Design

Have a Delicious Weekend.

king arthur pizza by cup of jo

What are you up to this weekend? We are making pizza and watching Fatal Attraction, which is so scary! Also, you may have noticed our new ads. We are exploring different revenue streams for the site, since my goal is to continue paying our team and offering health insurance during this intense time. Thank you for being so understanding! Have a good weekend — stay safe — and here are a few fun links from around the web…

Have you watched Unorthodox? I’ve been hearing the best things.

Fighting coronavirus means I haven’t seen my kids in a month.” By our beloved Grace Farris. (New York Times)

This apartment has the most beautiful pink sofa.

Living through a pandemic or potty training a toddler?

Looking forward to wearing this all summer.

25 movies and the magazine articles that inspired them, including Hustlers, Argo and Almost Famous.

A funny advice column from Bon Appetit.

Have you ever seen Hotel Chevalier? I watched it the other day and remembered how good it was.

Where’s Waldo in the era of social distancing, haha.

And a big question: Which book should we read for the next book club? I’d love to choose a book by a woman of color. Maybe the incredible Americanah? Or should we go with something newer?

Plus, two reader comments:

Says Emma on the power I found in shaving my head: “Your transformation is stunning and beautiful! Now, wait for the superpowers to slowly manifest themselves. When I wore my hair buzzed close to the skin, I found that I could close my eyes and feel the direction of the wind. I could sit on the bus and know when people walked by. I grew to know who passed me in the house by the feeling received on my head. You will notice that you are a more attuned antenna. Close your eyes and feel the world anew.”

Says LSH on helpful words from wise people: “From the wise Nora McInerny, my sage on grief and life, ‘Your life is going to be better than you’ll ever imagine and harder than you know. All of it is temporary. All of it is worth it. Go forward. And stand up straight.'”

Stay safe this weekend. xoxo

Note: If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission, at no cost to you. We recommend only products we genuinely like. Thank you so much.

(Photo by Yossy Arefi from the Cup of Jo Instagram.)

  1. Emily says...

    I finished Americanah just before “all of this” as I’ve come to refer to Corona Time. It’s gorgeous and so important. I think it would be a great book to discuss- and I selfishly want to do so!

  2. It’s been days… Weeks… This time will forever be marked by the shows that we watched, the friends we kept, the people we zoomed, and the pop tarts we consumed. One day we will say, “Remember when?”

  3. Sarah T says...

    I’d love to finally read Americanah so hope you’ll discuss!

  4. Lisa says...

    Unorthodox is wonderful but Shtisel, featuring the same actress a few years younger, is even better. Up there with the best, the Mad Mens, the Sopranos, the Breaking Bads. But the inverse, men and women struggling to be moral, rather than amoral.

    Highly recommended.

  5. BC says...

    RE: ads, did COVID impact your revenue stream? It’s awesome that you’re able to keep paying and supporting your team. I’m a new/occasional reader and I’m curious how you made money without ads in the past!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Thanks for your note! We made most of our revenue through sponsored posts, and since COVID hit, many of our sponsors had their budgets cut. You might have noticed that we haven’t had many sponsored posts over the past five weeks. Thank you so much!

  6. Cat says...

    A great read for the next book club would be Take Me Apart by Sara Sligar. I got an advanced copy and it’s a gripping suspensful read about the art world, gender and power. It comes out April 28th and début authors can use all the love right now since most of them have had their book events cancelled amidst coronavirus.

    • Adding this to my list. Thanks

  7. I’d love for the next book club pick to be “Know My Name” by Chanel Miller.

    • Jen says...

      I second this suggestion.

      Also, American Marriage by Tayari Jones. One of the best books I’ve ever read.

      Or anything featured by @wellreadblackgirl, esp anything by NK Jemisin.

      While on the topic of reading and listening to and learning from women of color, would you consider doing a post where you interview Dr. Uche Blackstock? Her writing about health disparities exacerbated by COVID-19 is so important right now. https://twitter.com/uche_blackstock

  8. Jess says...

    Books I’m dying to talk about with someone: “Tell Me More” by Kelly Corrigan and “In the Country of Women” by Susan Straight. Has anyone else read these? They are on the top of my list to reread this year.

    • Ks says...

      Off to order both! thanks for the recommendation xx

  9. Charlotte says...

    Unorthodox was soooo good. Highly recommend!

  10. Inês says...

    How about «Exodus» by Deborah Feldman, the book that inspired Unorthodox for the book club?

  11. Ariella says...

    I would urge you to do some research about unorthodox before you encourage people to watch it. It’s so frustrating that we just had this conversation here about how you represent Jewish narratives- surrounding a violent series of attacks on chassidim in NY. And now you’re promote a sensationalized show that represents chassidim dishonestly and terribly. You can do better and you are making the decision not to.

    • Lisa says...

      I loved Shtisel. I hope you feel better about that show? (I am not even Jewish so I want to make sure that someone from the community might endorse? I hear it’s very popular in Israel)

    • Rachel says...

      I recommended Unorthodox here and I am well-acquainted with Hasidim. The acting is excellent and it is a compelling storyline whether fact or fiction; something can be interesting and thought-provoking while also not being true to life for everyone. You (Arielle) could share the ways in which you see the differences. I would genuinely like to hear your perspective.

    • B says...

      To Lisa, I think Shtisel portrays Chasidim in a more human light, but it is also showing more extreme situations, like the father running away, etc of course there are times when that really happens, but those are more extreme situations that are not common. But I would for sure recommend shtisel over unorthodox. Really the best way is to get to know people is in real life if you live near them.

    • Ariella says...

      I think that in art it’s ok for there to be discrepancies and fiction is allowed, not being bound fully to the truth is what allows for amazing creativity. But when fiction is about minorities it can actually be really dangerous. For example: an orthodox couple was recently kicked off a plane because someone complained that they smelled. They were told by the plane staff that it’s understandable because Jews only shower once a week. Now translate that to the fact that unorthodox puts her in an ugly, oily wig. The reality is that a sheitel is very expensive (mine cost $1200 and I take care of it like another child) and they are usually beautiful, especially a first wig bought for a young bride. This might not be a huge discrepancy to you, but it just perpetuated a perspective that chassidim are oily and gross. And that’s not an artistic depiction- that’s a dangerous narrative.
      Shtisel is an amazing show. I heard the best summary of the difference between them: shtisel is a show about people who happen to be chassidic. Unorthodox is a show about chassidim and here and there you meet some people. Pair the weak narrative with the fact that the author herself admitted to telling lies and the very poor research about Jewish law, it’s just disappointing. And the timing in regard to recent attacks is just so insensitive.

    • Ariella says...

      Lisa I agree with B, the best thing you can do is meet real people. I’m not representative of all Jewish people any more than one Black person represents their entire community. We’re all individuals and we’re very nice :) I think you’d enjoy meeting some of us in real life and not through a screen if you can!

    • Lisa says...

      I am Jewish (moden Orthodox, not Haredi like in the show), and while Unorthodox was interesting, I found it uncomfortable watching. Also, to be a nit-picky there were things that I found inaccurate / inconsistent like her presumably going to a chemist on a Yom Tov, which would be prohibited, when she was still observant. I haven’t read the autobiograpy that it’s based on, but I did read in one article that some of the things that happened were embellished or outright made up.
      I agree that if people are interested in watching a show about the Haredi community, Shtisel is much better, not just as a TV show but also how it represents this rather insular and misunderstood community

    • So insightful. Thanks!

  12. Lynn says...

    Just read all these posts and have to say, here’s to voting with your wallet – if you can / at whatever level you can / for whatever you feel passionately about. I love that so many commenters here share this feeling.

    On that note, if you use TP, may I recommend bamboo TP? Bamboo is a FAR more sustainable plant to make it from. Just google it. It’s becoming easy to find. I like Who Gives a Crap.

    Did you know ordinary TP comes mainly from old-growth (hard to replace) Canadian forests? And Americans use 20% of the world’s TP while only making up 5% of the world’s population? Let’s not even talk about the ultra-conservative companies who profit from the “trees-to-toilet” pipeline.

    Despite what the Charmin bears say, your butt doesn’t need to be wiped with aloe-infused clouds . (steps off soapbox)

  13. Grace says...

    My suggestion for a lighthearted read would be Ayesha At Last by Uzma Jalaluddin (2019). It’s a modern Muslim Pride and Prejudice. I loved it.

    Other recent books written by women of color that I loved:
    – In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado. I read this in one sitting at the end of last year, and it was my favorite book of the year.
    – Trick Mirror by Jia Tolentino
    – More than Enough by Elaine Welteroth
    – The Body is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love by Sonya Renee Taylor
    – A Woman is No Man by Etaf Rum
    – On the Come Up by Angie Thomas
    – All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung

    I also loved Real Life by Brandon Taylor. Stunning debut!

  14. Caroline says...

    You should read Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward!

    I love love loved this book.

  15. Lydia says...

    For people who liked Unorthodox I highly recommend the show Shtisel, which is also on Netflix. I prefer it as it feels like a more accurate depiction of the hassidic community. It is being told from the inside, not as an escape story but how they live and love. You see the beauty, horror, challenges, joy and craziness a community like that lives with.

    • Lisa says...

      I have loved that show so much. Top 5, ever, IMO.

    • Anna says...

