Design

Have a Nice Weekend.

flowers by Yasmine

What are you up to this weekend? We are doing the same old things — watching movies, going for walks, eating chocolate chip cookies. But the monotony has also been relaxing, and I continue to be so grateful for our health. Hope you’re all doing well, and here are a few fun links from around the web…

Toby and I can’t stop watching this video of Steph Curry belting out Hamilton with his daughters.

How lovely are these twin sisters modeling swimsuits?

Melty cheddar tomatoes.

Before and after: three hair makeovers.

Michelle Obama is launching a podcast!

Wow, these photo comparisons by Uğur Gallenkuş are really moving.

I’m finally watching Normal People and whoa is it steamy. (fans herself)

What a colorful beach house.

12 things the creators of Black-Owned Brooklyn can’t live without.

South Korea’s female divers.

Wear a mask, wear a mask, wear a mask.

Plus, three reader comments:

Says Moriah on four ways to entertain yourself at home: “I’ve hosted two mini ‘Ted Talk nights’ via Zoom that have been an absolute blast. I asked my friends to present for five minutes on topics they are passionate about. We’ve seen talks on Why McDonald’s Has the Best Diet Coke, Famous Last Words, Why George Harrison Was the Best Beatle, Why Everyone Should Use Bidets, and my dad even told us why he believes in Bigfoot! I laughed until I cried every time.”

Says N. on a wedding at home in Brooklyn: “Speaking of bright spots, a couple of months ago we heard sirens, which was very ordinary in this intense COVID era in our part of Queens, New York. However, multiple ambulances pulled right into our building and paramedics rushed inside. I could hardly sleep all night, worrying over which neighbor it was all for and if they were ok. A few days later we found out one of our neighbors had a baby in their apartment – delivered by other neighbors (a couple who are doctors)!”

Says Megan on a new dating advice column: “When I decided I was looking for *the relationship*, a girlfriend gave me life-changing advice. She told me to make a list of all the essential, non-negotiable qualities I was looking for in a partner. Mine were things like: curious, kind to strangers, funny, ambitious, dog lover. I ran the list by close friends and my mom, and I started using it to evaluate dates. It was SO empowering! There were a number of nice, handsome men who had a lot of the qualities, but not all, and it made it so easy for me to say ‘thanks and goodbye’ rather than passing months investing in a relationship that was doomed to fizzle. When I met my now-fiance about four months into dating with ‘the list,’ I felt empowered to ask him all the hard questions very early, and to ask for exactly what I wanted out of the relationship. His friends had also advised him to make a list and we were engaged less than a year after meeting. He is truly the best partner I can imagine.”

(Photo by Yasmine/Instagram)

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  1. Megan Johnson says...

    OMG I devoured Normal People! I had to take a mini break halfway through though because it was so intense at points.

  2. J says...

    Lindsay, please do some research. You do not breathe in exhaled air all day when you wear a mask. Rather, masks keep our water droplets to ourselves which prevents the spread of the virus.

  3. Jen V says...

    The female divers of Jeju are inspiring and I want to add to the comments recommending Island of Sea Women by Lisa See, a beautiful book. I loved Conversations with Friends so I bought Normal People and was trying to hold out and read the book before the series but I couldn’t do it. The series was so heartbreaking and just perfect. I’m afraid I’ll be disappointed in the book now.

    • Becky says...

      You wont be disappointed! The book is awesome. I’m the opposite. I’m afraid the series wont be that great because the book was awesome!

  4. Laura says...

    I am bummed that you didn’t link to the artist who created the photos that the Instagram user @justiceforbreonnataylor did not give credit to. The artist’s name is Uğur Gallenkuş and you can find their work on Instagram @urgurgallen. Not giving credit to an artist is a really damaging practice. We all need to give credit where it’s due.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Thank you for sharing this!

    • Anon says...

      Joanna,

      I just want to say I’m so appreciative of how responsive you and your team are to your community’s comments and concerns. Thank you for acknowledging and updating when needed. This is a great space.

    • Kate says...

      I’m bummed that Gallenkus uses the copyrighted works of other photographers without licensing those images.

  5. Nicole says...

    Thank you for posting the photo comparison link. I hadn’t seen it before, and….oof. Powerful.

