Food

Claire Saffitz’s Malted “Forever” Brownies

Claire Saffitz malted forever brownies

Claire Saffitz, author of the gorgeous new book Dessert Person, is skeptical of people who say “I don’t like sweets”…

She’s convinced they just haven’t found the right desserts. Likewise, those people who say “I’m a cook, not a baker” like, um, yours truly? No such thing. Whoever thinks creativity takes a back seat to precision is, in fact, the perfect customer for her new book, which aims to make us confident, improvisational bakers.

What I love so much about Dessert Person is what I loved so much about her wildly popular Bon Appétit YouTube show “Gourmet Makes,” where Saffitz, a trained pastry chef, attempted to recreate iconic store-bought foods like tater tots, Mentos, Butterfingers, Hot Pockets and Krispy Kremes. (She has since left the show and the company, out of solidarity with BIPOC colleagues after their demands for more equitable pay went unmet.) She is both incredibly un-intimidating while also maniacally obsessive about getting things exactly right.

Also what I love: The recipes. Holy moly, it’s just the right mix between the comfortingly familiar (Chocolate Buttermilk Cake, Meyer Lemon Tart, Chocolate Chip Cookies) which you just know are their most best selves; and the innovative and inspiring (Ricotta Cake with Kumquat Marmalade, Salted Halvah Blondies, Malted Brownies) which are next-level in the best possible way.

She also wants to let us know exactly what we’re getting ourselves into. This matrix plots all the recipes in the books on two axes, total time commitment and level of difficulty. (How much do we love an infographic?) I like that it assumes we can be different kind of bakers on different days. First up for me, in the bottom right quadrant, are the Malted “Forever” Brownies (recipe below), so named because once she landed on this recipe, she decided it would be the only one she’d make forevermore.

Malted “Forever” Brownies
Malted milk powder is available in most grocery stores (look for the Carnation brand). If you can’t find it, you can substitute 6 ounces (170g) coarsely chopped malted milk balls for the milk chocolate.
Makes 16 Brownies

Active Time: 35 minutes | Total Time: 1 hour, plus time to cool

Butter for the pan
¼ cup Dutch process cocoa powder (0.7 oz / 20g)
5 ounces (142g) semisweet chocolate (preferably 64 to 68% cacao), coarsely chopped
6 tablespoons unsalted butter (3 oz / 85g), cut into pieces
¼ cup neutral oil, such as vegetable or grapeseed (2 oz / 56g)
½ cup granulated sugar (3.5 oz / 100g)
½ cup packed dark brown sugar (3.5 oz / 100g)
1 large egg (1.8 oz / 50g)
2 large egg yolks (1.1 oz / 32g)
1½ teaspoons vanilla extract
¾ cup all-purpose flour (3.5 oz / 100g)
2 tablespoons malted milk powder**  (0.63 oz / 18g) (optional)
1 teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt (0.11 oz / 3g)
6 ounces (170g) milk chocolate, coarsely chopped (1 cup)

Preheat the oven and prepare the pan: Arrange an oven rack in the center position and preheat the oven to 350°F. Line an 8 × 8-inch pan with 2 sheets of foil, crossing one over the other and pressing the foil into the corners and up the sides. Lightly butter the foil and set aside.

Bloom the cocoa: In a large heatproof bowl, whisk the cocoa powder and ¼ cup boiling water (4 oz / 113g) until smooth (this will bring out the flavor of the cocoa).

Melt the chocolate, butter, and oil: Add the semisweet chocolate, butter, and oil to the bowl with the cocoa mixture and set it over a medium saucepan filled with about 1 inch of simmering (not boiling) water (make sure the bottom of the bowl isn’t touching the water). Warm the mixture gently, stirring occasionally, until the chocolate and butter are melted and the mixture is smooth. Remove the bowl from the heat and let cool until lukewarm.

Add the sugars and egg: Whisk the granulated and brown sugars into the chocolate mixture. It will look grainy and you might see some of the fat start to separate from the rest of the mixture, which is normal. Add the whole egg, egg yolks, and vanilla and whisk vigorously until the mixture comes back together and looks very thick, smooth, and glossy.

Add the dry ingredients: Add the flour, malted milk powder (if using), and salt and whisk slowly until everything is combined, then whisk more vigorously until the batter is very thick, a full 45 seconds.

