

    Boston estimates at least 175,000 marchers. Fifteen women, all moms, from my neighborhood, met in the morning and walked to the T together, with our hats and our signs. People honked, waved and cheered at us/with us the whole way. I have never seen the T so packed or my city so full of people–even on Marathon Mondays. I was inspired, as a MA resident, to hear my elected officials tell us that MA leads the country in so many ways and we will continue to do so. But I thought of women in states where this isn’t true. I was very honest with my nine year old son about why we were marching and I felt we made a statement in our neighborhood-many of us are mothers of boys. Since the election, I have felt a need to go inward, cancelling social media accounts, avoiding tv and newspapers, and focusing my energies on raising a son who will grow up to be a champion of the rights of women especially. xo

  90. Maryann says...

    THanks for this post! I saw on Facebook that our local march organizers have created a page (rather than an event) and will start to post action items there. Please keep up these posts on what to do- they are so useful and appreciated. My local march in Portland, Maine was so inspiring. I expected about 2000-2500 people. There were 10,000+ people! It was incredible. My husband and I brought our 10-year-old son and 7-year-old daughter. There were so many kids there – it was great. Our kids missed two planned sport events to attend and my son in particular was not happy about missing a basketball game. He asked us why he HAD to go since its for girls and he’s a boy?! My husband replied because it didn’t matter what gender you were, it’s not okay to treat people the way Trump has. After the march, both kids told me that it was awesome and were really glad they went. I think it would’ve been hard to walk away from Saturday’s events and not feel hopeful and determined. That said, one thing I did this morning was to subscribe to Fox News headlines. Looking at their headlines makes me feel like I live on a different planet. But I’m thinking its really important to understand what reality is being presented over there. Love to hear thoughts on that!

  91. Wow, it’s so great to see all these photos and hear so many different experiences of the march. I marched in London and we had a fantastic turnout. It was amazing to see so many empowered people of all genders coming together in a peaceful way.

    Abigail Alice?

  92. Oh my goodness! What a weekend! I marched in Seattle and the streets were jammed packed! It was a long day being 6 months pregnant, but so worth it. Reports are that 175,000 people marched. The crowd was amazing – passitionate and joyful. There were so many messages/signs/platforms – but the feeling that we were unified that every human has value and dignity was amazing! I am loving this post, and the what other commentors are adding on!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that is wonderful, charity!

  93. Megan says...

    I marched in Madison, Wisconsin and over 100,000 women and allies filled the streets with signs and chanting. There were families, children, college students; everyone from every walk of life. Seeing so many people come together in such a peaceful and respectful way was touching and I will never forget it.

  94. Emily R says...

    I marched in Boston. It was the best day of my life to be surrounded by so much love and intelligence. Today it seems we are back to regular, but I won’t forget that feeling.

  95. Erica says...

    I marched with the 175K in Boston and, and hearing Elizabeth Warren speak made me want to be braver. The number of men and families with small childen marching gave it an even more hopeful dynamic – It was also one of the most inclusive, polite crowds I could have imagined!

  96. Julie says...

    Hi!

    I saw some other comments have included the action plan provided by the march’s organizers. I was disappointed it wasn’t included in your original post considering these women did all the hard work to put together the march as well as these action steps. I know there are great resources out there, but definitely plan on completing each of the 10 action items from the women’s march. White women need to show up for the women of color who put the event together, and it’s just one of the steps I plan on taking.

    On that note, I recommend this post: http://www.shishirose.com/blog/2017/1/23/q3tdgg73913w1lmvc5az9eqa8qls1m by one of the social media organizers of the Women’s March. Some great reading about white women showing up and how we need to keep showing up.

    Also recommend this podcast episode: http://www.callyourgirlfriend.com/episodes#/episode-74-pump-up-2017/

    The interview with Beth Pickens discusses picking one issue that impacts you and one that does not to show up and support. I’m a gay white female, I have been a long time supporter of Planned Parenthood, but it’s time to show up better for racial justice.

    Committing to one call a day to a representative (even though I hate phone calls). I’m reading Obama’s essential read list this year: https://www.wired.com/2016/10/president-obama-reading-list/

    And my friends and I are starting a Sunday Solidarity group.

    It’s long overdue for us to get to work!

    • melissa says...

      Totally agree and thanks for these resources. Shishi Rose’s piece is a must read for us white ladies.

    • MG says...

      Totally agree with all of this. CoJ had a great platform here to explain and emphasize intersectional feminism v mainstream/white feminism to white women here.

      Plz use it!

    • Lauren E. says...

      Thank you for posting all of this. That ShiShi Rose piece was really humbling. It reminded me of the Blackish episode on the election.

