Motherhood

Tooth Fairy: What’s the Going Rate?

adele

Breaking news from the Goddard-Williams household: Five-and-a-half-year-old Toby has a wiggly tooth! So, I’m curious to know: What’s the going rate for the tooth fairy? A quarter? $1? $5? I asked some fellow parents, and their answers made me laugh…

“We forget, far too often! Once for almost a week! Agh! We give $2, but when we’re late we pay self-imposed interest.” — Rony

“We do a single gold dollar sprinkled with glitter. I stock the gold dollars ahead of time and travel with them and the glitter if there is a wiggly tooth. We don’t do notes — I feel like that’s how you get in trouble. Haven’t been caught yet though it always makes me nervous.” — Megan

“$1! For the record, my kids love getting money, but five minutes later it means nothing to them. Side note: When we moved cross-country, we shipped our dresser empty. When we were unpacking, I heard something rattling and it was one of Stella’s baby teeth. There was something so disgusting about having an old body part in our furniture that I resolved to throw away all future teeth.” — Kendra

“When Alex lost his first tooth, my husband and I got into the spirit. We designed a form from the tooth fairy who works in the Department of Dental Enchantment and left $5.” — Abbey

“This week, Edie lost her first tooth and put it under her pillow. We talked all about it, and then I totally passed out and forgot to leave anything! She came into my room the next morning hysterically crying. I ended up writing an apology note from the tooth fairy saying that she wasn’t able to find it. Then the next night I gave her $10 because that’s all I had in my wallet, even though it was a ridiculous amount of money. But I decorated Hamilton to look like a fairy, which she appreciated.” — Lina

“We crept in and tucked a note from the tooth fairy instructing Henry to follow clues to his prize. He hunted around the apartment following a trail of post-its that we’d stuck along the walls. They led him to a Nerf sword. He was beyond thrilled!” — Samantha

“We leave a dollar bill folded into origami, like a ring or plane.” — Nandini

“We give $5 and a little Lego figurine. The hardest thing is just remembering. I can’t tell you how many times they’ve woken up brokenhearted that the Tooth Fairy forgot. We always make some excuse like, ‘We forgot to crack the window.’ I finally learned to set the alarm on my iPhone as soon as I remember it.” — Jordan

“When I was little, my parents would leave $1 and a note from the tooth fairy, so I did the same with my daughter. I upped the ante, though: I wrote rhyming poems every time in flowery handwriting. Also — and I should preface this by saying that we are Jewish — on the subway one morning, Lila asked me point blank, “Wait, is the tooth fairy real?” I was taken by surprise, totally unprepared, but I felt that at her age (she was 8 or so) I couldn’t lie to her face, so I said, “Well, no.” She was shocked and devastated, and had so many questions — so who writes the notes? Who leaves the money? Etc. And I told her. She couldn’t believe it — “Parents?!?!” And I said, yeah, it’s like Santa Claus. And she said, “SANTA CLAUS IS PARENTS??!” — Anna


Oh, man, the drama! I think we’re going to leave a chocolate coin. And I also like the idea of $2 bills (which you can easily get from the bank).

I also spoke to Ron Lieber, author of The Opposite of Spoiled, to get his take on the tooth fairy racket.

“I’ve heard stories of kids getting $100 bills for their first tooth,” he told me, “but there are other ways to make your kids feel special. I know parents who give their twins foreign bills and coins, which inspires conversations about different countries. With the first tooth, they bought them Throw Your Tooth on the Roof, a great book about tooth traditions around the world. Another couple I know in San Francisco bought animal teeth from a natural history store, and every time their kids lost a tooth, they’d get an animal tooth, along with a note written backwards from the tooth fairy with clues about which animal the tooth came from. They’d hold it up to the mirror to read it. You don’t have to go to that extreme for each and every tooth, but these are reminders that there’s always an opportunity to do something creative that doesn’t just involve spending more.”

When you were growing up, what did you get from the tooth fairy? What do you leave for your kids?

P.S. An ode to rituals, and my motherhood mantra.

(Photo of baby Adele.)

