Design

Four Fun Things

Spider costume

How cool is this Halloween costume? My friend Courtney Klein hates spiders, but she puts on a brave face for her kids. “I’ve probably gone overboard with the kids in the other direction always telling them how great spiders are so they won’t be scared,” she says. “Now Nell loves spiders and is a passionate defender.” At her daughter’s request, they made spider costumes, plus signs and brochures explaining to the neighborhood that spiders are not jerks!

burgundy sweater

Now that the weather is cooler, I’ve been settling into my trusty fall uniform. I’ve worn it every year for five years running, even a couple times a week. If we run into each other on the street or at a restaurant, chances are I’ll be wearing this cozy ensemble: a cashmere V-neck that has the easiest fit (I love the black and red), and button-front jeans with a little stretch. Plus, maybe these sneakers. Done and done.

Turkish breakfast

My friend Jason (of Kottke fame) just traveled to Turkey and had a classic breakfast spread. I’m so inspired to make something similar at home — salty cheese, bread, Nutella, jam, hard-boiled eggs, cucumbers, tomatoes… what would you add?

Abbi Jacobson

Finally! Comedian Abbi Jacobson just wrote I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff, a book about a cross-country road trip she took after a bad breakup. I can’t wait to devour her thoughts on comedy, heartbreak and (apparently) the life-changing magic of tucking in one’s shirt.

P.S. More fun things, and the best Instagram accounts to follow.

(Abbey Jacobson photo by Emmanuel Olunkwa.)

  1. Marieke says...

    Lovely V-neck. Just bought a similiar one and wearing it with the V on my back. Such a chique way of wearing! Just a tip I got and super happy about it :)

  2. S says...

    I’m Turkish and I can confirm that Turks take their breakfast seriously! Americans spend an average of 12 minutes on breakfast vs. appx. half an hour spent on lunch and dinner – it is the complete opposite of what we did growing up. It’s about to attitude as much as the food; Turks love to take their time drinking multiple cups of tea and socializing over the breakfast spread, which takes the meal beyond its traditionally utilitarian purpose. Needless to say, I missed breakfast a lot when I first moved abroad, especially with my demanding work schedule in finance, so much that I ended up starting a company that makes healthy breakfast products for office professionals. I passionately second the recommendations for simit and sucuk, if you are in Manhattan, the former can be found at Simit Sarayi on Park Ave and the latter at Kalustyan’s on Lexington. Enjoy!

  3. J says...

    Turkish breakfast is the best. So great to serve guests, too. Kids love it, easy to prepare, casual but fun, and everyone will find something they like. The trick is to have lots of bread and pour endless cups of strong black tea. (plus fresh figs, if they’re in season)

  4. Sanaa Rahman says...

    Turkish breakfast is my ABSOLUTE favorite breakfast. For those in Brooklyn, Damascus Bakery on Atlantic Ave has the BEST Turkish Sujuk (lamb sausage) which you can chop and fry up and a bread pretty close to the real deal Simit (Turkish sesame bread). Mix that with Sahadi’s feta, and you’re in business

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, thank you!!!

  5. Nina says...

    Say NO to Nutella. Look I love Nutella. My kid loves Nutella. I can’t buy a jar because he’ll eat it in two days but…we no longer buy Nutella because they use palm oil and it is killing animals in indonesia and OUR WORLD. from world watch institution: Oil palm plantations often replace tropical forests, killing endangered species, uprooting local communities, and contributing to the release of climate-warming gases.

    I’d love a series on foods you can eat that are help us create a sustainable world. Does anyone else teach their kids this?

    • Erin says...

      I JUST had this same thought this morning! An environmental-themed series would be so great. CoJ is in such a good position to help recommend small ways to make a difference for this planet!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      we’re working on something i think you’re going to like! thank you so much for these notes xo

    • YES TO THIS! It’s so important.

