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Powerful New Movie

Powerful New Movie

The movie I Smile Back, in which Sarah Silverman plays a mother suffering from depression and anxiety, comes out tomorrow. That title resonates so much with me after twice suffering from postpartum depression, but still wanting/needing/trying to present a happy, loving face to my children. Last night, I had a chance to speak on the phone to Amy Koppelman, who wrote the book and co-wrote the screenplay. Here’s what she told me…

Why did you have Sarah Silverman in mind for the movie?
While driving one afternoon, I heard Sarah on Howard Stern talking about her experiences with depression and anxiety. As a writer, a human being, you just want to be understood — and I knew she would understand the book. My goal was just to get the book in her hands; the miracle was that she opened and read it. We met up at a hotel a while later, and I said, “Would you ever think, maybe… if I wrote a screenplay…” and I knew at the time, she was just saying yes to be nice. She was like, “Sure, if it doesn’t suck.” And I thought, “Well, that bar is low, that’s perfect for me!” So I wrote it with my friend Paige.

What do you hope people take away from the movie? Depression is such an important thing to talk about.
The book was rejected 80 times, and the 81st publisher accepted it. My books don’t have redemptive endings, but I never understood the problem with that because I want the reader to have the redemptive experience. People might get a better understanding about themselves and seek the help they need, or might understand their parents better, etc. Sarah has a great line: So much about how you feel about the movie depends on your life experience, how much you have been affected by these things. People have come up to me at screenings crying.

We were speaking in front of a mental health group, and a guy kept saying, What are you giving me? What would I tell other people after seeing this movie? Because she doesn’t get better. Something overcame me, and I said, That’s not my job. It’s not my job to give you something you get to take away from it. She doesn’t get better, but the person seeing the film can get better.

What do you think your job is?
I only started to write as a place to put the sadness. When I’m writing books, I’m writing from the purest, most honest part of myself. Writing is the only time I don’t feel like I have to prove anything to anyone or make anyone feel better.

My biggest focus is women’s mental health; all three of my books deal with that. We are in the dinosaur age of understanding the minds of women — hormones, pregnancy, menstruation, menopause… Hopefully they’ll research more and be able to quantify the brain like other illnesses, like diabetes when you know how much insulin to give yourself.

Twenty-one years ago, when I had my son, I had never heard the words postpartum depression. I berated myself, why can’t you pick up your baby? They told me to stop breastfeeding, so I stopped cold turkey, and I got stuck in the bath, I literally couldn’t get out. The great thing now is that there are more resources. Hopefully by the time my daughter is ready to have kids, they’ll understand more about why the anxiety gets worse before your period, and how to treat depression and anxiety so it doesn’t overcome you.


Here’s the trailer, if you’d like to see…

Thank you so much, Amy, for all you do. I can’t wait to see the movie.

P.S. The hardest two months of my life and the difference between happiness and wholeness.

  1. Gabrielle says...

    I recently came across a new documentary, The Dark Side of the Full Moon, that delves into the issue of support for mothers and families in the U.S. I thought I would post the website/trailer here, since it reminded me of this post (and other similar posts on your blog). The film highlights the large disconnect within the medical community regarding treatment of the women affected by maternal mental health issues. Universities, health departments, midwives, etc. have been hosting screenings of it:
    http://www.darksideofthefullmoon.com/

    PS – Love your blog :)

  2. I loved this movie. Reading your blog definitely made me go down the memory lane. Thank you for posting this and creating awareness. Loved it.

  3. Megan says...

    Pass the popcorn! As a mental health clinician, recovering alcoholic, and a mother who has walked through post partum depression, I am thrilled to see this movie come to light. Bravo!

  4. Thanks Joanna for this post which raises awareness on mental illness. We live in a society that promotes happiness, negative emotion is viewed as bad or wrong. I think it’s time to change the perspective on mental illness, we are not broken people that need to be fixed. My hope is we can all find more self love and acceptance. We can understand without knowing deep sadness we wouldn’t know joy, without anger and shame we wouldn’t know forgiveness and honor. There are many resources available on the path to healing, but having a community that supports and understands our journey is imperative. Sending love and healing to all those suffering.

  5. Kathleen says...

    Speaking in general about illness: As the stigma of MENTAL illness is lifted bit by bit, more help will become readily available. Thankfully, insurance no longer differentiates between, what was labeled, a physical and a mental illness, we can go forth to help those we know are ill. When my husband was so very ill, some of my good friends did not know what to do or say. I am grateful that some friends did know and supported him and supported me. Please help families as they struggle. Give them love.

