Design

Have a Lovely Weekend.

Peaches by Kaitlin Wayne

What are you up to this weekend? Anton has been getting really into riding his bike (he’s his mama’s son!), so we’ll be going on bike rides together. Also, bravo for the global climate strike today. We’re kicking off a series next week about climate change and would love to hear all your thoughts, ideas, strategies, experiences, etc. Have a great weekend, and here are a few links from around the web…

The Downton Abbey movie comes out today!

The secret to the lightest pancakes.

Can’t stop looking at these beautiful gardens.

Loving J.Crew’s fall arrivals, especially this work shirt.

The correct way to serve grapes.

How to raise a lifelong reader. “‘When I’m sitting there on my couch, reading a book, and my kids are doing their own thing, I like to think, ‘I’m parenting right now — they can see me reading this book,’” [NYTimes Book Review editor Maria] Russo told me… Parents are constantly sending their children messages with how they choose to spend their free time.”

So excited for Alison Roman’s new cookbook.

Should you mention how tired you are? A flowchart, haha.

Wow, this pan makes the most beautiful cakes.

The cutest kids menu, of all things.

Beyoncé takes her rightful place next to the royals at Madame Tussauds.

Plus, two reader comments:

Says Emma on have you ever embarrassed your child: “My family moved to a new state when my brother, Stanley, was just starting middle school. When my mom dropped him off for his first day of soccer practice, she watched him join his team and couldn’t hold back her motherly nerves. She rolled down the window of the car and yelled out, ‘Be nice to Stanley!!!’ The phrase is now infamous among him and his old soccer teammates (his good friends to this day! they were nice!).”

Says Krysten on burning questions about food: “Something we always do is the vegetables-before-dinner plate. While cooking (when my kids’ whining inevitably sets in), I’ll put out a plate of veggies (sliced carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes, etc); if we have fresh fruit, I might also cut up an apple or pear. I leave this unannounced on the dinner table while I cook. This food is scarfed down almost every time. Before dinner. And when we get to dinner and they don’t want to eat their asparagus or whatever noxious vegetables I serve them, we move on. Because they’ve already eaten veggies. It’s made our dinner time so, so much better.”

(Photo by the amazing Kaitlin Wayne/Instagram.)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes, such a great point, kate. thank you!

  1. I dont think i ever told you that but one of my biggest pleasures in life is opening all of your weekly links at once without looking and THEN opening them all one after the other in delight. Trying to remember which is which. I love you guys thanks for being so super dupper awesome
    Mamaninprovence

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      What a lovely note!!! Thank you, means so much to me. Xoxo

  2. Karien says...

    Good you are going to focus on climate change problems and solutions!

    Some of the main important things I have learned that we as consumers can do:

    – Stop eating meat. Really..! Not just because poor cows but because rainforests are burnt down because the food that the cows we eat is grown there. Etc. Or buy meat directly from your small local farmer.

    – Start buying organic food and/or start growing your own vegetables (which is a lovely thing to do and fun and educational for kids too).

    – Reduce taking airplanes for travelling

    – Stop buying new clothes every season when your ‘old’ clothes are really still perfectly fine. Don’t buy into consumerism so much. We really cannot continue this way anymore.. Organise clothes swap evenings with your friends instead. Etc.

    – Buy Less Stuff.

    Basically, inform yourself and take responsibility. Climate change is not something that started just yesterday. It has just come so far that now we are all experiencing the effects of it such as floods, drought, heat etc. We all have to wake up to this as individuals.

    Love

    • It’s not just about the rainforests being cleared for cattle farming/feed – it’s also that the animals themselves produce greenhouse gases (lots of methane!) and that the energy and land use to raise meat is very inefficient compared to producing the same calories from vegetable foods. So buying from a local farm may be better in some ways, but it’s not really the best answer. (Local cattle may well be fed on Amazon-produced soya as well, btw.) Dairy farming presents many of the same issues as well.

  3. Kathryn says...

    One civic action anyone can take today is to call their congressperson to ask them to ensure the Renewable Fuel Standard, which has been a law since 2007, is being properly enforced by the EPA. In the past year the EPA has increased granting of exemptions for “hardships” under the RFS. The RFS is a program that ensures that refineries are creating a certain amount of renewable fuels to go into the transportation market. It can be from things like corn, or from renewable natural gas that comes from a variety of waste products (including Brooklyn’s very own wastewater treatment plant, which I have heard that locals affectionately referred to as S#*t Tits), and with the exemptions refineries are skirting their obligation to support these cleaner fuel sources.