      Shameless plug here: If anyone is interested in connecting more closely to the FEMALE farmer scene in Northern California – come join the panel that I’m moderating in San Francisco on 11/13! It’s going to be a really great talk about the challenges of being female, queer, or a POC as a farmer and the general difficulties that small-scale farms face. You’ll learn more about what you can do to in your day-to-day grocery shopping to help support these folks, and about how your grocery decisions have deeper environmental and social impacts. Come join!

      https://www.theassembly.com/schedule?event=2NlIEDWWL7WdoIDu0JsuCd

    • Sasha L says...

      We say no to Nutella too, and tbh, I think it tastes weird. We make our own sub and I think it’s a million times better. Just stir melted chocolate chips into PB. That’s it. Any kind of pb, any kind of chips, and amounts don’t really matter either- more or less chocolate is just fine.

      Of course you could use carob, or almond or cashew or some other sub too.

  6. Amanda says...

    One of my friends is Turkish, and on our first group cabin trip together we were all so confused when she put our cheese (for burgers!) out with breakfast. She said it’s Turkish tradition to have cheese at every meal, and we now account for meal cheese when doing our cabin grocery run. Count me in!

  7. SEVDI says...

    The comments section of this post is like a minefield for someone like me who is Turkish, but afraid of spiders. ;-)

    As extravagant as it may look, a Turkish breakfast spread is actually quite easy to put together. It doesn’t take any longer than frying up some bacon, making scrambled eggs and flipping a batch of pancakes. It’s quite a bit healthier too.

    A tiny recipe for those who want to prepare olives the Turkish way this weekend: Find some black olives, but not the pitted tasteless ones made for topping pizzas. Put the olives in a bowl and pour some good olive oil and lemon juice over them. Sprinkle liberally with red pepper flakes and dried oregano. Make sure you have lots of fresh bread on hand to keep dipping into the bowl. This used to be called “dul kebabi” -widow’s kebab- because it was assumed that a woman whose husband had died would no longer be able to afford meat, so this would be a substitute with the taste of red pepper flakes and the dried oregano resembling a kebab.

  8. Kelsey says...

    Oh my gosh, Joanna! Jason put out a story requesting ideas for his short trip to Istanbul and I am the one who convinced to make that stop for breakfast at Van Kahvaltı Evi. (My husband and I honeymooned in Istanbul for nearly three weeks and ate there three times!) You and Jason are the two bloggers I’ve followed the longest on the Internet and somehow a small interaction with me led to this connection with you! What a magical world.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, kelsey!!! when i asked jason about the breakfast, he said you had given him that rec!!!!! small magic world for sure :) xoxo

  9. Jamie says...

    “There’s always a spider three feet away.”

    I just threw off my sheets and searched the bed. That information will not be leaving my brain anytime soon. Ick!

    • Kay says...

      That’s one of the three “wildly inaccurate myths”!!!

  10. Alison says...

    Ah! That photo makes me want to go back to Turkey – mainly for the breakfasts! They were so amazing everywhere we stayed!

  11. Christine says...

    On the theme of spiders, may I recommend The Children of Time, by Adrian Tchaikovsky? I am not usually a sci-fi reader, but this is one of the best books I read last year.

  12. Amy says...

    I just knew that breakfast had to be Turkish! I think every day should start with olives, cheese, tomatoes, and cucumbers, LOL. 2 things that made breakfast especially good when I stayed in Istanbul- homemade apricot preserves/ freshly baked bread made by the hotel, and watermelon with SEEDS. The watermelon wasn’t much to look at but it tasted so much more watermelon-y than the seedless watermelons sold everywhere in the US. I had no idea what I was missing out on!

  13. Jay says...

    This is reminiscent of the Tarantula Parade put on by the My Brother My Brother And Me show in 2016.

  14. Reem says...

    Braided cheese is so good! My Sudanese family eats it for breakfast every day. You could probably find it in Egyptian grocery stores.

    • emma says...

      If anyone is in CA, they have it at Jons market. I think I’ve seen it at Whole Foods too, but of course at 10x the price lol.

