Relationships

Where to Donate to Support the Black Lives Matter Movement

holding hands

This week we’ll be taking a break from regular posting, and today, we’d like to encourage our readers to donate to support the Black Lives Matter movement. We will match readers’ donations up to $15,000 — all you have to do is make a donation to an organization supporting Black causes and forward your receipt, with subject line “donation,” to hello@cupofjo.com.

We will be donating here:

NAACP is a civil rights organization, founded in 1909, which is committed to political, educational, social and economic equality.

National Bail Fund Network is made up of over 60 community bail and bonds funds across the country, including the Minnesota Freedom Fund. It also includes a directory of protest bail funds, if you’d like to donate on the local level.

Know Your Rights Camp, started by Colin Kaepernick, has a mission to “advance the liberation of Black and Brown communities through education, self-empowerment, mobilization and the creation of new systems that elevate the next generation of change leaders.” Currently, the fund is also providing legal services for people in Minneapolis.

The Equal Justice Initiative works to end mass incarceration, excessive punishment and racial inequality in the United States. They provide legal representation to the most vulnerable people in American society, including prisoners who may have been wrongly convicted of crimes and prisoners who cannot afford effective representation.

Please join us in donating, if you’re able to. We’ll have more posts this week about listening to and amplifying Black voices, as well. Thank you so much for reading.

Update: Oh my gosh, readers donated $150,000 in less than a day, and we are adding our $15,000 for a total of $165,000 to organizations supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. Thank you so much, and let’s keep acting, giving, listening and learning.

P.S. 18 children’s books with characters of color.

(Photo by Simon/Stocksy.)

  1. PL says...

    These were wise words that I wanted to pass on:
    Just donated a good chunk of money to the ACLU. It felt like an uncomfortable amount of money until I sat with it for a bit. When I think of all the comforts my privilege has given me, it makes the donation feel really small. This is a good time to think about what you can really afford to give to amplify this wave. Think of a good number, try doubling it, and see what it feels like.

    • This is so kind of you 💕

  2. PL says...

    Since the donation matching has now been fulfilled, it would be AMAZING to link to other donation-matching sites, to really maximize your readerships impact!

  3. Jen says...

    Great! Thanks for encouraging us to donate – just did mine now!

  4. Mehwish says...

    Thank you for the resources.

  5. CH says...

    Just forwarded my receipt from ActBlue. Thanks for doing this!

  6. Heather says...

    WOW that is incredible! Thank you for using this platform as a way to inspire such generous giving!

  7. Jen says...

    I have been sick this week, so missed the matching deadline. But I am on the mend now, and wanted to thank you for your generosity. Today I have signed up for monthly donations to the NAACP, and in addition to contributing there, will be actively seeking ways to make my voice heard in the cause of education spending reform. So many public schools in my city (and cities everywhere, really) are either well-funded or shamefully underfunded. Since I feel very troubled by this particular root area of systemic racism, I need to take action and make my voice heard in ways other than voting.

  8. Lee says...

    I commit to doing more. Just donated.

  9. liz says...

    can any white people here share resources they think are useful to explaining to white family who “oppose police brutality” but don’t think it’s an issue that’ related in any way to race? I’m struggling to educate these people given that so much is not taught in schools and there’s really so much to explain and uncover — i’m about to start going through more comments so apologies if this has already been discussed

    • Anon says...

      The documentary 13th is a good place to start.
      Recent Code Switch podcast on “A Decade if Watching Black People Die.”
      Claudia Rankine, “The Condition of Black Life is One of Mourning,” published in the NYTimes in 2015, plus her Citizen: An American Lyric.
      James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time, especially his open letter to his nephew, “My Dungeon Shook”

      Just a short list! But hopefully a good beginning

    • liz says...

      thank you both! I know there’s a lot floating around, but it’s hard to engage folks who aren’t interested in learning more because they think they already know, let alone get them to read a book – sigh –

    • Kate says...

      Hi Liz! I’m in the same situation as you, and don’t have a perfect solution yet. One of the things I try to remember is that it will likely take many conversations over a long period of time, so it’s not about finding that one thing that will make them change their worldview overnight (because that one thing likely doesn’t exist).

      One of the things I have found helpful is talking about those implicit bias tests (I know Harvard has one, but I’m sure there are others). While my family generally ignored/shut down/argued against discussions of systemic oppression, they were actually receptive to discussing those tests. The way I talked about it with my family was that yes, police brutality affects many people, but when police are making split second decisions, they are more likely to see black people as a threat and pull the trigger.

      Obviously there is so much more to be discussed, but maybe talking about these tests can help open the door? For what it’s worth, my family didn’t actually take the test (nor would they watch/read any of those wonderful recommendations) but were still able to understand the idea. I think because it’s something easier to conceptualize and doesn’t rely on numbers or data, which I’ve found puts my family on the defensive. I would also love more tips about how to talk to white family members about these issues!

  10. Elle says...

    Since you posted “P.S. 18 children’s books with characters of color” at the bottom of this post about supporting black lives, I wanted to point out that it appears that only one of these is written by a black author (Full, Full, Full of Love). While it’s great to have diversity in books in general, black creators need to be supported in telling their own stories. Also great to link through bookshop.org to support local bookstores.

    I could be wrong because I am just going by what I can find online, but this is what your list looks like to me:

    The Bot that Scott built -white author

    Ada Twist, Scientist -white authors

    Lizard from the Park – white author

    One Family -white author

    Everywhere Babies – white author

    The Airport Book – white author

    I Hear a Pickle – white author

    The Snowy Day – white author

    Monster Trouble! – white author

    A Piece of Home – white author

    Please update this list to support black writers. Thank you!

    • Johanna says...

      Good call!

    • Rebecca says...

      An excellent reminder about the importance of #ownvoices in literature. Look for authors with expertise about the experiences that they write about. Avoid tokenism and cultural appropriation by white authors.