    Another thing to do is to see how your state is making electricity, and from what sources at what times, and if possible change your electrical habits from there. For example, in California, on sunny days, a large amount of our energy is coming from solar generation, so in fact, contrary to what we learned growing up, the middle of the day is a good time to use energy. Can you set your dishwasher to run then, or delay start your washing machine? Right now most houses in California come home and power up their big appliances as the power plants are switching over to natural gas, which has a larger carbon footprint than solar.

    Also, another simple thing to do is learn that it is okay to be a little uncomfortable, we are constantly told that there is a solution to every single problem, but most of the time we don’t need those solutions, so resist the urge to solve them. You will actually be more comfortable and happy in giving up the urge to figure out/buy what will finally make it all better.

    Due to the nature of my work I spend a lot of time thinking about carbon emissions and climate change, especially in context to my children’s future, and here are my takeaways that have made the dealing with the unknowns better.

    Climate change is happening, but there are so, so many smart and inventive people working hard to make a difference, and solutions already exist. I can’t stress this enough, in all of the doom and gloom, I often get to see all of the bright lights and the amazing things that are happening, it doesn’t mean that all of the problems are solved, but there is so much good happening. We are not starting from square one, you don’t have to come up with a solution, your role in the world can be understanding the limitations and helping with implementation. Implementation is the key to success at this point, and implementation can happen on every level, regardless of what you do you can implement in some aspect of your life.

    With children, take a step back, your job is to give them the tools to be adaptable and resilient problem solvers in the future. Growing this kind of child is different that raising a child to our current measures of success. Often I feel bad about myself a mom and what my child is missing out on, but I am saying yes to a different set of values, and now that my children are growing older I am seeing the payoff of not being the mom who always has the perfect thing in her bag to entertain her toddler, or always has great snack on hand. This has given me greater confidence to keep saying yes to these values as the stakes start to feel higher.

  4. Kaylie Padgett says...

    I’m very excited and thankful to see CoJ do a section on our climate crisis and am eager to see the content! While I’m sure most of it is already slated, I would love to see anything that focuses on environmental racism (PoC are disproportionately affected by our climate disaster) as well as corporate responsibility. There is already so much content around Easy Ways to Be Green! Eco-friendly Products to Buy! etc that shift the responsibility of the climate crisis away from the corporations who carelessly pollute and systemically destroy our resources. Like, yes, bring your own tote bag and your reusable water bottle and be conscious of your food choices, but the sustainability conversations ending there feels like a placation and distraction from larger structural issues. With an emergency as big as this, small actions feel so wonderful to alleviate anxiety and make us feel like we have some semblance of control, but I would love to see the conversation extended. Thankful to have this conversation in this community, which is always generous and supportive!

    • Marygrace says...

      so well put, thank you kaylie. seconding all of this!

    • Alyssa says...

      Kaylie, so well said! I feel pulled into the individual consumer piece a lot too and you are so right, there’s a) so much available in that lane already and b) that really diverts energy and ownership in public discourse away from the biggest issues. I read somewhere that is still a residue from 1990’s environmentalism that I grew up with (recycle yogurt cups! kids take shorter showers!) that succeeded in moving conversation from policy and corporate responsibility, as well as racial and class dynamics. As you said, people of color and people with less resources are already impacted disproportionately – they contribute the least to climate change and are most negatively impacted. Given this, could the major push be to hold systemic forces responsible, as well as discuss and advocate for vulnerable populations and then the movement in our own actions -eating less meat, traveling less, less single use plastic-be just another way to be connected to the process? A real question and something I’m pondering in all my activism right now. I too really appreciate this thoughtful, generous, kind, and informed community for complex important discussions like this.

  5. Andrenna says...

    I came to say the pre-dinner veggie/fruit tray really works. I also snack from it and love it!

  6. Looking at the feature picture of the peaches, and now I want some pie. LOL. My weekend was spent at work, I am really in the need of some family time :)

  7. Anonygirl says...

    I am here for more information on climate change. I’ve been thinking a lot about how I can reduce my carbon footprint and live more sustainably. I already do some stuff, but I know there’s more I can do.

  8. Sarah says...

    I saw the Downton Abbey movie on Saturday. It was fantastic — and I have never seen an episode of the show. Such a beautiful, funny film. And Maggie Smith.