  6. such an important issue that often is ignored. women’s issues such as postpartum depression really need to be brought to the front. I have struggled with anxiety and depression and think this is a great medium to bring forth such an issue to get people talking or educated. i’m looking forward to watching this movie! thanks for sharing!

    http://www.footnotesandfinds.com

  7. Kristin says...

    This post is wonderful, and the comments equally so. I’ve struggled with anxiety my entire life, but found that it amplified significantly during pregnancy. I had looked forward to being pregnant my entire life, but really never felt one ounce of joy because I was so overwhelmed by terror at the what-ifs. For some reason, I never anticipated having that reaction and missing out on the joy of those first kicks, nursery planning, name choosing, etc. still makes me truly sad. I feel like I’m one of the lucky ones in that delivery, and my return to medication has freed me from most of that anxiety so that I can enjoy my perfect daughter. But, the struggle is never gone entirely and I feel deeply for the women who can’t get out from under that terrible cloud. I’m so glad we’re talking about this. Thank you Jo, for continuing to include such important topics in your content.

    • emily says...

      Same. All my life I wanted children, and then the depression and anxiety that I’d had my whole life deepened when I had them, and I just can’t enjoy them and love them the way I want to without so much effort – meds, counselling – and that is such a frustrating, sad reality. This film hits pretty close to home.

    • E. Jones says...

      Same here too. My anxiety went through the roof with pregnancy and then weaning was another doozey…my return to medication saved me as well. I had such a hard time accepting my medication as necessary and not just looking at myself as a failure, but someone who was sick. I still struggle at times, but not like before. I wish I could have a cup of tea with you. To be able to relate to someone who went through the same thing would be so heart warming… at least we have this space-thanks Joanna.xo

  8. Katy says...

    Thank you, Joanna. This blog is a fabulous tool for women.

    This post, and everyone’s comments, finally motivated me to make an appointment with a mental health provider to hopefully gain some relief from a long-standing struggle with anxiety. Can’t thank you enough for your blog – for the light hearted posts and the sensitive ones, as well.

  9. Laura says...

    Thank you for this post and your post on PPD, Joanna. I read your post just a few months after my son was born, and it hit home, hard. Your story spoke so much to me and helped me realize that I was not crazy, but what was happening with me was real. I sought help, and now a year later am doing so much better. I am the mother I want to be to my son which makes me so proud.
    Amy Koppelman is brave to write such a powerful screenplay. Snaps to her for bringing such an important issue to the screen. Bravo to all.

  10. Stephanie says...

    This looks like an incredibly powerful film and I’m excited to see Amy in a serious role.

    I’m a fashion blogger in NYC. To follow my adventures featuring the best of NYC’s fashion and food, check out <a href="http://sustenanceandstyle.com sustenanceandstyle.com. Always looking to collaborate with new bloggers, so contact me! See you there xx

    – Stephanie

  11. Mary says...

    It seems so strange that noone highlights that something psychological is behind depression and anxiety (including PPD). Also while taking birth control pills may help surely it is a short term measure? Your body wants to be healthy and naturally it is so! By getting sick it is its way of telling us we are out of balance. There is nothing wrong with our hormones per se. There is nothing wrong with being female. There is nothing wrong with suffering from depression and/or anxiety. But surely there is something magnificently wrong with presuming a significant proportion of woman need to be medicated so they can ‘operate normally’ in society. Maybe it’s the patriachic nature of society at play here…you know with women being expected to play more of a part in the working (largely patriarchal) society we live in. The part if not chosen by us is still scripted. Its one where we might be expected to leave our emotional selves at the door… Our bodies are our friends. Thinking of them otherwise is horribly wrong to my mind.

  12. yael steren says...

    I’ve suffered from anxiety also. It’s refreshing to see so much more dialogue out there about it now then there was when I was growing up! Looking forward to see this movie. xx yael

    http://www.yaelsteren.com/blog/

  13. Kristin says...

    What resonated with me was the comment about how there are so many more resources out there now for girls and women. I suffered with anxiety (and still do sometimes) throughout my childhood and early 2o’s. Once I got help, I began to learn how to take care of myself. Now that I have a 14 year old daughter who also suffers from anxiety, I really hope that by acknowledging her struggles while simultaneously helping her get the tools she will need to care for herself, will put her in a much better place than I was in.

    • yael steren says...