  11. Anne says...

    If people are looking for ideas/inspiration, I live in Minneapolis and over the last week I’ve donated to these groups. I’m more of a caller/letter writer/reader/donater-type person, so that’s what I’m focusing on right now.

    Reclaim the Block (Mpls based)
    Minneapolis Freedom Fund (Mpls based)
    Trio Go Fund Me (Mpls based, Black-owned restaurant)
    Take Action Minnesota (MN based)
    Lake St Council rebuilding fund (Mpls based)
    Act Blue (national)
    Northside Business Associations (Mpls based)
    ACLU (national…we’ve been donating monthly since Trump was elected)

  12. Just donated. Thank you for organizing this. Xo

  13. Emily Bailor says...

    First time commentator. Long, long time reader. THANK YOU for continuing this conversation; for posting resources and voices to listen to. I am a white woman married to a black man with two brown kids (a girl, 4 and a boy, 6). I love every single thing you write and post but lately have appreciated being a part of this community even more. Just wanted to express my gratitude and appreciation. We are all in this together. With love…

  14. Tiffany says...

    Hi Cup of Jo,
    I’d love to know what you’ll be doing to further the movement once you’ve met your match amount. How are you going to continue to support BLM once the protests are over?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      We have lots of plans, please stay tuned! (And much of it is also offline, too.)

    • Jasna says...

      I’ve been following Joanna and this blog since Toby was a baby and I can attest that she has already done so much for POC with her inclusive content. I am from Europe and I learned a lot about POC through this blog.

  15. Amy says...

    This is how you show up as an ally. Thanks Cup of Jo!

  16. Nadja says...

    Thank you. It sometimes feels like the small amounts my family can donate can’t possibly accomplish anything. Knowing that donations would be matched, and that lots of others are donating alongside us, made me feel hopeful.

  17. Hayley says...

    Thank you!

  18. Maya says...

    Thank you!!!

  19. Hanna says...

    Thanks cupofjo!

  20. KB says...

    This is great. Thank you! Also, donating directly to campaigns of Jaime Harrison ( running against Lindsey Graham in SC) and Dr. Jamaal Bowman (running against Elliot Engel in NY-16) would be an additional way to add support and (continue to) change the complexion of the senate and congress.

  21. Natasha says...

    Thank you. Donated direct to Minnesota bail fund.

  22. Stephanie Raines says...

    I donated locally to the Athens Anti-Discrimination Movement in Athens GA. Thanks CoJ for this post and this support.

  23. Lucy says...

    Thank you

  24. Erin says...

    Donated to Southern Poverty Law Center. Super glad to see Cup of Jo readers are putting their money where their mouths are.

  25. Mali says...

    I would like to understand why you are dedicating a whole week to this cause, but when a shooter entered a synagogue in Pittsburgh and killed eleven people praying and wounded six others, there wasn’t a word here, at least not that was obvious enough to be seen by me. And when there was a shooting at a kosher grocery store in Jersey City in December, in which five people were killed, you were silent? And a shooting in Poway, California, at another synagogue, and an attack in which a man with a machete entered a private home and attacked people at a Chanukah party… all within about a year… you had nothing to say? Not even a line?
    There is deplorable, raging racism of all kinds, all over the world right now, and it must be stopped, but it’s only trendy to stick up for this one. #AllLivesMatter Please pay attention to ALL forms of hatred. Your silence on anti-Semitism speaks louder than words.

    • Eliza says...

      Hi Mali, I can’t speak for CoJ and the team, but I’m in Canada and never heard of any of those awful things on social media or news media! Those are horrific and anti-Semitism is disgusting and I wish they had been televised and hashtagged; I follow a handful of people who are religiously or ethnically(?sorry if that’s not the correct term?) Jewish and American and didn’t hear about it. I know that anti-Semitism has also been increasing in North America and it’s extremely disturbing; it feels like we’re going backwards- often the same groups that are anti-Semitic are also anti-Black (and anti-most-people-in-the-world). I’m not sure if “trendy” is the right word to use for fighting anti-Black racism though. This is literally trending on media and it’s gained a lot of attention nationally and internationally and the Black Lives Matter movement is currently having a long overdue recognition is probably why CoJ is trying to use their platform for a current event. I hope first and foremost that there is no tragedy in the Jewish community going forward, but secondly that if there is it receives the attention it rightly deserves. I also hope that the perpetrators of those attacks have been brought to justice – which is a big part of what the current movement is about: police officers being the ones who perpetrate the violence and attacks on Black bodies and almost never being brought to justice.

    • JJ says...

      As a Jewish woman, I’m here to tell you that this ain’t it.

      We are not here to play the oppression olympics. Our fights for liberation and justice walk hand in hand. Jews have a deep commitment to Tikkun Olam and right now that means BLACK LIVES MATTER.

      And, also, let me blow your mind here: Black Jews exist.

      Shalom.

    • Sara says...

      Mali, I think it’s clear by now that wokeness rarely, if ever, extends to fighting anti-Semitism. I have yet to see this site take a proactive stance in support of the Jewish community.

      Of course Black lives matter. Jews have been fighting alongside the Black community for civil rights since the earliest days of the movement. I’d also love to see Mali’s points addressed by the CoJ team, if not now, then in the near future.

    • Erin Schaaf says...

      Mali,

      Violence against “all lives” does happen but it is already rightfully abhorred in society, government, and justice system.

      The discrimination, violence, and murder perpetrated against Black people is different and frequent, so it needs more attention right now. This is because the very systems that are supposed to protect people are perpetrating the crimes. And when crimes are committed against the victims, the victims are blamed and justice almost never occurs.

      That is the difference. and that is why.

    • S. says...

      Another Jewish woman here. Mali, I understand your frustration with the lack of acknowledgement of those events, I’ve noticed that too. But while anti-Semitism and anti-Jewish violence are real and terrifying, it’s extremely important to acknowledge that (especially) in the American context it is NOWHERE near the scale of anti-Black violence. Saying that Black lives matter does not mean that Jewish lives, or the lives of other minorities, don’t matter. Instead it’s an acknowledgement of the depth and breadth of persistent anti-Black racism – stemming from a long history of slavery and Jim Crow – that systematically disenfranchises, incarcerates, and kills Black folks in America.

