Design

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

Illustrator Tomer Hanuka asked his students at the School of Visual Arts to draw pretend New Yorker covers looking forward to the end of the pandemic. I love the one above by Chenmiao Shi, and here are more…

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

By Amy Young

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

By Jane McIlvaine

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

By Lauren V

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

By Katrina Catacutan

Which is your favorite?


And below are some actual pandemic-related New Yorker covers from the past year.

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

“Grand Central Terminal” by Eric Drooker

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

“Bedtime” by Chris Ware

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

“A Chorus of Thanks” by Tomer Hanuka

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

“Lockdown Sampler” by Roz Chast

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

“Shifting Gears” by R. Kikuo Johnson

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

“Love Life” by Adrian Tomine

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

“Bright Lights” by Jorge Colombo

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

“Springing Back” by Liniers

Pandemic New Yorker Covers

“Delayed” by R. Kikuo Johnson

How amazing are those? xo

P.S. How to make a magazine cover, and framing magazine pages.

(Via Kottke.)

  1. Lauren says...

    The student coming through the Zoom square… My high school students just returned to campus for hybrid last week. We are all traumatized with no space for dealing with feelings. Are we really just supposed to keep teaching content and pretend like we are not in crisis? I saw a student dancing today and it made me want to cry because (1) it was so beautiful, and (2) he was the only one who didn’t look broken.

    • Emily says...

      High school teacher here that went back to school face to face beginning of March. I feel like students are just now starting to turn the corner and return to a bit of their old selves. I never thought I’d be so happy to have students giggling and talking all hour while totally neglecting their learning :) I hope you get to see your students begin to heal before the school year ends.

  2. Emily says...

    Do you know if we can purchase the student artwork? I love them.

  3. I don’t know why but that Chenmiao Shi illustration made me immediately burst into tears. My husband is looking at me like I’m a crazy person.

  4. LB says...

    My husband subscribes to the New Yorker (I, on the other hand, like to joke that I subscribe to piles of half-read magazines strewn across our small house, ha). With each passing issue in the pandemic and the weeks of social injustice, the covers were always so incredibly on point. I recently did a little spring cleaning and had to choose which issues from the last several months to part with; I found one from the week before lockdown (ugh, what we didn’t know), I kept the George Floyd issue, and a few others that really spoke to the times we’ve been through.

  5. Mona says...

    Okay I’m sitting in yet another teams-meeting right now and this made me cry. I miss the world so much.

  6. L says...

    Quite a few of these (especially near the bottom) were printed New Yorker covers over the last few months. Were they student work that was chosen? Or were they commissioned covers? I’m so interested to find out.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Oh those were actual covers — you can see a sentence halfway through the post. thank you!

  7. shade says...

    Beautiful. Some of them gave me goosebumps.

  8. Kate Shem says...

    I’ve been working in a long term acute care hospital for about six months and before that, worked at a skilled nursing facility. I returned to work March 2020 after my second daughter was only 4 months old and Covid-19 hit my work place hard. I was terrified. Navigating Covid, helping seniors and transitioning into the specialty long term acute hospital for respiratory patients has been the hardest yet most rewarding thing I have ever done. The “Bedtime” cover brought much emotions as I thought about all that I have missed with my daughters at home and all the rewards of helping many patients diagnosed with Covid-19. Thank you for this post.

    • NJ says...

      Thank you, Kate, for the hard and important work you do and did in this past year. I feel that we all owe you, and for what it’s worth, I’m so grateful for you and people like yourself. You make a difference every day. I hope you’re proud of yourself <3
      Sincere thanks and well wishes from a stranger <3

  9. Laura says...

    The second cover by Amy Young is definitely my favorite. So much of the rhetoric surrounding COVID is about the impact of quarantine on our lives, but we don’t hear all that much about those who died. This cover is haunting and beautiful and it made me tear up. The style of it is great too. The colors, the contrast, the subtle band-aids on everyone’s arms, the masks on the table. Wonderful.