  9. Brooke says...

    Oh wow, Joanna, this beautiful quote from “The Work That Reconnects” makes me think of your brave powerful sharing this week about battling the depression bog. I felt so seen and less alone in my story, and appreciate you so. Hope you continue to find Balm and know you’ve offered Balm to me and others.

    “The critical passage or hinge happens when, instead of privatizing, repressing and pathologizing our pain for the world (be it fear, grief, outrage or despair), we honor it. We learn to re-frame it as suffering-with or compassion. This brings us back to life.”

    • Sasha L says...

      That’s such a beautiful quote Brooke, thank you for sharing

    • Brooke says...

      Fun to “converse” with you on here Sasha. Yes that quote touched me so deeply as well.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that’s such a beautiful quote, brooke. thank you so much for sharing.

  10. Brooke says...

    That’s really exciting about your climate change series! You guys always pick really wonderful resources and authors so I look forward to seeing and learning. Feels like there’s political/systemic, consumer/culture, and meaning making/humanitarian layers. On the consumer/culture level, I would adore if you guys talked with anyone who can make recommendations about lowering plastic use and carbon footprint (ie functioning plastic free shampoos, cleaning products, iPhone cases).

    This may be beyond the scope of what you end up posting, but you may enjoy checking out the work of Joanna Macy. She is a long time environmental activist (she’s in her late 80s now!!) and she has a beautiful process called Active Hope and The Work that Reconnects, that is about engaging action from a very deep sustaining connected place in us. I’ve been to activist gatherings with this model and it’s very rich and moving.

    https://www.joannamacy.net/main

    • Sasha L says...

      A couple solutions:
      Ethique shampoo and conditioner bars are excellent!
      You can buy glass spray bottles and fill with vinegar and water, or dish soap and water, and use for just about everything. Cloths instead of paper towels. And you can refill the dish soap at many natural markets in the bulk section. Same for laundry soap (also very easy to make yourself, I use a recipe that is liquid castile soap, washing soda and water – super cheap and easy and very effective).

    • Brooke says...

      Thank you Sasha! These are great leads. I love having a brand to follow up on for shampoo and conditioner as that has felt harder to crack.

      I appreciate the comments here too noting that focus on individual consumer behavior can be a distraction I from the biggest solutions, at the political and corporate level.. . So true, that nothing will make as big of a difference as curbing big emissions, changing policy, and incentive structures. That said, If this makes sense, it feels congruent or motivating to link my devotion for individual change to my devotion to systemic change. I’ve seen Joanna your team do so much in speaking at multiple levels during this time of national and global upheaval and need, and I too am interested in whatever recommendations for political, policy, and corporate changes that are needed too, whether in this space or in other places available online and in person.

  11. Lucy says...

    As a child there would be times my mum wouldn’t want to cook. The policy then was we could have whatever we wanted (we didn’t really have treats in the house so it was often just toast or cereal) as long as we had a carrot. Carrots were the go to snack. Mum would also often hand them out to my brother and I before dinner, along with anyone who was over at the time. Every childhood friend of mine has eaten a carrot at our house.

  12. Ann says...

    I’d love to see some ‘Climate Change’ actions we can all do. Right now, I’ve tried to limit food waste, and eliminate beef from my diet, as I’ve read those are both big impact small changes individuals can make. I’d love to know more! I can’t wait to see what CupofJo comes out with!

  13. Andrea says...

    Would love a feature with Aja Barber in regard to the ways in which we can make our wardrobe more sustainable. She has amazing style, is so smart & funny, while also bringing awareness to the intersectionality of these issues, especially in fashion.

    • Anonygirl says...

      Yes, please! I am sick of fast fashion. I want to buy pieces that will fit well and last for years to come.

    • Sasha L says...

      Stasia Savasuk would be awesome for this too

  14. Emily says...

    I am so looking forward to the climate change series next week! As a broadcast journalist and weather anchor, who is studying meteorology, I’ve made the decision to leave the business at the end of my contract.

    Two years into this program, the reality is glaring. I would love to use my degree in meteorology to get into a field of work focused on sustainability- but I am not sure where to begin!

    Hope to find some inspiration and/or starting points in what your team publishes next week :-)

  15. Kaitlin says...

    Perhaps this is my nurse brain coming out, but am I the only one that thinks the cake pan makes cakes that look like a butthole?!? …But … a beautiful butthole. :)

    • Christina says...

      hahahahahahaha this is perfect.