Fold in the chocolate and bake: Add the milk chocolate to the batter and fold with a flexible spatula to distribute. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan, spreading in an even layer all the way to the corners. Sprinkle flaky salt on top of the batter prior to baking if you’re a salty dessert person.

Bake the brownies until the surface is shiny and puffed and the center is dry to the touch but still soft when pressed, 25 to 30 minutes.

Cool, chill, and cut: Allow the brownies to cool in the pan until they are no longer hot, about 1 hour, then refrigerate until the bottom of the pan feels cold, about 1 hour longer (this results in a chewier texture). Use the ends of the foil to lift the brownies out of the pan and transfer to a cutting board. Slice the brownies into 16 squares.

*Use a glass pan if it’s the only one you’ve got, but note that this will affect the way the brownies bake. Glass takes longer than metal to heat up and cool, which means the brownies will continue to bake once they’re out of the oven and possibly overshoot that medium-rare mark. To avoid possible overbaking, reduce the oven temperature by 25°F and keep a watchful eye.

P.S. Nine cookbooks that earn their keep and the best boxed brownie mix.

(Brownie photo by Alex Lau. Reprinted from Dessert Person with permission. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers.)

  1. Jackie says...

    Old post but just stopping by to say that I am going to make these brownies for my son’s adoption finalization this week because “FOREVER” brownies! Heart! Smiley face! Thank you for posting the recipe. :)

  2. Kristen says...

    Thank you Sally! It seems I added too much water. Not a good sign that the directions were screwed up. Hmm I wonder if that is a reflection of the book quality.

    • sallyt says...

      I know, it’s not a great sign. I always wish that I could get a side-gig as a cookbook proof reader.

      I do have the book and love it, but haven’t made anything else.

  3. Kristen says...

    Has anyone tried the recipe? I cooked it at 350 for 30 minutes per the instructions…and the brownies were totally raw. I left them in the oven for a total of 60 minutes and they’re still underdone. Not sure where I went wrong…

    • sallyt says...

      I made them! I commented below that there’s a mistake in the recipe – it says to add 1/4 cup water (4 oz, 113g) but 1/4 cup of water is 2 oz. Did you use the weight or volume version of water?? I used 1/4 cup and 1/2 cup would have been way too much.
      *
      I baked for 35 minutes and they were VERY fudgy. Delicious!

  4. Francesca says...

    She didn’t leave the show out of solidarity. She just didn’t renew her contract because BA was a mess. It was a smart PR move on her part, nothing more. She notably upheld the structures and participated in the inequity of BA.

  5. This is something exactly i was looking for. This looks so delicious that I cannot wait to try it at home. thank you for sharing

  6. Jennifer says...

    I think adding malt to my favorite box mix is a fantastic idea!!!

    • JessicaD says...

      Jennifer, I think you just made my YEAR. What a fantastic idea. (I grew up in the Midwest, putting malted milk powder on all bowls of ice cream, into my milk, etc.; could not find it after moving to the east coast. Found it on amazon and now I have 4 containers of it in my freezer (so they don’t get stale??)!) However, I am going to put WAY MORE than just two tablespoons in! Bring on the malt! :)

  7. Capucine says...

    I beg to differ – my two kids don’t have sweet tooths. It IS a real thing. After years of diligently expanding their palates (ahem), I’ve discovered that I can get them to make exceptions for salted caramels and raspberries. Sometimes salted cookies or salty peanut butter cups, if they are starving. Otherwise, cupcakes, ice cream, and any fruit get one bite or a total pass. Butter, olives, and aged cheese however, won’t last five minutes..

    I think it is odd. Everyone thinks it is odd. It IS odd, and after every soccer game they are the ones who won’t touch watermelon or orange slices or popsicles or yogurt squeezies or raisins, I had no idea pre-kid how kid snacks were so sweet focused. But here they are. Now they are big enough I can insist they politely take bites of birthday cake. What kind of gene pool is that, fat and salt over sugar? Their dad and his mom are the same. His mom has made a dessert just once in the twenty years I’ve known her! More for me!

  8. jules says...

    team boxed brownies but i’m sure these are good for the more ambitious among us.

    PS – let’s not say someone left their job “in solidarity” when the reality is more like “the brand was going down a la Titanic and it made professional sense to jump ship”

    xo

  9. Annalise Shumway Wagstaff says...

    I went to HS with Claire. She has always been incredibly talented–she practically has the Midas touch for everything.