      I’m sorry I’m seeing SO many comments here bashing Unorthodox and it makes me uneasy. This was Deborah Feldman’s overall reality with some, I’m sure, embellished elements made for Netflix. What is the point of denying or trying to cover up the very real issues for women in this community? Wouldn’t it be more productive and long-term to acknowledge and address those real experiences so that more Hasidic women do not feel the need to “escape” and more such stories don’t have to be told?

  16. Emily G says...

    Bring on the ads! Whatever you need to do to keep your team intact. Sending lots of love to the Cup of Jo team ❤️

  17. Elliesee says...

    Americanah is so great and everybody I recommended it to was so happy I did! I’m amazed a ”boy meets girl” story (and more) could be so compelling for nearly 600 pages. I also loved Half of a Yellow Sun as my knowledge of Biafra was minimal.

  18. Tara says...

    Grace Farris our weekly illustrator is a head doctor at a NYC hospital????????? My god, what a human. I cannot comprehend.

    • Hanna says...

      I second this! My jaw dropped when I realized the connection! I bet her humanity makes her an incredible doctor!

    • Kimberly says...

      I’m on this same boat, Tara!
      I am in total awe of her. I had no idea that she was not “just” an artist but a medical doctor in New York! Amazing.

  19. Cici says...

    With respect to my Pachinko suggestion earlier, I want to mention that when I say it explores courage and hope, I don’t mean that it is a book about extraordinary courage (though there is some of that if you consider immigration and going through the wars), but really more about ordinary, everyday courage during such hard times.

    xoxoxo

  20. Cici says...

    Please do not forget the Asian-American writers!

    My suggestion is Pachinko by Min Jin Lee. It is about a Korean family during the wars and their move to Japan, and details how they face class and race struggles, along with family dynamics and immigration clashes. It is also a story of survival and courage in hard times.

    I think it would be perfect for a time like this, and it is also an avenue to discuss issues of identity and race in a different context from the white/black/latina/asian context usually seen in America. Maybe there will be some more new or honest insights when readers do not feel so personally involved. And the issues we are facing now – courage and hope during a time of strife – are very much explored in the book with beauty.

    It is a book with depth and is not a frivolous book (not that there is anything wrong with light, fun books – I mean that this is not a book that is whiny or self-indulgent), but is still moves at a very strong, readable pace.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pachinko_(novel)

    • Sarah T says...

      I’m reading this currently! Would love as a digital book club choice!

    • E says...

      Best book I’ve read in the last five years, HANDS DOWN.

  21. Alina says...

    The ads don’t bother me I guess but I would normally look to Cup of Jo for comfort and helpful content during a world crisis like this and I’m feeling a little disappointed by the lack of serious Covid content. I feel like there’s a lot you could do to be helpful, even just sharing more personal tidbits of how you’re managing life right now?? Because one of the things I’m really wondering and asking everyone I know is- “how is anyone else doing this?!” Anyways, I’ve been turning to Goop a lot more since they seem to be posting more practical information that’s speaking to me, personally. Hope I can come back to my regular Cup of Jo visits when things feel easier.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      You might enjoy this post — it was a balm for me:

      https://cupofjo.com/2020/04/whats-your-life-like-right-now/

      We are trying to do a mix of COVID and upbeat content since that’s what I’m personally craving but we will definitely be doing more serious posts coming up!

      Thank you so much xo

    • Sasha L says...

      Alina, please try the Hear for you pod cast, if you haven’t already, I think it’s just what you’re looking for.

  22. Kay says...

    I’d like to suggest Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows Balli Kaur Jaswal. It was one of the best books I read last year. I’m also going to suggest The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy. It’s a debut novel that also won the Booker Prize. Like Americanah (which I would love as a book club pick as well) it’s been sitting on my shelf for ages and I need to pick it up!

  23. Kay says...

    Half of a Yellow Sun is excellent!! I also really enjoyed The Great Believers. Will have to try out Dearly Beloved.

  24. k says...

    Can we please stop criticizing CupOfJo? Some don’t like the ads. Others, it’s content titles, such as the Friday updates. And don’t forget links, such as Everlane or Amazon.

    For those who have so much to say, start your own blog. Or put your money where your mouth is and send money. Earlier, I said I’d be happy to set up a monthly payment.

    This is a business that provides much needed respite. Lighten up.

    I applaud CupOfJo. And I thank you.

    I’m sorry, but I think ultra criticism of sires like this now are ridiculous. If you don’t like the content, don’t read.

    • Megan S. says...

      Everlane is literally taking customers’ money upfront and failing to ship items, ship correct items, and process refunds-all after union busting and firing the very employees whose services they need to communicate with customers. There is nothing wrong with pointing this out so people can make an educated decision about where to spend their hard-earned money. It is by no means a criticism of Cup of Jo, who I know has long (and admirably) supported Everlane since it’s early days due to its use of American factories (not sure whether that’s still the case) and it’s ethos of “radical transparency,” which has now been exposed as a complete joke.

    • Claud says...

      I agree with you. If readers have an issue with the content, then why not find another blog? That simple.

  25. Julia says...

    please PLEASE choose “Homegoing” by Yaa Gyasi as your next book club novel! It’s one of the most moving books I’ve ever read and I would love for it to be mandatory reading for every dang person I know! The author somehow crafts an intergenerational epic in only 300 pages. Every chapter reads like a beautiful short story that binds you to every character you meet. This book stayed with me long after reading. xx Julia from Toronto!

    • Missy Poldrin says...

      Homegoing is an amazing book!

    • SB says...

      Yes!! I support this choice! Read it in a friend book club a few years ago and haven’t stopped recommending it since!

    • Tshego B says...

      I second that nomination! I just finished it. It took me all of 4months because a lot of the chapters are just so, so heavy and close to home as a fellow African. There were times I just paused and looked out the window and just couldn’t go on. Homegoing should be required reading for all humans.

    • Yes! such. an. amazing. book.
      Homegoing and Pachinko are two of my favorites. each compelling, hooking, and important.

  26. Lauren E. says...

    Thank you so much for the explanation on the ads. I thought they were a little annoying and now I don’t mind them AT ALL! Pay your staff and keep bringing us this fantastic content, and you can show me all the ads you like.

    RE: book club, how about a Stacey Abrams (pen name Selena Montgomery)?? Romance often gets a bad rap but hers is so well written, and I love the idea of supporting a (could we even dream it?!) potential VP candidate.

  27. A says...

    I don’t care what anyone says, I’m hiding cereal and snacks, But this is only so I have a chance at getting my share in a house of ravenous eaters.

  28. Jessica says...

    So, if folks are lookin for a jumpsuit that is similar to the Everlane one, without the union busting controversy and employee firings, here are some options! Hope this helps commenters who were concerned about that one.

    Designed and made in Minnesota: https://hackwithdesignhouse.com/product/ss20-hdh-basics-wide-leg-jumper/

    Designed in LA with a commitment to living wages wherever they are manufactured and philanthropic support: https://www.lacausaclothing.com/collections/jumpsuits/products/milwood-jumpsuit-green

    Linen, short sleeve and cute!:
    https://www.consciousclothing.net/shop/orchard-jumpsuit

    From one of the seemingly myriad Lithuanian linen sellers on Etsy (can’t vouche for practices on this one, but I have a piece from them and it is well made!):
    https://www.etsy.com/listing/598842336/wrap-linen-jumpsuit-torino-in-max

    Some more (a little hard to find linen, but still looking):
    https://www.peopletree.co.uk/women/jumpsuits/judie-jumpsuit

    • EB says...

      Thank you for these options! Everlane is on my no-buy list.

    • China says...

      Thank you! Agreed that I will not be shopping at Everlane again until they radically change their policy and allow their workers to unionize.

  29. abi says...

    I would love to see how the Everlane jumpsuit looks on you. I have a feeling that the butt will stretch out a lot.

  30. Megan says...

    What an incredibly moving article by Grace Farris! As I only knew her illustrations on COJ, I have to say that I always imagined her to be a super hip young illustrator. I am floored and amazed to know that she’s (secretly?!) Chief of Hospital Medicine! I will never look at the illustrations the same way… what a beautiful reminder that we all contain multitudes.

    • Tabitha says...

      No kidding!! I’m amazed and impressed, go Grace!!

  31. Yes, Americanah. I am early into that book so it would be perfect timing :)

  32. Michelle says...

    Book club recommendation: Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo. It won the Booker prize 2019 ( jointly with Margaret Atwood) and of the 50 or so books I read in the last year it was easily my favourite. The voices of the 12 ( mostly) Black British women are incredibly distinct and the weaving story lines set over a century are deeply satisfying. I also just loved the ending.

    Also: A woman is no man by Etaf Rum following a Palestinian American family was also a great read.

    • Nathalie says...

      Girl, Woman, Other would be great for the book club!

    • Natalie says...

      I agree with Girl, Woman, Other!

    • Aly says...

      Just started reading it today and I am hooked!!

  33. Lindsey says...

    Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo! She is a Black woman and this book won the Booker prize last year. Be warned though…there is not a single period or exclamation point in the entire book!

  34. Kelli says...

    My families favorite chicken recipe is from the website the salt marshmallow called crispy baked chicken thighs. So easy and so good. I even use the seasoning on vegetables to roast along with it. I could eat this daily.

  35. Unorthodox is one of the best shows I’ve seen in a long time. My husband and I couldn’t stop thinking about it after we finished it. And Shira Haas’ performance is amazing. Also, Berlin is my favorite city in the world, so it was wonderful to “spend time” in some beautiful corners or it.