      “Black people wake up every day believing that our lives are going to change, even though everything around us says it’s not. I’m used to things not going my way. I’m sorry that you’re not and it’s blowing your mind, so excuse me if I get a little offended because I didn’t see all of this outrage when everything was happening to all of my people since we were stuffed on boats in chains.”

    • Eleanor says...

      thank you so much for this — I realized that as a woman of color there was something about the womens march that wasn’t sitting right with me, and I actually think the Blackish quote embodies it well– I had this nagging “where have you guys been?!?” feeling. These resources are great. Lets keep making these positive changes.

  97. Kathryn says...

    I was at the Boston march. It was so uplifting to be with such joyful women, men, and children. Everyone was sooooo kind and respectful. It was an amazing day. I’m so proud of everyone who attended the marches.
    Now the real work begins. I feel in my heart that the light will win over the darkness!

  98. Jess says...

    I couldn’t make it to my city’s march, but I was there in spirit. I love that so many came out in so many places. I’ve had conversations with folks who have wondered, what now? Now it’s time to roll up sleeves and get to work. It’s time to encourage qualified people to run for offices, support local candidates, stop sending money to PACs and start financing local candidates, and above all, continue to build a culture of respect, dignity, and growth in our own spheres of influence. This weekend has shown the potential for change is astonishing and we have the power to make it happen in our own families, neighborhoods, and work places. I was low, low, low after the election, but this weekend has given me renewed hope. I loved Pres Obama’s final message – the most powerful word in our democracy is ‘we’.

  99. emily says...

    We marched in Oakland, CA. I’m 13 weeks pregnant and my husband was so concerned that something bad would happen that he ALMOST talked me out of it. When we got there, the streets were filled with people of all ages and walks of life – pregnant women, newborns, toddlers, kids, teens, people in wheelchairs or moving through the street with walkers. It was such a great experience and day and even hubs was glad we went out there and made our voices heard.

  100. campbell says...

    I marched here in Manhattan, too, and it was wonderful – especially seeing all the men who were wildly outraged. All day today I’ve been trying to figure out what else I can do. One thing that I’d add here is finding a way to support women in your own backyard. I live in Park Slope and started volunteering with a literacy organization where I help immigrant women learn how to read for the first time. Often, we’re their only American friend and it means a lot to be a friendly face (as opposed to what they may fear Americans think about them). I love this all so much. Thank you for beating this drum, Joanna.

  101. Judy says...

    I marched with my 10 year old daughter in Washington DC. When we got out of the metro and saw all the people wearing pink hats and the inspiring signs, my daughter spontaneously said “I feel so connected to all these people” The kindness and intergenerational support at the DC march (and all over the world) was amazing. The speeches by Gloria Steinem, Alicia Keys, Scarlett Johannsen, Madonna, and others were phenomenal. #respectmotherenergy

  102. Kate says...

    Thank you for being open about your beliefs on the blog – I marched with two other long-time CoJ readers in NYC on Saturday and we talked about how much we appreciate your voice. Thanks also for highlighting a wide range of demonstrators (not just white women) in your photos above. The march was inspiring, but it has also pushed me think about my privilege and how, when, and why I show up for what I believe in. This photo has stuck with me: https://www.instagram.com/p/BPjimx9hSDF/

  103. Farah says...

    At least 60,000 of us marched in Oakland, CA and it was glorious. Everyone was being so friendly with each other. Seeing the camaraderie among strangers was motivating.

  104. Heidi says...

    Thank you for all the great suggestions on what we can do post-march. I marched in Seattle with a group of friends. The turnout was amazing and the atmosphere was peaceful, calm, and kind but also serious and emotional.

  105. Nerissa says...

    I marched in NYC with my two sisters, my brother-in-law, my husband and our 14-month old twins! Marching with that giant crowd brought me to tears and restored my faith in America.

  106. Karen T. says...

    Goosebumps!!!

  107. Kate says...

    I was able to join the march in Denver, and it was an overwhelmingly powerful and uplifting experience. It was so positive, welcoming, and inclusive overall–I’m still in awe, and more determined than ever to join my sisters in the fight for our rights.

  108. jet says...

    Phoenix AZ, 20,000 people. The state is reddish ( I have a democratic congresswoman) and felt good to mingle with the tribe.

  109. Cat says...

    I love that women are being vocal about our rights and our power. I care deeply about issues such as violence against women (in words or action), inequality in the workplace, disrespect toward refugee and immigrants, human trafficking, etc. I was really upset that the March coordinators chose not to actually represent ALL women and that New Wave Feminists were removed from sponsorship, excluding pro-life women. I am a proud feminist and PR0-LIFE. I see it as protecting ALL vulnerable- including women in the womb… the person in the womb (that heartbeat and those kicks do not belong to the mother) cannot be slave to anyone (the mother or otherwise)… Still, I applaud all those that marched for women all over the globe- i just wish coordinators had been more inclusive.