  10. cm says...

    I think I’ve been listening to too much You’re Wrong About because after reading this post and some comments, I immediately wondered what Mike and Sarah would say about what has and is happening at Bon Appetit and Conde Nast.

    One of my big takeaways from the podcast is that people are complicated and contradictory, and that issues often get flattened for the sake of easy digestion. And if I were to take that way of thinking and apply it here it would be that, yes Claire Saffitz benefitted from a system at BA/CN that oppressed BIPOC and yes, she has had a far from perfect response to that. But I see some effort on her part, and it feels wrong to withhold support now, especially when she left the toxic environment at BA and arguably needs more financial support now.

    Does that mean we shouldn’t keep pushing public figures like Claire to continue to examine her privilege and what she can do for BIPOC in her industry? Absolutely not. And we should also ask CoJ to highlight lesser known BIPOC chef’s (Rick Martinez looks to be working on a cookbook and Priya Krishna already has a great one!). It would have been a lot cooler to see that perspective in this post a little more, maybe even a shout out to Sohla’s new YouTube show.

    I think we can buy Claire’s cookbook, push her on what she’s doing for BIPOC in her industry, and ask CoJ to highlight less represented folx. We’re all in this trash white supremacist system. I’m feeling hopeful that we can change it.

    • Amy says...

      THIS. I’ve been struggling with figuring out how to engage with content from folks within the “BA universe”; this approach allows space for both individual and institutional growth, but also accountability. Thanks!

  11. margaux says...

    i highly, HIGHLY recommend the salted halvah blondies in claire’s new book.

  12. having recently, finally, found my forever brownies haha — this one is very tempting because I also love malt flavor! I think a person can have two forever brownies, just as they can have two soul mates, right? this is my forever recipe, and I apologize in advance that I know nothing about its creator and adapter, I have no intel on that, but I can vouch for the recipe being very delicious. https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1013155-fudge-brownies

    • Lena says...

      What SR said! Diamond Crystal is just the cheapest table salt (but weighs very different from Morton’s, – you can use whatever you have and convert with google) and neutral oil is what everyone cooks with and makes it flexible and open ended.

  13. When have brownies become so “bougie”? Neutral Oil? Diamond Crystal Salt? Bake until medium-rare? This whole recipe made me laugh! I’m poking fun in jest and am not trying to be mean. I’ll do me (boxed mix with extra chocolate chips), you do you!

    • Emily says...

      lol yes. I only got halfway through the recipe list before I was like, I don’t have this, or this, or this… I’m sure this recipe makes an impeccable, probably very nuanced brownie. But while I think we’re mostly past the phase of COVID where there are major grocery store shortages around me, I’ll pass on hunting for these ingredients for now and stick with something classic. (love a box mix brownie.)

    • Anne S says...

      My brain always skips over those words now, I cooked and baked a lot from Bon Appetit’s website (before they showed their true colors) and they ALWAYS have really specific bougie ingredients. Neutral = vegetable, and salt is just salt. These things might “elevate” your brownies, but I like my brownies here on earth with me thanks.

    • SR says...

      I don’t think these terms are meant to be bougie at all (maybe with the exception of medium-rare brownies, ha!). But neutral oil just means any cooking oil that’s not olive/coconut/avocado, it’s not a special type of oil it’s literally the opposite of bougie! Diamond crystal is specified to avoid mistakes, different brands of salt have different saltinesses (if you used that much Morton salt the brownies would come out too salty), diamond crystal isn’t expensive or fancy, like Maldon sea salt, it’s really cheap! I hope that clarified! These aren’t fancy things!

    • Hilary says...

      I’m with ya. Team Ghiradelli boxed brownie mix for life!

    • Amanda says...

      Aldi box mix for life.

    • Isabelle says...

      They specify Diamond Crystal because a lot of people buy Morton’s salt and you need to adjust the recipe for that – it’s typically suggested to halve the volume if using table salt. I love boxed mix as much as the next person since brownies are typically tough to get right at home – if you’re making them from scratch these details matter.

    • MC says...

      SR, I completely agree with you! The queen of accessible and affable cooking, Samin Nosrat swears by Blue Diamond Salt. Using the term “neutral oil” is also not uncommon across many cook books and cooking blogs.