      I totally agree! I’m in my 30s, and I think there are definitely more sources and tools out there now, which makes me happy for those that are younger and suffering from these problems! xx yael

  14. Oh my goodness, I am weeping at the trailer! I can’t wait for this…it seems like the role Sarah was born to play

  15. Suzanne says...

    When I realized how close my anxiety was connected to hormones, I looked online for a birth control pill that was linked to controlling anxiety symptoms best, and was stunned that there was nothing out there. It was so obvious to me that regulating my hormones, especially now in my early 40’s, was key to keeping my anxiety in check. I agree that the research is in the stone ages. Something so obvious should be common knowledge. If you suffer from debilitating anxiety, then lets regulate hormones first. I didn’t realize how closely it was linked until I went off the pill and tanked before my period. I even experience depression for the first time in my life and that was frightening. So now I take a mild anti-anxiety medication (Buspar), I jog just 15 minutes a day, and I stay on a birth control pill that is on a 3 month cycle. I can start the next pack the day my period is supposed to start and and this keeps away the migraines and the anxiety is nonexistent on this routine.

  16. ashley b says...

    oh wow thanks for sharing. i actually just read an interview with sarah on her struggles with anxiety and depression. it’s always comforting to know you’re not alone. xo

  17. Susana Silva says...

    Thank you, Joanna, for such a great post and interview. It’s so good to hear that I’m not an “alien” in my long-term, merry-go-round depression. I wish mine would disappear one morning, but I’m sure that it won’t, just because I have to solve all my issues first. Anyway the feeling of absolute self misery is very common from what I can see and I usually say that if it would bruise people would pay more attention to this disease and wouldn’t look at depression as the problem of weak, childish, insecure people. I’ve really felt misunderstood. Anyway if you have the support of your family and friends it is rather easy to overcome it, in case you don’t it feels like you are fighting the whole world alone. Surviving is what you do in the end and struggling to come out of it, hopping that it goes by ASAP. I’m quite curious about the book and about the movie, but don’t know if I have the courage to watch it.
    xoxo

  18. karrie says...

    I’m 6 months pregnant with my first child and am overwhelmed by the amount of women who have quietly approached and said, “you know, it’s okay if you don’t connect with your baby”, ‘it’s okay if you feel more lonely than ever before”, “let me tell you how horrible the first few months with my new baby felt”, etc. None of it is alarmist, it’s just women in my life who silently struggled with PPD and are making sure it is discussed in this generation because they personally know how hard it was. I’m looking forward to reading this book — mental health needs to become more mainstream as it impacts so many people in such powerful ways.

  19. Alice says...

    What an incredibly powerful trailer. I’m blown away.

    One of my sisters has suffered postpartum depression, twice, and I tried earnestly and honestly to be there for her throughout. I hope I was. As much as I always try to be empathetic, it was hard for me to understand and for her to explain at times. It was a long process. I’m thinking I might not be alone, and this film could be a great tool for helping people understand, let alone raise the issue.

    I suffered pregnancy depression with my first and people wafted away the notion and put it down to mood swings, which was both frustrating and terrifying (if these are mood swings what is depression?). After a second mellow pregnancy I had a renewed belief in the extremities of depression I experienced during my first. I’m not sure putting a label on it helped, but looking at the experience and acknowledging it, and not belittling it, did.

    Raising the issue of depression and the voices of those who suffer is so important. I’ll definitely be watching this and spreading the word far and loud.

    • It gives me hope that you had a second mellow pregnancy after depression during the first. My first was very dark and I’m terrified of depression during a second. Thank you for your comment.

  20. Erica H. says...

    Can’t wait to see it! Brave and honest subject matter. Thank you!

  21. Great topic! I’m glad this is being talked about more I hope more research is done about women’s health in general, especially as it relates to hormonal cycles! But I think as a society we need to stop seeing our fertility and the natural cycle as a disease for this to happen. We can’t learn more about the complex interplay of hormones if everyone is on birth control most of their lives.

  22. This is fabulous. As a mom and a therapist I’ve taken a special interest in women’s mental health, especially post partum mental health – it’s not just postpartum depression, but psychosis, anxiety and ocd too. These are things doctors don’t always talk to about, no one does really and they’re things that you can get help for- if you only know to ask.

  23. Full disclosure up front: I am NOT a fan of Silverman.

    I am, however, a huge fan of Terry Gross (of NPR fame), so when Silverman was on Fresh Air today, I decided to give it a shot and HOLY WHOA. Sarah is super impressive, comes from a background that I was completely unaware of, and the bits of this movie that they played sounded SO INCREDIBLE.