  1. Michael's Mom says...

    Our Toothfairy had to deal with post traumatic stress. During a vacation in Thailand our 6 y.o. was very anxious about his wobbly tooth… When he “pulled” it out (it droped basically) during dinner time he felt so victorius. We all studied the tooth thoroughly and he packed it into a paper tissue to clean and dry the jewel. In all the hugs and proud moment, the service came and removed all dishes, napkins and … the most precious tissue! Shwupps!, down the huge kitchen bin full of gooey sauces, rice, etc. Oh, the drama…!!!!! We even briefly attempted to retrieve it – yuck! – in the end we wrote the note to the Toothfairy. He was devastated, “hated” the poor waitress. Next morning, lots of Bhat notes made up for the despair…!

  2. Aya says...

    My grandmother was my tooth fairy. I always thought it was odd that the tooth fairy would only visit me when I stayed over at Grandma’s house and it was only years later that I put it together. She always left fifty cent pieces for me, which seemed really special to me because I never saw them elsewhere. It felt kind of magic to have a mysterious coin and I kept them all.

  3. Jessie says...

    for the first tooth we left however many quarters they were of age. My daughter lost her first at 6 so she got 6 quarters. Going forward I think we are going to do $1. I say $0.25, but my husband said $1.

  4. Elizabeth M says...

    I work with elementary school kids and I kid you not, one got $30 for their tooth! That’s crazy to me! However, most kids in my class get $1-$10.

  5. Amy says...

    Growing up my mom would leave a tiny present under our pillows, like a pin, patch or stretchy bracelet. Now I do the same thing with my daughters. I also leave them a gold $1 coin (I got a couple rolls of them from the bank). After a couple frantic late night runs to the 24hr drug store for trinkets, I started keeping a little box of items that I can pull from when needed.

  6. Heather says...

    We generally left a dollar coin. But, one tooth was lost during prayer at church–just popped out on the floor! For that tooth, a grown up Bible was left beside the bed, opened to a favorite verse.

  7. Just a thought – chocolate coin may melt?

    Love the story about the Jewish mother! One of the engineers at the office I used to work at would always tell his little kids as he read books “but that’s not real” haha :’) I have a feeling this will be me – I want my kids to care about truth and not confuse them. There are enough fun traditions my family has to create that ‘kid magic’ :)

    Ahh you’re probably not putting the coin under his pillow… What an exciting milestone for Toby!

  8. Tia says...

    My Grandma told me that when I lost a tooth I should put it in my dogs food and let it eat it, than my teeth will be as strong as his. I loved it, and I have never had a cavity in my life. Is it superstitious grandmother or good genes is still a mystery :)

  9. Mary says...

    My daughter is two years old, so the thought of what to do for the tooth fairy hasn’t even crossed my mind, but I am so thankful for you delving into every stage and part of life. Selfishly I ask that you never stop blogging, I need you to help guide me along in life, in the big and small things!

  10. Jaime says...

    I got a charm bracelet for my first tooth and then a new charm for every tooth after that. They were always a charm reflecting an activity I was doing/loving at the time (painting, horseback riding, swimming, etc.).

  11. Hannah says...

    I got a sand dollar or another special shell to add to my collection. Much better than money.

  12. christine says...

    We live in Canada and the going rate around here is a “toonie” ($2 coin). My daughter, as she got older, started leaving surveys for the tooth fairy to fill out… questions like “what’s your favourite tooth ever”, “how did you become the tooth fairy”, etc. I thought it was so cute the first time, I answered in this beautiful flowery handwriting (so she wouldn’t know it was me answering). The second time she left the survey, she told me she was going to compare the handwriting from the second survey to the first survey so she’d know if the tooth fairy was real. So now I’m not just sneaking in to leave a coin under her pillow, I’m sneaking in to search through her room to find the first survey so I can match up the handwriting and not get busted – ha! The second time I took a picture of the completed survey…

  13. Ana says...

    I have had all the drama…forgetting…forgetting a second time…not finding what I was supposed to give…my children hate to get money, so I have to give them something else. For my oldest, I used to give her a beautiful stone, like a semi-precious (or not precious at all!) which is something a fairy would think of. And that’s what worked best :-)

  14. My son just lost his first tooth last month. He was so sad to lose it, and wanted to keep it forever and ever, he wouldn’t put it under his pillow! He said he didn’t care about the money the fairy would leave, he’d much rather keep his tooth. I thought after this second tooth came out last week he’d lose the sentimental attachments, but he felt the same way about this tooth.