  36. Meredith says...

    Thanks for mentioning the ads and explaining them here in the comments! As a few others mentioned, I also thought the settings on my computer had changed! I applaud you for taking care of your team and prioritizing the people behind this wonderful website over aesthetics. The content of the posts and the comment section are both as beautiful as ever :)

    • Ana D says...

      Same here – thanks for taking care of the content creators we know and love, Joanna!

  37. Kim says...

    I support you guys but I stopped reading Emily Henderson’s blog when she went to this format. I hope you find a different way.

    • EJ says...

      I stopped reading her blog because of ads, as well. But mostly due to the fact that she started incorporating moving GIF photos and videos in her posts around the same time and those, along with the the distracting motion of the ads, was very overwhelming. I found myself overstimulated and stressed when trying to navigate her site, which led to me not reading anymore.

      My comment is not a complaint whatsoever. Simply constructive criticism to help you avoid the same pitfall. Bravo to the COJ team for doing what needs to be done during this trying time! Like many have commented, a Patreon or single-time donation would be a wonderful way for us to give back to your team who has brought us all so much.

  38. Kim says...

    How can we support you? An optional monthly subscription (for those who can) as with NPR and Brain Pickings?

    • Julia says...

      Please consider starting a Patreon account. I’d be more than happy to contribute to CoJ to show my support.

    • Nicole Preston says...

      I would also love to do this.

  39. Vicki says...

    Sliver Sparrow by Tayari Jones!
    It would be so good for discussion the characters are complicated and their actions messy and the book is so good.

  40. Hollye Hudson says...

    Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie! It’s a reimagining of Antigone through the eyes of young Muslims in London and Boston. It’s a “stay up until 3am” page turner.

  41. Meaghan says...

    First — I certainly don’t mind the ads if I know they’re supporting your wonderful team. And thank you for explaining.

    And … what about SUCH A FUN AGE by Kiley Reid? And anything by Roxane Gay (I especially loved HUNGER & BAD FEMINIST) is penetrating and brilliant.

    • Carmen Faye Mathes says...

      I second Such A Fun Age! It’s totally brilliant and incisive on questions of race and privilege; it’s funny and totally current (set in 2015); and it’s written with such humor and charm. I think it would generate a compelling discussion.

  42. Emily says...

    I LOVE Hotel Chevalier, especially in pairing with The Darjeeling Limited– they’re really made to go together, and complement each other in aesthetic and storyline. The Darjeeling Limited is my favorite Wes Anderson movie and criminally underrated, as a die-hard WA fan since high school. His early movies are so brilliant. They bring together his (obviously, well-known) style and aesthetic with much deeper and profound emotional plot lines. The Grand Budapest Hotel, Moonrise Kingdom, and Fantastic Mr. Fox are probably his most popular movies but The Darjeeling Limited and The Royal Tenenbaums are by FAR his best. I could really go on about this forever!

  43. N says...

    Hey Joanna, could you do a post on how we can support you? You have ads, but how do you make money from them? Should we be clicking them? And on your sponsored IG content, how do we help you make money from it? Just asking because I’m clueless and want to make sure I’m doing what I can to support you and your team.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      You’re so sweet to ask! Just reading the site and Instagram is really helpful! Also “liking” sponsored Instagram posts is great. Thank you so, so much xoxoxo

    • nadine says...

      Thank you Joanna for mentioning the ads, I disabled my adblock here so I can see them. I had never given much thought about how they actually help real people getting their salaries for what they do.. I feel a bit naive but I want to do better!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Oh my gosh, thank you, Nadine!!

    • shannon says...

      Almost bought something this evening, then came back here knowing an ad would appear for it so I could clock through from here before purchasing. And I went back and liked as many sponsored insta posts as I could find. Hope it helps, at least a little. You’re doing the right thing in getting creative with revenue! Keep up the good work!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Thank you, Shannon!!!

  44. Carla says...

    I couldn’t stop watching Orthodox!! Soooo good!!

    • Anjie says...

      Me too. Loved it

  45. Sarah says...

    Highly recommend Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah (man of color).

    • Stacey says...

      Friday Black was AMAZING! It took me a minute to get into the stories just because they were so unusual, but once I did I was hooked.

  46. Virginia says...

    Love all of these book recs!! I wonder if you would do a roundup post of suggestions?

    On the lighter side, I highly recommend The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory. I’ve been gravitating to light reads lately and this one is the perfect escape while also including some identity and race issues.

    • Kate says...

      Yes! I love Jasmine Guillory and really only want light hearted reading right now. She does a great job of talking about race and gender issues but still keeping the story flowing and the book light and funny.

  47. Ooh also Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams would be a good one. Forgot to mention in my previous comment!

    • Nicole Preston says...

      I agree that Queenie would be an excellent choice!

  48. I’d highly recommend My Sister the Serial Killer! It’s a bit bizarre but isn’t everything right now?! The author, Oyinkan Braithwaite was the absolute COOLEST — I went to a book signing of hers earlier this year in London, and just loved the book even more hearing her talk about how she crafted it. Really good! And not as dark as you’d expect from the title, it’s actually kind of funny ?

    • abi says...

      This was such a disappointment for me! It was a good read, but I found it expected once I started reading it, and the end was suuuuch a disappointment. It felt completely incomplete.

  49. Maryn says...

    Re:ads, I actually really enjoyed seeing your pizza Stories yesterday! If that’s another ad route you’re considering, I’m all for it.

  50. Lucy says...

    On the topic of ads — how has the cupofjo setup changed in the context of the coronavirus so that ads are necessary to maintain preexisting salaries + insurance packages? I’m sure there are things I do not know about within the inner workings of the cupofjo team, but I don’t see how there were any significant changes. Did you not just shift online work to remote online work?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Thanks for your comment! Our two revenue streams were sponsored posts and affiliate marketing, and both have been cut down significantly. (You might have noticed that there have been no sponsored posts over the past few weeks — usually we will have 1-2 per week.) I left another explanation further down in the comments. Hope this helps!

    • Ana says...

      Have you considered setting up a Patreon? I’m sure I’m not the only one already supporting creators over there. Would be more than happy to chip in. Seems more “you” than doing ads, and we all get so much out of your content.

  51. Kiley says...

    I love your transparency about ads! I have been reading Cup of Jo daily since I first moved to New York in it’s earliest days. I am happy to help support it any way I can since it is has always been such a lovely source of inspiration.

  52. Rose says...

    I love the look of jumpsuits (including the one you linked to here). Isn’t it awkward to have to take them off to go to the bathroom, though? As someone who drinks a LOT of water throughout the day and has a peeing habit to match, I don’t know how practical they would be for me. Or am I missing something? :-)

    • krissy says...

      Oh it’s awkward – you’re not missing a thing on that front! For me, the choice to wear a jumpsuit does require certain bathroom/drink/general situation calculations that other outfits don’t. But they are SO CUTE!!!

    • Anjie says...

      My bff loves jumpsuits and has been trying to get me to buy one but i have the same concerns as you.

  53. N says...

    “Cantoras” by Carolina de Robertis ❤️

  54. Le says...

    Thank you for the pandemic + potty training link! We’re doing both. It felt so good to laugh and relate. We’re also expecting our second in a month. I am 40, so grateful and anxious at the same time. The doc said no visitors for four to six weeks after unless they can self-isolate two weeks first (they can’t). Laughter–and Cup of Jo–helps.

  55. Emma says...

    After reading all the comments here about *Unorthodox* I was surprised at some. One thing I got from the show is that this was just one woman’s story of her life and not about an entire community. The show did give me lots to think about and it showed me some parts of the insides of this religion that I was not aware of. I took this show also as a learning and teaching experience to help me understand the Hasidic community better. I did find I was shouting for this woman to escape and find a more peaceful way of life for *herself* as this was not how she wanted to live her life. I also found that the reason many women I think stayed in this community was that if there was ever a problem in the family, anyone needs something desperately or where there is a situation where help is needed immediately that the Hasidic community rallies around their own people to give what is necessary where as in a normal community you might not find that so quickly if ever. I enjoyed the show very much and watched it twice to make sure I got more from it the 2nd time around. Thank you for posting that show here Joanna

    • Catherine says...

      I’ve already commented, but just wanted to say that Unorthodox really affected me in a way I didn’t expect, as someone who left evangelical Christianity as an adult. I just listened to a long interview with Deborah Feldman, who wrote the book about her experiences.

      Her specific sect was founded after WW2 by Holocaust survivors, so there was a lot of trauma and survivor’s guilt in the community, even as she was growing up much later. Her particular story is especially difficult, and she was completely unaware of her own sexuality and even the fact that she actually had a vagina before she married. Her parents’ marriage was also troubled, and she was viewed as a reminder of that perceived failure from the time she was born.

      I found a lot of comfort in her story and it’s very beautiful and empowering. She wrote Unorthodox when she was only 22, and she admits that the publisher pushed her to sensationalize some aspects, but that it is her actual experience. Her second book, Exodus, is more of a response to the first book, as I understand it.

    • B says...

