Relationships

Where Have You Cried in Public?

crying in public

Having grown up in New York City, I have had the great pleasure of crying publicly all over this town…

From the Bronx to Battery Park!

I’ve cried publicly for silly reasons — like the time I bought a Groupon to get my teeth whitened but for whatever reason only my gums got bleached. I looked freakish and felt like a fool. I cried on the corner of Gold street and then again on the C train platform.

Or another time when literally a flock of pigeons shat on my new L.L. Bean backpack as I turned the corner from 100th street to West End Avenue. I was in sixth grade. When I got home, my mom made me stay in the hallway and strip down to my underwear. That backpack was never the same again.

I’ve also cried for more serious reasons. Like a time when my best friend’s five-year-old told me about the soft lockdowns at her school. She casually described hiding in a cubby with the other kids in her classroom. It was heartbreaking. So, I cried at the Crispus Attucks playground on the corner of Fulton and Classon.

I recently compared public crying notes with my friend Julia Rothman, who also grew up in New York City. And guess what? We’ve shed tears on some of the same street corners.

What’s the takeaway? Cry in public! Have your feelings! Don’t go to a Groupon dentist to get your teeth whitened!


Shaina Feinberg is a director and actress and Julia Rothman is an illustrator and author. Right now, they’re working on a modern guide to real sex written by everybody, for everybody. (If you’d like to contribute a story, go here.)

P.S. Making out in public, and a trick to stop yourself from crying.

(Written by Shaina Feinberg. Illustration by Julia Rothman.)

  1. Lauren Brown says...

    I no longer live in New York but I did for about 8 years in my twenties and I have cried all over that damn city. It’s one of those things that is hard to explain to someone that has never experienced it before, but crying in public (especially in NYC) is one of the best and most liberating feelings that one can experience. One of the times that I can more vividly remember is when I was interviewing for a new position within my current company. I wasn’t really happy there and hadn’t been for some time. A new role came available and I begged for the opportunity to interview for it. I had set all of my hopes and expectations on this new role, thinking it would fix everything that I didn’t like about where I was professionally. It was just a few weeks before Christmas when I was told at the end of the day that someone else had been hired for the new role. I quietly gathered my things and walked out of my office onto a bustling 56th street. I started crying immediately but it didn’t feel right; everyone seemed so cheerful and hopeful, doing Christmas shopping and basking in the glory of New York City during the holidays. As I turned the corner onto 6th avenue I ducked into the Hilton Hotel right there — it was full of tourists and no one I would ever see again. I knew no one from my work (or literally anyone I knew in the city) would dare enter a Hilton in Midtown for happy hour drinks. I sat in a very dark corner of their lobby bar, ordered a beer, and cried by myself for almost an hour. I was pitiful. But it helped so much! After I had no more tears to cry, I paid for my drink and walked out into the glorious New York night. About two months later I was offered a job at a different company that turned out to be so much more in line with what I wanted for myself and my career. I often think back to that night and think about the Hilton lobby bar on 6th ave with such fondness. I needed a place to wallow and the bar tender there was so kind to just leave me be. Everything worked out so much better in the end (as it usually does).

    • Laura Stanton says...

      I love this so much

  2. Michelle says...

    I’m a crier. And I don’t mind crying in public, although it often feels like time slow down when it happens. I was in Paris over Thanksgiving and had horrendous stomach cramps and the museum I wanted to see was closed. It was snowing and I called my mom and sobbed on the street. I remember it was beautiful that day even though it seemed like everything was awful.
    Last week my best friend passed away. I got the news in the middle of my open plan office and sobbed in a conference room with people walking by. A coworker took me home and I cried in the uber, in the lobby of my building, and as I walked my dog. I took a couple of days off and sobbed at the pool, at the dog park, at starbucks, and in the airport. I always feel better after.

    • Amy says...

      So sorry for your loss, Michelle. Thinking of you today.

    • Barbara Thornton says...

      I’m so sorry for your loss

  3. O says...

    I’ve cried in public more times than I can count. When I have anxiety attacks I almost always cry and at my last job I was having anxiety attacks nearly every day. I ended up crying in front of coworkers, my boss, my patients…. I do not care where, I will cry anywhere (lol).

  4. Caitlin says...

    When I lost my cousin to suicide I lost my ability to keep my tears in in public. I cried at work, in public (all over town), in airports … everywhere! I found secret solace in keeping a running list on my phone where I noted things that helped me keep the tears at bay (drinking water, working out, eating spicy food, not working out, etc.)

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i’m so sorry for your loss, caitlin. thinking of you today.

  5. Rebecca says...

    The other day I passed a street, where I cried in a car during a particularly rough breakup, while on a field trip with 30 middle schoolers. For a long time that street made me so sad even just to drive by and now it just makes me smile about being young and in love.. Public cry spots are the worst in the moment and weird funny memories after

  6. LTT says...

    I don’t cry in public often, but several months back, I was caught off guard and of all places, tears started rolling down my cheeks at an Urban Outfitters. It was such an overwhelming feeling. I read a text from the guy I was dating (the first guy that I’ve seriously dated)- it was a break up text. I didn’t see it coming. I was so heartbroken, and everything felt so blurry. I had to hide the fact that I was crying and eventually muster up all the energy to collect myself to walk to the counter to return an item.

    Afterwards, I had to go to Wal-Mart to pick up a few things (including a frozen pizza because it’s my go-to comfort food and I knew that was the only thing I would eat that night). Honestly, that entire time I was in Wal-Mart, it was such a blur, but I remember distinctly crying at the self-checkout counter and there was A CAMERA POINTING DIRECTLY AT MY FACE RECORDING EVERYTHING. Goodness, it was such a terrible day. I will never forget that. There’s a Wal-Mart out there with footage of me crying while trying to pay for a frozen pizza. What a day.

  7. HH says...

    Most of my public crying has been in response to the emotional rollercoaster endured while dating one particular long-distance ex:
    In the lone elevator, TSA line, and propellor plane from Monterey, CA, to the San Francisco airport and then the entire flight from CA home. Another time, from the point of leaving his car and going through security at San Jose, and the entire flight home. Through multiple hymns and sermons at church. On a bench on Main Street in my home town, right outside a tattoo parlor. Six years have passed and the anger and distress caused by that relationship have passed. Now I can laugh when I think back to the time he left me crying in San Jose. A kind man at the outdoor baggage claim looked from him to me and said, “It’s ok honey. I felt exactly the same way when I left my dad to go to university.”

    HA HA. My ex was only two years older than me. And I was 33 at the time! Bless you, kind man at the airport, who thought my ex was 50 and I was 20!

  8. Lindsay says...

    This reminded me of a time my husband and I were in the McDonald’s drive through, in his car with tinted windows. We could see our friend behind us in her van. She was crying. Made me so sad. We paid for her order but never said anything…It makes me cry when I see people crying in their cars. Like what happened, did someone die? Did they have a fight with spouse or child? I have definitely ugly cried in my car too.

  9. Rebecca says...

    I’ve certainly cried in public more times than I can count but after the fact I’m always able to look back at the remarkable kindness of strangers. One day 5 years ago I was on my typical commuter bus home, struggling to hide my tears from how miserable I felt at my job. Once I had generally composed myself the young woman next to me started asking me questions about the stops along the route and other general questions about the area. Her simple act of conversation saved me that evening and I still think about her.