  15. Leyla says...

    As a recent transplant to NY from Istanbul, the Turkey reference made me incredibly happy! As did the Turkey-love in the comments :)

    There’s a word in Turkish called “keyif” and it’s so hard to translate. It’s something along the lines of “a pleasurable state of idle, deliberate relaxation.” Imagine sitting by the Bosphorus, watching boats cross between two continents and seagulls chase the boats hoping to catch some bread passengers often toss for them. Sun shines between the trees while you wait for a huge breakfast spread. You know you have nothing else to do that day except to sit there a few hours, talk with friends and family, then take a walk. The city’s hum seems to slow down to a languid hum.

    That’s what a Turkish breakfast meant to me and I miss it dearly :)

    • Emma says...

      I spent a week in Istanbul last July and I loved sitting by the Bosphorus and just taking in all the views and the fantastic atmosphere.

    • Abbe says...

      Oh my gosh Leyla, what a beautiful description and what a beautiful word! I need to incorporate keyif into my life. :)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      leyla, that is so beautiful and you should be a writer :)

  16. Amanda G says...

    My husband has really helped me appreciate spiders when we lived in an older house that seemed to have a lot of them. We had one in particular who we would watch rebuild his web every night near our back porchlight. By morning, the web would be absolutely shredded by moths, and the spider would package his prey and then calmly go about tearing down and rebuilding. He lived there for a few months one summer and we were absolutely fascinated by him!

    As a kid, we used to visit a museum that would let you hold a tarantula if you were really brave. I always chickened out, but now for the past few years I have decided that I REALLY want to hold a tarantula and I am so bummed I was so scared as a kid haha.

    Disclaimer: I am a huge fan of *most* spiders, but black widows, brown recluses and their like are just no-go’s for me!

  17. Your friend Courtney should check out the Lucas the Spider series on Youtube! These shorts were animated with the intent of creating spider too adorable to be afraid of. Here’s the latest: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXmTkRdENNg

  18. Kristin says...

    i lived in western anatolia for a year and the town i lived in was known for kaymak – as people have said, it’s similar to clotted cream, but made with water buffalo milk and such a satisfying spread with honey and fresh bread – and sucuk (soo-jook), a savory, smoky sausage (think turkish chorizo) made with beef and spices; i loved it so much i smuggled some good sucuk to arizona when i moved home and had to quadruple-bag it to hide the smell of garlic and pepper and sumac, it’s lovely if you sneak some slices into a grilled cheese, and in a traditional turkish breakfast, it’s typically fried with a couple sunny-side-up eggs. also dried apricots and other dried fruits were a staple, as well as tulum, a crumbly white cheese (the texture of feta, but not salty) that was typically served in a bowl with walnuts and drizzled with honey.

    i recently hosted a breakfast with some girlfriends, and this makes an excellent potluck. i asked two people to bring different jams, a friend who lives near a bakery picked up fresh bread en-route, a CSA-having friend brought cukes and tomatoes, i always have jarred olives and raw honey, and when everyone arrived, a beat some eggs with a can of diced tomatoes and some jalapenos and red pepper and sumac to make a turkish omelet called menemen – it was very successful and fun and because nobody had spent a ton of time laboring over the food, we had energy and time to just nibble and gab and enjoy each other’s company.

    when i lived in turkey, my roommates and i would walk down the road on saturday mornings, and hand a lira coin to a mini-bus driver on the edge of our town. we would ask him to take us to “the farm”, a little restaurant on the edge of greater city area, nestled deep in a tree-covered ridge on a small mountain. there, surrounded by chickens and rabbits and goats, was the best little turkish breakfast joint, with excellent (and strong!) turkish coffee and friendly turks excited to learn english from us. some of my fondest memories are eating up there in the calm misty air, with our quiet city beneath us, reflecting on our weird, wonderful life teaching turkish kids english and learning so much about them and about ourselves.

    • Sarah says...

      There’s so much I love about your comment. I feel like I can visualise and taste the food, the vibe and the scenery in both situations you described.