  6. Nadine says...

    That is my kind of beach house!

  7. Lindsay says...

    I am in the middle of the book, normal people, it is very steamy yes! I cannot wait to watch the show when I’m done!

    • Elise says...

      Don’t watch it with your parents

  8. Winnie says...

    I’m sorry I don’t see what all the buzz about Normal people is? Please enlighten me. I waded through the miserable book and it does not make sense, he’s the jock at high school and she is not popular. Suddenly the dynamic switches at College… I can only assume it is autobiographical. Very overrated author.

    • MJ says...

      I have to agree. While Sally Rooney is an outstanding writer, her gifts seem wasted on her plots. The book seemed to be a millenial, hyper-sexualized version of Eliot’s ” Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”. All the characters seemed to have no moral center, and the plot revolves around an almost antisocial inability to communicate. Though the characters are sad, and perhaps pathetic, they are not tragic. I don’t get the fuss, and frankly am somewhat dismayed that so many love the book, given how lost and way over sexualized all the characters are. Rooney IS an excellent writer. I hope she digs deeper next time.

    • Anna says...

      I once read that Steve Martin’s comedic gift was that he made it look easy, when in fact it’s very, very hard to be funny in such a casual and understated way. For me, Sally Rooney is like that – it’s exceedingly hard to translate interiority and the cumulative effects of everyday occurrences into written form in an authentic way. She makes it look casual and easy, leading some people to think, “so what?” To me it’s an extraordinary gift.

    • Megan says...

      To echo MJ. . .I started the book but just could not get into her style of writing. Then I started the show and liked it at first (made me so nostalgic for when I studied abroad in the UK!), but the way the characters are so morally lost and could NOT communicate nearly killed me. As we’re also talking about dating advice. . .I would recommend taking notes from the show as to what not to do in a relationship!

    • Gina says...

      I totally agree! Not a fan of the book, I forced myself to finish it just to find out what all the hype was about.

    • Cait says...

      Totally agree about the book (I wanted to throw it when I finished it) and since the show strictly follows the book, not much change there. Totally agree with Megan that the relationship in the story is very unhealthy and an example of what not to do.

    • GRAY says...

      I thought I was the only one. I found the book really hard to get through which surprised me because I like Sally Rooney’s other books. The plot was so dry and repetitive to me. Initially I didn’t want to bother watching the series but after hearing all the rave reviews I tuned in. Very very meh for me. What made it worse was that they dragged it out into 12 episodes when it could’ve been done in half that. The acting was okay but I firmly believe it does not live up to the hype. I think the combo of releasing it during lock down and the graphic sex sold it despite people saying “but it wasn’t about the sex” haha .. right

  9. Annie says...

    THANK YOU! for sharing and showing the haenyeo women. My family went to Jeju a couple of years ago, and we got to observe these fierce humans in their element. I tear up when I read their stories and think of all that goes into creating a life less known. Now at least Cup of Jo readers will also see their beauty, too.

  10. Gail nelsen says...

    A good novel about the female divers is The Island of Sea Women by Lisa See.

  11. Hani says...

    I queued up Normal People on a whim a couple of weeks ago and…have not stopped thinking about it since.
    Whew.

  12. jane says...

    The Korean diver photo’s are amazing. Years ago there was a Japanese tv series called “Amachan” about Japanese female abalone divers – it’s a similar career path that is nearly extinct.

    I found it online for free and binged the whole series over a couple months because the lead is so charming and it was such an interesting window into an obscure cultural realm.

  13. amber says...

    Is it too picky to request a trigger warning or at least a heads-up on content like the instagram comparison photos? I’m still having a difficult time with this pandemic and feel like a head’s up is a basic courtesy.

    • Robin says...

      Seconded.

    • Laura says...

      I see you are upset, and worried, and that is probably the reason you voiced your request ina passive aggressive („too picky“ „basic courtesy“) way. I rarely comment, but your comment made me come back. Probably because it‘s such a common response, I struggle with that as well. We get scared, hurt, upset, and we look for someone to blame. It ain’t easy. I really like the CuJ community and how careful and considerate everyone is. I wish that next time you feel comfortable to speak about your pain – your story is valuable – instead of reacting to it.