    • Hannah says...

      I felt the same way. Thanks for this comment.
      I am a woman, and I believe in the rights of every woman, including women in the womb.
      A pre-born girl has a fully formed uterus, ovaries, and her lifetime supply of eggs by 18 weeks. I believe in her reproductive rights, too. Women, choose to stick together! Choose to stay connected. Then, nothing is impossible.

    • MK says...

      I am pro choice but I hear you.

    • Anitra Sweet says...

      Thank you for your post. You said exactly what I was feeling.

    • MB says...

      I’m not trying to be disrespectful but I don’t understand how forcing a woman to carry to a pregnancy to term can fit within the view of feminism. If you’re removing the freedom to choose, you’re basically making it so a woman that is pregnant merely a “vessel” to reproduce, precluding her own agency.
      This is problematic in itself, but more so when it’s a case of women that have been raped, assaulted, or those who carry complicated pregnancies.
      If you want to identify as pro-life I think it’s even more important to have Planned Parenthood accessible–with preventative measures there are fewer unwanted pregnancies.

    • MG says...

      Chiming in to agree with MB above. I would find pro-life feminism more plausible if there was an emphasis on contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancies and healthcare for women and children, early childhood education, etc, rather than just saying no to abortion. Would be really interested to have pro-life folks upthread address this!

    • Abbie says...

      Catholic school girl here (though I am pro-choice) and I see your point. I love to see pro-life feminists–ones who adopt children from foster care, give time and money to organizations that support women in crisis, and vote for expanding social support for women and families. Yes, that would include Planned Parenthood where many women access their prenatal care or obtain birth control to avoid needing an abortion.
      I don’t understand the breed of pro-birth activists who want to force women to carry pregnancies to term, but vote to take away the safety net from these women and families. Abortion is at its lowest rate in 40 years, but we have a lot of work to do to make every child a wanted child, and to enable that child to have access to a safe home, good education, clean drinking water, and food, at the very very least. Probirth and prolife are NOT the same.

    • Allison says...

      Cat, I completely agree. I chose to participate in women’s march because I want equality for all women, and chose to participate in the March for Life on the next day, because I want equality for all women (including the unborn, who do not yet have a voice to defend themselves). MB, in response to your comment, I think the question is when a person becomes a person. From conception, an unborn baby has its own DNA. It soon has its own fingerprints, blood type and circulatory system, heartbeat, ability to feel pain, and ability to survive outside the womb with medical help at a younger and younger age. I believe that makes a baby a person (separate from the person it is growing inside of) to be protected by the woman carrying it, and the society it is a part of. If a pregnancy is unplanned and unwanted, I know this can be an overwhelmingly difficult situation for a woman, but that is where I think we can do a much better job as a society supporting women.

    • MG says...

      Abbie, thank you! Your insight is great. I think abortion is such a political wedge issue used to divide us (I say this as someone staunchly pro-choice and who has had an abortion). I don’t like “anti-choice” bc it seems unnecessarily disrespectful, so pro-birth is a great term. I hope to see more of the pro-life folks you mentioned becoming more vocal to defend women’s health.

    • I respect every woman’s right to choose what is best for her health, her life, her family. I believe that any woman who is pro life due to personal values must do her research when it comes to the matter of advocating anti-choice political policies. Data, statistics, science and history teach us that not only does banning abortion not reduce the number of abortions, it endangers women’s lives and health. there are millions of stories out there that would appeal to anyone’s empathy to understand why abortion was a necessary choice. There are 10 year old girls raped by their fathers forced to have babies in countries that ban abortion, many of the policies pro life republicans put forth do not make exceptions, and even if they do we must consider what it means for a woman to prove she was raped, when we know just how difficult that is from recent cases. I believe medical science and experts should inform these decisions, and they support abortion. This is all a part of why this is an essential tenant of the feminist cause. As a woman who suffered a placental abrupt ion at 30 weeks, spending 6 weeks in a NICU, I will stand up always to remind all that pregnancy and childbirth are serious health risks that are not to be taken lightly and those risks should be the choice of the woman. If you want to reduce abortions than the advocacy and policy work necessary is to increase access to and affordability of birth control and womens health care and education. This is what research and data tells us, this is the logical way to achieve a goal of both sides which is to reduce the number of abortions, no woman wants an unwanted pregnancy.

    • P says...