    • Erin says...

      that was literally the only thing I could think of. It’s an anus.

    • MS says...

      Agreed! And…spiders. I definitely do not agree that the pan makes the most beautiful cakes :|

  16. So excited about the climate change series! I’m currently reading The Conscious Closet by Elizabeth Cline and I HIGHLY recommend for everyone! Her first book Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Fast Fashion was so informative and amazing!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you! these books sound fantastic.

  17. Kelly says...

    I take my kids to clean the streets and streams. Grab a bag, gloves (why do kids love plastic gloves) and head out. It’s blast to explore nature and make up stories about the trash and the bad guys that litter. My kids talk about it all the time. Even in 2019 the cigarette buds are everywhere. It’s small but as a working mom it’s a win/win. Spend time with my kids, be outside and teaching them to clean up (they love it when it isn’t their mess). People stop and say “thank you” and for that moment I believe in humanity.

    • Steffi says...

      Hi Kelly, that’s such a wonderful idea! Thank you for the inspiration and thank you for taking action with your kids!

  18. C. says...

    I have always appreciated the content offered here, the friendly, straightforward and thoughtful approach to a wide spectrum of topics. But I will be opting out of the climate change series for the sake of my mental and emotional well being. I think it is probably one of the most critical issues of our time (I read about it every day, do what I can, and it will influence my vote in all elections) but I need a break from turmoil and contention. I have come to realize that reading comment sections has dramatically impacted my outlook of the world in a negative way – people are often so awful to each other- thoughtless, intolerant, contemptuous, judgmental, arrogant, often ill-informed in their opinions- and topics like climate change can bring out the worst of it. Which is a whole other problem that I think is changing our character as a society in a bad way. Anyway. Good luck. I may check it out at another time when I am not feeling so depressed about the human race.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i promise our climate change discussions will be helpful, thoughtful and full of care. Cup of Jo readers are a wonderful group of people — I agree with you about comment sections overall, but our comment section is something special because of these amazing women.

    • Owl says...

      I just wanted to say that this is, for me at least, an ideal place to discuss the environment. The issue isn’t going away, and having such an engaged, thoughtful, and interesting community discussing it is a wonderful, hopeful activity that might help bring about some real change! Thanks COJ!

  19. Catherine says...

    I love pancakes, and I’m always on the lookout for new light recipes. Could you fix the link please? Loving the links, as usual!

  20. Frozen peas! @Krysten on “burning questions about food”
    When I am rushing around making dinner for my 3 kids, I pour out a big bowl of frozen peas (still frozen) and leave them for the kids (my kids, neighborhood kids, friends’ kids… who’s ever in the house!) to eat. Adults always think it is mad and kids always scarf them down.

    • Eli says...

      Oh my gosh, I LOVE frozen peas!! (And corn). I get made fun of so much because I will pull out a bag and just sit and munch instead of cooking them. (I also like dry pasta.) Love that you do this!!

    • Steffi says...

      Oh my god, that’s so funny! While traveling I met a girl, who loved to snack frozen peas! So thanks for the reminder, they are delicious I just always forget about it 😁

  21. CS says...

    Thank you so much for addressing climate change! By the way, I was talking to a scientist friend of mine who said that the single most powerful thing we can do as individuals to fight climate change is eat less meat (or no meat!). I fall under the less meat category, and I am also avoiding places like Burger King and KFC that source their meat from the burning Amazon. A quick google search before you purchase makes a huge difference – also check if the species of fish/seafood you are buying is sustainable. It really makes a difference!

  22. AndreaJane says...

    When I was in the 7th grade (if ever there was a grade just FRAUGHT with social anxiety…) I had forgotten my lunch and my mother brought to my 3rd period math class and when she handed it to me she gave me a big kiss on the cheek. I was mortified then but now it is one of my sweetest memories of her.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, the sweetest <3

  23. Erin says...

    Don’t mess around with cottage cheese! The secret ingredient for successful pancakes is actually a tablespoon of lemon juice.

  24. Hope says...

    “Be nice to Stanley!” I want that on a tee shirt. (And I’m so relieved that they were nice).

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      hahaha yes!

  25. mb says...

    re: the correct way to serve grapes.

    Squeezed, fermented, and in a glass.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      hahaha

  26. Gina says...

    While I’m all for strikes and marches, sometimes I think we do them as a way to shift responsibility. But if everyone who participated in the global climate strike stopped eating animal products, our earth would be in better shape. That’s something we can all do now that has a real impact.