      I echo JJ’s connection to tikkun olam, though I would say that tikkun olam has always been inherently and inextricably linked with civil rights and racial justice. I would also encourage you to educate yourself about intersectionality, and specifically about the racism that Black Jews (and other Jews of Colour) experience, both within our own communities and in wider society

    • Tasha says...

      Mali – You didn’t care enough to bring up these issues you pretend to care about because you needed to take this opportunity to be anti-black and detract from our movement. Black folks aren’t your mules. All Lives do NOT matter and that hashtag is vile.

    • Elle says...

      The reason this is different is because the murders of black people are happening at the hands of police officers who are paid by the people and are supposed to be protecting the people. Of course shootings of any kind need to be stopped and we need to fight anti-Semitism. The reason people are rioting and protesting now and not when an attack happens in a synagogue is that when the police are the killers there is no way for black people to get justice because the justice system is creating the problem.

    • Sara says...

      Tasha, just to clarify – which lives don’t matter?

    • Lisa says...

      Another Jewish mom your I understand your frustration. I’m in the UK and we have had anti-semitic incidents here, a whole thing with the main opposition party covering up anti-semitism in their party, and deafening silence from non-Jewish friends every time there’s an incident like Squirrel Hill or Poway, while I swallow my fear as my husband / children head off to synagogue. Also, it often feels inevitable that movements like BLM get infiltrated by anti-semitic people and it turns into a whole other thing.

      But, this is a huge moment and opportunity for the black community to actually have some kind of breakthrough, and they need us to stand by their sides like so many Jews did during the Civil Rights movement. It’s a chance for us to listen and understand, to look at ourselves and our own prejudices / assumptions.

      Chief Rabbi Mirvis puts it way better than I ever could:
      “The rallying cry ‘Black Lives Matter’ should be understood as more than a powerful slogan. It is a call for rehumanisation in a world that seems in danger of forsaking its humanity.
      While the shocking and tragic murder of George Floyd and the resulting protests across the world are currently making the headlines, the racism and dehumanisation that they have exposed is not new. We cannot stand idly by as it takes hold of our societies. However, it is also not enough for us to simply join in with a superficial chorus of disapproval. Real change calls upon us to find the courage to challenge racism wherever we come across it: on social media, in the streets, in our communities and in our hearts.
      The world remains in the grip of the most devastating global pandemic in memory, a tragedy which should have placed all of humankind on the same side as we face a common foe. Now more than ever, we must recognise that we are all part of one global family within which all people are created in the image of God, whoever they might be.
      Jewish tradition teaches that one who saves a life has saved an entire world and one who destroys a life has destroyed an entire world. Such is the value we must place on each and every human life. That ‘Black Lives Matter’ needs affirming at all is utterly shameful. There is no doubt that this is an essential wake up call for each and every one of us.”

    • Nora Coleman says...

      Mali, I am a white, Jewish woman and I think your comment goes against every single tenet of Judaism that I’ve ever been taught. You MUST educate yourself to understand the difference between anti-semitism and systemic racism against black people. No police officer can tell that you are Jewish simply by looking at the color of your skin, and even if they could, they wouldn’t be more likely to kill you because of it. You MUST learn not to focus only on your own suffering, but to appreciate that others are suffering too and heal yourself through compassion for and support of them. Your comment allows for the perpetuation of racial Jewish stereotypes. You are doing harm to the very movement you’re trying to support. Please stop.

  26. Justine says...

    Thank you Cup of Jo for matching donations and highlighting these important organizations.

  27. Monica says...

    Thank you, CoJ team. Have been donating and will continue to donate.

  28. Souma says...

    Thank you for doing this – team! I really really appreciate the effort to bring our CoJ community together for action.

    Here’s something I’d love to see – because we need to do more about black Lives than talk about Black Deaths. It’s about the daily discrimination and exclusion from the hetero white majority narrative.

    What if CoJ did an audit of their own content – out of your “house tours” how many have been featuring people of color/lgbtq+/intersectional families? Same with beauty uniforms, authors linked, books reviewed, and other posts – if we take a look at the current status of diversity(maybe you have) present in the content of this blog, I think it can propel the team to pledge for more inclusion moving forward knowing where you stand now. When our biases are implicit, the majority of content is white-centric, change HAS to be made by examining our platforms and actively seeing where we can do better. For when media stops talking about George Floyd – we need to still see and value melanin.

    • sarah says...

      Hi! You make a good point. I just wanted to say that I’ve been reading Cup of Jo for 10 years, and for the last few years (really since the BLM movement started) the site has been WAY more inclusive than it was in the past — I would say half (or more) of their beauty uniforms/week of outfits/home design posts are interviewing POC, and also women of all sizes. There are also POC on the Cup of Jo team contributing. This is one of the reasons I love this site. I’m a white woman and I CANNOT STAND seeing only white women in blogs/social media and will immediately unfollow if that’s the case. I’m sure the team is working on trying to do more going forward, and they’re always open to learning and taking suggestions from their community of readers.

    • Lydia says...

      I love this idea. I did something similar yesterday with my social media accounts. It was less of a formal audit going through all the accounts I follow, but I did a quick skim and estimated that about 80-90% of the accounts I follow are run by white people. It was an important realization for me and I’ve spent a lot of time since then finding great accounts run by Black women and discovering a lot of good content I’ve been missing out on.

    • Souma says...

      Sarah – I totally agree with you. CoJ has made great strides (ive also been following them for years). I mean this suggestion in the most gracious and hopeful way that it will be well received. I just want us to be able to really look at the numbers and set big big goals. Yes – it is great that we have one POC contributor on this site, but why not 2? Yes – it is great if 20% of the posts are with POCs – but why not double or triple that? And where is it that POCs are getting exposure, and where can they be doing better? (e.g. can they feature more recipes/chefs/authors who are POC, if they are meeting the mark on beauty uniforms?) I would just really respect that kind of transparency and commitment to sustained efforts from this team.