      I sense some bias towards Claire in some of these snarky-lite comments about bougieness. Any excuse to put others down I guess ¯\_(ツ)_/

  14. Margarita says...

    Hm. This feels bad. New info about BA and the toxic/racist work culture has JUST come out (E. Alex Jung’s article about Sohla) and Claire is one of the people who benefitted immensely from white privilege at BA… and seems to have simply walked away without supporting her colleagues. To not mention anything about this in your post and instead help her promote her new book feels! Bad! Please don’t get me wrong, I love CoJ, but this feels… this feels bad.

    • suki says...

      Can you blame people for the color of their skin and the benefits or challenges that imparts to their life? She WALKED AWAY from her JOB. That is a hugely supportive thing to do. Why must she also give blood – or whatever you’re condemning her for not doing? What have you done that equals walking away from your job?

    • SR says...

      Conde Nast Entertainment made a lot of money off of Claire, she hosted the youtube show that earned the most compared to the others. She walked away from her job to support and stand in solidarity with her BIPOC colleagues. Now CNE can’t make more money off of her. She used her privilege and power to take a stand even when it meant losing money, I don’t think that’s an empty gesture.

    • Capucine says...

      Wait, back up – can someone fill me in on what happened that triggered these race discussions around this book? Where should I have seen all this? How do you all know about it? There is a hole in my feed somewhere.

  15. EmBed says...

    I personally love sweets, and eat them pretty much every day (so no judgement), but does anyone think that those who “just don’t like sweets” shouldn’t try and force themselves? I mean, sugar is objectively unhealthy, and totally unnecessary in the human diet. If you don’t like sweets, count yourself lucky and don’t try and “find ones you like”. Battling a sweet tooth is just one less battle you have to fight!

    • K says...

      haha i agree! it’s like trying to like alcohol when you don’t.

    • Capucine says...

      My kids don’t have sweet tooths. It means they eat very little fruit and don’t eat snacks in class very often, unless it is cheese. I settled on a rule that dessert is always optional as long as they say thank you, except at birthday parties they must take one bite of the cake. So I mean, yes, sugar is detrimental to all living things, but handling all the social sweets takes some real diplomat training. So many sweets. A manners problem even I think is oddball, who doesn’t like brownies?

  16. Emma says...

    There is something immediately weird and patting-her-on-the-back-ish about bringing up her BA exit here. If CofJ was going to mention BA at all, I wholly agree with your last paragraph, Nina.

  17. Renee says...

    I am interested in this book (and the brownie recipe!) but I will not buy it. I did reserve it at the library tho. In my mind I just can’t untangle the author from some really uncomfortable and negative feelings about BA. There was something off about the magazine in recent years–it read like it was being run by the judgmental, popular, image-conscious kids at my high school. (Not referring to you, Jenny!) When the news broke a few months ago about the racism and injustice at the magazine and the larger company, I wasn’t the least bit surprised. Just wanted to add my two cents to Nina’s comment above.

  18. Nina says...

    To give some context regarding Claire, she did not just leave in solidarity with all of the BIPOC employees who left BA/CNE. Behind the scenes she too was problematic and complicit in the years of a toxic workplace that her BIPOC co-workers faced. Since leaving she received a handsome advance and knew she had a lot of work and money ahead of her. Sure, it feels good to frame it under the umbrella of “solidarity.” BA and Conde Nast have been and continue to be extremely problematic as a whole. As long as Roger Lynch and Anna Winter are at the helm and leading the “diversity” at CNE, not much will change aside from the tokenized surface. While they have tokenized their BIPOC past employees who left to unfair pay, their new hires are still making less than their white counterparts. I suggest following joe_rosenthal on IG (watch his saved stories) for truthful accounts of BIPOC employees who left, and all those who were complicit in standing by and doing nothing. As far as linking BA’s YouTube channel which sends them traffic and likes, which turn into monetizing those likes, doesn’t feel great knowing the huge pay disparity between white and BIPOC employees. I know you were at BA for quite some time, but now is a time for all of us to objective and thoughtful to who we give our time and attention to. BA/CNE is not the corporation who we should be giving our attention to.

    Which is why, I’m really disappointed to see Claire being given publicity on this forum, when publicity could have gone to a BIPOC chef such as Sohla (who Claire relied on HEAVILY on Sohla’s expertise) and her new cooking show.