  19. My husband and I went to Istanbul for our Honeymoon many years ago and we loved everything we ate while there. We make Turkish breakfast all the time and love making it for friends because it’s the easiest but it’s so insanely delicious. When I had my baby last year, it was very close to Mother’s Day and I still didn’t feel like going to a restaurant with a newborn to celebrate. My husband made us Turkish Breakfast and it was so amazing, we decided it’s now our Mother’s Day tradition. We’ve done it twice!

    Mother’s Day 1: https://www.instagram.com/p/BUFPFXAg–Z/?taken-by=petyagrady
    Mother’s Day 2: https://www.instagram.com/p/Biupq53H6J3/?taken-by=petyagrady

    Turkish Breakfast is THE BEST!

  20. E says...

    Jason’s turkish breakfast looks delicious. One of my favorite meals of all time is the Turkish Brunch from Cafe Zola in Ann Arbor, Michigan. I recreate this brunch for holidays at home as often as I can. It is an easy-to-put-together but impressive collection of herbed olives, feta and other sliced cheeses, fresh jam, hard boiled eggs, stuffed grape leaf dolmas, cucumber and tomato slices, farm butter, a basket of fresh savory breads and sweet pastries, and turkish coffee. Its SO GOOD!

  21. Callie says...

    One of the most terrifying moments of my childhood was when my mom was bitten by a brown recluse spider ON HER LIP WHILE SHE WAS SLEEPING. I vividly remember my normally very calm, brave, positive mother being SO scared and distraught about being disfigured on her face from the bite (if you’re not familiar, just google “brown recluse spider bite” to see what she was so scared about). It may not be common, but it isn’t a myth!

  22. Calla says...

    Have you tried those sneakers, and did you like them? I ordered them and could not believe how uncomfortable they are especially for the price, the tongue is so long and stiff if felt like a knife digging into my ankle even when just standing. I’m sure they break in but I couldn’t imaging walking around in them even for a few minutes. I returned them immediately but have since seen them on lots of other people, so maybe my feet are just a weird shape?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      I love and wear them! They took a little breaking in but I wear them all the time now. Footwear can be so personal I agree xoxo

    • Raquel says...

      I feel the same way, Calla! The tongue is so long and keeps rubbing on my skin, it’s awful. Such a shame, because they are a great brand. Just not for me.

  23. ANN says...

    Check out Insectlopedia by Douglas Florian….childrens poetry book about insects..some of poetry txt is shaped like the bug it is referencing…..what will your favourite poem be peeps?..ours back in the day was the Daddy Long Legs poem!!…
    I spy Nutellla in the photo…fyi to all New Yorkers, Nutella us opening a shope just off of Union Sq on University Place…(not sure if Nutella is the most healthiest of indulgences but hey every now n then it can’t hurt eh?

  24. While my favorite creepy crawlies are ants (they are SO COOL), I have a deep love for spiders as well! Even though we have not one, but two poisonous varieties where I live, and my husband was bitten by a brown recluse two weeks before our wedding and we almost had to cancel our honeymoon. In general, though, even the scary ones aren’t aggressive and we had a giant black widow that lived in our garage for a while and she was so beautiful and fun to watch! The best best best spiders, though are spiny orb weavers. We have tons of them where I live and they look like they were created by Tim Burton. They are gorgeous and spin awesome webs (I just have to remember to keep my eyes open when I walk in certain areas of my yard).

    Apologies for nerding out about bugs, but that was fun for me. Haha.

  25. Vanessa says...

    Is there any chance you could find out what trousers Abbi is wearing? I think that dark musty green would be so perfect for autumn and they look very flattering.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      we will try to reverse engineer!

    • Claire says...

      I love those trousers too. They look vintage to me.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      vanessa, these aren’t the same pants, but are kind of similar (high-waist, wide leg, pleated, green) and very pretty: http://bit.ly/2CVAXJC

      hope this helps!

    • Vanessa says...

      Thank you so much, I just ordered them!

  26. Except I have been bitten by a spider while I was sleeping…in my face. 😳

  27. Andrea says...

    Turkish food is the best. We loved all the breakfast spreads at hotels, most often served in a covered patio.