  29. Jess says...

    I donated yesterday to a nonprofit you mentioned last week- Black Mamas Matter (https://blackmamasmatter.org/). Thank you for the suggestion and for highlighting such an important cause.

  30. Tori J says...

    Lovely. Thank you COJ!

  31. Kate says...

    I had a job where I had to order lots of stuff from Amazon. It’s evil, I know, but there really was no alternative for this particular company. Anyway, I had my own login to the business account, so I set up the Amazon Smile thing and had it donate to the NAACP of my home state. So without my company even knowing, every time I ordered anything I was also making a donation to the NAACP. It didn’t take long for that 0.5% to turn into a few hundred dollars!
    Again, I KNOW Amazon is awful, but It was literally the easiest way to move a few bucks to the NAACP. I’d encourage anyone else who has to use Amazon to do the same!

    • kb says...

      agree, ever since the Nov 2016 election I have used Amazon Smile to donate to ACLU. I am trying to not buy anything from Amazon anymore because of their policies ( likewise deleted facebook account yesterday) but in the meantime, at least a portion is going to cause.

  32. Tori J says...

    Lovely. Thank you COJ

  33. A Rose says...

    Donated to all. Thank you for being an important voice for advocacy.

  34. miranda says...

    Wondering… why are you ladies not posting? It would be really wonderful to have a conversation on:
    – white privilege – how does it manifest?
    – what it’s like parenting a black child in a country where so many black young people end up suffering an unjust system
    – interracial couples – when you go into a relationship with someone KNOWING your life is suddenly 10x more complicated because of race
    – black-owned creative businesses (bonus points if owners are black women)

    While I respect your incredible generosity to match donations, I think it’s the very teeny tiny tip of the ice berg. It seems like contributing via a a check: it gets people like Obama elected, but doesn’t get any interesting laws passed because democracy requires PRESENCE and PUBLIC DISCOURSE. You have built an incredible public platform with this blog. Why not use it to add to the conversation? You don’t need to be black to speak out about structural inequality.

    • Joana says...

      My thoughts exactly. Why stop posting? You have a gigantic audience. Give a voice to the people who need to be heard.

    • Laura says...

      From what I understand, it was encouraged for white-passing people to be “muted” this week and instead, to “amplify melanated voices.” Maybe what would be a helpful is a resource of whose voice to listen to.

      Brittany Packnett Cunningham (@mspackyetti on IG) has an informing IGTV video on the blackout of content, particularly yesterday’s. I’ve also learned of the importance of letting your stance be known from Chrissy Rutherford (@chrissyford).

      ALSO! Guys! Just Mercy is available to rent for free this month! Here is a link to that: http://www.justmercyfilm.com. If you’d like to contribute to the cause of the movie, the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) would be the organization to donate to.

    • Heather says...

      Respectfully, Joanna said they were taking a break from “regular posts” and that they would “have more posts this week about listening to and amplifying Black voices, as well.” Your comment feels overly critical considering this site just raised over $150, 000 in one day to support these wonderful organizations. Money does matter, and Joanna has consistently used this space to speak out about inequality in its many forms as well.

  35. Stephanie R says...

    Yes!!! Forwarded my receipt yesterday!!

  36. Elizabeth says...

    In addition to bail funds that have been getting a lot of attention lately (good!) and the big-name national organizations that always get a lot of attention, I’d like to suggest a donation to your local mutual aid fund that is providing direct resources/services to communities. ACLU might argue a case before the Supreme Court, but community funds have a direct and tangible effect on people’s lives.

    Here in NY, for example, Equality for Flatbush is a grassroots, underfunded, Black-led group that has *been* resisting policing and has created an expansive mutual aid network.
    http://www.equalityforflatbush.org/
    Or South Brooklyn Mutual Aid, which has been feeding mostly immigrant & undocumented families during covid:
    https://ioby.org/project/south-brooklyn-mutual-aid
    Or the short-term Disability Justice Mutual Aid Fund for disabled organizers who are working on Black liberation protests, details here: https://twitter.com/sheabutterfemme/status/1268141805092118530

    If you do some research you can find others in your neighborhoods. Take a moment to learn about the community-oriented work they are doing, both related to policing and not, and why it matters.

    Fiiiiiiinally, and this is not exactly donations related, but maybe do some research on why organizers are calling for defunding the police, if you do not understand why something that seems so drastic is being called for. There’s a lot of good writing already out there from people more knowledgeable and experienced than me. NYPD is the largest police force in the nation and Bloomberg once bragged that it’s the 7th biggest army in the world. Their budget of $6 billion is larger than the operating budgets of many large American cities. Think about all the military-grade gear and weapons you have been seeing compared to doctors and nurses who were forced to wear garbage bags as PPE.

    • Elizabeth says...

      Had to circle back around because no one here has said it yet — it is PRIDE MONTH and Black Lives Matter means Black Trans Lives Matter, this month and always. I don’t know how many have seen the widely circulating video of a Black Trans woman getting beaten up by a large group of men in MN just this weekend. I won’t link to it, it is horrible. It is a reminder of the violence that Black Trans women, especially, are faced with every day, regardless of the presence of police. If you are non-Black or cis, do not invoke the names of Nina Pop or Tony McDade this month if you are not doing something concrete in support of Black Trans folks. Here are suggestions w info in the links.

      The Black Trans Protesters Emergency Fund (for resources like medical care and bail): https://twitter.com/BTFAcollective/status/1268285637439913988
      The For The Gworls Medical Fund (rent and affirmative surgery):
      https://twitter.com/4THEGWORLS/status/1268222225053876231
      The Okra Project, link in their description (contribute to the Nina Pop Mental Health Recovery Fund and the Tony McDade Mental Health Recovery Fund):
      https://twitter.com/TheOkraProject

      Happy Pride! Remember, Stonewall began as riots too.