      Unorthodox is certainly very interesting, but I would say not a place to learn about Chasidic communities, what is shown on tv shows or movies are usually sensationalized, or if absolutely accurate then a very sad story of people with dysfunctional family and perhaps a dysfunctional rabbi. I myself am Chabad which is a Chasidic community that has a different and more open view of the world from other Chasidic communities, I don’t live in that culture shown in Unorthodox, but we do have many similarities, particularly in how we take care of each other. I know of people who do live in that culture and they are trying to keep a close knit community, and of course there are instances of dysfunction, but that is not the overall way of life, there is a lot of warmth, charity, kindness, love, and connection that is not shown at all in Unorthodox, much more so than in general society where many people live solitary lives (though the coronavirus is changing that) I would suggest actually try to talk to Chasidic people in real life, and if you are a woman try to talk to another woman since some men might not be comfortable. Get to know them as people, not as a few select stories of abuse and dysfunction.

  56. Krystal says...

    Thank you for having the decency to pay your staff and keep them benefited right now during a global pandemic. Feel free to bombard my ass with adds until this is all over. I’m grateful for all the writers here—you feel like friends all the time, but especially now. Hoping you are all safe and well.

    • Krystal says...

      Ugh, typos from sleepy/sloppy typing on the phone. Sorry!

    • Brittany says...

      Agreed!

  57. kim says...

    i’d support via patreon if you had one.

  58. Courtenay says...

    As some one who is attempting to potty train a toddler while also living through a pandemic, I can attest that the article is %100 accurate!

  59. Annie says...

    Re: Book Club — may I suggest The Stationery Shop by Marjan Kamali? It’s a straight-up beautifully written novel (Joanna, like *painfully, earth-shatteringly beautiful*) about a young couple trying to salvage their innocent love in 1953 Tehran, during surmounting political unrest which led to a coup against a democratically elected leader and in its place, the establishment of a monarchy that would change the course of the country, literally ‘til this day. I promise you, it’s one of those books you’ll want to savor and you might even sob when it’s over, like I did.

    On a real note, I feel that understanding just a bit more of the rich, beautiful, complex history of Iran and its people, even through bittersweet and gorgeous fiction, is the least we can do in these unfortunate times when our country (if you’re American too) is either banning their people and/or trying to start war with them.
    <3

  60. Liz says...

    Such a fun age by Kiley Reid would be a great next book!

    • Lori says...

      Totally agree!

    • Meg says...

      Yes I was going to suggest the same! Really a good one.

    • Carmen Faye Mathes says...

      Yes!!

  61. Julia says...

    Not necessarily for this week, but a book that I’d recommend by a WOC (a Korean-American) is Pachinko by Min Jin Lee. Absolutely enthralling and full of things ripe for book club discussion. It covers a part of history I didn’t really know about (the relationship between Korea and Japan in the twentieth century), and has richly drawn characters. Very well written too!

    Hope everyone has a safe weekend.

    • fgb says...

      Oh, I loved this book so much. Read it a few years ago and still think about it.

    • Cate says...

      Seconded!!!!

    • MB says...

      Oh I love love loved this book!

  62. P says...

    Unorthodox is fantastic! Absolutely engaging.

  63. Autumn says...

    I’d be happy to do a monthly donation as well since I enjoy this site so much.

    • Britt says...

      Me too! Any way to do this, Joanna?
      Also, I would love to see some other organizations to contribute to, and I bet that other readers would as well. I may have missed seeing them, but it would be nice to see a list of ways to help out in one place :)

    • Shelley says...

      Agree. I would do this too.

  64. Liz says...

    If it helped you paying your team you could have ads that bounced across my screen with flashing lights and I wouldn’t care. Thank you for being amazing.

    • Lea says...

      This made me chuckle but I also strongly agree!

    • Deb. says...

      Agree with this so much! Websites cost money to run and this is my fav, if that’s what it takes. ?

    • Emma says...

      I third that ……bring them on!

    • Maryn says...

      Yes yes yes!

    • Agreed. Been clicking on all the ads…let’s have people get paid!

    • Stephanie says...

      Agreed about clicking on the ads. It is a good way for you to get revenue to take care of your staff. It only takes a few extra minutes to help.

  65. SanDee says...

    You know, the “living through a pandemic or potty training a toddler” piece was really funny…right up until the last couple of lines. It’s just so necessary for some people to inject negative comments about President Trump into everything. I know I’m in the minority on this site but I get sick of it. We don’t need more negativity. I doubt this will get printed because no one on this site would agree.

    • Tania says...

      It’s published but you’re right that no one agrees. He’s an incompetent turd.

    • Kelsi says...

      I mean, it’s funny because it’s true. Even my Republican relatives secretly admit he’s a total horse’s ass. And that has nothing to do with policy.

    • GCM says...

      Are you kidding? The last line was the best. We have a big incompetent baby in the White House. Do you realize that this was preventable?

    • L says...

      It’s published and I vehemently disagree. He and his administration and their active disregard for science are responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of Americans, including physicians and healthcare worker such as myself. Until they begin to make proper decisions based in science and data, negative comments are warranted and necessary and I will continue to use my voice to make them. And I will vote and work to make sure that everyone does in November.

    • Andrea says...

      Hi Sandee

      A quick note from NYC where I hear ambulances all day long and know people who have died from COVID. To refrain from “negativity” regarding Trump and his incompetence in the job is asking way too much. For NYers especially, we are facing a huge challenge and the president turned his back on us, insisting we were selling off PPE and didn’t need ventilators. I don’t need to love any government figure, and s/he doesn’t need to love me, but putting my life in danger makes this very personal.

      Your comment downplays the real risk this administration puts us all in.

    • Leslie says...

      I agree with you, Sandee. I am not a fan of Trump at all, but one of my biggest gripes with him is that he doesn’t ACT like a president, he doesn’t show the decorum and manners required by the position of president. In turn, I feel like a hypocrite if I don’t give him the basic level of respect the office affords. He is our president, people.

    • Laurie says...

      Hahahahhhaaah… wait, wait, let me get this straight, liberals are the ones injecting negativity into the public discourse? Hahhhahhha! Hooo! Hahaha…. I needed that laugh.

    • Katie says...

      Hmmmm, let’s see. The President puts all of our lives at risk, withholds medical care, chooses (it’s a choice at this point) not to increase testing in a way to open the economy and protect lives. He does not deserve any positivity. I’m mad that my families life was put on hold/will never be the same because he got this information in November (November!!!) and did nothing with it. If your concern right now is about your own views and if your comment gets published are not, in the midst of this terrible time, you might want to rethink some things.

    • Anon says...

      It is very important that people realize what a terrible and dangerous president Trump is. It is not just about his horrible manners and utter disrespect, it is about his lies, his disregard for the law and the actual truth, his manipulations, his calculated negligence, his criminal activity, and the list goes on and on and on. Americans have every right to voice their exasperation and disgust with that Absurdity of a president.

    • SanDee says...

      Nowhere did I say he was a perfect president or that I admire or agree with everything he has done. New Yorkers might want to look to your state officials for answers on why the city was so woefully unprepared to deal with mass casualties, especially having lived through 9/11. That’s not the fed’s job. As usual, liberals are only interested in being “kind” to people who think just as they do.

    • Tracey says...

      Sandee, I get where you are coming from. It’s hard when things are fraught to find people so willing to criticize. BUT! The president is your employee, they work for you, the people. And the people are the board of the company and need to discuss whether or not their employee has the chops to do the job at hand. My personal opinion is that it should not be reduced to taunting and bullying, no matter how they are as a person (tiny hands, orange face etc) (when they go low …) but I do think it’s essential in democracy for the people to talk about whether their most important employee is doing the task required in the way required – and sometimes, oftentimes at the moment, that involves criticism.

    • Andrea says...

      Hi Sandee

      I feel your troll vibes in your additional comment, and that’s on you if that’s how you want to spend your life. I know people who work in Emergency Management and what you allege about NYC culpability in a lack of surge supplies is absurd. No state can prepare fully for every possibility, which is why we have Federal supplies. Thanks to the Western states who did more to help than the Feds.

      And, Trump is the last person to be kind to anyone. So, let’s let him lead in being a wise and compassionate leader. One of my tasks this weekend is to call a friend whose daughter died in her home this weekend from a Covid-induced heart attack. The ME couldn’t get there for more than 12 hours, since they are so overwhelmed with in-home deaths. A mixed blessing, since it’s the last time they will see the body as she will need to be cremated due to COVID.

      I’ve heard nothing from Trump that would offer any word of comfort or concern for the more than 36K dead or their families. It’s all verbal diarrhea about himself.

      I know that trolls can’t have feelings, or you wouldn’t do this. Maybe you will see my friend and her daughter on your dreams, however, and feel the unconscious anguish of a mother waking to see her daughter dead in the room next door.

    • Sara says...

      I think it’s a real shame that so many of the responses to Sandee’s comments read like bullying. She/he shared a perspective. It’s okay to disagree but let’s be gentle with each other.

    • EB says...

      To respond to your latest comment, Sandee: it isn’t about being kind to people who “think like us.” It’s about not forgiving or erasing abject cruelty and those who codify it through legislative and executive policies designed to benefit a few and harm many others. My aunt and I disagree on politics; we are kind to and love each other. I don’t extend the same to a purported leader who clearly cares so little about the well-being of his own people that he refuses to plan for and enact the very federal systems intended to aid in a crisis of this scale. So before you sneer at liberals for not being nice to a megalomaniac reality star who refuses to lead (and who spent months denying it was even happening in the first place, wasting precious time that could have saved lives), or blame state leaders who are frantically trying to protect their people with a federal government that in some cases won’t help and in others actively hurts their efforts (look up the Defense Production Act of 1950), please understand that this isn’t about being unkind; it’s about accountability.