    Bad, polluting corporations only exist if we support them with our money, so it’s not just corporations and governments who need to change; it’s us.

    • Sasha L says...

      With you 100% Gina! I’m not a marcher, but I support those who do. I do, each and every day for more than 30 years now, eat no meat or seafood and very little dairy. While having no children wouldn’t been the most ecological choice, we did raise our two vegetarian, and they still are as adults. It’s such a simple thing that makes a huge impact if we all did it.

      Someone above mentioned stopping eating beef, and while any effort to cut back on consumption is commendable, there are huge problems with not only beef, but pork, chicken and all seafood as well (currently no seafood is actually sustainable). While everyone just likes to eat what they like, perhaps changing the focus to everyone having enough food would help. So many benefits beyond saving the planet too- health, saving loads of money, an ethical choice for animals.

    • KL says...

      I agree with you re: strikes and marches. Also, something that bugs me about them is all the new and sparkly signs urging people to do something about climate change. Couldn’t they have just used a piece of cardboard from an existing box? Use some markers they already had? Sometimes I think people like to strike just to post to their Instagrams.

  27. colleen k says...

    I can’t wait to read the climate change material!!I’ve been experience climate anxiety over the last few years and am always searching for tips and small changes that I can make. Best tip is to aim for improvement, not perfection (apply to all aspects of life :)

  28. I’m so excited to see Downton Abbey! Have a great weekend!

  29. Sally says...

    I’ll be finishing work at lunchtime on Tuesday. Then I fully intend to go and see an early afternoon showing of Downton Abbey! With a quick detour to the supermarket first, for some cinema snacks! And I won’t have to share them!

  30. Sasha L says...

    Super excited to read about climate change here next week. Thank you!

    I’ve started thinking of caring for our Earth as self care. My health, well being and choices are completely connected to our only home. This really helps me reassess buying something new as a pick me up vs tending my flowers to provide habitat for butterflies and bees, for example.

    Speaking of kids and vegetables, and of climate change, vegetarianism for the win! We raised our daughters vegetarian and they’ve always been super adventurous eaters. I think removing relatively bland foods, like chicken, fish, burgers, opens children’s palates to bigger tastes. It’s also such a help for the planet, will save families so much money and is healthy.

  31. J says...

    Regarding the climate change series – would you consider doing a month of easy vegan recipes or something to that effect? Veganism is one of the many ways that people can take making positive change into their own hands. It would be amazing to see this sort of proactivity on this platform!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes, will talk to jenny about this!

  32. Whitney Lanier says...

    Not sure if you all are still looking for climate material but Katharine Wilkinson might be a great woman to interview… here is her TedTalk about how educating women and girls can have a huge positive impact on climate change.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/katharine_wilkinson_how_empowering_women_and_girls_can_help_stop_global_warming/up-next

    She is awesome (and a friend if you all would like an introduction:)). Thanks for all the incredible content!

  33. L says...

    Riley – I have a 5 month old and also get about 3 hours sleep per night. Happy to listen to complaints anytime! :)

  34. Kaitlyn says...

    Oh CoJ I’m so glad you’re going to be discussing the climate!

    One suggestion would be to change the language being used from climate change to climate crisis or emergency. Words are so important, and change sounds passive and normal. Everything changes right? What we’re up against is a crisis or emergency. For those of us under 30 our futures look so bleak if we continue on this path, it’s certainly time to pull the emergency handle.

    But above all thank you for just talking about it! It’s so overwhelming and communities of people educating each other on this topic is so so powerful.

  35. Vanessa says...

    I had a little internal “yay” when you said three readers comments and felt rather crushed when that didn’t turn out to be the case!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh hahaha we ended up saving the third for instagram or a future comment round-up, but i’ll share it here! :)

      Says Emma on burning questions about food: “To take care of food waste, we have ‘Tiny Bites’ once a week. The idea is a plate full of tiny portions of leftovers. You can mix hot and cold food. Favorites include: halved meatballs, three carrot sticks, a dollop of hummus, slices of apple, a small pile of peas, cubed cheese, raisins no one ate from their lunch, yogurt with leftover herbs, that half cucumber you didn’t include in last night’s salad, bits of chips from the bottom of the bag… Arrange it all together on a plate and it even looks a little fancy.”