  10. Carly says...

    My secret talent is crying in public. In Chicago, I’ve cried for missing many L’s; recently, in Cannes, France, I cried at McDonalds (that caused a few stares as PDA is only reserved for kissing, not crying, in Europe); cried in a corner at Nobu in New York when I was 13; have cried at several Apple stores after they couldn’t fix something. The list goes on. Something about crying in public is comforting.

  11. S says...

    1) I cried on the street corner of 42nd and 2nd Avenue when I got the call that my grandmother passed away. I had just been visiting my hometown and had flown back to NYC the previous evening, only to have to jump in my car with my husband to try to beat the incoming snow storm so that I could make it for her funeral.

    2) My baby boy died in my arms in February, and these last few months I cry everywhere. In the store when I see a stuffed animal I would have wanted to buy for him, a baby in a stroller, a heavily pregnant woman, cute little boys, baby boys clothes, and the list goes on. Still working through this one and I’m often crying about not having him with me in the office, and on the streets of NYC, too.

    • HH says...

      S, I just want to reach through the internet and give you a great big [HUG].

    • Jenny says...

      I’m so sorry to hear about you losing your baby boy. Thinking of you and wishing you courage and strength as you pass through this incredibly painful and raw season of deep grief….

    • K says...

      I’m so sorry S. That is so tough to see those things too…:(

    • Laura Stanton says...

      I don’t have anything to offer except that I think about you and other women who have suffered through the loss of a child ALL the time. I hope you feel comforted knowing that while you may feel alone in your pain, there are so many strangers who think of you often.

  12. Marie says...

    Came back to this post to read more comments – and if it makes you feel any better, the same day you were crying and wiping away tears on your lunch break in Soho, I was a few blocks South, in FiDi, crying and wiping away tears on my lunch break for the same reason.

  13. Alyssa says...

    I’m a pretty big crier, and I’m a sympathetic crier. So if you’re crying, I’m crying. I find that I cry at work a lot. Not because of performance stuff, but just because of random moments. The funniest one looking back happened early in 2018. I went online to balance my bank account and realized that my account had been hacked and they had stolen well over $3000. I was panicked, but managed to call the bank and cancel my cards right away. I kept it all together when I needed to but the moment I stopped and my co-worker (in our very open communal workspace) asked what happened, I burst into tears. Like heaving tears. I felt so violated. I went outside and called my mom and sobbed to her. Everyone at my job was seriously so gracious and offered me cash and money to help me get by until it could be resolved. Grateful for their love that day.

  14. Tess says...

    Oh man, I have outright sobbed in public on the streets of New York so many times before. From serious things like deaths of loved ones and losses of friends to the time that I hadn’t eaten in 10 hours and got yelled at by a Bodega employee about my order and sobbed on the way home!! Oh NYC… how I love you. Thanks for never batting an eyelash even when I’m ugly crying in broad daylight in midtown.

    • Barbara says...

      Something about the hugeness of NYC makes crying in public feel weirdly private? Like “there’s so many people in this park doing their own thing, surely nobody will notice me sobbing quietly on this bench on my lunch break” !!! I did it so many times while I worked in the city, feeling alone and yet wrapped in comfort by the hustle around me.

  15. JESSICA says...

    I cried in the Trader Joe’s wine section after getting rear-ended. There wasn’t much damage and I didn’t get hurt, but I was pretty shaken up. To top it off, the police officer who came to the scene was a huge jerk and totally made me feel like an idiot for even calling the police in the first place. The girl who hit me was a teen who was texting when she hit me. I felt so overwhelmed that I couldn’t hold it in after the Trader Joe’s cashier asked how I was and started sobbing. They were so sweet and as I was leaving with my wine, they handed me a bouquet of flowers.

  16. Blythe says...

    1. A coworker I was traveling with sexually harassed me while on a work trip in Boston. I left early and raced through Boston traffic to make it to the airport to catch my flight home. There was a hiccup with the rental car and I was close to loosing it. The rental car lady – who could clearly tell that something was wrong – told me to go and I proceeded to sob through TSA and boarding. I kept it together on the flight, but publicly sobbed again as soon as I saw my husband.
    2. The day after the election at work. We watched Hillary’s speech in the break room and none of us could hold it together.
    3. When we found out that something might be wrong with our baby (36 weeks pregnant!) and that it would require surgery after birth. I cried my way through many restaurants and other public places that week.

  17. Natasha says...

    Penn station, in the Amtrak waiting area because yet another one of my friends announced they were pregnant, while I’ve been trying for nearly a year.

    The tears flowed there and for the next 4.5 hours on the train to Boston. I even texted my mom’s old number (she died a few years ago) b/c I was that desperate for anybody to talk to me. I would not have shirked a stranger telling me it would be okay.

    Although, I didn’t feel too terrible about it because of all the things that happen in Penn Station, crying is fairly normal.

  18. LB says...

    I just scheduled a chat with a mentor woman at work for later in the week, because I am upset about my job situation and want changes…We’ll probably go to starbucks and then I’ll be the crying woman in the coffee shop hiccuping to hold back the sobs. I’m laughing at the thought but also dreading it, ha.

  19. I sobbed in the waiting room of a doctor’s office in Boston. I was struggling to figure out what was going on with my cycle and chronic pain. It turned out it was endometriosis, but the doctor I’d just seen had dismissed that, and said instead my pain was caused by constipation from the Percocet I had been prescribed (which, of course, had been prescribed to treat my pain). I felt so invalidated. The appointment was over but I couldn’t make it past the waiting room. I sat down and just cried and cried.

    The next doctor I saw about the issue, though, took my symptoms seriously. Three laproscopic surgeries (and one baby) later, the endo is under control, and I feel much more skilled at speaking up for myself in medical situations.

  20. Lauren E. says...

    I’ve cried everywhere in this city. Once I broke down on 42nd & 6th because I forgot to meet my dad for lunch, and as I ran down the street to make it in time he called to tell me he had to get back to work and couldn’t stay. The thought of my disappointed dad sitting alone at the restaurant waiting for me basically broke me and I sobbed in the middle of the street.

    The worst part of it, I think, is that New Yorkers are not callous enough to just let you cry. They stop and ask if you’re okay! The nerve. :)

  21. Courtney says...

    Was in a long distance relationship until I made the move to Europe. So yeah, I’ve cried everywhere. There are times when I just can’t stand to hear another word of the German language. The worst day was when I lost it at the beginning of my language class. My teacher was going over the corrections on something I’d written and the tears started. She kept talking and wished me to get well soon when I grabbed my things and fled the scene. She’s a great teacher.

  22. I feel like if you’re not used to crying in public BEFORE you have kids, by the time you have a 3 year old you’re EXPERIENCED. I once cried on an airplane because she’d been up fussing for six or seven hours and I was at the end of my rope. And another time I injured my knee right before getting on a plane and the pain was so bad I couldn’t hold back the tears.