  15. Briana says...

    My parents gave coins – 6 quarters or 8 dimes or 10 pennies, things like that. I didn’t understand money so the value of the coins didn’t matter, I just thought 10 was more than 6.

    I LOVE that form your friend Abby made. Seriously genius.

  16. Alex says...

    LOVE the ideas…particularly the animal tooth! We leave $1 as well as a note that we write on this paper: http://www.chroniclebooks.com/titles/the-world-s-smallest-post-service.html. (I didn’t buy the paper for this purpose, but it’s actually the only thing I’ve used it for!) The final detail is my favorite. When she lost her first tooth, the tooth fairy mentioned in her note that she noticed our daughter’s dollhouse, and then left a spare tea set that she wasn’t using in the dollhouse. Ever since then, the most exciting part of getting a note from the tooth fairy is to see what fairy memento she brings too. (we get miniatures for dollhouses, from amazon prime) After the tea set she got a little Christmas tree and a little outdoor slide. I love the idea of believing in magic & fairies…I hope it lasts a while!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      That is so cute!!

  17. Rue says...

    My first lost tooth as a kid, woke up early, super excited to check under my pillow, and then nuthin! Started to walk down the stairs, but keep in mind that I was a tiny child, so my parents didn’t hear me on the stairs. As I put my foot on the landing I heard my dad from the kitchen, “OH sh*t! I forgot to give Rue a dollar!!” Buuuusted!

    File under: the woes of being the youngest child. (Why does the youngest get the “spoiled” reputation? more like “overlooked!”)

  18. Natalie says...

    The tooth fairy left us one quarter per year old we were. We had special boxes that we put the teeth in and had them under our pillows. No idea how I slept with a little wooden box under my head, nor how my parents moved it around without waking me.

  19. Ali says...

    A follar! (Fairy dollar.) I purchased a lot of random foreign coins from eBay for like $5, and with each tooth we leave them one of these coins. That way it has novelty and doesn’t just contribute to the whole consumerism aspect since you can’t buy anything with it (at least in the US!). They love trying to figure out what is on each coin.

  20. Susan M. says...

    Love these ideas. I haven’t decided yet. My 5 1/2 year still has all teeth firmly in place. It’s indeed the special visit. My parents always left simple coins — usually quarters. You could buy a chocolate bar for a dime, and then the price went up to a quarter. They never left notes, and that’s the creative part I’m interested in (and how to make it look different enough from everyday writing, but not too crazy that I can’t do it again).

  21. Carly says...

    The tooth fairy was always slightly more generous at my grandparents’ house, which created some suspicion. When I lost a tooth at home, I told my parents I was going to find out if the tooth fairy was real by sealing my tooth in an envelope and writing my name across the back, so the envelope couldn’t be switched. I woke up in the morning to find the same envelope, still sealed, with money replacing the tooth. I only learned much later that my parents had carefully steamed open the envelope, made the swap, and sealed it back up.

  22. Erin Sagadin says...

    I honestly can’t remember how much money our Tooth Fairy left (I’m 38, so it was a long time ago!) But, what I do remember is that she always left little Clinique makeup samples. I would often have a little light green compact of blush or lipstick tube tucked under my pillow. To this day, it was such a magical and special thing my mom did!

  23. Katie says...

    I got anywhere from 10 cents to a quarter, and once, when I was a bit older, a silver dollar! (Also, I’m not 110, I think my parents were just frugal.) I also got a note, which I liked almost more than the money. I recall my mom saying something like fairies only use coin currency, because it’s noisier and shiny, which fairies love. This made me think noisy & shiny things were twinged with magic for a long, long time.