    I am sad that the Turkish leader makes Turkey an unsafe place for its citizens and visitors. I so wish to go back.

    • Emma Bee says...

      Agreed! We went to Turkey in 2013 and loved loved loved it! It was one of my favorite countries I’ve ever visited. But what’s been going on there the past few years is depressing.

  28. My kids and I are super spider friendly and we relocate them to areas of our home that aren’t so high traffic, like the unfinished area in our basement. There’s a tiny one living on our window and we can’t stand to remove it. Maybe we’re a bit off our rockers, but we would much rather have a few wandering spiders than several biting mosquitoes. LOVE the boys’ costumes times a million!

  29. Sasha L says...

    Those spider friends and their mom are my new heros!!!

    I’ve made it my mission to help the small ones I teach be less afraid of insects in general, but particularly spiders and bees and ants. Every child that comes to me is at first pretty much terrified of insects. But I catch them, with a glass and card board, we spend time looking at them safely under the glass. We read books. I point out what helpful jobs they do (eating other bugs that bug us, pollinating our garden veggies, etc). I point out when the insects are just calmly minding their own business. I remind over and over how big and scary WE must be to them. I teach them to talk to wasps and bees in a calm quiet voice if one comes near “hello wasp, I’m your friend. I won’t hurt you.” Also to tell the difference between wasps and bees – bees safe, wasps can be mean so calmly walk away. And in not much time at all, the child’s natural wonder and curiosity has taken over and they are excitedly on a mission to show Mommy that she doesn’t have to be afraid of the spiders anymore. I’ve even seen a four year old little girl, who previously began shaking if an ant came near, calmly catch a spider, show her mommy and then take it outside to release. Mommy about fainted.

    BTW, I do not, under any circumstances want a spider to ever touch me, but I am REALLY good at faking being fearless for the sake of kids. It’s a gift to them to help them have fewer fears, especially about the natural world.

    • Janet says...

      This is so awesome. I hate, hate, hate bugs and freak out if I even get close to one, but I am totally gonna try your techniques (on myself, a 38-year-old, hehe). That’s an amazing thing you’re doing for these kids!

  30. Alice says...

    shirt tucking – I’ve tried and just cannot figure it out. Need tips for mid rise tucker inners (anyone else love the look of high rise but cannot due to post kids belly?)

    • Jen says...

      I’m with you! It looks so put together but it doesn’t work with my 2 year-postpartum/c-sectioned bel. Le sigh.

    • t says...

      The key is shirt tucking into a-line skirts. It totally works with my (twins) c section belly. Pants do NOT look great for me unfortunately but I have an a-line leather skirt that I rock with a shirt tucked in.

  31. Sara says...

    Where is the spider flyer from? (Googling the society’s name (so cool XD) yielded no results.) Thanks!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      her parents made it! :)

  32. Mullica says...

    One of my closest friends is Turkish and her parents are like my second parents. I grew up eating breakfast like that at their house with their Turkish tea in a samovar. I love “rabbit food” and definitely prefer a grazing type meal always.

  33. Sarah says...

    Does anyone else look at that photo of the turkish breakfast and just panic about how to eat it? So many combinations! How do I make the perfect bite? Can I get more bread??

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      hahahaha SO many perfect bites!!

    • SEVDI says...

      I love your comment! Turks believe that your eyes should feast even before your tummy and love having as large a spread as possible. Allow me to give you some pointers in case you find yourself facing a Turkish breakfast one day. ;-)

      1. Bread goes with everything + dips into anything.
      2. Honey goes with cheese, butter, kaymak (the clotted cream) and bread in various combinations.
      3. Cheese, butter, tomatoes, cucumbers and bread go together.
      4. Green olives and bread go together.
      5. Black olives, tomatoes, cucumbers and bread go together.
      6. Nutella is not exactly traditional Turkish breakfast fare, but goes amazing with bread and kaymak (the clotted cream), so we won’t be kicking it off the spread anytime soon. (They use Turkish hazelnuts, so there you go).
      7. Eggs are the pièces de résistance however you prepare them and obviously go well with bread. Hard boiled eggs go well with black olives and cheese.
      8. Tea goes with life itself.