    I’m still not a fan of her comedy, but I will 1,000% be in line for this movie on opening day.

    PS: Listen to Sarah’s interview with Terry here: http://n.pr/1QYTWkm

  24. Rebecca says...

    I had the fantastic opportunity to see this film when it was at TIFF. It’s a very very intense film and has some intense moments. I loved it – really and truly – but was completely sobbing by the end. I highly recommend the film, but if you’re worried about being sensitive to it in public, this is your fair warning. :) And yes, Sarah is brilliant in it and so is Josh Charles.

  25. Maggie says...

    The trailer is so riveting… I don’t think I can see the movie though. I had post-partum depression for a year after having my daughter five years ago, and even watching the trailer made my chest tight and brought me right back to that dark time. How do you deal with that, Jo? Are there still some things that are triggers for you and what do you do with them? I feel like I have to stay as far away from those triggers as I can, that time of my life is too dark to revisit on a casual basis… The good news is it DID get better, and it did have a redemptive ending. My dream would be that NO mother ever have to go through that…

  26. Elaine says...

    I’m always hoping mental illnesses are more represented in films and books. Makes me feel less lonely. Excited to see this!

  27. Thank you for sharing! I’ll definitely be seeing this movie!
    I’m not sure if I had postpartum depression, I was too afraid to go back to my dr (whom I love, I know she would have been super supportive) . I kept it to myself, put on a smiling face for those around me and wrote all the sadness off as being tired. My daughter was underweight, too small to nurse and needed to be fed every two hours.
    I definitly went through a long time of “what could I have done better?”
    Thank you Joanna for sharing you experience and being a voice for those who can’t.

  28. gpc says...

    This is wonderful – and long overdue. My mother had her first child, my brother, in the early fifties and suffered from depression after the birth, although there wasn’t a name for it then. The diagnosis from her doctor at that time was “if you don’t snap out it, you will need to be institutionalized.” I am so glad this issue has come so far, but there is still work to be done…

  29. Allegra Liu says...

    Wow, very important topic. I’m glad we’re starting or at least attempting to move beyond the “dinosaur age” of understanding women’s mental health. Since I’ve had kids and gotten older I’ve noticed more exhaustion and irritability in the week before my period and it’s nice to know I’m not the only one. I worry for those that have even more intense mood swings and depression. Hopefully we will have more understanding and therapies to treat this in the future.

  30. May says...

    The title is spot on. I look forward to reading the book and seeing the movie.
    There is more help now. However, not every therapist is the right one, and that goes beyond personalities. And, the prejudices a sufferer has to deal with can be difficult, even today. It will take more than awareness to change prejudice against mental illnesses.
    There are expectations a person has to sort out along the therapy road. Realizing you have any personal power at all, I believe, makes it easier to cope with depression and acute anxiety.

  31. Jeannie says...

    This is a wonderful post. Period.

  32. Anon says...

    I’m currently navigating through a period of clinical depression and so when I had read an interview with Sarah about her own experiences, and the difficulty she had in making this film, I found I could relate. I have never been pregnant but have struggled with bouts of anxiety and depression for the greater part of my life. I agree with Amy that there doesn’t seem to be more information on the effects of hormonal cycles and depression. It’s only now that I am starting to link some of the depression related symptoms I experience to my menstrual cycle. I’m not sure what research is out there, but my experience has been that there is little support in practice for helping women make these connections and in way of treatment options. Thanks so much Joanna for posts like these (your post linking weaning to depression in women was really insightful). The amount of SHAME that often accompanies depression can be so…..soul destroying. And isolating. Hearing about other’s people’s stories is so important – not only for those struggling with depression, but for their loved ones. I really can’t wait to check this movie out!

  33. The film sounds extremely powerful, and I think something that I will definitely watch…in time. I can’t bring myself to watch the trailer yet. I had my daughter 13 months ago and suffered from severe postpartum anxiety that lead to PPD. I was very fortunate to have received professional help immediately, and while the anxiety and depression is gone – the feelings are still very raw.

    I am absolutely ecstatic to see this topic being talked about. It’s so important to create awareness, so important to just TALK ABOUT IT. I applaud the Amy!

  34. Wow- this movie looks incredible.

    What a great quote from the book: “If the castle is hope, memory is the moat that surrounds it.”

  35. Lana says...

    I just listened to Sarah’s interview on Fresh Air! I was so nourishing to hear her speak about something that so many people feel shameful about. I about died when she said her psychiatrist had her on 16 xanax a day when she was 13! Could you imagine? It’s a miracle she’s alive.