    You describe Claire as being, “maniacally obsessive,” when in reality it was Sohla who was, yet she wasn’t given the spotlight for her own show when she cooked circles around others in the Test Kitchen. Sohla was used by all of the white chefs (including Claire) on their “wildly popular” shows as a token and for her knowledge that far exceeded theirs. Rick Martinez is another chef who left CNE and he has a remarkably delicious brownie recipe. Would have been nice had you given the spotlight to a BIPOC chef who actually left because they weren’t getting paid fairly, as opposed to a white chef who had the privilege to leave under the guise of “solidarity,” and with a gigantic book deal on the horizon.

    • AN says...

      This is enlightening; thank you, Nina.

    • Bb says...

      Cancel culture in a nutshell. How do you know that this is true: You describe Claire as being, “maniacally obsessive,” when in reality it was Sohla who was, yet she wasn’t given the spotlight for her own show/ how is jenny supposed to know this enough to cancel claire as you suggest she should do? Should CoJ now cancel jenny for highlighting someone who should have been cancelled?

    • Mika says...

      Thank you for writing this, Nina. It is very important to remember.

    • Lily says...

      Wholeheartedly agree. Hard pass on this. There are so many other cookbooks written by BIPOC who haven’t been complicit in supporting a white supremacist work culture that it’s difficult to justify buying one written by YET ANOTHER white former BA staffer. It’s not exactly a difficult decision to leave a cushy job or freelance contract (“in solidarity”? pshaw) when you already know you have a primo book deal in the pipeline. See also: Molly Baz.

    • C. says...

      So of course I don’t know you or your intentions, presumably you are trying to accomplish something useful and good here, but how are we supposed to know? you are writing things about people that seem pretty specific and derogatory. How do you come by this information? Are you regurgitating stuff you read on someone’s instagram account? What is your connection to these people? If you are going to be this specific and you want this information to be taken seriously please share sources. Otherwise you are just someone on the internet spreading rumors.

    • Abbe says...

      To those of you wondering where these “unfounded” allegations are coming from, Bon Appetit had a very public coming to terms with its toxic culture this summer, starting with former Editor in Chief Adam Rappaport stepping down after a picture of him in brownface surfaced. You can read more pretty much anywhere, but this is a good summary:

      https://www.eater.com/2020/6/10/21286688/bon-appetit-toxic-work-culture-of-racism

      And yes, Claire seems like a very nice white lady! And we can’t ever really know what was going on inside BA! But POC who have left those offices have spoken up about a VERY toxic culture, and its one that was allowed to continue until several WOC such as Sohla El-Waylly and Priya Krishna put their livelihoods on the line to speak out about it. Claire Saffitz benefited from that culture at the expense of POC, and that doesn’t mean she doesn’t deserve success and happiness. But man is it HARD to see her get a pat on the back for her allyship when other chefs of color are STILL struggling to make it in a very racist industry. No one is “cancelling” Claire (to reiterate: she’s great! I loved her YouTube series!) — we just want to see other equally amazing and hard working chefs get the spotlight they deserve.

    • Kath says...

      This is what makes the left so immensely entertaining, they always end up eating their own 😂 thanks for the mood booster, this comment section is a delicious caricature of 2020

    • Jules says...

      I’m on “the left” but I’m with Kath on this. The policing of everything that everybody does all the time is already backlashing. More and more people will be worn out and walking away because the mob wants blood over the proper place to source a brownie recipe. When everyone is complicit, no one is complicit. Few of us can stand up to these purity tests.

    • Emily says...

      This post is literally about a successful white woman who just got her cookbook published. Where’s the part where she got canceled? Or the mob wanting “blood?” Blood–wild metaphor to use when the rage at white supremacy and privilege, particularly this summer and leading up to the fallout at BA, was fueled by collective grief over the shedding of Black blood. How many complaints about cancel culture aren’t just thinly veiled, knee-jerk tone policing, I gotta wonder.

      I agree this post could have handled this aspect of Claire’s public identity better. She doesn’t deserve a pass for her silence and being oblivious to the racism she benefited from; no one does. And readers should be encouraged to critique posts and the people they celebrate. One of things that keeps me reading COJ is that this blog invites feedback and actually responds thoughtfully most of the time.

  19. Anya says...

    Hahahahaha! Just watched this and could not understand how they ALL messed up so badly!!

  20. Mac says...

    MALTED brownies?!!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      I KNOW! Alex’s favorite flavor is malt, so I’m excited to make these for his bday.