  10. Oh my goodness, so many feels! Literally teared up looking at the School of Visual Arts students’ works! (The published New Yorker covers were so poignant too!) As a cat mom, the one by Jane McIlvaine hit me so hard. Hot tears started rolling out of my eyes. Next week I’ll have to report back to the office full time. I know it’s already a privilege to have gotten to work from home since last March, but my (cat) mother’s heart hurts to know that my furbaby is going to be all by herself for much of the day again. This past year of getting to spend much more time with her opened my eyes to how much more she craves my attention and presence than I knew. Deep breaths.

    • Kim says...

      Wishing you well in your transition, Mel.

  11. shawn says...

    “Shifting Gears” and “Delayed” by R. Kikuo Johnson. So good.

    • NJ says...

      They were two of my favs too! R. Kikuo Johnson is so good!

  12. Suzie says...

    My favorites were Lauren V. and “Love Life” by Adrian Tomine.
    Watching people crawl out of their zoom meeting was cool.

  13. Caitlin Bernal says...

    These are so beautiful, Joanna. Thank you for sharing! The second cover by Amy Young is so touching, caused a real lump in my throat. So special.

  14. Rusty says...

    Amy Young’s because it’s FAR from over and the losses will be with us all forever, even with the glimmer of hope.

  15. Amy says...

    The one with the lady Zooming while drinking a Cosmo with cats and mess all around her and visible Amazon boxes is me. Replace the Cosmo with a glass of wine.

  16. Sarah says...

    I am such a huge Chris Ware fan and teared up at “Bedtime” before I even saw his credit. He’s so good at capturing the emotion behind the monotony of daily life.

    And I laughed out loud at “Love Life” – I’m happily married, so it’s certainly not the same, but you better believe my Zoom work meetings feature professional tops, comfy socks and a bevy of snacks just out of site of my computer’s camera!

  17. Cristina says...

    I have so many mixed feelings about these covers and this post. I’m happy that the vaccination campaign is working so well in the US but the pandemic is far from being over. Europe is still in lockdown, deaths in Latin America and India have soared, new variants are emerging, and a few countries are hoarding vaccines while many other countries don’t have access to them. It feels like we’re living in two different worlds.

    • mara says...

      I agree with your sentiment. While I truly am happy for the countries who can relax, globally the situation seems to worsen rather than get better. My country doesn’t get the vaccines we were promised (via a contract mind you) because of hoarding in other countries and so (not only for that, but it’s a big part) we are still in hard lockdown with soaring infection numbers.

  18. tamara says...

    The dog….

  19. Annie Green says...

    Every single one of those is a genuine work of art and makes me wish I hadn’t let my subscription run out. It’s the kind of thing that gives me great hope for humanity. For me, the people climbing out of the Zoom meeting is filled with humour and positivity and a sense of a new beginning. Art in action.

    • Susan Weston says...

      I’ve got three of this past year’s covers framed and up on my walls. I finally realized that I was holding not only art, but art in a form the artists intended and for which I had helped contribute to the artists being paid. And now I know why the New Yorker is the “dead tree” subscription I’m most committed to keeping.

  20. K says...

    idk how not to make it sound cheesy, but i love when i’m reminded of the benefits of art, it’s transcendental!

  21. Amy says...

    Chenmiao Shi’s is my favorite. I’ve never literally stopped to smell the flowers (with and without a mask on) so many times in my life. I don’t remember seeing flowers last year. This spring season seems extra colorful.

  22. Claire says...

    I LOVE the plant one! I have definitely become the plant lady this past year. :)

  23. Kelly says...

    I love the puzzles made out of classic New Yorker covers.

  24. Sarah says...

    “Delayed” by R. Kikuo Johnson really moved me when I received that week’s copy. It took me a minute to connect to all of the hate crimes, but then I was hit by the feeling of a mother trying to protect her child. I also remember receiving the copy with “Bedtime.” Such sacrifice for the greater good.

    • anon says...