  36. Stanley stan says...

    What’s the third reader comment??? If it’s as amazing as Stanley or Veggies, I want to know?

  37. Kristina says...

    Thank you for the link to Alison Roman’s new book–just pre-ordered it! I love to entertain and am always looking for ways to make it even easier and more enjoyable : )

    Also, I really appreciate your commitment to covering climate change (the reference above to the “climate emergency” is so powerful; it feels just that). I certainly feel the same anxiety about it that others speak of and look forward to your coverage. Have a lovely weekend!

  38. Laura says...

    Have you heard about Traverse City- For the Love of Water? They are doing some really incredible legal and policy work around protecting the Great Lakes. Not climate change specifically, I know, but an important topic.

  39. It is interesting to see so many people talking about climate change but continue to share meat, dairy, and other foods constantly on their websites. It truly is time to change our mindsets and together help each other find better alternatives to their favorites. I would recommend starting slow with something attainable.

    Cheese. Have you tried cultured cashew cheese from the brand Miyoko’s yet? It is a women owned company and you would love her. Let’s all stand together and support those who are making a difference and YOU can too. <3

  40. lydia says...

    1. i need to try the veggies before dinner with my children
    2. im super excited to read what you come up with next week for climate change! have you seen this ted talk?
    https://www.ted.com/talks/katharine_hayhoe_the_most_important_thing_you_can_do_to_fight_climate_change_talk_about_it/transcript?language=en#t-1019750
    she also wrote a book with andrew farley called, “a climate for change: global warming facts for faith based decisions. i found this so helpful as i try to have conversations about the climate with my conservative family.
    3. i watched the show you recommended a week or so back. are you familiar with the ennegram? i think the main character, Aine, is a seven, thoughts? i found myself saying out loud, “please just tell someone how you REALLY feel”, but maybe she didnt know how or didnt even know what she felt…
    4. has anyone seen the peanut butter falcon yet??? GO SEE IT, NOW!
    and ps, youre either missing one reader comment or you meant to write two instead of three. i love when you post reader comments. “be nice to stanley!”

  41. Sara says...

    This is like 100% off topic (sorry, not sorry), but I am so curious if anyone else is watching the first season of Couples Therapy on Showtime? I’d love to hear your thoughts. I’m feeling so many things about this show. Have a great weekend, CoJ family!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i haven’t watched it yet but the trailer looked so compelling (if a little dark!). i’m so curious to hear your feelings about it!

  42. Lara says...

    Have a lovely weekend joanna !
    I know last weekend you weren’t feeling very well .. I can relate .i had a rough evening today .i have been dealing with anxiety/ depression for a long time now and sometimes everything feels heavy . I was holding my tears the whole evening so i ended up watching three billboards to distract myself . It made me cry – happy tears !
    You are not alone ! I hope this helps
    Xoxo

    • Christina says...

      I hope you feel better soon too, Lara XOXO

  43. Maïa says...

    I love this comment about having veggies available before dinner, and I don’t have kids, but I plan to apply it to myself! :)
    And thank you so much for adressing the climate emergency! There is so much we have to do even if its so scary than it often feel easier to avoid the informations about it.
    I would also like to add than it’s actually very “normal” and sane to feel very anxious or depressed facing these informations. And a lot of people numb themselves cause its so complicated to connect emotionnally to the difficult situation we’re facing.

  44. Allison says...

    Lovely! I recently learned that Whole Foods will weigh jars I bring in so I can use them in the bulk bin section. Revolutionary! Saves money and waste with all of the individual packaging. Have a great weekend!

    • Wendy says...

      Oh, I was just discussing this with my husband today! It seems like a simple thing, I wish every grocery store would get on board!

  45. Annie says...

    Ha. Well. I’m 9 months pregnant with my third kid and SO TIRED. ;)

    • Megan Clarke says...

      Haha, yes! I feel it is good conversation when you are super pregnant or have a newborn. I’m in the newborn camp and people love asking about sleep.

  46. Riley says...

    I have a 4 month old baby and get approximately 3 hours of sleep each night, so I’m definitely talking about how tired I am regardless of what the chart says 😂

    • Kristie says...

      Hahaha! Honestly if us mums couldn’t talk about how tired we are, I wouldn’t have much to add to the conversation! Except maybe the number of poops my baby had today!

    • Megan Clarke says...