    • alexis says...

      I’m glad I saw the photos. I’m glad I didn’t look away. Of course it’s difficult to see, and it’s natural to feel complicated feelings – guilt, shame, self-recrimination among them. But I think we shouldn’t try to avoid difficult subjects or squash those difficult feelings. We owe it to our fellow humans to bear witness, to struggle, and to do better. Feeling bad when you see suffering isn’t something to be avoided; it’s something to sit with and to hopefully use to drive action. Ultimately we should feel worse for looking away and doing nothing than for confronting something that makes us uncomfortable and in so doing forces us to question our own beliefs and privilege.

  14. Stacey says...

    Agree on making a list for dating! Sometimes people can all seem the same, but we all have pretty different lists when you dive into it! I had to make one a few times before meeting my now fiancé, but it always helped me focus when dating. A good friend also made me see how dating more people wouldn’t necessarily mean you find someone due to the ‘numbers game,’ but because it does help you start to refine the qualities you find important.

  15. Jen says...

    Hi Cup of Jo team–thanks for diversifying more and more over the years. As a longtime Latina reader, it would be so nice to see more Latinx representation in your articles. Thanks for your great work.

    • CS says...

      I second this. Absolutely love COJ, Joanna and the amazing team. Would also love to see more Latinx represented… it would only enrich this already Wonderful space. Thanks for all you do! Xo

  16. margaret says...

    Just wanted to pop in to offer another take on the list. I had one back in my twenties (so long ago!) and then I met Him, and he was different in so many ways, but he made me feel so simultaneously joyful and comforted. I worried about those “missing” qualities, but I married him anyways. One quarter century later and we’re still over the moon!

  17. Julie says...

    If anyone is looking for a book recommendation inspired by the South Korean photos above, I HIGHLY recommend The Island of Sea Women by Lisa See. It would make an excellent book club discussion book too.

    • MK says...

      Yes! I loved this book!

  18. Taryn says...

    If you found the story and photos of the South Korean female divers interesting, I highly recommend The Island of Sea Women. It is a historical novel all about their matrifocal culture before, during and after the Korean War. It’s also a beautiful and heartbreaking story of two best friends.

  19. SEVDI says...

    I misread “South Korea’s female divers” as “drivers,” and coming from a country where female drivers are often ridiculed, I thought “oh, no, not in South Korea, too!” I’m glad I clicked on the link anyway, because they all look like they can handle rush hour traffic better than most men. I can’t even imagine doing what they do, let alone at 90 years old.

  20. K says...

    omg i originally skipped over the Stephen Curry link because I neither know basketball nor any Hamilton songs but that was the cutest thing ever.

  21. K says...

    the ted talk thing is the funniest thing ever!

  22. Wow, Michelle Obama has a podcast! That’s amazing. Megan’s comment on “a new dating advice column” is really cute. Have a nice weekend.

  23. Colleen S says...

    Those photo comparisons broke my heart. I’m fighting the urge to cry. I’m also hormonal, so sad photos of kids really affect me. But even when my hormones aren’t acting up, this is the case.

  24. K says...

    is anyone else annoyed that we’re all preaching to wear a mask like it’s the most obvious thing in the world, when back in February and March, we acted like it’s the most obvious thing in the world NOT to wear one? That we should only wear one when we’re sick? 2 possibly precious months of prevention…

    • Rae says...

      I hear the requests and pleas to wear a mask as coming from fear for our own safety, the safety of our loved ones, the safety of our community — not because “it’s obvious.” It is absolutely new for Americans, as well as inconvenient, hot in the summer, and hard to get used to. It is also a very small discomfort to literally save others lives.

    • Erin says...

      We didn’t have the data then about masks that we have now. It’s frustrating for sure but it’s also not surprising in the middle of an unprecedented global pandemic that there are these moments of 20:20 hindsight. We just have to do the best to go forward with the information we have now. Wear your masks, everyone!

    • K says...

      Unfortunately, we definitely did have data. The CDC and Fauci have admitted to telling us that masks weren’t necessary because they were afraid of a shortage. They thought they were telling a noble lie. They could have been honest and told us that they were worried and suggesting alternative masks so that we can save PPE for frontline workers from the get-go. Not only that, but we were seeing warning signs from countries going through the first waves before us.