  24. I’m Australian, we used to put the tooth in a glass of water by the bed for the tooth fairy. Word had it that if you sprinkled some salt in the water, the dye from the tooth fairy’s dress would leave some colour behind in the water. And a few coins would be in there too, a dollar or two.
    So not only did our parents have to mess around with money and teeth, but they had to dig around in the pantry to find food dye/colouring. Eventually all the dresses seemed to be white (a splash of milk in the glass).

  25. Amber says...

    We use gold coins too! Hint: put them on his nightstand or a nearby dresser with a note. We made the mistake of placing them under our daughter’s pillow, which left a melted mess. We blamed a tooth fairy in-training.

  26. Elizabeth says...

    My oldest son just lost his first tooth. He didn’t realize it until after it was “missing”, we assume he shallowed it. We left $1 under his pillow and a fancy cursive note from the tooth fairy telling him “Next time leave the tooth!”. He was so mesmerized/scared that something came in his room while he was sleeping he barely noticed the money. :)

  27. I love the foreign notes idea! When I was a kid the going rate was £1 but I have a feeling it’s probably more like £5 now.

  28. Once, when I was a teacher, a kindergarten girl told me all starry-eyed that I looked like the tooth fairy. Ha!! I have no idea what she saw in me that day but it totally thrilled me. :)

    • Bridget says...

      I love this comment. You sparkled.

  29. Gianna says...

    I lost my first tooth while visiting family in Italy. I got 5 american dollars and 5 lira. I thought it was the coolest thing. I kept the lira for a long time. It is probably still somewhere at my parents. I don’t remember a single tooth after that.

  30. Mel Flohr says...

    We have a stash of $2 bills that we pull from as needed. We wrap a $2 bill around a small pack of gum. The kids get more excited about the gum than the $2- HA! Be warned though, we’ve had many last minute runs to the store to grab a pack of gum before they wake up!

  31. This is the cutest thing ever. My parents, being Chinese immigrants, were like, “What is the tooth fairy?” So I had to tell my dad that it wasn’t a real thing but it was just something nice for growing up, and he shrugged and just gave me $10.

    • Celeste says...

      This was pure gold.

  32. twyla says...

    My dad always warned us if we had a loose tooth not to swallow it by accident – or it will come out and bite you in the butt! I say that to all little kids with loose teeth and they die with laughter!

    • That is hilarious, I totally need to remember that!!

  33. Susan Horridge says...

    Tooth Fairy duties stress me out! I’m always afraid my little guy will wake up and catch me in the act. I have him put the tooth in a tiny zip-loc bag; then I put the money in another one, and it’s easy(ish) to quickly swap out the bags under the pillow.

  34. Emily says...

    As a kid I used to give my Dad the tooth to give to the fairy himself and then just collect money later. I just refused to let him know I had it figured it out because I wanted my quarter. I had a quarter collection so that was part of what made it fun.

  35. I am 5 years older than my sister and I always got a $1. For some reason my sister always got $5 or $10 from my parents BUT she also would take her tooth to whatever the next family gathering was and she, somehow, was able to collect money from other family members for the tooth! It was never something I did and I’m just now remembering this so I think I’m going to have to consult with my other on this bizarre practice and why I totally got dooped!

  36. A simple note sprinkled with glitter congratulating your toothless wonder should do the trick. With the added promise to continue your newfound letter-writing relationship for years to come. I tend to stay away from distributing money, particularly with three children. Any slight difference in amount or presentation can lead to outrageous debates resembling this year’s Presidential election. So not worth it!
    http://brooklynchateau.blogspot.com/2015/04/beauty-reals-whats-bunny-got-to-do-with.html

    • Jeni says...

      I read this comment thinking — yes! I totally agree with this wonderful woman — without realizing it was you, Crystal, of course!

      Our daughter just lost her first tooth last week and she was so excited! She set up a spot for the tooth fairy near her nightlight with a fairy chair, cushion , tea and a kumquat, not knowing what to expect. The tooth fairy brought her a note written on tiny paper in tiny script and a tiny crystal. Her joy was priceless!

  37. Sara says...

    We leave 2 $1 coins, which are beautiful and special and feel like a treat. And then I sprinkle “fairy dust” (glitter) all around the pillow, which my 8-year old son adores. He declares that it gives him great dreams and loves the fact that I find glitter smooshed on his face/in his scalp for days & days.