      Yes, “Delayed” is subtle, but once you get it, it’s impactful. This speaks to me in volumes as an Asian American woman. I can’t tell you how envious, and yes, angry, I am when I look at other people, especially women, walking and jogging about, with their headphones without a care. I carry pepper spray with me all the time now. When my child gets out of the car when we are home I remind her that she can not run off ahead of me toward the front door (there have even been attacks at people’s front porch!). I am angry that people aren’t talking more honestly about the situation, and the truth is that the media is also spinning it a certain way and it’s not the whole story, it’s not genuine, all because folks are preserving themselves. All the while the Asian (American) community suffers from everyone else’s cowardice to say it it like it is.

  25. Anne says...

    I just love the one by Jane. I know we’re not there yet, but that bright light she’s walking into looks so beautifully promising.

  26. Alexandra says...

    I love seeing student work on CoJ!
    It’s so exciting to see what’s coming up in the art + design worlds– especially as students tend to have more freedom to explore and push boundaries than most commercial work we’re used to seeing. Plus being highlighted on a platform like this is a fantastic boost to emerging talent! :)

  27. Karin says...

    The family dinner one is my favorite. But maybe I’m being dense…I thought the empty chair represented the grandma who’d passed away but then I see the grandpa is blue, like he’s a ghost. Is he dead and the empty chair represents that grandma is in the hospital with COVID? I’m confused (signed, A. Overthinker).

    Regardless, I love that image. There has been so much loss this year, it’s not just about Zoom and working from home. Although I like all of the covers, this one seems to best honor those losses.

    • Kate says...

      I was also a bit confused…he’s a ghost, but why is the chair empty and where is his wife? I hadn’t thought of that, you’re right maybe she’s in the hospital :(

    • Sarah says...

      I wondered the same thing (I’m also an overthinker ;)

      The interpretation I settled on is that he is consumed by, and stuck in, grief.

      If you look at the colors, everything in the cool purple tone could be seen as relating to the loss and the pandemic: the masks, the empty chair, the picture. He is still very much living in that.

      Everything in the warm pinks represents the hope and “light at the end of the tunnel” some are now feeling: the young people (representing the future), vaccination bandages, the communal gathering at the table.

      The woman in the upper left seems to be in between leaving the past behind (the mask) and looking to the future (the bandage).

      This piece is so thoughtful, so poignant, I think it’s better than most of the actual New Yorker covers!

    • Mado says...

      Wow I love this analysis Sarah.

    • Lori says...

      This one also caught my attention (along with the plants growing out of the subway). But I love speculating on the intent of the images in the family one as I too was puzzling. Perhaps grandma died and grandpa is sick which is why he is in blue and not there in person (maybe quarantining or in hospital while grandma is just represented by an empty chair. )

      I have also so missed the opportunity to see art and am excited to be going to a socially distanced Calder and Picasso exhibit later this week.

  28. Kati says...

    It’s the Amy Young one for me…

  29. Sarah says...

    Amy Young’s feels the truest to my experience, having lost my dad during the pandemic. We were barely able to say goodbye because of hospital visitation Covid restrictions. When they finally let us in to pay our final respects under a time limit, we found that he wasn’t wearing any socks and his feet were so cold. My brother and I took turns cradling his feet in our hands to warm them up. After a while the nurses told us we had hit our time limit and we had to leave. Joanna, I will always think of something your sister Lucy tweeted– that families are a critical part of a patient’s care team. I will always wonder if things had been different if we’d been allowed to visit before he died. If he’d had someone who noticed he needed socks, who kissed his forehead and held his hand.

    I love Amy Young’s illustration because it shows that not everyone will “return” in the same way. For people who’ve lost someone during this, we can’t ever return to the way it was. Not after our vaccination, not in a month, not even in 20 years.

    • Sarah says...

      So sorry, Sarah.

    • JessicaD says...

      Oh Sarah. Your poor dad’s feet. I am sending you and your family all my love.

    • MB says...

      I’m so sorry for your loss, Sarah. The grief of losing your dad compounded by his being alone at the end. Sending hugs xoxo

    • Agnès says...