      And as an adjacent fact, wearing face coverings brought me additional racial discrimination back in February and March when it was the unpopular choice, and I was choosing between an attempt to protect my health, and an attempt to protect my safety.

      I do agree that wearing masks is not a custom in the U.S., though, and that wearing them is our best simple defense so far against spreading it. I don’t think there’s ever enough reminders to wear one, but I think context is always helpful, otherwise it feels to me like we have short term memories and we’re just at the mercy of the public whim.

    • Angela says...

      I definitely do wear a mask! However, I 100% agree with your thoughts. I don’t understand when people reference research as reason/proof to wear a mask. It confuses me because pre-COVID(ahhh!) medical studies used to take years to even be considered credible, and there usually has to be multiple studies before doctors would even value that data. I ask this very sincerely, can anyone point me to mask studies done pre-COVID?

    • Lisa says...

      I’m not annoyed as much as FURIOUS. Everyone would have been told to wear a mask in March (even if they weren’t 100% sure it would work) had there not been a shortage of PPE. And there wouldn’t have been a shortage of PPE if Trump had done his job instead of calling this a hoax. He was advised in JANUARY of Covid. He has chosen over and over again to put himself over the need to protect the American people. I can’t WAIT to vote in November!!!!! Let’s GET HIM OUT!!!!

    • Lindsay says...

      Curious what your thoughts are about how areas where masks were mandated in April are now hot spots, like LA. Or how Sweden never had any masks or lockdown and they are now doing as fine as the other European countries. If you tested positive, would you then go visit the nursing home bc your mask prevents them from getting it? I wear a mask but I don’t really think it makes much of a difference. It also can cause its own problems breathing in exhaled air all day. Or give a false sense of the level of protection it has. The fact is, we have literal examples of those who have already gone through this before the US like In Europe. Many countries have been teaching kids in schools for months and are fine. Soon it will be big in Australia and the countries that seemed to escape it. It goes everywhere and you can’t stop it. The CDC website says we are in the 12th week of declining deaths. Why can’t we be a little relieved and happy that it’s ending soon? As it has in Europe? I guess we’ll see If it plays out just like it has everywhere else :)

    • Erin says...

      What K below said.

      The US government didn’t want to encourage mask wearing because they thought folks would hoard N95s a they would have a shortage for the hospital workers and other essential workers.

      The data existed. Countries in Asia wore them ASAP and have been wearing them for years (see also SARS).

    • mindi says...

      This is a response to Lindsay above: Sweden is not okay. I’m not sure where you’re getting your information, but a quick Internet search shows they’ve had a higher death rate than neighboring Scandinavian countries that quickly locked down and required masks. My sister and her partner live in Stockholm, and both have it right now. They’ve been distancing as much as they can…but not wearing masks. I knew it was just a matter of time before they both got sick, and I’m worried about them every minute (I lost an aunt and an uncle to this early in April). As we go back to school, like things are normal, we have to look at the reality that things aren’t “normal” in the way we remember them. Unfortunately, I don’t think all of this will be over soon as suggested, especially if people aren’t wearing masks.

    • Lindsay, two things:
      Sweden most definitely has not fared as well as other European countries. More here: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/business/sweden-economy-coronavirus.html?action=click&algo=top_conversion&block=trending_recirc&fellback=false&imp_id=119216874&impression_id=378109846&index=0&pgtype=Article&region=footer&req_id=814524987&surface=most-popular
      Secondly, it’s misleading to say that many countries have been teaching kids for months normally and it’s been fine. The countries where schools reopened normally have all seen case numbers shoot up. More here: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/18/health/coronavirus-children-schools.html?action=click&module=Top%20Stories&pgtype=Homepage

    • Lisa says...

      On Europe – Sweden has had a much higher death rate than comparable countries (Denmark, Norway – which are already opening up again). Their economy has taken a similar hit, so as far as we can tell, for now they haven’t made any recognisable gains.