    In the first instance, most people tried to avoid eye contact with me because they were so pissed about the noise, but one flight attendant gave me sympathetic looks, which I accepted graciously. And in the second case, the lady behind me offered me a Xanex (which I didn’t take, but the sentiment was lovely).

    I say have your feelings. Once you’ve crouched by a screaming toddler who is saying “I hate you I hate you mommy” for the whole Target to hear, who really cares about the definition of dignity?

    Also people are mostly nice.

  23. Ana says...

    I commuted every day for two and a half years on Metro North and I’m convinced I was known by my fellow 6:32 train riders as “the crying girl.” I cried once because a middle aged man yelled at me for talking on the phone (it wasn’t even the quiet car!!!). Once he realized I was crying he started apologizing but I was sobbing so hard I couldn’t even respond. And the other time was after I finished Me Before You. The train was empty because we were already towards the end of the line, but the whole car could definitely hear my heaving sobs. I closed the book and calmed my breathing…after ten minutes I opened it up again and immediately started hiccuping and sobbing and had to stop until I was finally in private!

  24. Tiffani Green says...

    I cry at work regularly and it’s a retailer with one of those horrible open offices upstairs so it is impossible to find a place to be alone. I have cried on the loading dock, in a closet in the break room, in the produce walk in, and in the stairwells. I also cry at HomeGoods and the hardware store a lot.

  25. Beth Stevens says...

    On an airplane after visiting my son in Colorado, and realizing he was probably never moving back to NC; the sweet Delta flight attendant gave me free wine!

  26. Ellenel says...

    Four years ago while on a cruise, I got “the call” to come home since my mother who had been battling breast cancer had taken a turn for the worse. I made arrangements to leave port the next morning to take three long flights back to Los Angeles from Cobh, Ireland. I balled in public off and on before, during and after each flight until I got to her at the hospital, where I balled some more but in a more private setting for the next week or two (she passed away in my arms hours after I had arrived).
    To the kind strangers those 24 hours while traveling home, thank you from the bottom of my heart.

  27. Allie says...

    Looking forward to the sequel, “Portraits of Coworkers I’ve Cried in Front Of.”

    • Kate says...

      Hahaha this is gold.

  28. Quinn says...

    This whole year I had been in my dorm, living four floors down from this cute British guy I only started hanging with two months before the end of the school year. We knew that it wouldn’t last long but we decided to be together and I asked him to be my boyfriend for two weeks. Our second week anniversary rolled around and before I knew it we were spending our last day together, he had to go back to the UK and because he was on exchange he’s not coming back to the US. On our last day we adventured and just spent time together, our last few hours as a couple. I felt really numb leading up to saying goodbye, but when we got on the train and I was next to him it started to hit that we wouldn’t be this close again maybe forever, and that he wasnt going to be mine when I left him at the airport. I started crying a little and then I couldn’t control it. I tried covering my face with my hair but his friend was there and there were two middle aged men sitting directly across from us and it was pretty obvious to everyone I had lost it emotionally (oh the joys). We got to the airport and hugged and cried on the platform and this lady came up to us and said, “you guys are beautiful.” It seemed a little strange at the time but in retrospect it felt validating. Our relationship was so short it almost felt like it hadn’t happened, but when she said that it was like we were real. We really had been together and it really was beautiful, even if short. . .

    We kissed goodbye and he ran to catch his flight. . .I caught an uber. It was around one in the morning and my driver said nothing to me the whole ride, he just let me cry quietly in the back of his car. He saw me leave him, he knew. Love and loss are universal and without talking he quietly validated my tears. . .

    I’ve never cried as much as I did those two weeks when I knew I’d have to say goodbye to my British boy, but he was so sweet and would always hold me .I’ve heard that tears are just an overflow of emotion, it can be anything and I think many of those tears were because I was glad to have been his first girlfriend and he my first boyfriend, even if only for two weeks xx

    • Eloise says...

      Quinn,

      12 years ago I met an American boy a month before he was finishing his exchange at my university in Sydney. We hung out as much as we could in that month, and then had a similarly tearful goodbye, fully expecting to never see each other again. But, we stayed in touch with sporadic emails (playing it cool!), and a year after all those tears, he flew back to Sydney to see me.

      We’re married now.

      I don’t believe that marriage is a happy ending to every story about love. But I thought you might want to know that some “nevers” don’t stay that way forever.

      x

  29. Alice says...

    I live in London and have cried on the tube more times than I can count. Almost entirely on the northern line- it’s busy and no one pays attention, which is simultaneously heartbreaking and a massive relief. I’ve cried in Russell Square, on the South Bank, in Hyde Park, in Regents Park, outside the River Cafe, outside the Tate Modern, inside the Tate Modern, in pubs, in restaurants, at work far more times than I’d like to admit…
    Basically if you’re coming to London, and you’re going to a big thing that you simply MUST visit- I’ve probably cried there.

  30. Haha, oh lordy, your poor gums! I’d definitely cry at that also, so know you’re not alone ;)

    I’m quite a discreet cryer so have often gotten away with a good public cry (at least, I think I got away with it… maybe I didn’t and will never know)

    I have to say though, busy cities are the best for a good cry in my experience, especially London. Everyone is so busy/distraught themselves that you just get left alone, which is exactly what you want in those moments, isn’t it?

  31. Sarah says...

    One day during the dissolution of my 13 year marriage I had to meet my now ex-husband at the bank to remove my name from a joint account. He casually mentioned that he was moving to California and the tears started. I left as quickly as I could and then sobbed my way down 7th Avenue to the subway.

  32. Leah says...

    I did that program, too, Emily, and I remember those late nights too. I’m sure you were a better teacher than you thought, and I’m sure the others were struggling more than they let on. xo

  33. Coleen says...

    1.) Every time I fly out of JFK International Airport going back to my home country.
    2.) While in public transportation, whenever a painful memory suddenly reappears.
    3.) Recently in my office room, good thing I have privacy.
    4.) When a friend or a family member sends positive affirmations and compliments.
    5.) Inside a church while praying or hearing mass.

  34. I’ve had a few airport breakdowns, one in which I was doing that kind of screechy cry thing where you’re trying to hold the frustration in but you just look…deranged? And when I was robbed in front of my apartment in broad daylight…that was no fun :-(

  35. I cried in public transportation a few times and I still don’t remember why.

  36. Maggie says...

    I was by myself doing a medical elective in Alice Springs which is this small, wild, desert town in the centre of the Australia.

    While i was there my first love broke up with me and I was totally heartbroken, so sad and so lonely. I would go on long walks through the town and in the surrounding desert at twilight with tears streaming down my face, often on the phone to my Mum or Dad or friends back home on the Australian Coast.

    Alice Springs is incredibly beautiful but has a lot of social issues, particularly amongst the indigenous population there. There is a lot of alcohol fuelled violence and homelessness and intergenerational trauma but to be honest I was mainly absorbed in my own heartache.

    I remember a homeless man seeing the tears running down my face and asking gently “you alright love?”. I thought that was so kind.