      To the ladies saying they are feminists who believe in equal rights for all women including unborn women in the womb, those are simply incoherent statements. By choosing the life in the womb over the life of the mother you are inherently denying the mother rights, and making her less important than the unborn woman. And therefore, unequal to it. I don’t mean to offend, but to say those things in the same sentence is hypocritical and illogical.

      Please be pro-life all day long and shout it from the rooftops. But you can’t support pro-life legislation and say you support equal rights. Because if abortion is legal, you as someone who is pro-life gets to choose not to have one. But if abortion is illegal or even just inaccessible, myself who is pro-choice is now inferior and unequal to you. With that scenario, you get to choose what to do with your body but I don’t. That’s not equality at all.

    • Margaret says...

      But what about the person who gets killed? Do their rights matter?

    • Allison says...

      P, I respectfully disagree. Less than 1% of abortions are cases where the life of the mother is in danger. And if the mother’s life is in danger, the fastest solution is an emergency c-section, not an abortion. I believe there are situations when there is no choice but to abort, and I think it should be available and safe in those few situations. However, when there is a choice, I don’t feel any of us have the right to make a life-ending choice for the baby. That doesn’t make you inferior to me or the baby, it means our lives are equally worthy of preserving.

    • Hannah says...

      I so appreciate the thoughtful and civil conversation on this topic. It’s rare on the Internet.

      It would perhaps be appropriate to acknowledge our privilege in this conversation, in that we have all been born.
      Some additional thoughts
      Sex education that respects the power of a woman’s sexuality should be widely embraced; this alone could shift the paradigm for what it means to be female in this country.
      The existence and functionality of a woman’s sexuality ought not to be thought of as problematic–
      That the occurrence of a pregnancy is somehow a ‘whooops’, you messed up- now hand over your job, your career, your body, your life–OR, abort the baby.
      I believe that women(at all stages of womanhood) should have options, choices, support from accessible doctors and community health clinics in the form of contraceptives if needed, std screenings, cancer screenings, and any other basic health care service.

      If a pregnancy is a danger to a mother’s life(in a relatively tiny percentage of cases), the decision should be made between her and her doctor.
      What I am asking is, why should the collective policy be bent in such a life-unfriendly way? Why can we not change the paradigm for women in this country, where our sexuality and fertility is not problematic, but celebrated? Why should the choice have to be made once a baby is already on the way and there is now that unique life to consider?
      I disagree with the hateful rhetoric of the pro-life movement of old(have witnessed its effects close at hand).
      But as women, if we carry a child in our womb, I think that in that moment, the truly empowered choice is to expand our hearts in compassion toward that child, to stand with our child, even if it poses significant inconvenience to us. I understand that many disagree with this.

      [I would add, myself having grown up in poverty and ignorance, that there IS the reality of economics to consider. If a mother cannot afford to feed or clothe her child, we as a society should not close the balance on the life of the child, but rather close the balance on policies to elevate the mother out of poverty with education and support.]

  110. Maire says...

    I rallied with my husband, my parents, 7 of my best girlfriends and 7,500 of my closest friends in Indianapolis, and it was a great day! I am going to try to be better at calling my Congress people and attending their public events. (I hear that calling on the phone is way more effective than emailing or sending letters or petitions.) I have also added a new volunteer opportunity to my plate with Girls, Inc., where I will be spending one hour a week for six weeks in a local classroom with a group of girls teaching them a curriculum about media literacy (they also offer other programs such as anti-bullying, self esteem, etc.) I think Girls Inc. is a national organization, so check out your local branch. I do my first session this week and I am so excited to help girls in my city become confident, engaged citizens.

    Also, another thing that we can do is to sign up to be a mentor for a kid. It is an amazing way to help foster a new generation of kind, thoughtful and successful kids. My kiddo that I worked with all through her high school years is in her first year of college and is doing great. I am so proud of her :) I get a new kiddo this summer through the same local mentoring organization, Starfish Intitiative, and I can’t wait to meet her, whomever she may be!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      “7,500 of my closest friends” = i love that!

  111. I was in DC with my husband, 2 kids, parents, brother, sister-in-law and their 3 kids. It was thrilling. Best moment was watching my 7yo daughter, dressed in bright pink, yell out, “Tell me what democracy looks like!” and having the crowd of people call back, “This is what democracy looks like!”

  112. I marched in Atlanta with 60,000 people – it was a historical and empowering experience for me! While marching I knew this was only the beginning. I was excited when Women’s March on Washington came out with their 10 actions/100 Days campaign. My friend is hosting a party next Sunday where we will all write to our Senator (Action 1)!

  113. Wendy says...

    Our march in Memphis from the courthouse to the National Civil Rights Museum was packed with children, mothers, sisters, and grandmothers. What a beautiful and exciting day!