      Europe had a very real lesson with Italy. I live in the U.K., and I remember reading about Italy and hearing from colleagues in Milan, and thinking that it was so unbelievable and wouldn’t happen here. But it did, only a few weeks later. For the time being, the virus has abated (after weeks / months of strict lockdown) and now we are just preparing for a second wave, predicted to come in September. The U.K. government has been behind on its response by weeks / months. In France it’s mandatory (and has been for a while) to wear a masks in shops and on public transport.
      I was initially sceptical about wearing masks – there was a real fear that if the general public bought up the supply, there wouldn’t be equipment for hospital staff (which happened in the U.K.). But – we now have more movement (until mid June only essential shops were open, only allowed out once a day for exercise, no meeting people outside your household) and production has picked up, so it makes sense that people do something. Yes it’s uncomfortable- I’ve now been through a super long hair dressing appointment and a flight with a mask on the whole time, but if it helps why not? Better than the guilt of thinking you maybe infected other people. There is still so much unknown about this virus – it hs been around for barely six months. We don’t know the long term effects of infection, if infection causes immunity to develop, can it lie dormant like other viruses (herpes, chicken pox) and cause other diseases. We just don’t know for now

    • Lindsay says...

      I guess what Sweden Showed us was what happens when you do absolutely nothing about it. I am surprised It wasn’t worse…..?
      But Do masks prevent the spread? All the areas in LA that had mandated mask wearing ( 15 million people) since April, and now In July they have this extreme record breaking amount of cases?
      I’m ok with wearing them for now but I’m very skeptical about it.

    • Becky says...

      Lindsay,
      I’m not sure how closely you follow the news or if you are just having a difficult time adjusting to the new normal. It’s hard I know but in some ways we are in a better place with more education. There has been discussion in the news of a salon where the staff used masks before it was mandetory. Through contact tracing not one case was linked back to that salon. I have many friends in the medical field. When PPE was low they used donated hand made masks. Not one of them tested positive for covid and they directly worked with covid patients. Parties where young adults are gathering like nothing happened are bringing it home to their families. We know this through contact tracing. Masks work. It’s not that inconvenient for the purpose of staying alive and preventing someone else from dying. if you need further proof, look at NYC and the northeast like Massachusetts where I am. Masks are mandetory and we have not had a flare up. Please keep wearing the mask. Science is real.

    • Jane says...

      I am sorry but have to chime in, too. As has already been said, Sweden is not doing so great compared to its neighbors with similar health care systems etc.
      Also, they absolutely did not di NOTHING. It is simply not true and misinformation to say so. They did not do nothing and did relatively well, they closed secondary schools and universities, they prohibited gatherings with many people, many Swedish worked from home and practiced social distancing, but it was still not enough. Their decision to keep open retirement homes for visitors, for instance, is now seen as a big mistake also within the country and the government, as it likely caused many deaths.
      You can read more here
      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/COVID-19_pandemic_in_Sweden

      Please inform yourselves and refrain from spreading half-truths!

    • Ally says...

      Angela- there was lots of mask research before this! Covid has brought these research questions to the forefront of society and has increased the urgency to pursue these questions further, but the research predates the virus. These articles are from fantastic medical and academic journals but may be paywalled without an academic account. Regardless, these serve as just a few examples of mask related research that precedes this pandemic.

      https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/153567601001500204

      https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2749214

      https://academic.oup.com/annweh/article/54/7/789/202744

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3306645/

    • Tricia says...

      Lindsay I live in Los Angeles and the reason we’re having so many cases out here is because there is a refusal on the part of some people to wear masks. Look at what’s happening in Orange County just to our south, the school board just voted to open schools with no masks and no social distancing. I just had a heated discussion with a relative of mine who lives here, who is very anti-mask, and he’s a dentist. I find that terrifying. He used facts promoted by Rush Limbaugh (not a scientific resource argh) to support why masks aren’t necessary. Scary, scary times.

    • Lindsay says...

      Becky, the Northeast accounts for two-thirds of fatalities in the USA. If there has been a steady decline there now, do you think maybe it is because it has already run its course there? I am in WA and we also are pretty much over it, not having many deaths now despite reopening more.

      Jane, you are right, Sweden did not do absolutely nothing. But they have still had less deaths per capita than Uk, Spain, Italy….also the hospitals were never overrun, and wasn’t that the whole point of flattening the curve? I believe these are facts.