  38. molly says...

    Growing up the tooth fairy brought us a dollar and sometimes left a sweet note, if we were lucky. When she forgot to visit us, the ante would go up and we would get something like $2 or $5.

    One particular night, my parents came home late from a party, and my dad– who claims to have been only slightly over served– was in charge of paying the babysitter and putting a small stack of bills under my brother’s pillow to pay off some tooth fairy debt. He’s the 4th of 4 kids, so it had probably been a few days of neglect! (You can probably guess where this story is going…). My brother ran down in the morning screaming “I got $100 from the tooth fairy!”

    My dad still talks about the look my mom shot him from across the kitchen. He had accidentally swapped the two stacks of folded bills. Needless to say, they actually paid $105 for that tooth because they felt too bad to claw back the money from my brother AND they had to dole out another $100 to pay the babysitter for the night, who they had only paid $5 the night before!

    • katie says...

      Haha! This made me laugh out loud.

  39. I love the idea of getting the book and reading about traditions around the world. My 4 year old has already learned out the tooth fairy from Peppa Pig so we will have to have the tooth fairy visit too. I think $1 is a fine sum for a tooth!

  40. claudia says...

    The tooth fairy, although being an american and/or british tradition, also comes to Germany. As a kid in the 1980s I got 50 Pfennig, which was a beautiful silver coin with a kneeling maiden on it. Now that we have the Euro as a currency, my kid gets 50Cent, which is less than a dollar. Maybe I will give more (1 Euro coin) once she is older, although I don’t know if she will still believe in the tooth faith too much longer. She is now five and I think she will not believe in the tooth fairy in a year anymore. She already doubts the existence of Santa Claus or the “Christkind” (that comes in Southern Germany, where her cousins live).

    On another note: In Germany we also have the “Schnuller-Fee” (Fee means fairy, Schnuller means pacifier) which is the pacifier-fairy. She comes at night, takes the pacifier and leaves a gift in exchange. She usually happens in collusion with the kid. When the parents and the child both think it may be time to cope without a pacifier this is a really sweet way of celebrating the big step. The “Schnuller-Fee” left a book wrapped into a nice scarf for my daughter when she was 3 and half. She was soooo ready to chuck the pacifier and have the fairy come and swap that baby-thing for a cool gift.

  41. The tooth fairy doesn’t exist in Belgium: problem solved! ;-) Good luck for Toby!

  42. its Adele on the pic

  43. Jilly says...

    My kids didn’t want to give up the tooth so instead of the fairy we have a birthday celebration for the new tooth. I bake a “tooth-cake” decorated per child’s wish and we light candles and sing happy birthday to tooth. Yums all around. .

  44. Jilly says...

    My kids didn’t want to give up the tooth so instead of the fairy we have a birthday celebration for the new tooth. I bake a “tooth-cake” decorated per child’s wish and we light candles and sing happy birthday to tooth. Yums all around.

  45. nohatnogloves says...

    In England, in the late 90s…20p piece. My daughter once swallowed a tooth with her dinner so we just ponied up. The quote above with the Jewish mother on the subway, digging her way deeper and deeper into trouble…hilarious.

  46. Leah says...

    Our fairy leaves $1. However the first tooth is special, so she left $5, a new tooth brush and a little “Frozen” medallion. She also left a letter, praising my daughter for her clean shiny tooth and asking her to keep it up.
    My daughter was ecstatic and still makes extra special effort brushing every night. Funny enough, that toothbrush left the most impression, more than the $$ or Frozen item…

  47. Sandra says...

    What a funny post!
    My niece lost her tooth last week, and instead of money or chocolate, her parents went for a new electrical toothbrush under her pillow!
    I found that to be such a befitting thing, to encourage healthy habits! Needless to say, she was beyond thrilled.

    Good luck from Beirut!

  48. Tara says...

    The first tooth caught us unawares so we had nothing smaller than a ten on us. Since then each tooth has been $5. When my son is saving up for a new video game and he’s getting close to the total he starts wiggling all his teeth to see if he can pick up an extra few bucks the easy way, LOL!!

