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The Women’s March and Beyond

Best Photos of the Women's March

Wow, what a weekend! Did you march on Saturday? What was your experience like? Our team was marching in D.C., Manhattan and upstate New York, and it was incredible to see people pouring onto streets around the world. Here are a few great moments (and we’d love to hear about yours)…

Best Photos of the Women's March

All that pink in Washington! I marched in Manhattan (the streets were packed like sardines!) and here’s Cup of Jo editor Megan on driving to Washington: “I could feel the magnitude of what we were about to do before we even got to D.C. On our way down, we stopped a handful of times — we were a car full of ladies, including one pregnant woman, and we had to pee! At each rest stop, the parking lot was PACKED with busses and caravan carpools, and inside we were greeted by a sea of pink hats. We were all in this together! The excitement was palpable.”

Next are a few awesome shots of the Women’s March on Washington by Cup of Jo friend and photographer Ana Gambuto.

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

One of Stella’s most moving moments was when a little girl climbed a tree with a megaphone and led the crowd in singing “This Land Is Your Land.” Plus, some other favorite photos from the weekend…

Women's March in Chicago

Women's March in Paris

Women's March in New York

Women's March in Antarctica

A very inspiring slideshow of marches all around the world, including Chicago, Paris, New York and Antarctica!

Women's March best signs

How cool are these signs of badass women, including Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan and Eleanor Roosevelt?

Women's March funny signs

Women's March funny signs

Made us laugh.

Women's March best signs

But our question today is: What to do now? Here are three things we’re doing today…

* Check out The Indivisible Guide, which lays out how to have the most impact. They also have an excellent email newsletter.

* Support great journalism and the freedom of the press. We’ve been subscribing to many, many newspapers and news magazines. A few ideas: The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, your local NPR station or your hometown newspaper.

* And, if you can, consider donating to organizations you believe in — perhaps the ACLU, Planned Parenthood or the Committee to Protect Journalists, which is dedicated to the global defense of press freedom.

Do any of these appeal to you? Do you have any other ideas or plans?

P.S. How to follow the news, and raising race-conscious children.

(All photos by Ana Gambuto for Cup of Jo, except: the pink overhead photo is a screen capture from an MSNBC broadcast; the Chicago, Paris, New York, Antarctica photos were from The New York Times; the photo of the historical women’s heads by Kirsten Luce; the introverts sign photo by Susan Kaufman; and sign guy photo by Amelia Kaheny.)

  1. Thanks for sharing this Joanna! I was so glad that I went to the women’s march in D.C. , it was so incredibly empowering and encouraging.
    I’ve had a lot of friends recently become much more involved in volunteering and contributing to social and political projects. I’ve started keeping a list of resources partially for my own benefit, but also in case anyone else isn’t sure where to start. http://bit.ly/2jFXXjY
    They’re mainly NYC-centric (because that’s where my friends and I are located) but I’m always open to suggestions of resources to add to the list!

  2. Lindsey says...

    I planned on attending the NYC march (I live in Brooklyn) but at the last minute a spot opened up on a bus full of therapists with NPAP/psychoanalysis! I felt so empowered to be surrounded by women (and men!) who believed in rights for women. It was cold and gloomy and my whole body ached from standing for hours and a cramped bus ride, but it was so worth it and I felt oddly ENERGIZED from being a part of something I felt strongly about.

  3. I did not march. While I am very concerned with Trump’s attitude toward women (and others), anyone with my viewpoint on abortion was excluded from the march. Unfortunately, we are not all in this together. Wish we were.

    I don’t really understand the emphasis on “abortion rights” in this setting, either. I don’t know why anyone, pro-choice or pro-life, would think that Donald Trump cares one lick about limiting abortion. He does not. That would surely infringe on his lifestyle of using women without accepting the consequences.

    • Johanna says...

      Unfortunately, he tends to say one thing and do another, and he was fully supportive of the march for life because it panders to his base.
      Being pro-choice doesn’t mean you’re pro-abortion, it means that you support a woman’s choice, and her rights over her own body. If you can’t support that, then you’re right, there wasn’t really a space for you in the march.
      The emphasis on “abortion rights” is in accepting that a woman has autonomy over her own body and can decide things for herself, that is absolutely crucial. In the same way I wouldn’t want someone to force me to carry a pregnancy to term, I’m sure you wouldn’t want to be forced to have an abortion, that’s how we’re all in it together.

    • I am not pro-stealing, I just think stealing should not be outlawed.

      This does not make any sense with stealing, nor does it make sense with abortion.

      Yes, of course, I am for women’s rights over her own body. Very few people aren’t. Some of us just have a more scientific view of what “her” body is than others, and it doesn’t include a very small human growing inside.

      Sex makes babies. If you don’t want a baby, don’t have sex. Yes, it’s difficult, but it’s also really that simple. That is how you have true autonomy over your own body. You only engage in acts that make babies when, well, you are in a good situation to have a baby.

    • Amy says...

      I think we can all respectfully discuss our different and heartfelt views on this very difficult topic. Until a fetus can survive outside the uterus, it is a hard scientific truth that continuing a pregnancy does in fact require a woman’s body. It is easy to say “don’t have sex until you can care for a child” but most women who have abortions are not simply irresponsible. I hope Anamaria that you are blessed in that you have always been able to make your own choices about when to have sex. Not all women are so lucky. Unless you are very young, it is statistically very likely that you know someone who has been pressured to have sex or been outright assaulted- imagine for a moment saying to such a woman’s face what you said so offhandedly here. Or imagine saying it to a woman who met your definition of sexual responsibility, wanted a child and was able to care for one, but learned about a medical condition that predicted a short life full of suffering, or threatened her own life. And consider the downstream effects of unintended or unwanted pregnancies in more common situations- simply wishing people would plan better does not prevent such pregnancies. Beyond the broad societal issues of perpetuation of poverty, etc. there is a visible human toll to denying abortion when a pregnancy is truly not desired. My mother was a physician in the ’70s who vividly remembers caring for a teenage girl who died after an illegal abortion. She still tears up when she recalls a beautiful baby girl who died as a result of abuse because her too-young mother, who did not want this child, could not cope with her crying. Many of her colleagues and older women in this march, who remember the days when abortion was illegal, have similar stories. My point here is that the reasons women and girls seek abortion are complex and cannot be resolved with an admonition to be more careful. And protecting a fetus does not always translate to valuing the life of the mother, or the child it may become. We all wish every pregnancy was wanted, well-planned, and safe for all involved. But that’s simply not always the case, and wherever one falls on the pro-life to pro-choice spectrum, if we are to have a constructive conversation it is crucial to acknowledge the complexities of this issue.

  4. I marched in Raleigh with a friend who is pregnant with a girl (baby’s first march…whatupppp!!) and I left feeling energized, inspired, and ready to fight! Thank you and your team for always supporting women and equality for ALL!