    • Bonnie says...

      Sandee – You need to get your news and knowledge from more sources than Facebook. Ignorance is dangerous. To not only yourself but others.

    • Claire says...

      At ease, people.
      The world is asking a lot of all of us these days- everyone is anxious, everyone is easily triggered. But all she did was express an opinion, and she’s entitled to do so. I don’t like Trump either, but I know absolutely zero about Sandee and I will be damned if I let the current political shit show influence me to treat someone with hostility. Lord knows we’ve all had more than enough of that chaos, and no good comes of it.
      Respect and peace to you, Sandee. Be well.

    • L says...

      Telling anyone to be “at ease” when their friends, neighbors, families, and colleagues are dying is a big ask, to say the least. The thing that is really interesting to me is that several of the comments are people giving their own opinions, just as the OP did. There is no hostility. There is emotion, but that is warranted. So yes, let’s give each other a bit of grace and be kind, but facts are facts.

  66. Cait says...

    If you are looking for a book by a WOC, I highly recommend Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. It’s a masterpiece and she wrote it when she was TWENTY THREE. She has a new book coming out in October that I’m so excited for.

    The recently released Valentine is also great.

    • Jess says...

      Yes to Homegoing! And I am so excited about her next book!

    • Deb says...

      Oh yes I loved this book!

  67. Ashley says...

    I agree with all the love for Homegoing. It is one of my favorite books ever. Americanah is on my to read list though so I would vote for that. I was told by friends that it is a must read.

  68. Brooke says...

    I highly recommend The Girl With the Louding Voice. Another Nigerian writer. Such a powerful story. The narrative voice will keep you reading!

    • Natalie says...

      Yes please! I own the book but haven’t started it yet. :)

  69. Katherine says...

    Genuine question- why would the current situation prevent you from paying your staff? I’m assuming your revenue comes from sponsorships, monetizing links, and ads, all of which seem like they would still be profitable. Not at all trying to be snarky; sincerely curious. For what it’s worth, the ads don’t bother me. The well-being of your employees should be priority #1.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Good question! Thanks for asking! Many of our sponsors have had their budgets deeply cut so can’t do their sponsored content anymore (you’ll see that we haven’t done sponsored posts in weeks). And we don’t want to do affiliate as much anymore — we aren’t doing spring dress roundups and curated links to lots of brands. It’s just not what people want to see right now. So our two main revenue streams have been cut way down. Hope that makes sense!

    • Lea says...

      Thanks for asking and explaining, I was also curious :)

    • Daria says...

      Joanna, thanks for explaining! So sorry that your sponsored posts revenue got cut down – they were good! I have to say Google ads between the articles look reeeeally cheap, but then again, whatever makes your team going in this difficult time!

  70. Ashley says...

    For the next book club book, I would recommend More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say) by Elaine Welteroth. She is the second African American woman to hold the editor-in-chief title at Condé Nast. (bonus point: she reads the audiobook version and it’s fabulous!)

    • Grace says...

      I really enjoyed her book, too!

  71. Maddie says...

    I would love to read a classic novel of some sort and hear what others have to say!

  72. Kimberley says...

    I don’t have a book recommendation because I have been lax about reading lately, but I have to mention that I have always been impressed with how you already know what your weekend plans are right down to the movie choice! My husband and I take 30 minutes of Netflix/Hulu/Prime searching to settle on one! It would be so nice to always have that figured out before we settle down. Even if I will fall asleep 10 minutes in….

  73. Kathy says...

    Wait….how does Grace Farris have the time to create such a lovely and insightful cartoon series for this site AND be a full time physician fighting on the front lines of this pandemic in NYC? Really?? RESPECT

  74. Nicole says...

    Great links this week. Happily will deal with ads to support you and the team, even if I did initially think my iPad had a virus haha.

    Dr. Ferris- thank you. You are incredible.

    Homegoing is on my list, and I’m excited to read through the comments for more books to add. I loved “Stay With Me,” but oh man, is it a heartbreaker.

  75. JO says...

    Oh I burst into tears at the end of Grace Farris’s article. These days are surreal, but the privilege of being able to scoop up my healthy kids and smell the tops of their heads is not lost on me.

    The other day I inhaled my son and encouraged my husband to do the same, saying- doesn’t he smell so good??!

    My husband’s reply? “Not especially.”

    Noted. Must be a mom thing ❤️. Sending a virtual hug and a thank you to everyone keeping the world safe for our babies right now.

  76. Elizabeth says...

    Wait a minute. Grace Farris is an amazing illustrator AND a gifted writer AND a doctor, in fact, the chief of hospital medicine at Mount Sinai? And she managed to write a beautiful piece for the NYT while also working as a doctor fighting a once-in-a-century pandemic within the hardest hit city in the country, maybe the hardest hit city on earth? What an incredible person.

    I really hope her book deal is already in the works, and that the book’s title is My Blackest, Stoniest Heart.

    • Joanne says...

      Right?! I didn’t realize the entirety of her talents either, and that article was just beautifully written. She’s a powerhouse.

  77. Naima Coster says...

    I’d love to see Cup of Jo choose a book by a debut writer of color. The attention and exposure can go a long way for a new writer. A few terrific recent fiction books by women of color debut authors include: Heads of the Colored People by Nafissa Thompson-Spires, If You Leave Me by Crystal Hana Kim, Fruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas Contreras, Love War Stories by Ivelisse Rodriguez, Affairs of the Falcóns by Melissa Rivero. And for memoir: Ordinary Girls by Jaquira Diaz.

  78. Abesha1 says...

    “It’s the weekend…”

    Joanna… not to pile on. I enjoy the Friday links and I understand you’re trying to be a respite … but in the vein of a few comments last week regarding the title of the Friday post, there are a lot of people in my city and yours, and in our communities, who don’t have food in their homes today. They can’t have a “delicious” weekend.

    Again, I truly don’t write in order to shame, or guilt. My family, while we enjoy the bounty of our blessings this weekend with a job and a full pantry, will be making a donation (substantial for us!) to our local food bank this weekend; I urge those readers who can, to do the same. And, if you have the time, call or write your representative and ask them to make SNAP benefits accessible and generous during these difficult times.

    • Be kind says...

      You do want to shame and guilt or you would have phrased this differently. Be kind. You could have asked people to join you in donations in a friendlier way and likely had a bigger impact.

    • KJ says...

      Yes, there’s always terrible, difficult things happening in the world. But why should that mean that we can’t be who we are now? I’m not sure what you’re trying to get out of your comment. This blog can’t be everything, for everyone, all the time. I see comments like this far too often and just don’t get it.

    • Liv says...

      I think Cup of Jo does an excellent job of being aware of the world and shares with us ways to help others all the time. This is just piling on.

    • Erin says...

      I’ve donated to my local food bank *and* I am also grateful to Jo and her team for providing a corner of the internet that gives some respite from the relentlessly bad news elsewhere. Two things can be true at once! So please back off with the guilt trip, and instead try assuming we are all working hard to do our best under awful circumstances. Thanks.

    • Lucy says...

      Maybe it’s the way that I use the word or read it, but I don’t think that ‘delicious’ is a word that only relates to food anymore. Sexy times can be delicious. A juicy film can be delicious.

  79. Nicole says...

    The ads don’t bother me, especially given the reason behind them. Glad you’re able to make this change in order to support your team through this time. All love to CoJ. You all are a tremendous source of joy, which is only magnified by the current situation.

  80. Kate says...

    I’ve so appreciated that every Friday post in the last month still starts with asking us what we’re up to this weekend. Makes it feel a little bit more normal and also reminds me there are still things we can do to make it a weekend. Thank you. ?

  81. Johanna says...

    I will definitely put up with stupid ads if it means people have an income stream and health insurance! Thank you!

  82. Maya says...

    Grace Farris is my new hero. A Dr and an amazing comic/author. Wow ??????

  83. Kim says...

    Can you please share the recipe for the pizza pictured here? It looks lovely!

  84. Laure says...

    Came here to make this point. I personally did not like Unorthodox because it seemed to unnecessarily vilify an entire community, which is quite rich and nuanced and genuine in a way that was not portrayed. I also second Shtisel, an Israeli show, as a much better portrayal of the Haredi community. In addition to the axe to grind, even standing alone, I felt the Unorthodox show suffered from several other defects — the Berlin friend group seemed a little artificial, as were her forays into the secular world. In reality, moving out of that community is the work of months, if not years, not days.
    Basically, skip Unorthodox and watch Shtisel.

    • Charlotte says...

      I came here to say the same thing. I’m not very familiar with the orthodox traditions and communities which were portrayed in this show (I’m of a different faith and grew up out West), but it did feel incredibly judgmental of an entire religious group. I didn’t like how the sacred rituals were portrayed in almost a mocking way, it felt disrespectful. I agree the friend group was too sweet and too kind to be believable, and the pace at which the main character developed was completely unrealistic. The last episode left too many loose ends. Maybe the book is better, but I’m not a fan of the show.

    • B says...

      I would say read Unorthodox vs. skipping it entirely.

    • Sara says...

      Thank you for the thoughtful comment, Laure. I completely agree.

  85. A says...

    I highly recommend Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi. It’s phenomenal and I suspect not on the radar of a lot of readers.

    • Grace says...

      It’s also available on Hoopla as an audiobook! It’s beautifully written.

    • AB says...