  49. Drasa says...

    We have 4 children and do 4 quarters for each tooth. Strangely – we leave the tooth in a drinking glass on the kitchen window sill and then they find the quarters in the water in the morning. I can’t tell you how many times I walked into the kitchen in the morning only to have to make a mad dash for the coin purse as I heard kids stirring!
    I did forget once and told my daughter and under duress told her that because the tooth was lost after 5pm it would be reimbursed on the next business day. Ha!

    • Growing up, we also left the tooth in a drinking glass on the kitchen window sill. My mom accidentally poured a few of them down the sink though! I laughed out loud about the “next business day” talk! Ha!

    • Leah says...

      Love the “next business day”. Also made me laugh!

  50. molly says...

    Hey Jo! Our tooth fairy leaves a paperback book ;) I think she’ll have to include a chocolate coin next time as well! That’s awesome! xo

  51. I hadn’t even thought about this yet! I love the idea of foreign bills since my daughter loves maps. I’ve been thinking of putting a little fairy door in Luna’s room too.

    xo Lendy
    http://www.twoplusluna.com

  52. Mindi says...

    My kids are six and seven. For their first teeth, we left $5, a sprinkle of glitter and a teeny tiny note. Now it’s $2 and glitter. We have forgotten a couple of times but have managed to come up with a reason, oh it rained last night and the tooth fairy has to keep her wings dry.

  53. Susan Magnolia says...

    My daughter is four and she loves the book “Little Rabbit’s Loose Tooth.” Little Rabbit tells her parents that she is not sure if she believes in the tooth fairy and asks her parents to check and if there is not a dime, could they sneak one under her pillow. 🐰

  54. Sef says...

    Ha! I usually forget ( my kids know it’s me but we all play along) then have to feign an email message to show the kid from the tooth fairy like ” wow sorry darling! Super busy in Taiwan right now! I’m doing Rome tomo and will hopefully get to Australia that evening!”
    Then they get whatever coins I have on me! I never throw the teeth away. Have a gross collection.

  55. MJ says...

    When they lost their first teeth, my kids got $1. We’re Canadian so this looked special to young kids as it’s a gold coin. After a while, I boosted it to $2. By the time, they were losing their final baby teeth I went all out and gave them $5. Inflation. Sheesh.
    That said, when my son was young enough to still believe in the tooth fairy and he had just lost his second (maybe third) tooth, we had him put it under his pillow and the next morning he came into our room to report that the tooth fairy had not arrived. I quickly made up a story about how since he had lost his tooth right before bed that the tooth fairy hadn’t had time to fit him into her rounds. It was a lot harder to sell that story the next morning when we had forgotten…again. So, I put a loonie ($1 coin) in my hand and said, “Are you sure? Let me look.” And then I deposited the coin farther under the covers and said, “Here it is.” He doesn’t seem too scarred by it all.

  56. We did a dollar coin for the first tooth, and ever since then I do quarters. There are lots of teeth in each child’s mouth. ha!

  57. Lulu says...

    A wobbly tooth is so exciting! Our kids receive a $2 (golden coin) for their first tooth and then a $1 (golden coin) for subsequent teeth. Sometimes when we lose the tooth that has fallen out, we write a tiny note to the ToothFairy explaining what happened (these are cute to keep). My (now) 7 year old daughter lost her 7th tooth on her 7th birthday, so naturally the ToothFairy left her $7.

  58. SBK says...

    I know I’ll probably sound like a self-righteous buzz-kill, but the whole giving money thing bugs me for reasons I can’t quite articulate. Instead of some quarters or bills, we pulled coins from a bag of foreign currency we had collected over the years (mostly that other people had given us from their trips). Their worth was mostly pennies, but our three kids had fun figuring out where their coins where from.

  59. Kassi says...

    The tooth fairy brought us one coin or bill from another country for each tooth! Now, I have a collection of coins from around the world I cherish.