  114. Lauren says...

    I marched with several of my girlfriends and our husbands and boyfriends in the POURING rain in San Francisco. Despite the soggy weather, the crowd was huge and in great spirits. It was a truly inspiring evening and I felt honored to be a part of this historic event. I was so thrilled to see that all of the marches were incredibly peaceful and there were zero arrests in DC – what a wonderful example to set! Well done everyone – keep up the peaceful protesting!! #thefutureisfeminist

  115. I marched in NYC as well. It was amazing, and I couldn’t have been more inspired. I was dreading the crowd, but in the end the vibe was so friendly and positive, it made me cry and gave me goose bumps.

    I’m still trying to figure out what to do today, so thank you for posting!

    PS have you heard about the Tax Day march people are suggesting?
    https://twitter.com/sadmonsters/status/823298584409997312

  116. Elisabeth says...

    Thank you for posting about this! I would add to the list – advocate on behalf of the National Endowment of the Arts and Humanities! The budget for both is in danger of being cut, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting privatized. What a tremendous loss that would be!

  117. Anne says...

    I marched in Austin, TX with 50K+ fired up Texan women and allies. It was an incredible experience. I was impressed with how patient and kind everyone was despite the crowds. It truly was a peaceful movement. Another highlight was the sound of the various chants rippling through the crowd. My favorite was when the women in the crowd would chant “My Body, My Choice”, the men (fathers, husbands, partners, friends) would call back “Her Body, Her Choice”. Really moving. I felt hope for the first time in a long time. Can’t wait to keep it going!

  118. Abby says...

    I’m so proud and thankful you use this platform to speak about issues like this- and not just talk about the amazing feeling of one march, but ideas of how to carry this momentum forward. Keep it up!

    I also plan to read, listen and post more ideas/ experiences from women of color. As a white woman, I am realizing it is not enough for me to care about women’s issues, but how I include, listen and partner with women of color. The fact that Saturday’s march was so peaceful with almost no arrests is not just “lucky” or a testament to women, it’s a proof of white privilege. I think it is our duty- those who marched or those who wanted to- need to show up to Black Lives Matter marches too.

    • THIS! It’s been a difficult pill to swallow learning about my own privilege and not feeling offended when that privilege is [rightyfully] served back to me by POC. It felt wonderful to be in a supportive, peaceful environment on Saturday, but we’re not being systematically gunned down in the streets and having our protests met with SWAT teams and riot gear. It’s a very different, desperate movement for BLM.

      We HAVE to show up and use our white privilege to do better. White women have to do better and I promise to do better going forward.

    • Stacy says...

      YES. Show up to marches for Black Lives Matter, immigration reform, welcoming refugees–there are so many ways to be an ally. What a powerful statement that would make if this march were merely the beginning of a unified effort calling for more just and equitable policies that affect a wide range of marginalized groups.

  119. I feel so hopeful and thankful after Saturday and hope to carry that with me throughout the next four years. Fired up, ready to go.

  120. Lillian says...

    Sign up for Daily Action – text “Daily” to ACTION (228466). They will ask for your zipcode and then text you one thing you can do every day. Its so easy – you click the link, they brief you on the topic (15-30 seconds) and they connect you directly to your relevant representative or other company. Or if its not a topic you agree with or feel compelled to call about, you can choose to skip it. Also follow them on facebook @yourdailyaction. Feels good to actually DO something….other than wallow (which I’ve also done plenty of). Let’s get to work!

    • Gabrielle says...

      I second this! I’ve been doing this for a few weeks and it literally takes 60 seconds to do it every day. You can also sign up here: https://dailyaction.org

  121. Mama kun says...

    I went to one in Walnut Creek California with my kids, my mother-in-law, my girlfriend and her kids and my 8 month old niece! It was wet and a lot of standing in the rain but felt good be a part of the march. My kids told me that they felt good about it and I was happy that we shared lifetime experience together. I was very proud of my kids! I told my kids that this is just the beginning…. we will keep fighting for human rights!!!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      how awesome to bring your kids! i went to the march in NYC with female friends but took lots of videos to show the boys.

    • Patricia says...

      I went with y husband and our daughters (ages three and four). I was curious to see what they thought of the march so I asked them. My three-year-old said, “It was good” and my four-year-old replied, “Should we get a bunny?”

  122. I was at the Philadelphia March, it was an amazing day! So proud to have been a part of this – so proud of all of us. I love that the marches were scheduled the day after the inauguration and we could plainly see the difference between the crowds there and the millions who marched! I was with my husband and three year old son – it felt so important to show this to all our children.