  37. K says...

    I used to live in NYC in my 20s and remember a couple of distinct cries. Being heartbroken over a boy, I watched Devil Wears Prada alone (first movie I saw alone in theatres. Loved it and felt so independent doing so!) at Lincoln Square AMC and walked downtown at night crying and being grateful for this fine city. Getting the news of my friend’s dad being killed after someone robbed his store, outside of the Paris Baguette bakery, I broke down in the midst of people rushing by me. Everytime I pass by those locations on visits I remember those life altering moments in my life. It’s like they are frozen in time. I remember all the details. Sometimes you just need a good cry…

  38. MarlaD says...

    I cry at every single live performance I see. It doesn’t matter what it is, it can be a band in a bar, a children’s dance recital, a broadway show. It has nothing to do with the content of the performance, if it’s live, I’m gonna cry. Beats me.

    • Kez says...

      Me too! It makes me feel better knowing that someone else does this. I also cry whenever a sports team wins – doesn’t matter who or what – and I don’t even like sports!

    • Meg says...

      I cry at loud rounds of applause! It doesn’t even have to be live. If there is rousing applause, I start to tear up and sometimes fully cry. It’s really annoying because it doesn’t seem to matter what the applause is even for!

  39. Sarah says...

    Welp, you guys. I was literally in the middle of commenting on this post at my work computer this afternoon when an interesting sequence of events happened… long story short, I was duped, locked out of my office, and had all my IDs/cards stolen and used today, and immediately turned to my coworker in tears once I realized what had happened. Suffice to say, I had never really cried in public; just airports, on walks, and that one time in Panera (why is it always Panera?) But today, after a couple hours of police reports and finding out that my office building does not have a single security camera (!), I got to my apartment and sat down on my stoop and sobbed while commuters passed and avoided eye contact. I needed a moment to just feel angry and vulnerable and disgusted and sad, then pick myself up and go inside and have dinner and leave those bad feelings outside my house as much as possible. This was unexpectedly appropriate for me today, so thank you!

    • Amy says...

      Oh my goodness, what an awful day :( Thinking of you and I hope things get straightened out as quickly and as easily as possible!!!

  40. Kaysie says...

    My most recent cry (just yesterday) wasn’t in public but it left me feeling just as exposed. I’m currently 15 weeks pregnant with my second and having a really, really, really tough time. I kept telling myself that I just had to get through the first trimester and I’d feel miraculously better once the second trimester hit (like I did with my first). I’ve been devastatingly disappointed in the fact that each week I seem to feel worse, instead of better.

    Anyway, I had to call my manager about something work-related and she knows I’m pregnant and she always starts all our calls with “How are you feeling” and I always lie and say “great” except that yesterday was a particularly bad day (numerous bouts of violent vomiting) and when she asked me how I was feeling I just started uncontrollably sobbing over the phone. Like, I completely lost it. She pretty much just sat on the phone and listened to me blubber because it was the kind of crying where every time you try to form words, you just end up crying even harder.

    She ended the call by saying, “Whatever work thing you called me about can wait until tomorrow. As your boss, I’m instructing you to hang up the phone and take a nap for the rest of the day. I won’t take no for an answer.”

    I hung up, cried a few more tears (of gratitude) and took the best damn nap of my life.

    • Bobbie says...

      This one got me…not really the same but I’m currently 6 weeks pregnant, first pregnancy, and feeling a bit overwhelmed. Last night my husband was out at a friends birthday (I avoided going cos I didn’t want to answer question about why I wasn’t drinking, and I knew there would be lots of smokers too) and I went to bed and (very unusually for me) just could not sleep. After downloading Calm and finding a free sleep story read by Stephen fry I started to relax a bit then shocked myself by bawling my eyes out for ten minutes for no reason at all. I ended up with the pillow over my head sobbing but actually felt like it realeased a lot of tension and I feel a bit more zen today.

    • Your boss sounds like an amazing human!

  41. Emily says...

    I was a Teaching Fellow in NYC – teaching high school full time and attending grad school at night for two years. I was struggling so hard to stay afloat – working 80 hour weeks and still just barely keeping up with my lessons. My night classes were full of watching model teaching videos of experienced teachers with perfectly running classrooms and analyzing them with my teacher classmates who seemed to be doing just fine. I remember so many evenings just holding it together in class, and sobbing on my subway ride home because I felt so inadequate.

  42. Isabel says...

    The timing of this… wow. Two weeks to the day, my partner broke off an almost 9 year relationship. Yesterday I walked around SoHo on my lunch break on the phone with my dad, sobbing underneath my sunglasses, holding a big wad of toilet paper to mop the tears. No one batted an eye and strangely that was the best part of it all. Reading stories of all of these amazing women doing the exact same thing – I feel so seen! Glad to be all part of the City Crying Club and also to hear that really good things are coming even after a tough time. Love seeing all of the tears of joy mixed in here too! Love to all of you.

  43. Ceciel says...

    I cried my heart out publicly in the fall of 2001. I was suffering from traditional heartbreak—22 year old me dumped by someone I was over the moon for—and from the heartbreak of 9/11. I cried on subways, as I walked down 6th ave. in Manhattan, wherever and whenever I was by myself. I just visited the city this summer and as I left that playground in Park Slope on 5th between 3rd and 4th, I saw a young woman sitting on a concrete step crying by herself. I had a hard time looking away and walking away.

  44. Em says...

    1) I’m in a theater in NY, alone waiting for a play to start, reading these comments and crying. Of course I had a really bad day so this is not a surprise.

    2) last summer a broke down near the Lincoln center after church. I was sobbing/SCREAMING into the phone and a New Yorker stopped to ask me if I was ok.

  45. Heather says...

    I ugly cried on the Coney Island boardwalk. I was in the middle of a really ugly breakup. Ugly Betty was filming at the time and they kept yelling at me to get out of their way. I couldn’t deal so I sat on a bench and bawled. A lovely older woman came along and said “I’m sorry you’re so sad. I know how hard it is to be sad. ” It was the perfect thing to say. No promise that it would get better. No trying to minimize the situation. I felt acknowledged and less alone. After she walked away and I had composed myself a bit, I tried to find her to buy her a hot dog but never did.

    I use that now whenever I see someone crying in public.

    • Sydni Jackson says...

      That is SO sweet.

  46. Elle says...

    Twice in my life, in my 20s and my 30s, I found myself crying in Italian restaurants (in Boston’s North End and in Rome’s Piazza Navona) because it tasted exactly like the simple, perfect ziti my grandmother made for me when I was growing up. (Our family meals had never been the same since her going.) Both times, I alarmed and confused the servers as I was sobbing away yet clearly enjoying my meal, while alternately saying, “This is so wonderful!” and “This is terrible” — referring to my tears, which were uncontrollable and getting on the ziti. I wish it would happen again.

    • Em says...

      This is so sweet. I hope it happens again for you, too :)

  47. anjie says...