      Oh goodness, this book plunged me into the deepest depression of my life! You’re right that it’s astonishing and not often mentioned. If you’re sensitive like me, save this one for after the pandemic. :)

  86. Magda says...

    Bernardine Evaristo’s Girl Woman Other – winner of the 2019 Booker Prize. I haven’t read it but I’ve heard the best things, and Roxane Gay gave it a stellar review on Goodreads.

    • Lucy says...

      Yes please!

  87. Grace says...

    Americanah & Homegoing are both fantastic. I’d also like to suggest The Hate U Give, by Angie Thomas. I think it is a book everyone should read. Along with Just Mercy, (though written by a man). But both are very important books.

    • Denise says...

      Oh, The Hate U Give is such an amazing book!

  88. J. says...

    ADS EVERYWHERE PLEASE — truly, Cup of Jo is the lightness, warmth, and home in my day (and has been for the past 8+ years)– paying yourself and your team in this time is so important and necessary.

    I also love Americanah, though will second, third, and fourth many of the suggestions below!

    Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi would be my number one choice — it has stayed with me for years afterwards, and though I was so happy to see it recommended so many times below, I find most people haven’t heard of it when I mention it in “what should I read next?!” conversations in ‘real life’ (i.e. not quarantine/the COJ comments!)

    Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo also absolutely wonderful, which I also got from Obama’s favorite books list alongside Tayari Jones’ An American Marriage and Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jessmyn Ward (I think from different years’ lists) — highly recommend all three.

    These are much older and also coincidentally have both been made into well-known films, but The Color Purple by Alice Walker and Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel are two of my Top 10 books of all time and are so beloved by so many for so many years for a good reason!

    Would also suggest Know My Name by Chanel Miller (as I think this should be read by every human being!) – thank you to the kind flight attendant on a random Friday morning flight from San Francisco to Chicago who didn’t once judge me and kindly refilled my drink while I was hysterically throughout the last two hours of reading this (from sadness and from being overwhelmed by beauty/strength).

    • Aya says...

      This comment made me really like you. We have 7 favorite books in common; you’re gracious and a crier. Just wanted to send a note into the abyss that you sound wonderful and I wish we were friends.

    • Susan says...

      I second the Know My Name recommendation!

  89. Emily says...

    I loved Americanah. It’s a book that I keep thinking about even a year and change after reading. I just purchased another book by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie – Half of a Yellow Sun from my local indie. To get free shipping I also purchased The Dearly Beloved (which I adored) and The Great Believers.

    • Kay says...

      Half of a Yellow Sun is excellent!! I also really enjoyed The Great Believers. Will have to try out Dearly Beloved.

    • Susan says...

      Half of a Yellow Sun will always be in my top 10.

  90. Marisa says...

    Homegoing has been my favorite book I’ve read in the last five years–I’m not a writer, but I can’t say enough good things about Yaa Gaysi!! I really liked Americanah, but actually preferred Half of a Yellow Sun by Achidie more.

    Either way, really excited for the next choice!

    • Susan says...

      I liked Half of a Yellow Sun better too!

  91. Molly says...

    Thank you, Grace Farris. I can’t comment on her NYT article, so I hope she sees this. I am grateful for all that you do.

    • Jessica says...

      Grace has the grace (haha) to respond to almost all of her Instagram follower’s comments. I you tell her there, she’ll see it. LORD KNOWS how she finds the time!

  92. T.F. says...

    Spending my time bored on a Webinar clicking through all of your new advertisements. I hope that helps you help your wonderful team – you are all important to me!

  93. Krista says...

    After you watch Unorthodox, make sure to watch the 20 minute Making: Unorthodox episode. Such a good series, and so thoughtfully done!

  94. Another Sara says...

    I’ll post it here, I accidentally posted in the main thread:

    I’m an Orthodox (and Hasidic) Sara too, and I concur.

    Stories like Unorthodox certainly do exist, but the show lacked nuance and and an accurate representation of a rich, if controversial, culture. Orthodox Judaism, including Hasidism, which is just one branch within it, contains a very broad spectrum of belief, practice, and degrees of exposure to the secular world. Unorthodox is based on one person’s experience, representative of a specific subset of a specific Hasidic community, within the Orthodox world. Please go in with an educated mindset. I absolutely do not defend many of the cultural and religious practices and attitudes shown in the show, but it is important to have a broader context for one woman’s somewhat fictionalized narrative.

    Shtisel is far more human and level. I recommend watching it if you are looking for a more even-handed approach to the Orthodox world.

    • Lily says...

      I really enjoyed watching Shtisel and anticipating Season 3.

    • Anna says...

      Glad to hear this Sara. My husband and I are not Jewish and have watched both Shtisel and Unorthodox. While there are no doubt elements of ultra Orthodox Judaism that are very troublesome (similar to fundamentalist practices in any religion) I thought Unorthodox was a rather tabloid, simplistic view which failed to capture nuance. I don’t doubt that there are individuals who have had this experience nor seek to diminish their validity as there have been some truly abhorrent practices within some orthodox communities, but was disappointed it failed to grasp the complexities.

    • hannah rosner says...

      it was a mini-series based on one woman’s book/experience so, of course it’s not going to represent every single nuance and every experience of an entire community. It was her story though, dramatized as it may be, and yes, any educated and/or lucid viewer will hopefully be aware of that.

    • Charlotte says...

      I agree with you’re assessment. I’m not of Jewish faith, but thought the show’s portrayal of this religious community seemed unnecessarily judgmental and unfair. The detail in which they portrayed sacred rituals also felt disrespectful.

    • Lauren says...

      I am not Jewish but I am a classical musician in Berlin! I didn’t like Unorthodox very much. It was full of Haredi stereotypes and musician stereotypes, and was generally pretty shallow. Shtisel, on the other hand, is a much more nuanced portrayal of the Haredi community and of an artist!

  95. Kenzie Randall says...

    I saw another comment for this and wanted to put my plug in as well for Such a Fun Age! It’s such a great timely read!

    Also recently read A Woman is No Man by Etaf Rum and I think it would be a fantastic book club read!

    • Grace says...

      I loved A Woman is No Man. That book stuck with me for days after I read it.

  96. Caitlin says...

    Thanks for explaining the ads! I thought something was up with my computer, haha. It’s so great that you are doing what you need to do to take care of your team. Love to you all!

  97. Katie says...

    Such a fun age by Kiley Reid was a great read!

  98. Kate says...

    Would love to read something more recent! “Girl, Woman, Other” by Bernardine Evaristo, “Wow, no thank you” by Samantha Irby, and “The Night Watchman” by Louise Erdrich are top of my list!

  99. Erin says...

    If you haven’t seen Onward yet, do! My husband and I enjoyed it every bit as our kids. Some points we enjoyed even more, lol. They don’t get all the great broken down van jokes.

  100. polkadotdress says...

    Bookclub suggestion: If I Had Your Face by Frances Cha!

  101. Amy says...

    Grace is my h ero! I had no idea that she was THE Grace who also does the comics on Cup of Jo. Bravo!!!

    Can’t wait for the next COF book

  102. Sarah says...

    So happy to hear you’re doing whatever possible to help take care of your team during this time – I bet the Cup of Jo community would help too if needed! I don’t mind the ads one bit and am so grateful you’re all still providing the incredible service that you do in this uncertain and difficult time. Sending love and light to the whole team!

  103. Megan says...

    Jo and team, I’m not bothered by the ads but would happily sign up for an option that allowed me to pay a recurring donation to support you all (not limited to during this time). This might just be my favorite place on the Internet!

    • Mari says...

      I had the same thought too! Maybe a Cup of Jo Patreon? I would love to support this site directly rather than through more ads!

    • I second this. I’d happily pay for a subscription to Cup of Jo, even if it’s just a recurring donation

      you guys have gotten me through some of the hardest times in my life, and safely to the other side of them. I’d happily support you.

    • Caitlin says...

      Me too, I learned so much about how to be a good mom and literally everything I know about beauty here, so I really owe ya one.

    • Katie says...

      Agreed. I was getting ready to suggest the same. I’d gladly make a recurring, monthly donation to a place that brings me so much joy.

  104. RS says...

    If you liked Americanah, I highly recommend the book, MAKE YOUR HOME AMONG STRANGERS by Jennine Capo Crucet. I picked it up recently because it was recommended by one of my fave authors, Curtis Sittenfeld, and it truly didn’t disappoint. I think it would be a great book club pick (I love when less obvious books are selected!), or just a great next book for anyone on the hunt for a good read.

  105. Anne says...

    I just finished Such a Fun Age and loved it. I’m itching to re-read and discuss this one.

  106. CARRIE says...

    Can you do a week of outfits for pregnant people? Would love to see some cool styles :)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      We’re on it!

    • Rachel says...

      Yes!! I’m pregnant with twins and now even maternity shirts are getting tight on me! Not going to be flattering with my belly sticking out of the bottom. One silver lining of social isolation is that no one will see it but my kids and husband.

  107. Laura says...

    I’ve been reading your blog since before you had babies (i’m dating myself for sure). I have two boys 6 and 4.5 so its been a joy to follow you through motherhood. We just finished week 5 at home and I just wanted to THANK YOU for all of this that you do. You have been a constant through all of this. It has been a bright spot to my week, my days. I honestly don’t think that there is another space on the internet that is as real and honest. The space you have created has created wonderful followers because I look forward to the comment section of every post full of ideas, encouragement, hard things, hope. I laugh and I cry and it’s so wonderful.