  123. The march this weekend was truly a profound moment in my life. After the extreme disappointment I have been experiencing between the election and conservative family members, this was exactly what I needed. In our family, we have always tried raising our 4 daughters aaa little women who know their worth! I marched in St Paul Minnesota alongside the most inspiring women, and even my badass Mother in Law who used to protest Vietnam! Thank you for providing information on what is next for activism. This fight is NOT over, and we need to keep the momentum strong! I am so proud to be a woman and a US citizen!

    Xoxo http://www.touchofcurl.com

    • Katy says...

      I also marched in St. Paul, and with me were my husband and two sons. I felt amazing marching and supporting all women, while the men in my life were doing the same. Such an incredible and moving experience. I was at Obama’s 2009 Inauguration which you can imagine was pretty moving, and this was a similar experience. Way to go ladies!

  124. Tania says...

    Yes!!!! I live in Washington DC, right near the capitol, and I’ve never experienced anything like this weekend. I’ll never, ever forget it. It was a galvanizing experience to have the day after the inauguration, which was dark for so many of us. These are amazing photographs and I have to really commend you on the suggestions for what to do next.
    I work for an advocacy organization and we love the Indivisible Guide–it’s an amazing primer to becoming an effective rabble rouser. It includes really helpful suggestions for calling and meeting with your lawmakers, which is of course the next and most crucial step. They need to keep hearing from us, every single day.
    Thanks for your wonderful coverage.

  125. Kate says...

    Yes! brandnewcongress.org

    In two years there will be another incredibly important election. For an in-depth interview with the man behind it, listen to Rob Bell’s podcast (the Robcast) called “Zack Exley has a Plan to save U.S.” it’s a really long episode but worth it, I was so inspired by his plan.

  126. Erin says...

    Saturday was a truly wonderful contrast to Friday – despair gave way to hope as I marched through Denver, surrounded by pink-hatted women from all across Colorado.

    And yet – as we move into the 3rd week of 2017, and the 1st full week of the Trump administration, there is a nagging feeling. A WHAT NEXT? kind of feeling. Making a few signs and marching with like-minded ladies is not enough to move things forward. I am concerned about many of us patting ourselves on the back for participating and shifting back to life as usual. I am very aware that that shift is easiest for those of us with multiple privileges to our names.

    Recognizing that What Next? will look different for each of us, I came up with the following excercise for mmyself:
    1. Enumerate and self-reflect on my privileges
    2. Make specific, measurable commitments to future-action

    I have decided on one commitment to future action for each of my privileges, with the acknowledgement that each privilege means that I have resources that others do not – resources that I can invest in action at a much lower cost than those without that specific privilege.

    Privilege: white
    Action: I will educate myself on intersectional feminism and diversify my media intake. I will start with This Bridge Called My Back and continue with Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw’s (who originally coined the term intersectional feminism) new book, On Intersectionality, out this spring. I will broaden my media intake (from books, to podcasts, to television, etc.) to be more diverse in both race and gender. Any recommendations for other podcasts, books, shows, etc., would be greatly appreciated.

    Privilege: heterosexual
    Action: I will become politically active off of social media. I will commit to reaching out to an elected representative two times per month, even though it feels fruitless and makes me uncomfortable. I will subscribe to at least one newspaper, to stay informed and to support “real” (e.g. not fake) news.

    Privilege: cisgender
    Action: I will become barred in Colorado by 2/28 so that I can commit myself to pro-bono opportunities that support at-risk populations

    Privilege: economic class into which I was born/in which my childhood privilege allows me to remain
    Action: I will increase my monthly donations to Planned Parenthood & the ACLU

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes!!!! love this!!! really great points. i’m reading ‘Between the World and Me’ and ‘Hillbilly Elegy’ right now to expand my understanding (and have a long list of other books). inspired to do more from your comment. thank you, erin!

    • This is GREAT, Erin. I find this (and Saturday’s march in LA) so inspiring!

    • Anna says...

      Erin – I really love your framing for reflecting on privilege and action steps. I pledge to follow your example. Thank you for sharing this.

    • KL says...

      i’d high-five you through the screen if i could.

    • Caitlin Crow says...

      What awesome/clear concrete steps. Thank you for this idea.

    • brianna says...

      It looks like On Intersectionality isn’t coming out until 2018.

      Joanna, would you share your list here?

    • Jamie says...