      My thoughts exactly. Two month old baby over here 😴. But I do get the point. My husband seems to only focus on the tiredness of a newborn and forgets to mention the good parts. So when he is constantly telling people “I’m tired” when they ask how he is, it gets to me.

  47. hali says...

    I have such a big mom-crush on all the moms that comment on this blog, it’s unreal. Veggies BEFORE dinner? Be nice to Stanley? !!! So much to aspire to!

    PS Happy last weekend of summer!!

  48. Sheila Mary says...

    I greatly look forward to the climate change series!!
    Speaking of, I’m reading an incredible book, “Inconspicuous Consumption,” by Tatiana Schlossberg (the former NYT reporter). Very accessible read. She helps people who care about the environment by giving us DATA, so we know what’s really going on. She’s not exposing anything, not unlocking secrets — just sharing the environmental impacts we don’t know about. Highly recommend.

  49. NatDU says...

    I am so glad climate change will be featured!!!
    I suffer such debilitating environmental depression and anxiety about the world my (all of our!) little boy will have to face, and I don’t know how to feel like I’m doing enough within what is possible for me. I recycle like mad, avoid plastic wherever possible, buy second hand (from clothes to toys), avoid driving, donate to climate causes, am not materialistic at all, email politicians and it still feels so futile! I do not have the personality or the means to get into politics or activism, but I can’t help but feel this is the only way to make a real difference.
    Looking forward to some positivity regarding the world. I can’t stand the thought that I’ll look back in the future and say to my son “I could have done more”.

    • Maïa says...

      Hi Natdu, I really feel the same about “we could have done more” thing. And of course we should do more. I read recently that our individual efforts are only 12 to 25% of the CO2 impact, it encourages me to do more in my day to day life, but at the same time I wonder if I shoulndt spend this time on collective activism.
      Also, I don’t know CoJ how you plan to adress this subject, but I read a French magazine that has 3 angles :
      – individual actions
      – collective actions
      – change of mindset (how to reconnect to nature, to ourselves…)

    • Gina says...

      You should watch the documentary Cowspiracy. Silly name, but good information about how individuals can make an impact.

    • Hazle says...

      Ooh yeah, that’s going to be interesting!!

  50. Jill says...

    Yay! I knew your lifestyle blog would be the one thoughtful enough to focus on the climate strike this week. Thank you and I look forward to reading about it. It is something I have been thinking about a lot today.

  51. Amelia says...

    Oh my goodness – this is the person who commented abour climate change on the food post – I am SO EXCITED that you have more posts planned <3 <3 <3 <3 Just came from bringing my 4 year old to our local rally and was in awe of all the amazing young people there.

  52. Elle says...

    Thank you for listening to feedback about linking to independent booksellers instead of Amazon for your book recommendations and making the change right away. Love this community!

    • Kathleen says...

      Came here to say the same thing! So glad to see a link that wasn’t to amazon!

  53. Cynthia says...

    Re: the vegetable plate before dinner. When My husband and I would go out for the evening, I often fixed a “snack tray” for the kids for their meal – cheese, crackers, fruit, veggies and dip, finger sandwiches. Easy for me and something special for them, especially when it’s called a “snack” and they can pick and choose.

  54. Sadie says...

    I use that vegetables-before-dinner trick, too! It really works. Hungry kids are good eaters. We used to pick up a vegetable box at the Farmer’s Market every Wednesday after work, and my then three-year-old would graze on the way home– a box of cherry tomatoes, peas from the pod, an entire cucumber, whatever looked interesting. I just let it continue. He is six now and still generally objects to “leaves,” but he will eat a bag of snap peas like they’re chips when he comes home from school, and he eats bell peppers out of the fridge like they’re apples. (Yes, the seeds do get everywhere).

  55. Loesie says...

    High school reunion tomorrow! Contemplating telling people my friend and I invented post-its 😊
    Can’t wait. I checked out who would be there, and at least one old flame will be there… I wonder what kind of vibes that will create 😊

    • Jade says...

      I always thought it would have been great to invent post it’s and I adored their matching 90s dresses. I hope you have a blast !

    • Brooke says...

      Haha Loesie, love the Romy & Michelle shout out! 😆

  56. Erin says...

    I’ve been reading articles about how to turn your yard into a carbon sequestering habitat, which feels doable and encouraging- imagine if we all did it (and pressured our cities to increase tree canopy/regulations!).

  57. Elise Derstine says...

    I do the same thing with veggies before dinner! Amazing how well it works.