      I am so sorry Sarah, your testimony is so important and I hope CupofJo will invite someone -when the time is right- to write an essay on this so important topic: how so many people couldn’t properly be with their loved ones on their deathbed, during the pandemic. In France, it has been an issue aswell, and we need, as a society, to talk about it and never ever let that happen again. I will be thinking of your dad’s cold feet today, and as a metaphor for that solitude, I will keep that moment in my mind and heart.

      Sending many thoughts your way Sarah, your comment moved me to the core.

    • karen says...

      Same with my dad who passed a few months ago. The cold feet at the lonely hospital! The grief is hard… sending you an empathetic hug.

    • Eva says...

      So sorry to read about your loss, Sarah.

    • Kati says...

      I’m so sorry, Sarah. My heart goes out to you.

    • Elena says...

      Sarah, I am so sorry for your loss, especially in such a unique and heart breaking time. I was an ICU nurse for six years and was with many patients while they were dying. I took care of several patients whose family was unable to come. And for those few patients, who I will never forget, I held their hands, stroked their hair, told them how much their family loved them. I would have made sure your dad’s feet were warm. And I don’t think it’s false hope to say I’m sure his nurses did everything they could to make sure he was comfortable and knew how much you and your family loved him. <3

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Elena, your comment makes me want to cry. And Sarah, I’m so, so sorry for your loss.

  30. Katie says...

    ….and now I’m crying. These are so beautiful and moving.

  31. Emm says...

    Beautiful and moving covers. We love getting our New Yorker every week:
    Immediately I look at the cover and the food review Tables for Two by Hannah Goldfield, my husband checks the table of contents for articles he will read first and our two year old checks the whole magazine for cats – there is almost always a cat.

    • Hehe, I’m with your two year old, Emm! I once enjoyed an entire afternoon looking through New Yorker’s archives of covers with cats and catalogued them (by cat color, scene, etc) :)

  32. Marisa says...

    “Bedtime” has been my reality for the last 13 months. It’s been hard.

    • Agnès says...

      Marisa, your children will be so proud of you when they understand…

    • Elena says...

      I see you Marisa, thank you for everything you are doing. <3

    • NJ says...

      Marisa, thank you for the hard and important work you’ve been doing. I feel that we all owe you, and for what it’s worth, I’m so grateful. You make a difference every day in this hard time. I hope you’re proud of yourself <3
      Sincere thanks and well wishes from a stranger <3

  33. Ruth says...

    Oh these are all so good. The family table one… <3

  34. AMK says...

    Profound. Moving. Wow so powerful. 😭🥰🤗🌸 All the feels.

  35. Elizabeth says...

    They’re all wonderful but the first is my favorite.
    I am addicted to New Yorker covers, and well, also the New Yorker. It’s shaped my sensibilities to a large degree — taught me how to see, how to read — I can’t imagine life without it. And a big part my affection is due to the covers. I play the online jigsaw game just to see the covers and I’m always amazed at how contemporary many of the earliest covers look.

    In 1984 I went to an exhibit at the National Academy of Design of New Yorker cover art — startling but rewarding to see the actual art work in real life. And the images without the title was also a surprise. It was a fantastic exhibit. Thank you so much for this post!

  36. Anna says...

    Wow, do any of these commentors understand we can begin to live normally again? Regardless of what Fauci says (which changges routinely), our lives are still in our own hands.

    The virus will never dissappear fully and politicians will always find reasons to prolong their authority. First it was “flatten the curve” and now it’s, what, no one can get sick again and surges in the world mean lockdowns here in the States?

    It feels like some people want this to go on indenfitely!

    • Lisa says...

      You seem to forget that there won’t be a version of normal until people all over the world are vaccinated, and at the moment many developing countries have yet to give out a single dose. Until a critical mass is vaccinated, the virus will continue mutating and spreading amongst the population. Yes – at some point we will learn to live with it (like we do with flu viruses) but we’re not there yet. Many countries in Europe are still in lockdown despite vaccine drives, and if you look at India right now, they are having a huge wave – one city (New Delhi) is recording the equivalent of a death from COVID every five minutes. While there is some hope, we’re not there yet.