  21. Meg says...

    We’re at the point of quarantine where all the COJ posts are about chocolate, and the people of the internet are HERE FOR IT.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      hahahahaha

    • M says...

      These have both!! :)

    • serena says...

      I love a butter brownie, but not too sweet!? That recipe calls for 3 cups of sugar! I don’t think I’ve ever seen a baking recipe, anywhere, with that much sugar. I might try it with a touch less cocoa powder so I can cut back on it.

  22. NW says...

    Does anyone know if Horlicks would be a fine sub for malted milk, or does it contain too many other things? I read above that Ovaltine is fine, but I’m a Horlicks girl ;)

    • MozartsGirl says...

      I’m a professional brownie baker – Horlicks works! The ‘full fat’ version though, not Light (as if you would…!) x

  23. Kathryn says...

    As someone who is both creative and a LOVER OF RULES AND STRUCTURE, baking is my happy place.

    • Mj says...

      Haha! I feel exactly the same

  24. The second set of ** isn’t showing up in this post, not sure if it is a typo or not.
    I love all things malted, so I will definitely try this.

  25. Laura says...

    I just put this book on my Christmas wish list.

  26. Emily says...

    so funny. Ever since The Great British Bakeoff chocolate episode last week, I have been craving brownies.

    • Megan says...

      Same!! As an American watching that episode I was like, this challenge is SO EASY. Apparently, I was mistaken!! No one thought to do a mocha brownie?? The best!

      And can’t wait to try this recipe!

    • Emily says...

      Megan – I think they all over-thought it!! Tooooooo many layers and flavors!

    • Calla says...

      Oh my god yes! @Megan I was literally thinking, why does no one throw some espresso powder in there and call it a day?

      Although I often feel like the judges can be pretty critical of them doing things too simple, but a simple brownie is the best so there was no way to win.

    • Sasha L says...

      Same, I made some on Sunday!!! Also, I can’t believe how bad the bakers bombed, I felt so sorry for them. But I don’t think brownies were a good choice for that challenge, just plain fudgy crackley brownies are perfect and shouldn’t be messed with, but who would think they could win by making plain brownies??

      Anyhoo, you will win by making these ☺️
      https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/143667/brookes-best-bombshell-brownies/

    • Megan says...

      @Calla totally! It was a trick challenge. . .!

      Also can we just have a side conversation about how GBBO is the quarantine joy the world NEEEEDS right now. Though I miss Sandi!

    • Maryn says...

      Megan, right there with you—GBBO is LIFE. I’m so happy the new season is on Netflix and we don’t have to wait to watch it! I do love Matt though. Easily my favorite host! :)

    • K says...

      I was also SO CONFUSED as to why they all struggled with brownies!

  27. Erin says...

    I mean, I’m not much of a baker or a dessert person but the brownies look amazing and I might need this book ;-)

  28. Claire says...

    Yum! I love food post day.
    The cookbook sounds very interesting, and I am intrigued by this recipe (even though I am eternally devoted to the King Arthur Flour fudge brownie recipe)

  29. Rickelle says...

    I got my book yesterday and love how detailed it is! I’m driving my husband crazy talking about everything I’ve learned just from reading the intro.

  30. Morgan says...

    Can’t wait to try these brownies, and pleeeeease can we get a beauty uniform post for Claire? I love her style and vibe, and it would be fun to hear more about her to help fill the BA video void…

    • El says...

      I think there was one! Now I can’t find it, so maybe I’m thinking of Into the Gloss? But I swear I’ve read a beauty uniform from Claire.

    • Calla says...

      Yes! I would love this!

    • Megan says...

      Yes, she did an Into The Gloss interview! It’s great :)

    • Caitlyn says...

      Yes please! Claire on beauty uniform please!

  31. yum!! any adjustments you’d recommend for high altitude?

    • Catie says...

      Hi Emily, King Arthur Flour has an *excellent* guide to substitutions and adjustments for high altitude baking (https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/learn/resources/high-altitude-baking). Usually it has to do with raising agents, liquid, and flour. My guess is you could add a little more oil here (they usually suggest oil or eggs as the extra liquid that you add), but as an avid baker who recently moved up above 5500 ft, I have to say….I haven’t noticed much difference? I’m really lazy about remembering to calculate substitutions and all my cakes and sourdough have turned out just fine. (Am I cringing waiting for a baking disaster? maybe…)

    • Danielle says...