    • Jane says...

      Lindsay, yes, because they did do something, and quite early, too. Also, their health care system is a lot better than in Spain, Italy and the UK.
      They preached social distancing very early on and studies have shown that most of the population followed these guidelines. What was so different in their approach was that they did not make these things the law, they have laws prohibiting that,but they appealed to the population. And they have since admitted that keeping old people’s homes open was a mistake and have changed some of their guidelines and also some of the people responsible.

    • Becky says...

      Lindsay,
      Yes the northeast was hit hard, early on. And since then the governors have been STRICT about masks and reopening. Not many people argue about it here. People generally understand that for things to return to some kind of previous functioning, masks are a huge part of it. Stores limit capacity. There are arrows directing traffic in the stores. Employees stand outside and wont allow someone in who isnt wearing a mask. Governors are also requiring a quarantine for out of state visitors. While not strictly enforced people generally follow it and there are fines in certain cities and states. I live by the beach. There are serious rules about residents only. No one from next town over on certain days or any days at all. Is everyone here common sense? No there are still people here who foolishly think masks are stupid. No one has hit the second wave yet. We are in the first one with parts of the country dealing with spikes. There will be a second for sure combined with regular flu and it feels somewhat comforting to know that our governors and residents are more prepared and will have an idea of what to do. Wear a mask.

    • Rae says...

      Lindsay, in response to your comment “has the virus run it’s course in the North East.” I say, emphatically, NO. I live in Massachusetts, one of the hardest hit states in the US. People here adopted mask wearing early on, by mid March, and are still wearing them. This map shows where masks are being worn in US – despite our current low numbers, we are still wearing them.
      https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/07/17/upshot/coronavirus-face-mask-map.html?searchResultPosition=3

      It is mandated when inside businesses in Massachusetts and where I live, everyone complies. Our governor, a Republican but a believer in science, has been slow to open up our business. My kids won’t go back to in-person school until late October, at the earliest. In other words, the virus is still here. People are still wearing masks, businesses are not fully open, schools will keep up distance learning.. I expect this will continue until we have a vaccine. The virus will not run its course until it doesn’t have hosts (people who have no antibodies). Stay safe. Wear a mask and stay away from people who aren’t.

    • Angela says...

      Ally, I hope you see this! Thanks for your reply.

  25. Annel says...

    Oh my goodness… My dear friend had an unexpected home delivery in Queens, a bit over 2 months ago and two neighbors (with the EMT’s help I should say) delivered the baby! Maybe this happens a lot, but N.’s description sounds wildly similar to my friends’ birth.

  26. BC says...

    Regarding the Haenyeo, one of my favorite movies is a South Korean movie called “My Mother the Mermaid”. I highly recommend it.

    My mother emigrated from South Korea when she was in elementary school. My grandmother passed away in 2013 and it was a heartbreaking loss for us, she lived 5 minutes away from us when I was growing up and was a primary and consistent source of love, support, and comfort. The year after she passed my mom and I took a trip to South Korea to visit my grandma’s hometown but we also went to Jeju Island. You can go to this stunning cove where the Haenyeo sell what they catch immediately after their dives. They were so curt and ornery when I was deciding what to buy…they reminded me so much of my grandmother because she was the same way. I could almost hear her telling me with her thick Korean accent, “It’s your fault for taking so long. They were working hard all day and they’re tired. You’re on vacation but they have to work. Why you take so long?” Then she would smile and laugh, hug me, and we would have walked along the beach holding hands. She loved to hold hands when we walked, even when I was in my 30’s.

    I miss my irritable and terse grandma with the loving and gentle heart.

    • Tina crisas says...

      Aw what a special grandma and beautiful relationship.

  27. Lindsey says...

    “What Black-Owned Brooklyn Creators Cynthia Gordy Giwa and Tayo Giwa Can’t Live Without.” Did that headline throw anyone else for a loop? Obviously, the people featured here aren’t owned by anyone, Black or otherwise. But if you don’t know the name of their business, that’s how it reads. Come on, Strategist editors! If you click to share the article, the headline appears in the text as “What the Creators of Black-Owned Brooklyn Can’t Live Without” which is much clearer! (Great products. Love that GIANT tote!)