    • Robin says...

      Not everyone who reads this blog lives in the States. Cases and deaths are still very high and going up where I live, and that’s in Canada. A 13 year old died this weekend not far from here. One of my closest work friends lost her 30 year old cousin the week before that. Around the world, many countries don’t have any vaccines and the virus keeps evolving. I know it feels like it’s over in some parts of the US but for a lot of the world that future doesn’t feel nearly so close.

    • amber says...

      The most brutal legacy of Trump is the lack of confidence he generated in the public view of government. It is warranted – our government is deeply corrupt and has been for decades. But we must learn to discern actual, vital governance from abuse of authority. Realize that there are certain instances where government IS FOR the PEOPLE. Do you think government would destroy the economy and expose itself to vulnerability by letting it’s populace die off? Doubtful. Aren’t we are all at risk? The most patriotic thing you can do is wear a mask and get vaccinated and make sure all those around you do as well.

    • MB says...

      Living in the UK, where we have been under some of the strictest lockdown measures in the world, it reassures me to see these New Yorker covers. When I see pictures of my friends in other parts of America flying to go on vacation, going to dinner inside restaurants in large groups, living lives that resemble normalcy, I’m aghast to be honest. The experience of those living in NYC has probably been the closest of the to the UK – our entire reality has been altered for a very long time, necessarily. Scary stories from Michigan this past week illustrate how the virus is mutating to affect younger people in their 30s and 40s. No we don’t want to live our lives in fear, and yes vaccination progress has been fantastic in parts of America and the UK, but we’re still living in the middle of a pandemic where thousands of people are dying every day and vaccinations are still hard to come by in most parts of the world. I don’t think anyone wants this to go on indefinitely, but I think a lot of people have seen and felt firsthand the horrors of this disease and are being cautious in order to spare other people the same suffering.

    • Agnès says...

      Anna, politicians have nothing to gain from that, any lockdown is an economic disaster and no President going through a crisis like that will be reelected. Listen to the scientists, they are much more worried that the politicians.

    • Bonnie says...

      To use your exclamation, Anna, Wow. Your thought that anything can go on as normal after profound losses to so many is an ignorant and hopefully naive, rather than intentionally blase, comment.

      If only people’s lives were in their own hands. People wouldn’t be dying from hate crimes. People wouldn’t be dying through ignorance.

    • Rusty says...

      Whaaaaaat?!?!
      I was only going to read the comments, but really??
      It’s called a GLOBAL PANDEMIC for a reason.
      Until every country has it under control and the majority of every country is vaccinated, WE ALL still have it.
      Gah!
      I just can’t even …

  37. Madeleine says...

    I’m a Madeleine too! <3

  38. Agnès says...

    The first and the second one are so intense and beautiful! both life and death, the tragedy and the hope… Amy Young and Chenmiao Shi, I can’t wait to see more of your work. I got my vaccine last friday, I’m so moved and hopeful and sad at the same time. Love from Paris.

  39. Mwis says...

    I feel all the emotions that I think we all will have when we finally go back to work and leave all that is familiar in Jane McIlvaine’s illustration.The pets, the kids,all the alone time and family time gone…yet still the joys of going back to normalcy-or the new normal.

  40. ML says...

    Oh my heart. These are so good. Those first two…

  41. B says...

    All of these covers are gorgeous! I agree with the commenter who said this pandemic isn’t over yet. We have a long way to go before we reach herd immunity and before we can return to anything that looks like normal.

  42. Elizabeth says...

    Loved these! The family at the table especially got me in the heart.

  43. Caroline says...

    Oh wow— I didn’t notice them at first, but the vaccine band-aids in Amy Young’s drawing just broke me. So much sadness and hope, loss and beauty.

  44. Broadwater says...

    This is such stunning art, but the pandemic isn’t ending. It is not over. It alarms me that the media is pushing this idea. It changes peoples’ behavior (less likely to wear a mask, keep socially distanced, be careful). Look at India. And you may say that is not our problem, but it is. We are all connected. If this pandemic hasn’t taught us that, I don’t know what will. I live in the United States and my community is experiencing high rates of Covid-19 transmission.