  60. Taylor says...

    I love Throw Your Tooth on the Roof! There is one tradition that involves burying the tooth next to a place of profession that the child hopes to someday become, like next to a hospital if they want to be a doctor or school if they want to be a teacher. But I think anything will be cool and special to your little ones!

  61. Jamie Elizabeth says...

    When I was little my mom would leave me money that she had collected from all over the world. She had traveled to Egypt, Japan, and all over Europe. I still have my tooth fairy money in a safe place some 25 years later.

  62. $2 bill sprayed with glitter and a Japanese Iwako animal or food eraser. They are cute, tiny, cheap and most importantly – since they are rubber they don’t make noise when the tired tooth fairy drops them on the hardwoods in the middle of the night.

  63. Karen says...

    OK. So here it is. My grandparents were Sicilian, and no dainty fairy ever dropped by. Oh no…it was a big rat that delivered the cash. His name was sugi, which means rat, of course. It was always under a glass. I am a teacher and I often tell this story to the horror of my first graders. I always have to chuckle. We would always get a coin ( I am Australian). It was either a 20 cent or a 50 cent piece. With inflation, I’m sure that would be in the vicinity of a $2 note!

  64. Meghan says...

    Growing up the tooth fairy brought is a very crisp 2 dollar bill.
    I do the same for my boys and sprinkle a lot of blue glitter around his bed and hallway for the tooth fairy dust.

  65. Noelle says...

    When I was little, my parents would leave some money and a silver star (that I later found out was from a piece of costume jewelry my mom deconstructed – I remember seeing the remnants years later and finally putting the pieces together). It was magical for a little kid :)

  66. kadcat says...

    The going rate was $5 for the first tooth and $1 for all other teeth when I was growing up. My parents would switch it up between really crisp $1 bills and Sacajawea coins, which was really fun. There were a few times that either my sister or I lost two teeth in the same day (we both really liked to wiggle them!), so we got $2 bills under our pillow!

  67. Jessica says...

    When my niece lost her first tooth she was so excited to get a visit from the tooth fairy. Her nana waited until she fell asleep and dusted her bed with fairy dust before leaving $2 in a treasure box on the nightstand. However, sometime in the night, my active -sleeper of a niece must have hit her face on the wall or her headboard and she woke up with a black eye. My niece is now wary of the tooth fairy since she clearly punched her in the eye while she slept!

  68. Leslie says...

    The tooth fairy brings golden dollars, but when my daughter had to get her two front teeth pulled, I folded a $5 in an origami heart that held a golden dollar (thank you Pinterest!). She was such a trooper, I felt like she deserved something special! Also, we told her that there are lots of different tooth fairies because there are so many people in the world, so different fairies bring different things (my nephew got $20 when he lost his first tooth!!!) I couldn’t think of any other way to explain why he got so much money!

  69. Estela says...

    Hi Ladies,
    Can you make a post about what you currently read on the Internet when you have free time? I just read your blog and news websites, would love some ideas :-) thanks!

  70. Jess says...

    My oldest lost her first tooth while we were at some friends’ house. We were too lazy to stop late at night on the way home so she got a $20 for her first lost tooth! I keep a stack of $1 ever since then.

  71. Kelly says...

    Laughing out loud at these comments, it’s fun when the comments are even better then the post! What a great group of readers! My son is 5.5 and I had planned on dollar coins but I LOVE the idea I read of special rocks/geodes, he loves collecting things!
    Thanks!!!

  72. Laura says...

    My kids get a $5 note for their first ever tooth and then a gold coin (I’m in Australia so that’s a $1 or $2) for each tooth afterwards. I also bought a dirt cheap eyeshadow kit with an obnoxious white shimmery eyeshadow. I smudge a little of that on my pinky finger and leave some teeny tiny fairy footprint proof on their bedside tables and/or on their pillows.

    Once, my eldest’s tooth fell out while staying with her great grandma who got so excited, she left $20 from the tooth fairy!! That created some problems so we had to say that town must have a different tooth fairy who pays more, lol

  73. Brittany says...

    My mom always left me unique coins (silver/half dollars, a British pound, South African dimes, etc.) or $2 bills. Now, as an adult, I have a huge coin collection and I definitely plan on passing it down to my kids one-by-one in exchange for their teeth :)

  74. Amanda says...

    My sister and I always got 41¢, one of each coin!