      Joanna- thank you for mentioning Hillbilly Elegy. Up until this point whenever I heard that title my stomach churned a little bit (I live in Appalachia and I thought it was a book by some elitist full of stereotypes about hillbillies). But since you mentioned it I just read a review and I was just nodding along the whole time. I really need to read the book now, it sounds like it sums up so many truths about Appalachia. (BTW, I am a Hillary supporter and I hate Trump). But the fact is, welfare fraud is rampant around here. I’ve witnessed it myself, known people intimately that live off the government and don’t even try to stop. It IS a liberal lie that that doesn’t happen. It is SO frustrating to me that I work a full time job and pay taxes while people I know are living off the taxes of the hardworking people like myself. I know, I know – the single mothers and the people that really need it. Sure. But what about the mass amounts of government money wasted to support lazy people and (some of their) drug habits. It’s disgusting.

  127. I love this! I marched in Austin, Texas! 50 thousand strong! I live just north of Houston which had a march as well but we wanted to march at the state capital. It was great. My mom, 2 aunts, and friends were there. It was so great to see pictures from my friends and family across the country and world. It was a great day and I still feel energy from it!

    We have to keep it up!

  128. Mallory says...

    I flew with some friends to DC from San Francisco. It gives me chills just remembering how it felt to be surrounded by so much positivity and resistance to hate! The excitement, the love, the outrage that was peacefully conveyed, it makes my heart sing!

    The march organizers just released 10 actions in 100 days:
    https://www.womensmarch.com/100/

  129. Linds says...

    I marched in DC with my mom and sister (we took a bus from Wisconsin). I was moved to tears to be part of such a peaceful movement. I like Sally Kohn’s idea to now have all marchers make phone calls:

    From Sally Kohn’s Instagram: If everyone who marched on Saturday would call Congress on Monday, we could #StopSessions. 202-224-3121 Do it.

  130. Jordan says...

    I marched in NYC! One thing I think is super important for everyone to know (and this is all in the indivisible guide, but in case people don’t read it), is that the most important thing you can do right now is to TALK TO YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS. Call, go to their offices, email them. Do it every day. It takes minutes. Thank the ones who are doing a good job and ask them to be bolder. Tell the ones you disagree with how you feel about the things they are working on. Tell them WHY. They need us. So let’s get real personal with them.

    • Becca says...

      I agree! I remember one of my favourite poli sci profs in university saying this is the single biggest way (in his opinion) to make a difference. I’m Canadian (if you can tell by my spelling), so I’m not sure what the exact equivalents are, but phone the person who represents you directly and the politicians in charge of files that are important to you as often as you can. Visit their offices whenever possible.

  131. Jennifer C says...

    I was at the Boston march and it was amazing! Women and men of all ages, many races and cultures, and all united to advocate for the American values of equality, justice and freedom. Everyone was polite and kind and happy even though we were so crowded. An amazing empowering experience!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      everyone was so polite and kind, i agree! i am usually really claustrophobic in crowds, but i felt so calm in these crowds.

  132. Summer says...

    Ahhh! I love this! I’m simultaneously so moved by all the support from everywhere and finding the naysayers (especially the females) on social media tough to deal with. I think I’ll be taking a break from that for awhile.

    Thanks for the Invisible Guide link. I’ve been doing the other two, and am also reaching out to a friend in politics to see how we can get involved.

    (Also, I’m going to have to create a scrapbook of all the amazing signs I’ve seen people post.)

  133. M says...

    The Chicago march was amazing! My friends and I all keep talking about how amazing it was to be in a group of 150K people who were all so civil and polite and positive. Even though I don’t like large crowds, I always felt respected and safe. It was incredible. The signs were also amazing and often hilarious or heart-warming (like the little boys with “feminist in training” and little girls with “future president”).

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes, same!!!

  134. Lauren R says...

    Cup of Jo team – thank you for your public support for the Women’s March, Hillary, motherhood experiences, and empowering women!

  135. I know you can’t get TOO political on here (and THANK YOU so very much for using this platform to promote fairness and equality), but this grateful reader can! Here’s a great PRACTICAL resource for progressives who want to have a direct impact on tight congressional races near them: https://swingleft.org/

    • Jen says...

      Thanks for posting this! I’m in a congressional district up for grabs in 2018.

  136. courtney says...

    AMAZING. Went with my husband and 1 yr old to the SF march. The roar of the crowd that would roll through the streets. Solidarity. And love and high spirits and children — wonderful, wonderful day.
    Have you seen the video of the little girl rallying the crowd? Check your IG direct message, I’ll send it to you.
    Me and my little guy https://twitter.com/courthoov/status/823222474879877120

  137. AM says...

    I marched in Los Angeles with my husband. It gave me hope :)

  138. Kelly says...

    My husband and I marched with our 4 kids in Raleigh, where there were 17,000 people marching total. What a great and uplifting sight! We participated in several chants, some of which were national in scope and others which were specific to our peculiar NC politics. At dinner that night my 5 year old started chanting “hey hey! ho ho! HB 2 has got to go!” (a reference to our deplorable bathroom bill). The experience must have made an impression on his young mind. Made me proud.