    • Shanti says...

      Amen, Broadwater. As someone in public health and who’s a South Asian healthcare provider watching tragically and helplessly what is happening in India, the push for the pandemic’s end in the media is utterly unacceptable. It is just cavalier to imagine that us mortals control the end of such an unforgiving virus. Please, let’s continue to stay humble, reminding ourselves of our interconnectedness as Broadwater beautifully stated, by continuing to take safety precautions. It takes all of us.

    • Alex says...

      I’m so confused! A doctor friend just sent out a mass email begging her friends and family to stay vigilant and cautious – masked, outdoors, distanced. Vaccine or not. And then this weekend, my governor stood mask-less in a crowd of other mask-less politicians and developers for the opening of a new food hall in our smallish town. And then crowds of people streamed in and celebrated the opening, mask-less and not distanced and it was all over local social media pages. The CDC says not to worry about surface transmission anymore and the EU is opening to vaccinated tourists….but then INDIA. I get my second dose of the vaccine this week, and I’ve been looking forward to family gatherings and maybe even a summer trip. But what is okay to do? What is safe? The messages are so mixed up. I’m going crazy!!

    • Gina says...

      I agree. I live in Europe and we are nowhere near normality. Most countries like France, Spain, Germany, Greece are still in lockdown so as much as everyone is ready for their European summer vacations, this is not our reality right now. We are still waiting for outdoor dining to open after MONTHS. Stay humble! This is not behind us just yet…we are still very much in a pandemic.

    • Isabelle says...

      Same here, in Europe, it’s far from being over! Vaccination helps, but there is no guarantee that you won’t get sick or pass on the disease. Please keep taking precautions in a responsible way. I’ve been severely sick with covid and have been very lucky to recover, but believe me, this thing is no joke.

    • Odette S. says...

      We’re receiving so many mixed messages, though! Plus far, far too politicians have been using lockdowns/COVID restrictions to their advantage. I’ll never forget the image of Gavin Newsom dining at the French Laundry in the middle of the pandemic. The hypocrisy!

      I for one and am ready to start living my life normally and that includes not wearing a mask. It has been a year of this and there’s no real understanding of when we can go maskless.

    • Sam says...

      I mean my question in this comment sincerely: I understand that the pandemic is far from over (looking today at India, though infections will swell in different places at different times), but how does that translate into what people should do in regions where the vaccine is widely available and the healthcare system can tolerate the covid-related hospitalizations? In the US, we are within a couple of months of almost every adult having access to full vaccination, and even now, hospitals can largely tolerate the rates of serious infections. If the vaccines continue to be as successful as they seem to be, why shouldn’t we start to move forward “at home” once people have access to them? (I understand why it would continue to be a bad idea to travel internationally.) Again, I mean this question sincerely.

    • Sam says...

      Also to clarify, I DO think that what happens in other countries can be “our problem”—I think the US should’ve been far more generous with its vaccines than it was, for example. What I’m raising a question about is the impact our lifestyle changes will have on how the pandemic evolves in other countries.

    • Emilie says...

      Agreed – here in Canada we are in the middle of a third wave that is far and away the worst one yet, and the lockdown measures are the most strict we’ve had (still likely not enough to flatten this third curve). The vaccine roll out is not going well and normal is no where in sight. Happy for folks in more optimistic locations, but the light is a tiny speck at the end of a very long tunnel for us.

    • Charlotte says...

      Odette, I think your statement, “I for one” is really speaking volumes. This isn’t the time to be operating according to your own individual wants and needs. As Broadwater said, we’re all connected.

    • amber says...

      @odette By not wearing a mask you are protesting with your life. Best to wear a mask and push for vaccination within your circle. Gavin Newsome was incredibly insensitive and savagely flaunting privilege.

      Do not risk your life by making HIM your behavioral model.

  45. Susan says...

    ‘The true New Yorker secretly believes that people living anywhere else have to be, in some sense, kidding.’ – John Updike. Love all of these.