  37. Clare says...

    How sad how many comments free giveaways get compared to this. Lots of silent readers on here all of a sudden. Their silence speaks volumes.

    • Christina says...

      Considering how much is raised already, I guess not all who donated wrote a comment too. Some write a comment only when they have something to say that isn’t already said multiple times. It mustn’t mean more than that.

    • Tori J says...

      I’d like to kindly suggest reframing this. The giveaways command a comment; many posts request sharing experiences, quotes, recommendations and more in the comments. My action of forwarding COJ my receipt required no comment on this post, and the $150,000 of receipts forwarded in less than a day in fact show how active and supportive this community is! <3

    • B says...

      I agree with the other commenters and I think that it’s important to step back and make space for the narrative of those whose voices are routinely marginalized and whom are directly and disproportionately affected by institutionalized discrimination in our country. For me personally, posting regarding my donation felt like coopting the post to demonstrate allyship rather than standing with those who are already leading the movement for equality.

    • Taylor says...

      I didn’t comment (until I saw your comment), but I emailed two different donation receipts to be matched yesterday. In this post she calls for e-mailed receipts to be matched. The giveaways are probably funded by demonstrable reader engagement, so comments are a clear way for Jo to prove her value to the people providing swag.

      Posting a comment telling Jo “thanks!” feels unnecessary and performative, and your comment is an apples-to-oranges bad faith criticism that does nothing to promote awareness or action.

  38. celeste says...

    Donated to Know Your Rights Camp. Thanks for the resources.

  39. TNelly says...

    We love to see it!!! Thank you Cup of Jo for spreading awareness. We all can’t be on the frontlines but we can use our platforms and reach in our wallets. Big Hugs from Pennsylvania (muah muah muah!)

  40. Stella says...

    Thank you for the list as it prompted me to donate.

  41. Natalie says...

    Just made a donation to NAACP…so thrilled to see how far you have exceeded your matching goal! XO

  42. M.E. says...

    Thank you for matching reader donations!

  43. P says...

    Long time reader. first time commenter.

    I assume the matching goal hasn’t been met yet since I don’t see any indication otherwise. A HUGE thank you to the COJ team for doing this, and I hope everyone is giving whatever then can!

    I’ve been feeling very helpless recently and my cash flow is pretty low due to being furloughed for the last month+, but knowing my small donations to Black Mamas Matter, Know Your Rights Camp, and my local BLM Legal Support Fund will be matched brings a bit of joy to these dark times.

  44. LG says...

    Thank you! <3 <3 <3

  45. Kalani says...

    Even though the matching funds were gone by the time I made my donation, this motivated me to make a donation to the Equal Justice Initiative.

  46. El says...

    Thank you for doing this!!! I love this community.

  47. Sarah says...

    COJ team or others: do we know of other places/ celebrities/ orgs matching donations?

    • K says...

      Yes! Scroll down in the comments for a spreadsheet listing other folks who are matching donations!

  48. Nancy Chen says...

    Thank you for doing this and always producing inclusive content for readers!!!

  49. Hannah says...

    Thank you for mobilizing this huge contribution, COJ team! I appreciate seeing this blog do work and grow.

  50. Caitlin says...

    Yes! I emailed my receipt. Thank you for doing this Joanna.

  51. Liz says...

    Please cup of jo readers, make this happen! I’m a little disappointed at the few number of comments on this post. Let’s act now. Even if you can only donate $10, please donate! Let’s reach those 15000 quickly!

    • Clare says...

      Agreed, very low compared to if they get a chance at a free piece of clothing.

    • AG says...

      I donated and forwarded my receipt, but I didn’t leave a comment here. But now I’m realizing I should have commented, too!

      I’m sure there are others who did the same. :)

  52. Shannon Torphy says...

    Thank you!

  53. Amy says...

    I donated to the Northside Achievement Zone (NAZ) based in Minneapolis. (northsideachievement.org) and pledged monthly to the Southern Poverty Law Center, both of which I did before seeing this post.

  54. jill d. says...

    thank you – i donated…again and will continue to do so….

    thank you – thank you – thank you.

  55. Elana says...

    This is truly wonderful to see. Thank you for inspiring us with your clear demonstration that Black Lives Matter to the CoJ team.

    Will there be an update once you’ve reached the match limit?

  56. C says...

    Thank you for using this space to provide resources, encouraging to see that all the work of educating white people does not have to fall on the shoulders of the BIPOC community.

  57. KG says...

    Thanks so much for doing this. I donated to the Connecticut Bail Fund, which I had never heard of before, so thanks for alerting me to that too (through the National Bail Information Network).

  58. Mayu says...

    Thank you so much for doing this!!! I just donated to NAACP and Know Your Rights Camp.

  59. Csilla says...

    Thank you <3

  60. marylouise says...

    Thanks for putting this together. I’ve sent a receipt so thank you again!

  61. Nicole says...

    Thank you! I donated to 100 Black Men.

    I also donated to LAist because of their local political coverage. I plan on arming myself with a lot of information so I can vote responsibly.

    Other places on my list: Black Girls Code and Alvin Alley Dance Theater

    • Jess says...

      Thank you for posting about Black Girls Code. I just checked them out on your recommendation and donated as well. As a female web developer, I know how hard it is in this industry for women. I can’t imagine the difficulties for women of color.

  62. Jules says...

    Done. And Thank you.

  63. Sarah says...

    Thank you! Just sent a receipt (and shared with my IG followers that you are matching donations).

  64. Jenna says...

    Are you matching NAACP Legal Defense Fund donations as well? Or just NAACP? :)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      We are matching donations to any organizations that support Black causes.