      Afiyet olsun.

  34. Kaitlin says...

    Turkish breakfast reminds me of the breakfasts I used to eat in Germany. Weekdays, it was bread, meat or cheese, spreads, and yogurt. On weekends, though, we added soft boiled eggs, croissants, soft pretzels, and more cheese and meats. In September, we’d bring in fresh figs from the garden to top it all off.

    I swore I’d host a German weekend breakfast, and years later still haven’t. I guess I figured out my New Year’s Day plans.

  35. maclean nash says...

    My mom and I traveled to Turkey in 2011 and whenever we reminisce about our trip the food is always remembered as the highlight.
    The spreads and variety of foods at EVERY meal were incredible! Turkish coffee definitely took us a while to get used to but after our three weeks, we were totally hooked. Plus, it almost always came with a piece of Turkish Delight (what more do I need?).
    Also, RAKI! It’s the Turkish version of Ouzo and ahmazing.

  36. Amy says...

    Does anyone have fun facts to help me like earwigs? Do they do anything good at all?

    That Turkish breakfast looks amazing. I’m not sure how much I’m going to get to travel in my life but Turkey is on my list.

    • Sasha L says...

      Ack. Now I’m thinking about earwigs. Nope, nothing good at all!!!!

  37. Kate says...

    Turkish breakfast is truly the best breakfast. The cheese especialy!!

    I’ve been experimenting with tucking in my shirts before I go to work but when I get there I chicken out and untuck. I need to read Abbi’s book!!

  38. Katherine says...

    Abbi looks so fierce. I strangely didn’t recognize her for a second. I have to say I really feel like she’s getting to the age of her true self, with that confident “yes I’m owning this” face. Do you think there’s an age of true self, where you hit it and then forever your own mental image is you at that age? Is it a standard thing for most women? Is it like, 35?

    As a new-ish mom, I often get the feeling that these moments with my baby are those touchstone memories my life. I simultanesouly hate that concept, then try to love the moment as it happens, and then feel pre-maturely melancholy as though I was thinking back on this time while in my 80’s.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      “…then feel pre-maturely melancholy as though I was thinking back on this time while in my 80’s” = i get that ALL THE TIME! what is that????

    • Louisa says...

      Ditto! I spend half of my time as a mom thinking about how sad I will be when this time is over. (And the other half I’m pretty much saying “hurry up” in all the ways I can.)

    • MissEm says...

      I get that too! I also remember moments after my first child was born when for a split second I couldn’t remember which of us was older. It was likely due to lack of sleep, but it was also a little magical to feel on the fringes of time in those newborn days. Turns out she’s also the most perceptive person I know, so maybe there was something in that after all.

  39. Kathryn says...

    I was bitten by a spider in my sleep in 2017 and nearly died.

    10 days later: 7 of which were in hospital, antibiotics of last resort, 70 min under general in the operating theatre. Open wound post-op took 10 weeks to heal. Spiders are real.

    • Katie says...

      Yeah, I live in Washington state and spider bites are a real thing! Not usually fatal but still annoying and painful.

  40. Lindsey says...

    My husband and I are acting as stand in parents for two girls this week, and last night we took them trick or treating. They both love insects, dirt, science…it’s awesome. The 13 year old was a Madagascan hissing cockroach (she was very particular about saying its entire name- not *just* a “cockroach”), and the 9 year old was a spider. She even had put pipe cleaners on a headband that she wore on the front of her face for its pincers! It was actually adorable, and I loved how they stood firm in their decision to be these creatures, even as all their friends were princesses. I learned though, don’t call a spider a bug- it’s an arachnid. Haha. I got corrected multiple times. :)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that’s awesome, lindsey!