  46. Janey says...

    These are gorgeous. They would look great framed in my hallway!

  47. Madeleine says...

    All are so beautiful. I got a lump in my throat looking at these. “Bedtime” put tears in my eyes. What a time, you guys.

    • Madeleine says...

      I rarely see someone who spells my name the exact same way, so I thought I had somehow already commented on this, ha! Agreed, these covers are incredible.

    • M says...

      Also a Madeleine! :)

    • Madeleine says...

      Are we having a Madeleine party??

      And yes, today’s gentle weep.

      (And here in Canada we are in the midst of a 3rd wave, with infection rates as high as they’ve ever been. Parts of the country are running out of beds and ventilators.)

  48. Michelle says...

    Grand Central Terminal by Eric Drooker. The way the light is shining into that empty space is a whole 2020 mood.

  49. Kelly says...

    Oh, these are so moving. I love seeing these. I live in a part of the country where people are reluctant to get vaccinated, and I miss feeling a part of a reality where people who take the pandemic seriously. These covers capture the times so well. As a side note, I have sound out that some of my healthcare providers have gotten a Covid-19 vaccination, and I feel so much despair and anger. Has anyone else run into this? These covers remind me that many of us actually do understand the gravity of the pandemic from many angles.

    • Kelly says...

      Goodness. My typos. I meant to say that some of my healthcare providers have NOT gotten vaccinated and don’t plan to.

    • ingrid says...

      Why are people resisting a vaccine? I don’t understand. Vaccines have been essential to good health for over a hundred years. Can someone educate me, please? Thank you!

  50. silly lily says...

    We’re not completely through this, but there’s light at the end of the tunnel. And these beautiful renderings make me suddenly feel very proud of us — all of us. Thank you for that!

  51. Mandy says...

    These are so beautiful!

  52. Laura says...

    I am in awe of each of these artists and cannot pick a favorite. Each is poignant in its own way.

  53. Amanda says...

    cool art assignment, great work. “Love Life” made me lol.. ;)

  54. Kate says...

    I’m confused, all are amazing but aren’t the bottom five real New Yorker covers?

    • Alexandra says...

      Yes, the last 9 are all real covers! Joanna wrote “And below are some actual pandemic-related New Yorker covers from the past year” before them :)

    • Maclean Nash says...

      Yup, she mentions the last five are actual New Yorker covers.

    • Emily says...

      Yes, she notes that between the two groups, it’s just a single line and easy to miss though!

    • Kati says...

      Right after Katrina Catacutan’s image of a guy bringing flowers to a woman in her plant-filled home, there’s the following text: “Which is your favorite?
      And below are some actual pandemic-related New Yorker covers from the past year.”

    • Fion says...

      Hi Kate–there’s a break in the middle of the article:
      “And below are some actual pandemic-related New Yorker covers from the past year.”
      The last nine are , like you said, real New Yorker covers :)

    • M says...

      Yup, that’s what it says.

    • Elizabeth says...

      Yup – “And below are some actual pandemic-related New Yorker covers from the past year.”

    • Kate says...

      Thanks, everyone! I scrolled through many times and completely missed that line – I see it now!

  55. Lashley says...

    Picking a favorite seems impossible! Amy Young’s is so heartbreaking – life continuing, but missing a real person. Katrina Catacutan’s and Chenmiao Shi’s are so sweetly hopeful, but Young’s seems to capture more of the real-life picture.

  56. E says...

    The one by Amy Young and “Bedtime” are making me emotional. What beautiful ways to capture a brutal time and some of its effects. Thanks for sharing

  57. Brittani says...

    Hi! Though this is a lovely post, I was EXTREMELY moved by the post that was up and then taken down earlier this morning. Will it reappear? I didn’t make a note of the book that the excerpt was from, or the author, before it was removed. Would love to see it again. 💕

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Yes! The foster parent post was mistakenly pushed live by me for 2 minutes — it’s actually slated for next Monday!

  58. Anna says...

    Oh wow – I love these.