  65. Alice says...

    This is wonderful- thank you so much, Joanna and team.
    I’d also like to recommend a couple of organisations here in the UK, if that’s okay? I absolutely do not want to take away from everything that everyone is doing to support the US at the moment- the fight in the US is front and centre in our minds too. But in case any UK readers are looking for additional places to support this side of the pond, the following are great causes:
    1. The Stephen Lawrence Trust: https://www.stephenlawrence.org.uk/support-us/donate/
    2. Runnymede Trust: https://www.runnymedetrust.org/support-us/donations.html
    3. Show Racism the Red Card: https://www.justgiving.com/theredcard
    4. Stop Hate UK: https://www.stophateuk.org/donate-to-stop-hate-uk/
    5. Race Equality First: http://raceequalityfirst.org/about-race-equality-first/

    Again- I don’t want to detract from the amazing US resources you’re sharing, I just wanted to share these in addition :) I hope that’s alright.

    • Lisa says...

      Thank you!
      I’m in the U.K. and to be honest, not even going to colonising half the world, the U.K. doesn’t have a great record in relation the BAME (like deporting people back to the Caribbean who were here perfectly legally). Some U.K. books include girl, woman, other, zadie smith’s white teeth and swing time if you want an insight into the black British experience (and if anyone has other suggestions / recommendations I’m all ears)

  66. Alexa says...

    YES! Thank you, Cup of Jo team! Just forwarded mine for the Equal Justice Initiative.

  67. Claire says...

    Hi guys, do you have any info about how to donate from the UK? thanks!

  68. Agnès says...

    I am proud to be one of your reader. On saturday we will be sitting in front of the american ambassy here in Paris.

  69. Amira says...

    Long time reader of yours Joanna, and I think it’s so great that you are involved in these issues, especially with the wide platform you have. I would also hope that going forward this thinking would play out in your blog (and other popular blogs!) by having regular pieces contributed by writers, modelled by, or about businesses owned by citizens of colour, from all over the world, without pointing out this fact. I like to think that this would go a long way in making it clear that people from all backgrounds and cultures are equal and deserve a voice unequivocally.

    • Michelle says...

      agreed 100%

  70. Erin says...

    Thank you! Donated and sent receipt.

  71. Rachel says...

    Pardon my French but FUCK YES CUP OF JO.
    Thank you for using your platform. I hope this continues to be part of the information you share.
    Donation receipt coming your way.

  72. Michaela says...

    Incredible! Your article has helped me so much in deciding who to donate too, and knowing its matched is an incredible bonus, thank you so much.

  73. Rachel says...

    Thank you for using your platform in this way.

  74. Mc says...

    Thank you for using your platform and privilege in such a tangible way.

  75. Liz says...

    This is incredible Joanna. ❤️ xoxo

  76. Katherine W says...

    Thank you for speaking out and matching funds. I’ve sent in my receipt supporting National Bailout. I’ve been reading Cup of Jo for over a decade, and content like this is the reason why. Thank you.

  77. Natalie says...

    Done, and thank you

  78. Corey says...

    Thank you! When you resume blogging, I’d love to see a post on Black-owned businesses to support in the areas featured in CoJ’s header – style, design, food, etc. I’m researching myself but it would be awesome to have an aggregated list from you awesome people.

  79. Kate says...

    Good move CoJ. Money matters.

  80. Claire says...

    Thank you so much for doing this. i just donated to the Equal Justice Initiative. <3

  81. Kirsten says...

    Thank you!

  82. Rebecca says...

    Thank you for encouraging your readers to put money behind all of the thoughts and prayers. It is just one way we can actually do something in support of this fight. I recommend to any Greensboro readers or others with an NCCJ chapter to donate to their organization. They specifically aim to reach youth in these topics who will hopefully lead the way to fix the wrongs that my generation has failed to do.

  83. Hilary says...

    This is the only “lifestyle” blog where this post doesn’t feel performative, incongruous, and stumbling. You have been working on these issues in a real and substantive way for years. Thank you for amplifying diverse voices both now and always.

  84. Laura says...

    thank you for doing this. receipts just sent over. <3

  85. Faith says...

    Thank you for doing this! I just donated and forwarded you the receipts. xo

    • K says...

      Wow, this is a great resource! Thank you for sharing :)

    • ZB says...

      It looks the cap has been reached. Hopefully you will be notified of this comment.

  86. Jess says...

    I just donated to a local organization that is helping out local stores that were hit by the riots. My heart goes out to the middle class working/tax paying individuals and families whose businesses were close-to-destroyed by these people. I wonder if they will ever be able to recover. I can’t imagine the years of hard work that were simply overturned in one evening. I’m so happy CoJ exists only on the internet, I can’t imagine what would’ve happen if they had a storefront in Brooklyn!

  87. Emily Pizano says...

    Thank you for doing this ! Can u let us know when the 15000 is reached ?

  88. Rachel says...

    Donated and thank you so much for doing this. Just sent two receipts along now.

  89. Melanie Bell says...

    Fantastic! Thank you : )

  90. Chivonne Harrigal says...

    Thank you. I am donating and sending receipts. Black Lives Matter.

  91. nandini says...

    Thank you Jo, I donated to Equal Justice Initiative. I admire their mission to work for a more equal and just present and future, while collecting the memory of the past.

  92. PJ says...

    Thank you! I donated to a local bail fund focused on people with immigration arrests.

  93. Miriah E. says...

    Done!

  94. Wendela says...

    Thank you for using your influence in this way. I respect and admire you for doing more than just saying something thoughtful (though all your posts about race have been welcome and appreciated around here). Thank you.

  95. Daniela says...

    Thank you for this.

  96. Brianna says...

    Donated to EJI and just sent you my receipt—thank you!

    • Virginia says...

      This is nice.
      But, am also interested in how we can support the hundreds of small businesses that have had their livelihoods burned to the ground senselessly and might not have any or enough insurance to rebuild and rebound due to recent events. Thank you.

    • melissa habegger says...

      This is @Virginia – here’s a great org raising money for small businesses in Oakland, California. The great news is, this small business alliance stands in solidarity with the protestors (and in many cases, are out there themselves).

      http://www.oaklandindiealliance.com/repair

  97. Tovah says...

    Thank you for using your platform and money to amplify this cause. I’ve donated to the Black Lives Matter org, and my family regularly supports the Southern Poverty Law Center. I will add the above causes to my list!