  36. Jessica says...

    I’m a psychiatrist who deals exclusively with women’s mental health (peripartum in particular) and I cannot applaud this topic, this movie, this author enough!

  37. Laura says...

    Anxiety does get worse right before your period?! That just brought so much clarity. I thought something was wrong with me. It didn’t help that when I finally asked my doctor he shrugged it off and just told me not to worry about it, which made me worry more. Thank you so much.

    • Anxiety gets crazy-worse before your period. I have to take birth control pills to never get my period to stop the anxiety+migraines.

    • Em says...

      It absolutely can get worse pre-period (for the same reason as post partum depression- all those hormones!). I realized this about 12 yrs ago and have had a huge amount of success taking 5-10mg of prozac the week before my period. Realizing the pattern and having something that helped with it was life changing for me, if only to realize that I only had to survive a week & then things would get better. It has also helped my relationships immensely.

    • Em says...

      Also… if this is causing problems for you- talk to your dr again and stress that it is affecting your life. If he brushes you off again, find a new one! He should absolutely be taking your concerns seriously.

    • Anon says...

      Sadly, I’ve had the same reaction from my own female doctor. And yes, I’ve struggled with over twenty years of feeling that something was wrong with me and that I was somehow intrinsically flawed. My own ignorance in making these connections is in part related to reactions like these, but also the fact that every woman’s experience with their menstrual cycles can be so varied. I don’t know anyone personally that struggles with depression/anxiety to such a disruptive level with their own cycles and so I just assumed it was all just in my head or something was wrong with me.

    • The way I look at it an have heard many experience it if your periods are moderately regular: if you count day 1 as the day your period starts, day 21 anxiety starts increasing, day 25 and 26 are almost unbearably anxious, and the crescendo continues somewhat until your period starts on day 28-35 or so. If you start to keep track of your own day patterns, you can then begin to recognize them even from within the shroud of anxiety, like “oh, it’s a day 25, that’s why I feel like the world is ending. Things will get better.”

  38. Wow! That’s big…heavy big and so well done. I didn’t know I was depressed after having my first until I looked at our receipts years later for a tax issue and saw my spending habits in the 3 months after her birth. I thought what I felt was just the change in my lifestyle. Depression in motherhood I think comes in ebbs and flows because we give so much of ourselves. Without support from our husbands, sisters, mothers, and friends motherhood is a heavy experience. Just recently I realized I was watching a lot of TV at night instead of doing my usual proactive routine and then it hit me. I’m depressed. TV is my escape. I have on hand an immediate list of 5 things I do to make me happy. I did them and it’s a start but I know its not always as simple as that. And I also know no one talks about it so I’m so glad this movie is here to break the ice!!!!

  39. The movie looks so well done and intense, but I don’t think I can see it. Since becoming a mother four years ago (and again last year), I am extra sensitive to everything with mothers and children. There are already so many horrible stories on the news (babies being killed by parents, kids being accidentally shot by siblings) that even though the film deals with such an important and real issue, I think seeing it will cause me nothing but angst. I almost feel like I’m disrespecting the victims of depression for saying that, but even watching the trailer made me feel sick to my stomach thinking about the mother’s pain and what might happen to her children.

    • Yep, I’m right there with you. Had my first child this past winter and as much as I really appreciate the conversation around postpartum depression and anxiety, it might be too much for me to handle. Bad headlines seem to affect me so much more than they used to… like I don’t want to exist in such an evil world sometimes. But then I see my daughter, and she’s wonderful.

    • Kellie P. says...

      I feel the same, and it is probably one of the reasons women’s mental health issues have been largely ignored. It hits so close to home that it’s really scary and upsetting. I’m not offering any kind of solution, just want you to know that completely understand what you are saying.

    • Tessa says...

      I hear this. Its like that saying “I have all the feels” or ” all the feelings” I have two little kids (under 3) and I feel very similar. I cant watch the news or any shows/movies that aren’t comedy anymore. I don’t think its a permanent change, but for now, its just too much. My emotional life feels so full that I cant take on much more. But I also think this movie looks wonderful and so glad people are talking about it. Seeing her kids and hold her children is so raw and real right now.

    • Heather says...

      Yes, me, too! Exactly this! I know just what you mean.

    • M says...

      My emotions as a mother are always so close to the surface and so overwhelming. It’s like my capacity for empathy (and worry?) has gone through the roof- anything to do with children and families just destroys me. Soon after having my baby I watched the movie City of God and I could not stop crying and I couldn’t finish it. I know this movie will help a lot of people but I will not be seeing it.