    When I was moving from a third world country to NYC I was sobbing so hard that the immigration guy at the counter asked why was I leaving the country if it was such a wrench?. NYC was hard, my new marriage was hard and I often cried all over the city on the corner of York and East End Avenues, on 3rd and 52nd street. I have lost count, when we were moving to Asia nearly a decade ago, I again sobbed on my way to JFK, I was leaving the city I had grown to love warts et al. Crying in public in NYC is easy :)

  48. Caitlin says...

    Like many other commenters, most of my public cries have occurred as a result of a broken heart. While I was living in San Francisco my boyfriend of almost 8 years and I broke up and while I’ve since moved to the east coast, SF is FULL of my tears: on the 43 (where I saw someone had written “this too shall pass” in the fog of the window, thanks universe!) the 6, the N, numerous Uber’s; up and down marina boulevard and crissy field, fort mason, fisherman’s wharf; ocean beach; my office in the sunset; the ferry building; at the top of the Lyon street steps (and at the bottom); an acupuncture office in the mission; a park in North Beach; a pasta store in north beach; Target…the list goes on. At first I felt embarrassed by my public displays of heartbreak but soon I found some comfort in them. We’re all human with human feelings, and I think there’s something really brave about showing intense emotion in public.

  49. Jessica says...

    For most of the month of December, I felt like I was engaged in some bizarre performance art of public crying while navigating the ins and outs of our young adult son’s first significant mental health emergency. …On an airplane, at the grocery store, in a hotel lobby, in an Uber, waiting for coffee, standing in line at an Old Navy while others around me tended to their Christmas shopping.

    I’m not sure if I have every cried in public previously, given personal hang-ups around vulnerability. But the emotion was so present and so overwhelming that I had absolutely no choice but to let it out. It was such a completely surreal experience for me, but towards the end, I started to reflecting to family and friends that “crying in public is my superpower.” A lot of my self-consciousness about it drifted it away. In my experience, public crying serves as a portal to seeing the humanity in others and ourselves…

  50. M says...

    Last weekend I cried while mowing the grass at one of my rent houses. I felt like shit and the heat index was 105. I cried off and the whole 3 hours it took me to finish 😳

    • Vanessa says...

      I recently flipped a small house and while I am normally can-do all the way, I cracked one day while scrubbing a filthy floor, until I finally said “this is what you WANT to do.” Oh, right. No more tears.

    • anne says...

      i wish i could come help you plant a beautiful wild native garden so you’d never have to mow again! <3

  51. Andrea says...

    I never ever cry in public except for one time. My father was dying and I’d been staying at my parents house for a few weeks when my mom said go home, rest up and I’ll call you when I need you back. It’s an almost four hour flight from Phoenix to Atlanta and I literally wept the entire flight. I was in a middle seat and the absolute sweetest older gentleman from India was in the window. He asked me what was wrong and I told him. He paused for a moment then said, please, tell me all about your dad. I kept weeping and talking and at some point he offered me half his little homemade lunch. This was thirteen years ago and literally the ONLY time I’ve cried in public. Yet the most beautiful soul of a stranger just let me. I will never ever forget his gentle kindness.

    • MarlaD says...

      This beautiful story made me cry. Bless that kind man.

  52. In the middle of the song “The Truth Untold” at a BTS concert just this past May (Rose Bowl Day 2!). I just couldn’t hold it in any longer, it’s one my favorite songs and just so so sad, and their live performance was so beautiful. This girl, two seats over, reached out to my shoulder and just patted it saying, “I know, I know, it’s okay.” So embarrassing!

  53. Ariana says...

    Today, underwater at the Jackie Robinson park public pool amidst splashing, happy children. But I stopped pretty quickly, because I was afraid the lifeguards would become too concerned about my underwater sob-fest. :)

  54. Emily says...

    Yep. Not a native New Yorker, but even in the few years I’ve been here, I’ve cried on the 1 train while going to meet my bf (we had a fight about Israeli politics, lol), in JFK when finding out via phone call that my uncle had passed away, on the UES walking to dinner one night when feeling lonely, and those are just the ones that immediately come to mind! It’s weird because I do really think of myself as a private (if prolific) crier but sometimes in the city you just have to cry in public.

  55. I cried as I walked through the hinterlands to get to my car in the back of the Costco parking lot after a cashier confused me for someone else and asked if I’d left the kids at home that day. We’re dealing with infertility and my temp had dropped that morning, meaning my period was imminent. Luckily, it was raining.

    Not in public, but my most mortifying crying story to this day was about 10 years ago when I was almost a full year into my first after college job. My then boyfriend dumped me a few days after I met his mom – ouch. I was fine! fine! until my cubicle neighbor, who’d been on vacation for a few days, asked me how the mom meeting went. I almost started sobbing, and sent my boss an email asking if I could leave work due to personal reasons. He freaked out because it was so unlike me, and called me into his office to see if I was ok. I proceeded to ugly cry and managed to tell him what happened through the sobs. He told me to go home and eat ice cream or whatever I needed. I wanted to die, and I’m still not sure that I ever recovered from that mortification.

  56. Susannah says...

    Oh my gosh, I cried so many times on the subway, on street corners, and in parks when I lived in New York. I moved about 6 years ago and recently took my 14 year old niece back for her first trip to New York. So fun, right?
    Unfortunately being a teenager, starting her period on the trip, and being the middle of summer meant that hormones and emotions were running high. We had already had a long day, were waiting for the Staten Island ferry and had to buy emergency tampons at the little store there which was super embarrassing for her. She started to cry in the bathroom, which made me start to cry. Then as we were standing there crying, a little girl came in also crying and proceeded to start throwing up into the trash can that we were standing next to. Pretty soon we were laughing and crying together because of the absurdity of it all. Did I mention it was also 90 degrees??
    I told her that crying in public was a rite of passage and she was one step closer to being a New Yorker herself one day. It turned into a funny bonding moment between auntie and niece that I won’t forget.

    • Masa says...

      This is so sweet

  57. Andrea says...

    I can’t remember all the exact reasons, but I know I cried a few times on the bus while living in San Francisco (one was because of a crazy lady sitting behind me on the bus talking crap about me for no reason!!).

  58. Lauren says...

    Crying here in NYC is one of my hobbies. Happy tears, sad tears, exhausted tears, hormonal tears, relationship-specific tears… it doesn’t matter. Somehow they are more cathartic, meaningful, and healing when shed among strangers and buildings that make you feel small and anonymous and totally inconsequential.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      “Crying here in NYC is one of my hobbies.” = love that :)

  59. KM says...

    I once sobbed for a full hour over a plate of spaghetti at a restaurant. It was a casual restaurant and I was dining by myself. At the time I felt like my heart was literally breaking. Nobody said a word to me about my crying, not even the waiter. I did feel a little bit better after the massive cry though! Sometimes the tears just need to come out, even in the most unexpected places.

  60. Mary says...

    Oh man, this cartoon today makes me feel seen. I’m working on a really frustrating research project where my supervisors keep giving me conflicting or incomplete information, and today I cried before, during, AND after a meeting with one of these supervisors. The “after” cry lasted all the way from the office to my bus ride home to my bed, where I’m currently sitting and trying to work up the courage to dive back into my data.

  61. Anonymous says...

    Grand Central Station. When my fiance and I were first dating he lived in Connecticut and I lived in Brooklyn. He would come to the city every weekend. I would cry tears of join when I saw him every Friday evening and cry that I didn’t want him to go every Sunday night when he left. 10 years later every time we’re in Grand Central I get teary fondly remembering that first year of long distance love.