  28. Jess. says...

    The swimsuit link goes to swimsuits in general, but no twin models in particular. xox

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Oh yes, just scroll down slightly. There’s the cutest video of them dancing!

  29. Gee says...

    Gee Joanna, you sure are going the extra mile to show off your wokeness! Your intentions might be good but the wokeness is painfully obvious and the resulting content painfully boring.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      We can agree to disagree, thank you!

    • Michelle says...

      The content is boring too someone who is boring . I would have never known about the female South Korean divers or that Michelle Obama is launching a podcast had I not come here. Did you see the comparison photos? They were heartbreaking. I loved seeing a black man (Steph Curry) with his daughters, since the media always portrays the black family as broken or led by a single mother. I can’t find this content anywhere else. I hope JoAnna stays woke and never falls asleep.

    • Sequoia says...

      Joanna you are the absolute best!

    • Gee says...

      Actually Michelle if you followed the news you would have seen this content in many other places. None of this is original reporting. You might want to expand on where you get your news content because if it’s only coming from this lifestyle blog…. sigh…. you will be woefully uninformed.

    • Emma says...

      This comment is the rude for the sake of being rude. If you have ideas or suggestions for how you think the COJ team can improve their content, make them known! The team has always shown that they respond to suggestions and feedback. But your comment shows that you just want to be hurtful and nothing more.

    • Rashmi says...

      Joanna, keep up the great work. Love your site. Loads and loads of power and hugs to you and the team.

    • Tess says...

      Joanna, the last couple of months your website has made me more aware and more connected to other women’s voices, views and struggles.

      In my country there is this saying: Unknown makes unloved.

      To make other women / views known, is making them more seen and loved. From that, compassion and action can grow.

      The effort you make to be inclusive is so needed and appreciated.

    • Liz S says...

      Joanna keep doing what you are doing. I have to say that you have been instrumental in breaking down my “anti fat” attitude. I used to have a strong bias against overweight people. Your blog completely changed that for me. Seeing all the posts featuring women of larger sizes: outfits of the week, reading their personal stories, showing larger sized models etc. All of this completely broke down my bias. Now I literally don’t see size anymore. I just see a human. I was just telling my husband the other day that my bias is gone. Just gone. So thank you.

    • K says...

      One of the best link posts. Great job as always, Cup of Jo!

    • El says...

      Love you and your work, Joanna. “Gee” is being an asshole. (Are we allowed to say that? Either way, Joanna you’re wonderful!)

    • CS says...

      Gee: If you are bored, move along. Plenty of other blogs for you out there.

    • Jane says...

      Joanna and others, just keep up what you (and hopefully many many more) are doing and over time, FINALLY, it will seem just NORMAL to include any and all voices, people from all backgrounds, walks of life, …, AS IT SHOULD. I also see some media content (not here, this has always felt different) as maybe trying a little hard, but if it helps changing the way we see reality? If what some perceive as trying to hard today just doesn’t register as anything out of the ordinary in a few months, years, … time??? If a couple of links to some Black hairstyles etc. just wouldn’t be perceived as trying hard to support BLM because it is “trendy” (I wish…) but just as a NORMAL beauty link because that is just the way REGULAR people look??? Wouldn’t that be amazing if even the last person recognized that THIS IS REALITY???

      Sorry for shouting all over your comments section. It just bothers me that people have the audacity to complain about being subjected to the horrors of having to look at, read about, …. people who do not exactly look, live, behave, … like they themselves. How dare they…

      I for one find and always have found it way more interesting to see and learn something new instead if looking in a mirror all day.

    • Mollie says...

      Gee- You’re welcome to read a different blog if the fact that Joanna cares about the common good bothers you!

  30. Anna says...

    Re: the divers: of you haven’t, read Lisa See’s novel about them, The Island of Sea Women. Fascinating and an easy read.

    • Lauren says...

      Came here to say the same thing! One of my favorite books :)

  31. Sarah says...

    Megan’s comment is so interesting! I imagine my list would change so much over time. My husband and I try to see ourselves and our relationship as ever-evolving, but I imagine there are core qualities that drew me to him. Very thought-provoking for me!