      I’ve heard good things about Pie in the Sky cookbook for high altitude baking. That being said I’m with Catie- I haven’t noticed any big differences moving from sea level to above 5500 in the few years I’ve lived at a higher altitude but I imagine that higher than 7,000 you makes a big difference.

    • Diana says...

      Imprecise Denver baker here- I generally toss in an extra 1/4 cup flour and 2 T water for adjustments, and depending on how sugary the recipe is, take out a T or so sugar. The altitude makes the water evaporate off quicker and concentrates the sugar, is how I understand it. But like I said, imprecise and everyone will eat it!!

    • Jess says...

      I live at 7,000+ ft and baking is so hit or miss! I usually end up feeling so overwhelmed trying to do all the math and science (lol) to adjust recipes that I just never bake anymore

  32. Abbey says...

    That infographic should be in EVERY cookbook. Genius. I ordered this book along with the *perfect* apron Claire designed for Alex Mill. They’re selling them as a bundle! Woohoo!

  33. Maclean Nash says...

    I love Clare so much! Thank you for sharing this recipe! I will be adding her cookbook to my holiday wish list!

  34. sallyt says...

    her book arrived yesterday! I’m a malt fan, so what do you think of using malt powder (I love the King Arthur brand) AND malted milk balls? THANKS!

    • Jenny Rosenstrach says...

      I can’t imagine that would be BAD?!!! I say go for it

    • sallyt says...

      Jenny/Claire – I’m making the brownies, and it says to mix the cocoa with 1/4 cup of boiling water (4 oz/113 g) – but 1 cup of water is 8 oz, so shouldn’t it be 2oz? Which is correct – the weight or volume measurement?

      THANKS!

  35. Rita Dantas says...

    I am missing the **
    I was hoping they would suggest an alternative, as I don’t think I can get malted milk in Portugal…

  36. Selena says...

    Is malted milk the same as Ovaltine/Milo? That’s all I can find in the UK when I search ‘malted milk’. These sound AMAZING!

    • mb says...

      Maltesers would work for the malted milk ball substitution.

    • Shelley says...

      Yes ovaltine is chocolate malted milk :) I’m sure it would be yummy!

    • I think Ovaltine is malted milk powder and Milo is chocolate-flavoured malted milk powder.

    • MozartsGirl says...

      Selena…UK pro brownie baker here…you can use Ovaltine but Horlicks is better (not the Light version) and Maltesers are a good addition too…yum! x

  37. Calla says...

    Yes I love Claire! Can’t wait to try these, I’ve never found a brownie recipe that I really love.

    Also people saying they are not a baker because they are just too creative and can’t be bound by the confines of rules is such a pet peeve of mine. The implication is always that if you do bake, you are clearly made for following rules and not as much of a creative genius as them.

    • Jenny Rosenstrach says...

      Yes, you do hear that ALL THE TIME. Claire definitely proves that is not the case with this book.

    • Cathleen says...

      Exactly right. It’s like saying that musicians who follow a score and perform in a symphony orchestra aren’t as “creative” as those who do improvisational jazz. Please!

    • Terra says...

      I’m so glad you said this, Calla! Thank you! I definitely have said some version of this before and had never considered that implication. I’ll think better of it in future because of you!

    • Raquel says...

      ha, I definitely consider myself a cook, not a baker, but not because of the ‘creativity’; instead I just suck at measuring ingredients…. :P

    • Jen says...

      I recommend a kitchen scale if you aren’t great at measuring ingredients. Has changed my baking game.

    • Sadie says...

      I just can’t handle that if I mess up a baked good I can’t adjust and fix it like I can while cooking.

    • suki says...

      How sad for people so creative that they cannot follow rules – they cannot drive or play board games or etc etc? I never knew how difficult life was for them. [off now to practice my tiny violin]

    • Katie says...

      Right. I’m a pretty good cook. I know how to improvise and I can save dinner when a recipe goes wrong. I’m not great at baking from scratch, even after reading a recipe several times through. It’s not about creativity. Vegetables and sauces are intuitive to me. Flour and sugar and temperature is not.

      Baking, I can make Rice Krispies, no knead bread and banana nut muffins. I fail at cakes and fruit bars\crumbles and brownies. I can’t make a good crust to save my life.

      As far as cooking, the one thing I consistently fail at is mashed potatoes.

      So whatever.