  75. Megan says...

    Not sure why, but we consistently made a big deal of losing a tooth. Always balloon, books, small stuffed animals, art and craft supplies, etc. Never money. Just last week my daughter lost her last baby tooth. Sort of sad to see the tooth fairy retire from our home!

  76. Sophie says...

    Oh my gosh, the quote from Anna about Santa almost made me choke on my frozen yogurt. Hilarious!

  77. Kristin says...

    We have 4 children and they are thrilled to get a quarter or two left under their pillows. It’s just the idea of a magical fairy visiting in the night that is so exciting and not the amount left. In the beginning we forgot several nights in a row. When we finally remembered, we (she) left a tiny note apologizing for the delay and informing the child how much she loved to travel on vacation. Now whenever we forget, the kids just say “oh, she must be on vacation again”, and they know she will visit when back on duty.

  78. Susan says...

    What about sprinkling some fairy dust? 💫

  79. Jo Chan Smith says...

    The ‘tooth fairy’ left Australian $2 for our daughter when she lost her first tooth. Apparently it wasn’t an acceptable rate, because she asked for a refund, and since then has kept her baby teeth in a little container rather than ‘selling’ it to the Tooth Fairy!

  80. ally says...

    Helpful tip: We have the kids put their tooth in a plastic baggie- makes it way easier to pull out from under the pillow. We return the $ in a baggie as well.

    We do loose change for teeth- from 80-90 cents; they like to count it up and have the jingly coins. For the 2 top front teeth we do gold dollar coins.

  81. Carly G says...

    Fair warning, don’t put the chocolate coin under his pillow, my parents did that once and it made such a mess that I still remember it 20+ years later.

  82. Mac says...

    I felt a little cheated/suspicious when the tooth fairy left a trail of glitter from the window to the pillow of my friend’s room, but not mine!

    I did leave a note asking the Easter bunny what he looked like. His response–black with two white stripes down his back. I didn’t understand the joke. :)

  83. Stephanie Gilman says...

    The going rate when I was five was a beanie baby. I would get so excited and take it everywhere with me during the week I lost my tooth. Everywhere. Once, I even wrote my new beanie baby’s name in the church “visitor’s pad”.

  84. Mkw says...

    We haven’t seen the tooth fairy for years…. The girls are now 19 and 14! But our tooth fairy brought books. I would often buy a few for the stockpile from those Scholastic book forms that would come home from school. Of course, one needs to then have the teacher in cahoots as she would sneak the book order directly to me instead of via our kid(s).

  85. Lila says...

    Old coins bought from eBay! They had to be under $7 and the more rare or strange, the better. This took some effort on my part but my son (now 12 and done losing teeth) has a pretty interesting coin collection. I would try to buy a few from the same seller so I could be “prepared” but of course sometimes I wouldn’t be ready! Then I used 3-4 dollar coins. We also had the Autumn Witch come visit, your child leaves out most of their Halloween candy, she leaves you 2-3$ Or a small toy. Just as exciting as the Tooth Fairy!

  86. Kathy L says...

    My dad could always “find” the dollar from the tooth fairy if we woke up without it under our pillow. He’d usually say, “It must have fallen down the side of your bed.”

  87. Melissa says...

    There are so many great comments here, but I received some wonderful advice from a friend recently since we are also right at this age with a 5 year old. She told me that soon enough, the kids start comparing how much money they get from the tooth fairy, and at some point, they will ask the question as to why they all get differing amounts. So she tells them that the tooth fairy leaves fairy-land every night with a budget. Some nights lots of kids lose their teeth, so she has to split the money among all those kids. Some nights, only a couple lose their teeth, so she is able to give more money to a fewer amount of children.

  88. Elisabeth says...

    My children would place their tooth in a little black bag and then stick it under their pillow. I would replace the tooth with a stone or geode. The stones were purchased at a local nature shop or rock shop and had a card with them telling all about the particular stone. After they lost all their baby teeth they had a nice little collection.