  32. Susan says...

    Thanks for the link on haenyo! There is a restaurant called Haenyo in Park Slope Brooklyn with some pictures showing these women’s strength and endurance.

  33. Sam says...

    Normal People is SO GOOD.

    • Sal says...

      Thank goodness you’re fiiiiiinally watching normal people- pls do a post on it!

    • AngelaPC says...

      NORMAL PEOPLE ??

  34. Sasha says...

    Hey Cup of Jo, you guys are AMAZING! But the “How lovely are these twin sisters?” link, which directs to J. Crew, somewhat comes off somewhat strange (like you baited us, just so you might earn affiliate commission). I get it. Those twins seem like great people. And I love the age diversity.

    But, maybe just lengthen the description to “How lovely are these twin sisters on the J. Crew website?” Just so we know what to expect.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Oh I didn’t mean for it to seem confusing! I’ll add to it now.

    • Apollonia says...

      That was my exact initial reaction.. J crew. Again…

    • Angela says...

      Thank you original poster and Jo! This helps!

  35. Twyla says...

    If you’re a Hamilton fan – you MUST Google ‘Hamilton Muppets’. It’s seriously made my whole week!

    • Kathy says...

      Omg. I’m DYING, this is hilarious!!! Thanks for sharing!!

  36. Midge says...

    Yes to making a list! My list was tall, funny, smart, kind, and decisive. And the lovely man who met all those criteria is still a keeper 24 years later!

  37. Megan says...

    Re: Megan’s comment. I highly recommend the novel The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion to read this approach to dating played out with comedy and tenderness.

  38. Ellen says...

    FYI, the twin sisters link goes to bathing suits on the J Crew website.

    I’m loving Normal People! Curious about the book now…

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh yes! scroll down slightly and you’ll see the twins dancing and modeling the suits :)

      Normal People the book is so good!! you’ll love it.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      PS the twins are 48 — I love that jcrew is using a range of ages!

    • CS says...

      It is great to hear that the twins are 48. Here is to age diversity!

    • Allison says...

      Speaking of age diversity, this awesome ad for Knox got overshadowed by a global pandemic, but totally deserves attention: https://youtu.be/AoClPQbneLc

    • karen says...

      I thought the show way outshined the book. Controversial, I know! The show painted these characters to be so awkward, yet loving. I read them as whinier and fussy fools. Maybe I just needed the visual…

    • Lindsey says...

      Those twins are sweet and have lovely energy, but how many of us looked at them and thought, “Oh! Those two are middle aged women like me! I feel seen and spoken to”? Not me. The info you shared told me that they’re 48. Nothing about the images did. What impact does this age diversity really have if many (most?) of us would be off in guessing their age by a decade or two? No criticism of them. Just a nudge to think a little more about this use of the word “diversity.”

    • CS says...

      Lindsey: Really, that is a good point, I hear you. Still, I think it is a move in the right direction.

      As a 48 year old woman myself, I couldn’t help but think: How cool would it be if COJ featured the twins in a post where they share their lifestyle habits?! I’d be more interested in their health habits and their attitudes on ageing, than products that they use. (Hope Joanna is reading this suggestion ?) I’m sure some of it is genetics, but it must also be how they take care of themselves. I’d be so curious to know!!!

    • Lainey says...

      I completely agree with Lindsey’s comment. They are totally adorable but look like J. Crew models. (I should note that I love J. Crew; a full half of my wardrobe is J. Crew). The fact that they happen to be older is sort of irrelevant when it’s not readily apparent. I am in my late 30’s and would never have guessed that they weren’t my age or younger. I am truly not adding this to pile on, but only to agree that we should hold retail businesses accountable up to a higher standard in terms of truly diversifying their marketing.

    • Soph says...

      I agree! The show was loads better than the book. So impressive they were able to create the depth and intimacy they did with the show. One of my favorites.

    • CS says...

      Allison, I just checked out the link you provided! Thanks for sharing! LOVE it!!!

  39. Rae says...

    Man, I love the Currys so much.

  40. Sherri says...

    Awwwwww, such a cute video from Steph Curry.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      he seems like the cutest dad!