  62. Alyssa says...

    After my last day at an internship with a magazine I had dreamed of writing for since childhood, I was gutted. (It also didn’t help that my visa was about to run out and I was being forced to leave NYC, possibly forever.)
    I didn’t even try to hold back tears on the downtown 1 train.
    No one batted an eye, of course, but a man sitting across from me grabbed his iPad, scrawled a silly happy face on the screen, and turned it around in a wordless attempt to cheer me up. It worked– and eight years later, that anecdote embodies so much of my cherished time in the city.

    • K says...

      This was so touching!

  63. J says...

    I have cried in yoga class. Sometimes the pace of life is so fast that it feels like there is no down time to absorb everything that has happened in a day/week/month. In Yoga class I finally slow down enough to feel everything and honestly sometimes it’s a little too much to handle and out come the tears.
    Reading some of the other comments was really interesting because I would not have thought of spin class as a good place to have a cry, but it makes sense.

    • Akc says...

      Yoga allows me to cry too. I feel so tightly wound up with all the roles I carry I actually have a hard time finding time to allow myself to feel my feelings. I have even googled “help me cry.”. A good yoga class is therapeutic.

    • Daisy says...

      I cried during a Barre workout class. My husband was having a Maniac episode and was packing his bag to leave and I had to get a workout class in because I knew I wouldn’t be able to workout regularly having to take care of my son by myself. I wish though, someone would have asked if I was ok. Sometimes, all we need is a little compassion.

    • anne says...

      i’ve cried a few times during savasana, at the end of yoga classes. a lot of the time i am just lying there feeling grateful and in love with the people i have in my life. other times, i feel that i’m overflowing with feelings about myself, which are often difficult and complicated. either way… these crying moments are intense and beautiful. even when they are so sad.

  64. Nicole says...

    I lived apart for my husband for internship, and spent a year in Miami. We fought in person, on the phone, any chance we got. At a picnic with coworkers, I just sat in the grass away from everyone and sobbed, while a cruise ship full of waving, happy tourists slowly glided by. It was so ridiculous that I felt better somehow!

  65. Stephanie says...

    I don’t even live in NYC but I did cry publicly while I was there! Me and my boyfriend at the time got in a huge fight because HE was mad that I got to stay in NYC longer after my flight got delayed 2 days because of a blizzard (!!!). So glad he’s no longer my boyfriend. Anyway, I remember a very nice stranger came up to me while I was waiting to board my plane at JFK and handed me a travel pack of tissues.

  66. KP says...

    The anonymity of NY allows one to publicly, shamelessly sob unlike you could do in most other places. If I cried publicly in my hometown (population 1 mil.), people would stop me to see if I were ok or would generally think I’m crazy. Sometimes, you just need to cry in public and be left alone.

    I will never forget receiving the phone call that my darling grandfather was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer, giving him only a couple months at best. I was in the Hallmark on 2nd and 44th, and I sobbed the entire walk to Grand Central and the subway ride home. No one looked twice. I needed that.

  67. LK says...

    NYC is the BEST place to cry in public. Just this week I’ve cried on the subway (at 8:45am, with dark sunglasses on), at Flywheel (it’s dark and very loud in there, everyone’s sweating and panting, and not paying attention to you, all good.) outside Sephora at 59th/Lex on the phone with my mom (um, literally no one cares, they just want to get on the Jitney) and almost imperceptibly at my desk (pretending that my allergies are acting up, and dabbing my nose/eyes with a kleenex). My beloved cat is dying of cat cancer, I’m trying to pick a good not-too-sappy father-daughter dance song for my wedding, and I’m just hot, sweaty, tired, and full of PMS… I take so much comfort in being able to let it all out.

    • beks says...

      So sorry to hear about your kitty, very valid reason to cry. Consider yourself hugged.

    • lauren says...

      LK, i am so sorry to hear about your cat. my first cat, chuck – the one who was my familiar and followed me like a shadow from the day we met until the day he died – died of small-cell lymphoma a few years ago, and I am not the same. in case you need to hear this, don’t you listen to what other people did when their cats had cancer. you can and will do right by your cat, and only you know what that means. the internet in particular can mind its own business.

      i called my husband from an NYC taxi on the way home from our vet’s office to tell him about chuck’s diagnosis, and i cried raggedly both then and when i called my office to ask if i could spend the rest of the day at home. when the cab driver stopped at my apartment, he apologized for his broken english and then told me that i was a strong person, and that he knew that god would take care of me. he wouldn’t accept money for the (very long) ride, and he blessed me and said he would pray for us. i am in no way a religious person, but i blessed him, too.

  68. Franny says...

    I’ve cried all over NYC, and honestly, it is kind of comforting. Once, when I was so stressed and overworked and exhausted, I broke down on a pretty crowded train at maybe 8-9pm while on my way home. I’m talking like full body sobs. The woman sitting next to me, without saying a word, just reached out and put her hand on my shoulder and stayed like that until she got off a few stops later. It was such a tender gesture, without being invasive or uncomfortable.

    • i think if i witnessed the kind of sobbing you’re describing, i would follow suit with crying. genuinely & sincerely in solidarity with you, but also because i am incapable of not doing the same as someone, whether they be laughing or crying.

  69. I found out just this week that I didn’t get a job that I really, really wanted after several rounds of interviews. I cried during my dance class that night, big huge tears of disappointment. It felt a bit silly to be so worked up over a job, but I felt the way I felt and the tears helped me work through the pain of it. The beautiful thing is that my dance class is one of my happiest places in the world and I saw my teacher, who I love so much, see me crying during the warmup and she gave me a little head nod of knowing and I felt her empathy. I’m not the first woman to cry in that dance class and I know I won’t be the last. In fact, sometimes I cry just because I’m so happy, too. :)

  70. Lauren says...

    I’ve lived in NYC for 12 years and have cried in public so. many. times. The most memorable time was when my Nana was sick and in the hospital and I was walking down the street crying. An older woman stopped me, gave me a hug, and told me everything was going to be alright before continuing on her way.

  71. Kate says...

    My marriage was dissolving. I was in New Orleans for a conference. Before my phone died, my ex-husband and I were having a screaming fight. I climbed onto the St. Charles streetcar and cried into my scarf. It was dark and I was alone, but surrounded by people. It’s not the worst memory.

  72. k says...

    well, this is timely–definitely cried in my office of my new job today. I usually am not a crier at work, but what a year this week has been.

    my favorite (is that the right word?) place to cry is spin class because no one can tell whether its tears or sweat in the dark.

    • Jessica Brown says...

      Yep, I had a sobbing episode in a dark sweaty spin room with loud music and I don’t think anyone noticed…

  73. Elena says...

    My favorite NYC cry:
    Ten years ago, I was in college interning in NYC all the way from a small beach town in California. On a day I was feeling slightly homesick and disoriented, my laptop where I stored all my fieldwork crashed. I took it to the Apple Store, where they told me that my hard drive died.

    I will never forget sitting on the subway, ugly crying without even hiding it– over the loss of my field notes, the lack of money I had to get a new laptop, the general adjustment to a new city and home. I remember feeling liberated that, as I bawled openly, no one really acknowledged me. It was nice to just be able to BE in a public space without having to explain myself. I’ll always have a soft spot for this aspect of NYC.