  41. Kate S. says...

    The spiders!!!!! I love, love, LOVE that! Being a big fan of honey bees (who also get a bad rap) I am fond of helping the removal of unjust falsehoods! And speaking of falsehoods and fun facts… yellow jackets, those aggressive back and yellow insects that ruin every great picnic are actually wasps not bees! Bees are adorably docile and only sting as a last resort :)

    • t says...

      I am totally good with bees and agree they are not jerks but spiders ARE jerks (except daddy long legs). Their webs are sticky and gross and hard to see (which also seems a bit unjust for their prey), they seemingly multiply overnight inside my home (I don’t love them outside but I definitely don’t want them inside) which has required me to hire a pest control company to spray harmful chemicals around the perimeter of my house on a monthly basis, and they might not bite sleeping people that often but they do hang out in clothes and bite when you put on said shoes or clothing.

      I am in no way scared of spiders but I do think they are a bit jerky for living in my home. Stay outside!

    • t says...

      I also want to add that those kids are so adorable and are clearly NOT jerky spiders.

  42. courtney says...

    I have Turkish friends stay with me part of each year, and they make a full Turkish breakfast spread daily. It’s almost a day’s worth of food for me! Usually eggs, three kinds of cheese, yogurt, tomatoes, olives, bread, and juice. It feels luxurious, food-wise, but also the time you spend on a morning of preparing and eating it all!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, how wonderful! and what a lovely gift for houseguests to do for their hosts!

  43. Catie says...

    Turkish breakfast is the best! I’m an archaeologist and I travel every summer for work….breakfast is hands down the thing I miss the most coming back. (Well, and the tea…).

    It makes such a difference to get really good feta or another salty white cheese for this! If you’re not near a specialty regional food store, try looking for goat’s milk feta (the US standard is cow) in your grocery store, which I’ve found to be the best approximation of a classic Mediterranean white cheese texture. It’s a little less crumbly and a little more rich and creamy than standard feta made here. (There are so many varieties of Turkish white cheese that this sentiment is far oversimplified, but…there’s something about the creaminess of goat’s feta with tomato and cucumber and a little bit of egg yolk. Bliss.)

    • Catie says...

      whoops. I meant *sheep’s milk* feta! (I’m eating goat’s cheese as we speak…a brain slip)

    • Jill says...

      fellow archaeologist here, though my work is primarily in alaska and my field meals are far less luxurious. lots of mac n cheese and spam! want to life-swap for a season?! ;)

  44. LC says...

    Thank you for using fewer Amazon affiliate links. Them pitching their facial recognition technology to ICE has finally convinced me to use their services less.

  45. Nur says...

    I’m Turkish, and I can tell you that the breakfast spreads we make regularly at home have even more variety :) I know Turks who pack feta cheese and olives if they have to travel abroad!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that’s amazing, nur! they look SO good.

    • Jessica says...

      The week I spent in Istanbul was my favorite breakfast week! Now when I see a great breakfast spread, I compare it to the meals I ate there. Life goal: serve it at home for a friend brunch.

    • Leyla says...

      Guilty of being one of those Turks who pack both feta and olives… Huge staples, but I haven’t found either here in NY that’s comparable to what you get in Turkey!

  46. Aysegul says...

    Turkish breakfast are the best! Add some Simit, (a bagel like ring shaped breaded dipped in to molasses coated with sesame) which you can get from Simit Sarayi across the soon to be gone L&T.

    Kaymak might be hard to find unless you visit Sahadi in Brooklyn or Turkish/Arabic store in Bay Ridge. But use Cream Cheese or CremeFresh. Both delicious with good quality honey!!

    I’m getting hungry just writing this!

    • Sala says...

      I love kaymak, oh my – it was like clotted cream but better! I was super lucky to do a food tour in Istanbul, and foolishly had a small snack before I set out for the first of 2 breakfasts, which included the traditional spread as above and with Simit and a Shakshuka type dish and hot, sweet Turkish tea that sent your heart racing like nothing else. By 3pm and too many stops to mention we practically cried at our last stop as we were presented with more bread, more deliciousness. Can’t wait to go back, but will definitely take elasticated trousers next time!