  139. Grateful to see WSJ (a far more conservative choice than the NYT) in your list of recommended newspapers. I know COJ is really into the NYT so it means a lot to see a shout-out to a different paper with a different political approach.

  140. Cat Mouton says...

    Great round-up from the weekend, because oh man was it incredible! I still get chills reading everyone’s stories and seeing photos from allies around the world. I was blessed to be in Chicago for the march. Originally expected 50k, then 100k, and estimated actuals is around 250,000! A historical march in Chicago! The media said it was “cancelled,” but many of us were still able to walk 4.5 miles around a major part of the downtown area.

    I also always appreciate that Cup of Jo posts a “what next.” We need to look forward! It’s important to support our community organizations – now more than ever! Another important resource I hope you can add to include is the “10 Actions in 100 Days” agenda ( https://www.womensmarch.com/100/ ) First action is to write to your senators; the website even provides a convenient downloadable postcard.

    • Rebecca says...

      Thank you for this! The women in our neighborhood are getting together to write postcards on Thursday, and the template at the link is really helpful.

      I read somewhere that sending letters to a senator’s local office (as opposed to the one in D.C., which is what the website linked me to) can be more effective. Not sure if that’s true, but I was able to easily find a list of mailing addresses online.

  141. Sandra says...

    I’ve been following Dan Rather on Facebook, which has been very helpful, as well as his news group. I would recommend.

  142. Sandhya says...

    For those contemplating local political action, I would strongly encourage you to connect with the League of Women Voters — they can help leverage your voice for the greatest impact.

  143. Karen says...

    My friends and I drove down to Salt Lake City Friday night to attend the march in Park City Saturday. Unfortunately, there was a snow storm and we had to turn around that morning! It was so disappointing. Later that afternoon we participated in a mini march in our town in northern Utah.

    • courtney says...

      I’m sure disappointing but what a win for the mini march in northern Utah. :)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes, the small town marches peppering the world were so inspiring!

  144. Celeste says...

    Those signs of women are so great! And the “sign guy” lol!

    I’ve been volunteering with the Girl Scouts in its Outreach program, which serves “at risk” girls including refugees and low-income students. Investing in the next generation! It’s a great organization that gets amazing programming into these girls’ lives.

  145. Joanne Kang says...

    I can’t tell you how much it means to see more explicit political activism on women’s blogs, especially yours given your vast audience and influence. It’s been heartwarming to see more and more advocacy-related posts over the past 4 years I’ve been following Cup of Jo, and you empower more people than you know. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

    • sarah says...

      agree. thank you Joanna.

    • Lizzie says...

      Agreed 100%! I commend your team for taking a stance and being brave. I am sure you sometime receive negative feedback from some readers, but its so important to be engaged and outspoken about your beliefs, now more than ever.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      our sincere pleasure, thank you so much for the support. it means a lot.

    • A.D. says...

      Agree! Thank you for using your platform to publicly acknowledge that women’s and minorities’ rights are not partisan issues.

    • DD says...

      AGREED! Good work, Joanna! This is not the time for silence and I commend you.

      PS I marched in DC and it was incredible! I don’t think I’ll ever be the same.

    • Emily says...

      Agree. This is not politics, as usual. Thank you, Joanna and team, for refusing to normalize this very scary moment in our history.

  146. I’m so glad I went in NYC! It meant a lot to me that my husband offered to stay home with the kids so I could go.
    I have been thinking a lot about intersectional feminism and how to educate myself (white momma in a brownstone) moving forward about the struggles of other groups. I had had mixed feelings about all the reporting on the whiteness of the march, but I think the only way forward is through, with some uncomfortable conversations along the way. But the positive energy I felt made me feel that progress can be made.

  147. Hope says...

    My friends and I are forming an action group where we will get together and write letters, call our congresspeople, and brainstorm ideas on how to resist. It’ll be like a little pocket of the women’s march meeting up to keep it going. Today I’ve called my Senators and written emails about stopping Sessions.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that is awesome!

    • Eleanor says...

      That you for opening up this dialogue!
      I am loving reading all of the comments about the amazing experiences about the March, as well as the constructive conversations about some of the flaws overall.
      Admittedly, I haven’t read all of the comments, so apologies if this has already been said, but I wanted to share this article that I felt articulated some of my own reservations about the March as a minority woman– while I love to see how the election and its aftermath has motivated people to incite change, it also highlights for me the position of privilege some are coming from. I want to be clear that I support the March and the movement, and think it is absolutely a step in the right direction, but the conversation can’t stop here!

      http://jezebel.com/i-want-to-trust-the-womens-marchers-1791491466