  74. Nora says...

    I’m also from NYC and have had a good amount of public crying. A LOT of subway crying, including this week.
    My biggest cries:
    Going back to high school a few days after 9/11. I looked out of the bus window to see the empty space where the towers used to be and turned back to see everyone else doing the same. I lost it.
    Found out one of my best friends had died. Left work early and for some reason went into Zara. Broke down and a salesperson came over and said: “I can help you find your size.” She hugged me and it felt nice.
    The morning after the 2016 election. Cried on the subway. Walked by Trump Tower on the way to my office and stood there crying. Screamed out “F*CK!”

    • Sarah Wynhof says...

      I was curious if there would be an election story. The day after the election for me was endless tears running down my face at my desk at work. The night of the election was uncontrollable sobbing – my husband said he could hear me from the parking lot of our apartment complex. I was 3 months pregnant and work with people from all over the world. I was (and still am) so devastated for my daughter and our country.

  75. Yvonne says...

    The floodgates opened up in Trader Joe’s last week. I was browsing the white wine section trying to find the perfect bottle to drown my sorrows because my oldest son moved to Alabama (we’re in California). One of the workers there comforted me and calmed me down. As I was getting ready to walk up to the checkout counter, she brought me a bouquet of flowers and wished me better days ahead.

    • A Martin says...

      How sweet!!

    • Sarah says...

      I was once listening to a particularly heart wrenching episode of Savage Love, and ended up finishing the episode in the TJ’s parking lot, puffy eyes from crying. I walked in and did my shopping, and when I got to the register, the cashier bought me a small bouquet of flowers and said he hoped I felt better! TJ’s is the best!!!

  76. JenF says...

    One of my best memories of crying in NYC is walking westward from 6th Ave., I’m guessing in the mid-20s streets, during my lunch hour on a beautiful spring day. I was sobbing on the phone to my fiance about something that was soul crushing (and now can’t remember 15 years later). I sat down on a bench outside of a salon, and a middle-aged man brought out a box of tissues and offered them to me. He was so matter-of-fact. There were no looks of concern, and it’s not like we were going to talk. He just saw a human in anguish and did something to acknowledge it. I have never forgotten this small gesture, and I love thinking that we all carry these memories of kindnesses received, even as we may not remember the ones we’ve given.

  77. OMG I would bawl hysterically if my gums were bleached! I gasped at my desk just reading that! I’ve cried on stoops, park benches, bars (SO. MANY. BARS.) and after watching that damn tearjerker of a documentary, Won’t You Be My Neighbor I cried on the sidewalk all the way from Houston and Broadway all the way to Union Square. Thank God for the forgiving cover of night!

  78. Emma says...

    When my husband and I first moved to New York, we spent ALL our money doing it (literally *all* the money that I had saved up over two years + a loan from my dad went to first, last, security deposit and brokerage fee). We also moved without having jobs lined up (I was starting grad school)! When we made the requisite “just-moved-need-toilet-paper-Target-run” we counted every dollar, including on our most expensive purchase, a modem. After turning over my credit card with a big “gulp”, we got on the subway and headed to our new home, only to unpack our shopping bags and discover no modem. WE HAD LEFT IT AT THE TARGET. AFTER PAYING FOR IT. I immediately turned around, getting back on the subway (another precious $2.50 down the drain), bereft at the idea of having to buy a new modem with money I just didn’t have. Thus, as a fresh one-day-old New Yorker, I cried into my lap on the R train at two PM on a Sunday.

    I cried on the streets of New York many times after that, but you know what they say: you never forget your first.

    (The modem was still at check out; it was fine; I didn’t have to buy a new one. My husband got a job a few weeks later and I started grad school which included work study. We figured it all out.)

  79. Sara says...

    My emotions live near the surface so I’ve cried in public many times. But the time that stands out the most was last summer. My father was struggling with a neurological disease that seemed to come out of nowhere. My mom had passed 8 months earlier of cancer and it was a year of constant struggle while we tried to keep up. We had to move him into care and find him a neurologist; there were many trips to emergency. I took probably my last available day off work to bring him to a doctor’s appointment. When we finally arrived there was a note on the door saying they had to close the clinic unexpectedly. I BALLED. I sat on a bench with my dad and balled. A kind stranger stopped and asked if he could help. Which of course he couldn’t, but the look on his face which showed he wished he could was enough. I eventually mumbled “He’s just so sick and we can’t help him.” The stranger stayed a little longer and asked if he could help me in any way. I calmed and assured him we would be ok. My dad had to enter palliative care a few weeks later and passed away shortly after. Sometimes crying in public can feel lonely but other times there’s this removal of shame, a dive into authentic feeling and such a connectedness to the humanity of life. There were quite a few kind strangers during this very difficult time in my family’s life and honestly they’re a big part of what pulled me through.

  80. Leah says...

    Do aeroplanes count as public? Asking for a friend.

    • Elizabeth says...

      Yes. I’ve cried on airplanes enough times. The best one was where the flight attendant noticed I was crying in my seat in the back and reseated me towards the front to an empty seat right into the middle of a group of nuns traveling. They were exceptionally compassionate.

  81. Laura says...

    What about crying on planes? I am not just talking goodbye tears, but life introspection. And of course alllll the movies. I travel a lot for work and I have shed many tears on the Atlanta to Johannesburg flight. I think the altitude does something funny.

  82. Roxana says...

    I cry somewhat regularly at church during the music. The lyrics are so beautiful that I’m overwhelmed. Not sure if church counts as public crying, though, because it feels like home to me.

    I cried at work and then in the middle of the street when my first dog died. My sister and I were on a short weekend trip with a group of friends. Our big Golden Retriever, Oscar, had died of a stroke the Friday before we left. He was THE BEST DOG. We both found ourselves sobbing in the middle of this cutesy, getaway town while our friends gently tried to decide where we should go to eat.

    However, the most painful public and seemingly random crying was a few months after we lost our first son. He was born early and passed away in my husband’s arms minutes after being born. The waves of grief would slam into me seemingly out of nowhere. They sometimes still do. We were standing in line at a Panera and I completely lost it. I was overcome with grief. I sat at a table and let it all out while my husband ordered our food. I don’t know what set me off. Maybe the ordinariness of the situation and the fact that I felt so profoundly unordinary? He would’ve been nine years old. I still miss him so, and wish he were with us!

    Anyway, it’s good to let it out. I think we would all do well to cry more.

    • A Martin says...

      Your story touched me very much. Thank you for sharing <3

  83. Ashley says...

    I cried for about an hour up and down the streets of Charleston, SC, where my husband and I were visiting for our tenth wedding anniversary on a beautiful weekend last October. We had just found out shortly before we left that we had had our third miscarriage, and by the time we got there, I was so filled with emotion that it all came out when I started seeing everyone walking around with their small children looking so happy.

    (Happy to report that after several cycles of IVF, I am finally pregnant and near the end of my first trimester.)

    • Danielle says...

      Congratulations! <3

    • Elizabeth says...

      Congrats to you! I am so thrilled that you are pregnant!