    I just decided that I needed to reach out and tell people when they are doing something great. We all need that right now.

  108. Melanie says...

    Unorthodox is soooo good! Wish they’d made more than 4 episodes!!!

  109. S says...

    Another vote for Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo. It was published last year, won the Booker, and is fabulous. A really funny and smart look at the lives of several interconnected characters.

  110. Julie says...

    Hello!

    I have not really noticed the new ads – sorry- but I think it is great that you are striving to continue paying your team and offering health insurance during these weird times.
    Ham and beans soup, Home alone 2 and hemming curtains for us this weekend!
    Stay safe =)

  111. Jaime says...

    Ope, as of this week I am actually potty training a toddler DURING the pandemic. Ha. Mainly because I don’t want to spend more money on diapers… Wild times!

  112. NH observer says...

    Book club recommendation — “A Little Life” by Hanya Yanagihara! So incredible. It is LONG, and flawed, but so moving and addictive, and it stays with you.

  113. Julie says...

    Girl, Woman, Other!!!

    Available in paperback, which is nice from a book club perspective.

  114. Julie says...

    “Wow, no thank you” by Samantha Irby just came out and is supposed to be great.

    • Alison says...

      It is HILARIOUS! I LOL’d many times.

  115. Angela says...

    Where is this deep dish pizza recipe (image in post)?? Looks YUM.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      In our Instagram stories!

  116. Brenna says...

    I have a book club suggestion! Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng—a writer of color, and plus, a Hulu show based on the book just came out this past month! (And it is amazing.)

  117. Annie says...

    For book club I would HIGHLY recommend The Island of Sea Women, by Lisa See. This book swept me up in its current (pun intended, you’ll see) from the very first page. It takes place on the island of Jeju, in South Korea, in a matrifocal society—women are the bread winners, doing dangerous work free diving in the sea to support their families, while men care for the children. It’s a fascinating glimpse into a dying culture, and has a beautiful narrative following the relationships of generations of women.

  118. Lisa says...

    100% Agree re: Everlane. Cannot shop there in good conscience after what they pulled. Super disappointing.

    • Caitlin says...

      I fully support the ads! Whatever you need to do!
      A couple of books that have stayed with me- Know My Name by Chanel Miller and The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas. Know my name is so stunningly beautifully written- it brings me strength. The Hate U Give is so powerful and I have gifted it to many.

      Thank you for all of your wonderful posts. I look forward to reading this site everyday. You guys are awesome!

    • Joaquina says...

      Came here to post the same comment.

      Anyone wanting an ethical clothing company with cute and stylish outfits should check out La Causa. Though it is not “cheap” by fast fashion standards, they pay fair wages, contribute to progressive causes, and employ here in LA. I dont buy makeup so that money goes toward pricier clothing from ethical brands. Just bought a jumpsuit from La Causa similar to the one profiled in Jo’s link.

      Also…boycott Sephora if you care about how employees, esp. those of color, are treated.

  119. Anna says...

    Haha, we did toilet train the toddler starting in mid March! It is the same as stay at home! Can’t go out, lots of hand washing, etc. She’s 27 months and a total pro now… at home. Next step: using an unfamiliar toilet. Just as well for her that it will be a while.

  120. Abbie says...

    My youngest attends a wonderful Montessori school that sent a very forward email when it became clear school wasn’t come back anytime soon. “We expect everyone able to honor their tuition contract in support of this community and those who currently may not be able to.” I absolutely feel this way about COJ and would guess many readers who are able would happily supplement your loss of revenue via patreon or subscription or whatever makes the most sense for you and your team in this challenging time. I’m also not at all turned off by ads. Everyone must make a living. This is a different time and as a long time reader I am happy to support in anyway I can.

  121. Brienne says...

    Cannot recommend the book An American Marriage by Tayari Jones enough. The writing is beyond beautiful and the subject incredibly thought provoking.

    • Britt says...

      Agreed. Read both that one and A Place for Us in one weekend. Heartbreaking and beautiful.

    • Heather says...

      Loved American marriage and A Place for Us

  122. Clarita says...

    Love Americanah and would love
    To reread it for the book club! But also- just devoured Such a Fun age last weekend and would LOVE to discuss and hear from the author as well!

    • Alison says...

      My turn finallyyyy came on the ‘Such a Fun Age’ e-book and I can’t wait to dive in this weekend!!

    • Sara says...

      Agree! Such a Fun Age would be an awesome book club book!

    • Allie says...

      Second vote for Such a Fun Age! Also Red at the Bone

  123. Paige says...

    I have two WOC book recommendations! Neither are “new” but both are excellent and were two of my favorite books I’ve read in the last few years, and if you haven’t read either yet, I highly recommend them: The Mothers by Brit Bennett and An American Marriage by Tayari Jones.

    • Shirley says...

      Both of those books were EXCELLENT! Good choices.

    • Julia says...

      Oh an American Marriage just gutted me. One of the best books I read last year.

    • Emily says...

      Loved American Marriage. I’d HIGHLY recommend reading Bryan Stevenson’s Just Mercy as a “buddy read.” The non-fiction and fiction pairing is so powerful with these two.

    • Sharon says...

      An American Marriage was so good…

  124. Kate says...

    This weekend we are eating pizza as well (like we always do!) and starting sleep training for our 6 month old. Everyone please send good thoughts our way cause mama is going to have a hard time staying consistent!!

    • Christie says...

      Hang in there! It’s two steps back and one step forward with sleep training. Just be kind to yourselves, don’t rush and remember that no matter what happens, one day they WILL sleep on their own!

  125. Julie says...

    I’m sorry, Grace Ferris is also a doctor???? #boss

  126. shade says...

    I started watching Unorthodox last night and I could not stop watching! Cut myself off after 3 episodes. Excited to continue watching tonight.

  127. Michelle says...

    I’ve been wanting to read Octavia Butler and Homegoing, both recommended by other commenters. It’s another memoir but I just finished The Yellow House and it was amazing; WOC and pretty recent.

    • Maggie says...

      I second Homegoing! Yaa Gyasi also has a new book coming out in September that could be a pick for a later phase of quarantimes.

  128. Erin C. says...

    Please run ads. You deserve to get paid for the fantastic content you and your team and contributors put into the word. Your site has picked me up on extraordinarily hard days, brought beauty through words and pictures into my life, opened my mind, and made me a devoted red lipstick wearer.

    • Arielle says...

      This!

    • Christine says...

      I second all of this!

    • Mirza says...

      Yes yes and yes.

    • ABC says...

      This! This!

    • Rusty says...

      I noticed yhe ads and I thoought you did it because it was necessary.
      This place is helping me to keep my sanity through the pandemic and I am here because you’re doing such a fabulous job!
      I actually miss you over the weekends! That’s what a difference you make to our lives! Thank you for being here for us. xx

    • Kim says...

      Ditto, minus the lipstick but I still use CE Ferulic at your recommendation!

  129. Susannah says...

    HOLY MOLY GRACE FARRIS IS A DOCTOR TOO!?!? Ugh I fell in love a thousand times more.

  130. El says...

    I just read Such a Fun Age and it had a lot of the stuff I loved about Americanah– really incisive, often humorous thoughts about how race and gender function in nannying/babysitting situations in the US. With the update of a lot of social media/viral video culture– there’s a video that goes viral of one of the main characters and it’s super interesting. (I know Americanah is about A LOT more than nannying, but when I read Such a Fun Age this month I kept thinking about how it captured something similar to Americanah.)

  131. Joana says...

    I can strongly recommend the book “Girl. Women. Other.” by Bernardine Evaristo. I’m ploughing through it, it’s so well written! It won the Man Booker Prize last year and it tells the stories of 12 women (mostly WOC). Really astonishing!
    Have a lovely weekend!
    (And yes to the ads and to healthcare provided by employers!)

  132. Emily B says...

    That was a fascinating article about movies that were based on articles. Bookmarking it to go back and do a deep dive into some of them. Question for any Canadian readers- I would love to spend some time right now watching some old, classic movies but aren’t sure how to find them with libraries being closed and netflix/crave/amazon not offering very many of them. Does anyone have any tips for streaming older movies?
    Thanks!

    • Kathleen says...

      Try the Criterion Channel and MUBI – depends a bit how your tastes run. My local art-house theatre is doing a weekly roundup of NFB films (all free) and my local library (Vancouver) offers free streaming to members for AcornTV, IndieFlix, etc.

    • Charlotte says...

      Hi Emily, we get a service called Kanopy free through our library which has an excellent collection of classic movies, documentaries and foreign and indie films. We’re in the US but I know the Toronto Library provides it too, so it is available in Canada! On a side note, I know a lot of libraries are providing library cards to new patrons online now so people can access digital content, just a general FYI in case anyone was looking for library access right now. Our library provides audiobooks, ebooks, streaming services and access to the NYTimes online. Libraries are the best, aren’t they?

    • Emily B says...

      Thanks so much for these ideas Charlotte and Kathleen! Yes Charlotte I could not agree more- libraries are the best. I stocked up right before my local library closed but I just finished my last book :( Missing it so much.

    • nadine says...

      Hi Emily,!
      adding to Kathleen and Charlotte great suggestions, another resource is the open culture website http://www.openculture.com/freemoviesonline they have great old classics.
      Love all the ideas ladies!

  133. D says...

    I found Unorthodox quite fascinating . I didn’t know too much about this world and will now watch Shtisel as well. I believe the actor who plays Moishe is in that too.