  98. Lindsey says...

    Yes! Thank you for matching donations. I’m thrilled EJI is on your list. Just sent my receipt.

    • Ramya says...

      Thank you so much for your action. I donated to three of the organizations on your list and sent you the receipts.

  99. Lindsay says...

    Two receipts just sent – thank you for doing this!

  100. AE says...

    So many bloggers and magazines have put up random blurbs about being anti-racist. This is one of the first I’ve seen put it’s money where it’s mouth is. You’re a treasure,
    CoJ. Donated and emailed. Thank you for being… real.

  101. Sara says...

    Thank you! I have and will continue to donate, and I’ll make sure to send this post to everyone I know! You guys are awesome

  102. Martha says...

    Thank you COJ team. I’ve just e-mailed you my receipt, and am now sending you LOVE.

  103. Thank you for doing this. I sent over some receipts.

    • Kate says...

      I appreciate you, Joanna. You came out earlier than most white bloggers, tackling these tough issues with thoughtfulness and real humility.
      Please don’t let this post turn into a bunch of white people feeling satisfied with themselves, regaling each other with their moral/financial superiority. There is already enough of that in this world, and that is not what this whole thing is about. The sooner white people learn to stop centering themselves, the sooner this whole system will start to turn around.
      Can we all just commit to each other that we’re going to DO THE WORK of breaking down these systemic issues of racism, starting with our own experiences, every day? No one on social media even has to know that you’re doing it, but it will mean something to someone out there whose life you’ve touched.

    • Nerissa says...

      Thank you for this comment, Kate. I would also like to add that as a black woman I would very much appreciate it if white people remember that they can also make an impact in their daily lives. Choosing to amplify the voices of their black colleagues, choosing to pay and credit black artists and writers fairly, and becoming more aware of the ways their implicit bias shows up in their everyday interactions.

      So much of what I am witnessing online this week makes it seem like people still think racism is something somewhere far away being done by someone else.

  104. Eliza says...

    Sent two receipts from two different donations (NAACP and NAACP-LDF) but I didn’t send it with the “donation” subject line the first time so i re-forwarded both properly! Hopefully that helps :)

  105. Sharon says...

    Thank you…I had made 2 donations already and forwarded them to you. I so appreciate this.

  106. Lauren E. says...

    Wow, this is fantastic. Thank you.

  107. K says...

    Thank you!

  108. Jodi says...

    Thank you for the encouragement and shift of focus this week, and for your unwavering support of racial injustice.

  109. Tara says...

    I donated to Black Lives Matter and Black Visions (based out of Minneapolis) on Sunday. I’m not sure that you’ll still match them, but I figured I would forward my receipts just in case. Thank you, thank you for your continued commitment to racial justice and protecting black lives.

  110. Candace says...

    Thanks so much for this generosity, CupofJo. Donation to Outdoor Afro (https://outdoorafro.com/) forwarded and I’m spreading the word. xo

    • Ash says...

      EJI is one of my favorite orgs, and in addition to Just Mercy please consider reading The Sun Does Shine—penned by one of their former clients who was wrongfully incarcerated on death row for some 30 years.

      CoJ team, thank you for pausing regular content and for the matching challenge, bravo.

  111. Sasha L says...

    THANK YOU ♥️

  112. Courtney says...

    Thank you. Just sent you my receipt. I previously never made purchases through affiliate links, but knowing that you are using your platform in a positive way has changed my mind and I will start clicking through.

  113. Clare says...

    Good on you & thank you!

  114. Thyme says...

    Hello fellow CoJ friends! I want to share that this is a great way to help the protests that are happening right now if you’re tight on money! This video donates 100% of its ad revenue to bail funds. All you have to do is skip through each ad points and let the ads play or let the whole video play through while you’re working on your computer (you can turn the volume to very low, but not muted!).
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCgLa25fDHM&t=14s

    • Ali says...

      Thankyou for this Thyme!

  115. Julia says...

    My employer is matching donations by 200% this week to charities that support the Black Lives Matter Movement. Please check with your employer, too!

    • Lauren says...

      Excellent point, Julia! I’m usually glad to be a freelancer, but I do miss how my old office would match charitable donations.

  116. Valerie Folz says...

    Thank you Cup of Jo! I donated again today because of you.

  117. EJ says...

    THANK YOU Cup of Jo team. Thank you thank you thank you. Putting your money where your mouth is has never been so important. I’m proud to be a regular reader of such a positive, action-oriented site.

  118. Lia says...

    Just want to say thank you, always, for being so amazing at what you all do. Your efforts to diversify your team and your perspectives and to provide gentle but persistent education and exposure on important but sensitive issues to your readership is MUCH appreciated. Thanks for doing the right thing, always.

  119. Emily says...

    Matching campaign- amazing!! This is very inspiring. CoJ puts their money where their mouth is!!

  120. Mary says...

    Thank you!

  121. Claire says...

    Thank you for matching donations <3

  122. Dawn says...

    I donated yesterday to the Southern Poverty Law Center – an organization dedicated to eradicating hate of all kinds. Thanks for asking people to contribute to all these good causes.

  123. Andrea says...

    This is amazing.
    Also just throwing it out there- I live in the Twin Cities and am going to make a trip this Saturday (12 pm central time) to donate baby and ladies’ supplies to the North Minneapolis community. If anyone would like to donate necessities in this tangible way, my instagram is @andreamrozek and my Venmo is @Andrea-Mrozek. Let me know. :) I will send receipts.

  124. Daphne Phillips says...

    Thank you. Donated.

  125. Kath says...

    Wow, CoJ team! thank you for the recommendations and for matching donations!!

  126. G.b. says...

    Sent you my receipt for my donation to NAACP, thank you for using your platform this way! Black Lives Matter.

  127. Cathie says...

    Donated $50 to Equal Justice Initiative. Thank you for using your platform for this critical work.

  128. Chiara says...

    WOW, CupofJo, so so cool. Thank you for matching donations, I will definitely take you up on this.