    • laeti says...

      I felt this way also right after I had my first baby (now 4), it actually got to a point where news about tragedies including kids were so hard to handle, I would just obsess over it, and actually get completely paranoid about the safety of my own baby. The day I started taking mental notes of all License plates of cars parked in my street “just in case” I call a psychologist, which I had never done before. It took only a few sessions, and my anxieties got much easier. I cried a lot in that office, telling this total stranger about all the fears I had for this tiny human being I loved so much! And what help me most is him saying all those fears were absolutely normal :)

  40. Hadley says...

    I recently read a quote from Sarah Silverman on depression that I found SO accurate it brought me to tears, “It feels like I’m desperately homesick, but I’m home.” I can’t wait to see this movie, although, I’m sure that it too will bring me to tears… Xo

    • Katharine says...

      Oh my goodness that’s a powerful quote! That aptly sums up my struggle with PPD after the birth of my second. Thank you for sharing it :)

    • Erin says...

      That made me cry, too! I know just that feeling.

    • Claire says...

      That quote is so simply put yet immensely powerful. I’ve had several episodes of depression over the past five years but always struggled with putting into words how I was feeling. I’m going to need to bookmark this.

      Like many others, Joanna, I thank you for sharing your experiences with postpartum depression. The fact that you are willing to talk about something that, tragically, is often taboo, is so comforting to someone who has experienced something similar. I’m torn between wanting to see this movie and Sarah Silverman’s performance (plus I love Josh Charles from The Good Wife so much!), yet also nervous to have my worst feelings on a screen in front of me.

    • ashley b says...

      i read this too! and ditto!

    • Sarah Silverman has created such a simple quote that seems to nail the feeling perfectly. I can’t imagine what postpartum depression feels like, but I want to see this movie so I can learn more about it. I can’t believe she is doing a serious movie and I applaud her for doing it based on her own experience. xo

  41. wow. thank you so much for sharing and all that you do, joanna! i cant wait to see it! xo

  42. Jessie says...

    Well, that made me cry. It hit so close to home. Maybe too close? I’m still walking through my own season of (postpartum?) depression. I do applaud Amy for writing a book dealing with women and mental health. We need more focus in this area! Hurrah for Sarah bringing this to the screen. And thank you for sharing, Joanna!

  43. This is really interesting to me because I’ve struggled with anxiety for so long. I read an article by Sarah in Glamour that talked about her experience with depression, anxiety and panic attacks and it all was too familiar. I like what the author says about hopefully someday being able to treat anxiety just like we treat diabetes, on an as-needed basis that balances us out!

  44. Kim says...

    Go Sarah! Excited to see her in a dramatic role…excellent casting choice! P.S. On a side note, this is filed under ‘Design’…might want to correct that ;)

  45. Wow! This is such a difficult and hard subject to explore, write about and even watch.
    I appreciate that you included a link to resources available so that if somebody that goes through a similar situation is reading this, can relax and know that it is treatable and manageable.

    Alina
    http://www.eclecticalu.blogspot.com

  46. I can’t wait to see this movie. Although I might read the book first! Thanks for sharing Joanna. – Charlie

  47. I will be seeing this. Sadly, I think Amy’s right when she says we’re in the dinosaur age of understanding women’s minds. I suffered from postpartum depression and was surprised at how difficult it was for me, someone lucky enough to have health insurance and a support system of friends and family, to get help. We have so far to go. I’m glad people are talking about it, because that’s the first step in getting better: awareness.

    • Erin says...

      I agree, it was striking how difficult it was to find help. I had a traumatic birth and debilitating postpartum depression and anxiety. It literally seemed like there was no one who was going to help me. I was drowning in a dark sea and one of the therapists I saw told me to take a bath and light some candles. (Seriously) I ended up checking myself into a hospital for 6 days. I do not hesitate to tell my story because a) none of this was within my control b) I am not ashamed and c) yes, awareness!!! Thanks for sharing this with us, Joanna.

  48. Wow, that trailer brought tears to my eyes… powerful. Really interesting interview, too. Can’t wait to see this!

  49. I heard the amazing Sarah Silverman on “Fresh Air” today and can’t wait to see this movie (plus I’ve been seriously crushing on Josh Charles, aka Knox Overstreet, since his Dead Poets Society days). What a lovely post – thank you.

  50. Lilly says...

    This movie looks amazing. Loved reading Amy’s insight. Thank you for sharing!