    • D says...

      Correction— it’s Shira Haas who plays Esty (incredible performance btw) who’s in Shtisel

  134. Annie says...

    I second Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi!

    I just finished binge-watching Unorthodox. Absolutely incredible. Shira Haas is such a talent. Highly recommend!

  135. Megan S. says...

    Hi Jo and Team! I’m sure I won’t be the only one to point this out, but you may want to think twice before steering readers to Everlane. As the pandemic ramped up Everlane abruptly fired their customer service employees for attempting to unionize. They then launched a massive sale and failed miserably at shipping items. Every Everlane IG post is flooded with comments expressing frustration that their money was taken up front with no information regarding shipping delays. There is no customer service team to address this now, and many customers have been unable to get refunds properly processed, if at all. And of course, many still haven’t received their items. I have always loved Everlane, but their recent conduct has me rethinking whether I will ever order from them again.

    On a lighter note, I can attest that the KA pizza is AMAZING, and I’m making the dough for another round of it today!

    • Susan says...

      I think one of the things I will remember after this is all over is the different ways businesses reacted. One grocery store near us is doing all they can to protect their workers (and their customers) while another one hasn’t changed anything. And, of course, there is Amazon who is treating their workers horribly and firing any who speak up. We canceled our Amazon prime membership & I honestly can’t imagine ever ordering from them again.

    • jane says...

      WoW. Thank you for posting this!
      One of the most important insights I am getting from this pandemic is how very important it is to support ethical profit and not merely capitalist profit. Unions should not even be necessary imo, but the fact that the protection they offer has never been more important for so many (Amazon???) has never been more apparent. It is clear that Capitalism is deeply unsustainable without Compassion. Some call that Socialism but so what if it is? We need a deep re-think on how the people who work for us are treated or you end up with ultra useful businesses that profit beyond all known limits simply because they are legally allowed to exploit their labor force. Workers need to stage walk-outs etc because abusers simply do not understand anything respectful because they do not function respectfully themselves.

      For shame Everlane, Amazon and all others whose business models are very old paradigm and need to step up to the challenge of gratitude – and proper culture and compensation – for those who give their business life.

  136. Catherine says...

    I really loved Unorthodox and bought the book after watching the show on Netflix. It’s such a sad and inspiring story.

  137. Jessie Lewis says...

    How did you watch Hotel Chevalier? Is it now part of Darjeeling Limited when you rent it?

  138. Charlotte says...

    I finished Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler earlier this year before the pandemic started to spread. It was written back in the 90s (so doesn’t really check the “new” box) but couldn’t be more on point with the state of things right now. Such a powerful amazing story, it has lingered with me over the last few months in the best way possible.

    • El says...

      Great suggestion, so apt. Also, if you like Parable of the Sower you may be into the work by Adrienne Marie Brown and Autumn Brown– they have a whole podcast based on the principles of this book.

  139. SR says...

    I think it would be nice to choose a newer book written by a WOC! It must be difficult for authors to have books come out during this time, their events and tours are canceled (a big way they make money), and people’s minds are elsewhere. I loved Americanah but I found it very hard to get through, pacing wise, very good but maybe not suited for a book club. Plus, if we choose a newer book, fewer of us will have read it already and we can support a new author! :) have a wonderful weekend everyone! ❤️

    • ES says...

      Agree! There are many wonderful recent books to choose from.

    • Alison says...

      Been loving the light-heartedness of ‘Wow. No Thank You’ by Samantha Irby. Was fairly quick and easy to get the e-book from my library and like that I’m able to pick it up and put it down without too much intense focus right now. A book to consider if you’re looking for recent releases from WOC!

  140. Erica says...

    I had no idea Grace Farris is a doctor on the frontlines fighting Covid-19 in NYC. Thank you for linking to the article. Perhaps you’d consider referring to her as Dr. Grace Farris in her comic strip posts so more people will recognize her multiple talents. You are a gift to the world, Dr. Farris! Thank you for all you do.

  141. Hali says...

    Can’t stop thinking about Unorthodox! I thought the scenes of Williamsburg were absolutely incredible. The wedding scene felt so real it was eerie, like we were watching from someone’s iphone. The grocery store scene was so intense I burrowed into the corner of my sofa while watching it. The Berlin conservatory scenes, however, felt like a bit like a Disney Channel movie to me.

    I started wondering who makes the wigs and clothing for the women and men of the community and then I realized how Hasidic women may be spared/deprived of “influencer culture” because of limited access to social media. At least, as the community is portrayed in the series, they are. I know very little about Hasidism. So much to think about.

    • Catherine says...

      There’s a wonderful documentary on Amazon called 93Queen about a group of Hasidic women who start a women-run EMT service with the help of a local attorney, now judge, Rachel Freier. I’ve watched the documentary several times and find it so inspiring (as someone who was raised in an evangelical Christian family and left in adulthood). The group of women is from Boro Park, Brooklyn, and I’ve thought about them a lot lately. That neighborhood was particularly affected by Covid.

  142. Meg says...

    I love that Everlane jumpsuit but what really stuck out to me was the variation in ages and sizes in the models they picked! Really refreshing. Have a lovely weekend you guys <3

  143. Sara says...

    Thanks for addressing the ads! I was wondering what was going on. I SO APPRECIATE wanting to take care of the staff during this crazy time. I’m in a place where I’d like to offer to pay for a subscription or something to limit the random ads. Sometimes I get really weird ones that, in my opinion, don’t align with COJ’s values. Again, I realize I’m in a privileged place to help that isn’t an option for everyone. Thanks for your dedication and excellent content! xx

    • Georgie says...

      I was going to suggest something similar. I’d be so happy to support the sites I love so that they’re able to move away from the ad revenue model, especially at the moment! Obviously I realise that not everyone will be in this position, but perhaps a voluntary subscription or something similar to a Patreon could be considered?

    • Christie says...

      Agree. Everlane are promoting themselves as “radically transparent” while laying off workers who tried to unionise.

    • Caitlin says...

      Came here to say exactly this! Can’t recommend this book enough, it’s spellbinding. Yaa Gyasi also has a new novel coming out in September (called Transcendent Kingdom)–I imagine the book tour may be affected by Coronavirus, so might be a good way to support a really great author?

    • Heather says...

      I was coming here to suggest Homegoing also! I loved that book so much!

    • Em says...

      I have been meaning to read this and would love to read and participate in COJ book club :)

    • El says...

      wasn’t it so, so wonderful.

  144. heather says...

    Yes please to a book by a woman of color. I’ve read Americanah and loved it – also love Jesmyn Ward. Especially Salvage the Bones which is about a family leading up to Katrina- it’s older too but so good.

    • Mary says...

      I second the recommendation for anything and everything by Jesmyn Ward. Her writing is fantastic!

      I also highly recommend Kali Fajardo-Anstine’s Sabrina & Corina: Stories.

  145. Misha says...

    Please post all the adds. Do all the things. Whatever we can do to help, I want to do. You are like a second home for our hearts, Jo, and after reading Grace’s article I am in tears & wish I could go even more. ♥️

  146. Michelle says...

    Oh my gosh. We bravely/stupidly started potty training at the beginning of quarantine and it is working/not working/too much. It seemed like being home with nowhere to go for an extended period of time would be ideal… but it is making long days so much longer.

    • KB says...

      We also started potty training our boy and it is NOT going well! I’m losing the will! No amount of stickers or chocolate buttons are enough!

    • Heather says...

      Yes!!! We thought that same thing. She’s our fourth and I thought it would be a fun family project or something.

      I hate it. A friend of mine told me she’s paying her 13 year old daughter $100 to do it for her and I’m so ready to make the offer to my 12 year old.

  147. B says...

    Re: Unorthodox, I would read Frieda Vizel’s review in the Forward before watching. Oftentimes entertainment based on Hasidim is lurid and Other-ing and isn’t afforded quite the same depth of conversation that entertainment based on other religious, ethnic or social minorities is, so it’s important to go into it with a bit of education. If you’re after a realistic peek into the Haredi world, Shtisel is a much better option, IMO (also streaming on Netflix).

    • Sara says...

      Yes to everything you wrote here! I am an Orthodox woman (not Hasidic but related to many Hasidim and familiar with the culture) and Hasidic communities like Williamsburg are almost always othered in popular culture. It really upsets me.

    • Rachel L says...

      Thanks both B & E for these great links to reviews. I really enjoyed Unorthodox but appreciate the constructive criticism both of these articles offer. Glad to have these additional perspectives to roll into my views of the show.

    • Lisa says...

      I’m so happy to read this comment. I found Unorthodox to be so gripping, but by the end I was honestly a bit depressed, it paints Judaism in such a narrow and negative light.
      The show WAS amazing, but in a time where people are quick to label people as “good” or “bad”, I think it’s important to remember the reason these people act the way they do, and that they are a group within a group within a group within a group. Things are never so black and white!!

    • Another Sara says...

      Oops, I’m “Another Sara,” and meant to reply here!

    • Emily says...

      As a (between reform and orthodox) Jewish woman in NYC, I would argue that the Orthodox community others itself purposefully including from other Jews who they view as not Jewish. It’s offensive. Also, Unorthodox is based on one woman’s experience and successfully portrays HER experience– not that of all Haredi or Orthodox people. If a viewer watches the show and takes everything portrayed as indicative of all Orthodoxy, that’s really on them.