  129. Loren says...

    May I also suggest making a contribution to The Committee to Protect Journalists? I have been sending money their way every now and again and I donated just now in honor of Linda Tirado, the freelance photo journalist who was shot in the eye by the police in Minneapolis a few days ago. https://cpj.org

  130. Rachel says...

    Thank you so much for using your platform and resources to encourage your readers to be the change. I was looking for specific organizations to support, and this post appeared! With matching! My receipt is in your inbox :)

  131. Ilana says...

    This is amazing! I donated to the ACLU and Fair Fight 2020 earlier today and forwarded my receipts to y’all as soon as I saw this. Not the organizations you mentioned, but I hope my donations can be doubled anyway :)

  132. Sandra says...

    I literally just logged onto CoJ to check for recommended charities and this post was sitting front and center! This site is one of my favorite things – thank you for always being relevant and providing great resources!

  133. Lea says...

    Bravo, Cup of Jo.

  134. Lauren B says...

    Thank you. <3

    To anyone looking to support Texas, may I suggest the following two organizations:
    * Faith in Texas – https://faithintx.org/ (they also have the bail fund for Dallas. Donations to the Luke 4:18 Bail Fund are separate)
    * Texas Civil Rights Project – https://txcivilrights.org/

  135. SG says...

    Sweeping Trump and his allies out of power in November seems like an incredibly powerful way to support Black causes.

    Is there an organization that would forward this goal, and also meet your criteria for matching donations?

    • Courtney says...

      Hi SG, I donated to Fair Fight, founded by Stacey Abrams. My understanding of COJ’s post was they would match donations “to an organization supporting Black causes” ~ and fighting voter suppression is definitely a black cause.

      From the site:
      “We promote fair elections in Georgia and around the country, encourage voter participation in elections, and educate voters about elections and their voting rights. Fair Fight brings awareness to the public on election reform, advocates for election reform at all levels, and engages in other voter education programs and communications.”

    • Kathryn says...

      Last week another reader suggested https://www.higherheightsforamerica.org/ , and I donated there. Their missions is to be the political home of black women, through supporting candidates, creating agendas and helping to register voters.

    • SG says...

      Thanks for your suggestions, Courtney and Kathryn! I’ve made my donation and forwarded the receipt on to the Cup of Jo team.

  136. Shannon McQuilkin says...

    Hi Jo,
    I just donated $100 to NAACP, but there was nowhere to put hello@cupofjo.com

    I’m thinking that you will reach $15,000 anyway with your wonderful followers. Thank you for focusing on this right now.

    • Caroline Donofrio says...

      Hi Shannon,
      Not to worry, we’ve logged your donation on our end. Thank you so much for donating.

    • Shannon McQuilkin says...

      WONDERFUL! Thank you for doing this. Bravo.

  137. Alice Tavoukjian says...

    Thank you for your thoughtful posts. Cup of Jo has always been a safe place to share ideas and discuss important topics.

  138. Brittany says...

    I live in South Minneapolis (about 20 blocks away from the 3rd precinct) and, suffice it to say, the fear I have felt this past week with the riots, fires, and violence against peaceful protesters is NOTHING compared to the fear (and every other imaginable – and unimaginable – emotion) that PoC have felt for so incredibly long. It’s an honor to call this city home and bear witness to the remarkable way people are using their voices, bodies, time, energy, resources, and pain to continue to fight for a world where PoC matter.

    Jo and team — thank you for also being a place that amplifies the message that PoC matter. You continue to be a light in what feels like an ever-darkening world some days.

  139. Pamela says...

    Thank you for using your forum to encourage your readers to take action. I have been wondering where to donate and appreciate these suggestions!

  140. BD says...

    CupofJo team, your blog feels like a refuge. Thank you so, so much for your delicate yet powerful work during this period of crisis. Your humanity is truly inspiring. Donating now.

  141. Chiara says...

    Thanks for matching donations! I donated $100 to a bail fund in my state (VA) and $100 to Reclaim the Block in Minnesota, another great organization recommended by the MN Freedom Fund.

  142. Ashley says...

    CoJ has long been my favorite place on the internet. Thanks for foregoing regularly scheduled programming this week and looking forward to hearing from Black voices in this space.

    • Courtney says...

      I want to echo this x100! Thanks for being supportive, CoJ!

  143. Holly says...

    Does anyone know of legislative/public policy organizations working at either a national or local level to advocate for changing the way police departments discipline their own? The fact that Derek Chauvin had something like 18 complaints against him–a tragically common story–tells me that we need to put some attention on how police departments are handling discipline.

    • Jackie says...

      Hi Holly-
      I had the same concerns and donated to Campaign Zero today. This organization works to support a variety of initiatives like you describe, such as research to identify & raise awareness of policy solutions to end police violence, assistance and capacity for local organizers leading police accountability campaigns, promoting body cam usage & safe-police training.

      Hope this helps!

    • Tricia says...

      Hi, Holly,
      I’d also recommend listening to The Daily (NYT podcast) today on the topic of policing the police.

    • Deanna says...

      Hi Holly! Residents of NYS can call their legislators and ask them to pass the Safer New York Act, which includes a repeal of 50-A, a state statute that prevents public defenders and defense attorneys from accessing a police officer’s disciplinary record (unnecessary force, misconduct, etc). I know it’s not exactly what you’re looking for, but it’s a step for transparency.

      Anyway, I think calling your state legislators can definitely help. I’m in NYC so my afternoon hobby is calling NY’s Senate Majority Leader Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins and Speaker Carl Heastie—often, staffers answer the phone and are down to have a dialogue about the issue at hand.

    • Alice says...

      If you live in New York, join the campaign to repeal 50-a! https://www.changethenypd.org/topic/repeal-50

      Also, staywoke.org has created work groups where you can volunteer in tangible ways a few hours a week. For example, you can help compile data on police misconduct and brutality, so it will be easier to understand and leverage.

  144. Abbie says...

    Thank you.