      I am about to be in your shoes. Our tenth wedding anniversary is next weekend, we will be in Toronto instead of home, and we are starting IVF in October after years of trying everything else. It’s bittersweet – I’m so proud of US for making it ten years and having a great relationship, but hitting the ten year mark with no children yet…it’s kind of like a bridge I prayed never to cross and yet I’m crossing it regardless. I want the weekend to be happy but I’m nervous it’ll be sad because it’ll be a reminder of all that grief.

  84. Meg says...

    Cities are the best for crying in public! You’re surrounded by people, which is kind of comforting, but there’s a buffer of anonymity. Ideal.

    I have cried a lot on the CTA in Chicago. Transitions (even being in-transit, like coming home from work) are vulnerable.

  85. Adrienne says...

    Most recently, a few months ago in the IHOP parking lot after having a terrible meal/experience with our 3 year old and new baby who had a massive blowout while we were there.
    Fresh out of pharmacy school, I was working in a very busy pharmacy with minimal staff. Tons of prescriptions stacked up to be checked that were “past due” and lit up bright red on my screen, people waiting in line for flu shots, angry customers at the drive through window. And I was the only pharmacist on duty. Just got very overwhelmed and started to cry in front of everyone. Sometimes you just can’t hold it in :)

  86. Jenn says...

    I remember sobbing, hot from the tears, in my parka in the alley next door to my YMCA in Boston after my roommate’s boyfriend threatened me and trapped me in a bathroom. I called the property manager to try and use technicalities to get out of my lease, then when that didn’t work I sobbed on the phone to my mom for the better part of an hour. I still went in and worked out afterwards. I cried a lot on the phone between the Symphony YMCA and my tiny, crappy, apartment in the South End that winter (and finally moved out two months later, on St. Patrick’s Day).

    • jane says...

      i’m so sorry he did that! and you survived 2 more months in that place! you are seriously resilient, jenn.

      i just want to put this here: if anyone has a similar situation and needs to break a lease because of violence, you have a right to, in most situations!! call your local domestic violence center–they can help you figure out the paperwork you need. (yes, even if that person is not your romantic partner. violence in the home is domestic violence.)

      xoxo from an advocate who does this paperwork all the time

  87. Amanda says...

    I’ve cried 3 times publicly this past week alone. Twice in restaurants with our dear friends, all of us grieving the bi-polar depression diagnosis that is tearing their relationship apart– even though they want so badly to be back to normal. And I’ve been prone to tearing up at the end of yoga class when they let you just lie there and think. I think it’s good for me? I find crying so cleansing after you’ve had a bout of it, even though the sadness that made you cry is still there.

    • Daisy says...

      Amanda, hugs to you. I am dealing with the exact same issue of my husband’s bipolar diagnosis tearing our marriage apart. Have been living all alone in the US with our son for a few months, while he is trying to deal with his issues in India. With no family support, I have been managing. Kindness of friends and strangers is all that keeps me going

  88. allison says...

    like most people, most of my public cries were in the weeks following a tough breakup of an unhealthy relationship. the breakup itself was drawn out over multiple days/weeks (as only the best ones are) and we each were living with roommates so privacy wasn’t really a thing. we had all of our “pre-breakup” conversations in nearby public parks and the final conversation was in the lobby of a Marriott between our two offices?! (i can laugh about it now, haha – the poor hotel staff!) once it became clear we were really done – i cried in the back row of a yoga class, i cried on the bus behind my sunglasses, i cried in the dressing room of a department store. all very cathartic, i must say.

    but my most recent public cry was a much happier occasion, last Saturday when I got engaged to someone who i just adore (and who adores me right back) at the Boston Public Library <3

    happy crying, people!

    • Stefa says...

      Congratulations Allison xx

  89. Emm says...

    I remembered my “best” public cry. I was on my way to work on the London subway. My family and I had been crying all morning because we decided we finally had to take our cancer-sick cat to the vet that day to be put to sleep. We said goodbye and I went to work. I was holding it together, crammed into a carriage, standing up with three strangers packed around me, and I suddenly started bawling. With strangers’ faces inches from my bawling face! Nobody said anything but I didn’t feel embarrassed, and a nice woman gave me a tissue.

  90. Emm says...

    Where HAVEN’T I cried in public??! #cryer #noshame

  91. shannon says...

    Not even from NYC and I’ve cried in public there 😭 On my first visit to the city, there was not enough sleep, not enough snacks, and too much walking. We attempted to get on the Queensborough Bridge tram, and it was closed. I had a total meltdown right there near the entrance.

  92. Danielle says...

    I should add too that everytime I see someone crying, I want to know the story — what made them so sad and how I wish I could let them know they aren’t alone.

    • Talia says...

      Me too! I am always curious as to what could be so bad/sad and can I help make it better?

  93. Yulia says...

    I’m a big sentimental crier, which means I cry (or at least tear up) nearly daily on the subway listening to music. There are certain songs where the first few chords elicit tears, which I actually love–it feels cathartic to listen to music and have a strong emotion response. (Lately, a favorite has been Jacob Banks’s Unknown.) So if you see someone on the 2/3 train during your morning commute, crying with headphones in, it’s probably me!

    • Tali says...

      I’m the same! But I’ve cried listening to The Moth podcast on my commute.

    • Emm says...

      Same. Watching the Katy Perry documentary mid-Atlantic was a total blood/water-bath.

  94. Danielle says...

    I’ve cried in public in New York City more times than I can count! there was the one time I called my mom after suffering from a breakup, a new job, not sleeping and my anxiety at a record high. I was I-can’t-breath-sobbing but I felt a lot better after talking to her about it and realized I definitely wasn’t the first or last to experience something like that moment.

  95. Erica says...

    My most recent public cry was a few weeks ago as I was walking towards North Station in Boston after I found out a potential job opportunity fell through (I just graduated from nursing school and I was really counting on it!) Another time that sticks out in my memory is when I was on BART and reading Lucy’s epilogue in When Breath Becomes Air. It was so tragic and written so beautifully, there was so stopping the tears as I commuted to work.

  96. Meg says...

    I used to wander Toronto streets in the middle of January and February nights to cry when I was suffering from postpartum depression. I would go out without a coat to circle the UofT library, which is a huge brutalist abomination that matched my mood perfectly, to shock my system with the bitter cold. My eyes would leak, my breasts would leak, all of it would freeze lightly against my skin in the most soothing way. The dirty compacted snow would reflect the glow of streetlamps back up at me, ever so softly, which was comforting – light finding a way even though it was so dark without and within. No one ever bothered me during those awful nights. Those streets looked completely different in the daylight than they did through hopeless tears at 3am.

    • Megn says...

      Yes. Everything you said.

    • Rosie says...

      Ugh. Robarts Library = Grad School Prison

  97. Stephanie says...

    I thank my lucky stars Obama was president when the Sandy Hook school shooting happened. After meeting my first grader at the bus stop (crying on a corner curb in Knoxville TN), together we watched his presidential address and prayed together for the victims. I will never forget his compassion.

  98. Heather says...

    I cried in the middle of a Cracker Barrell (hello, midwest) once with my husband when I got some bad fertility news. I’ll never eat another pecan pancake! haha

  99. H says...

    I live in a city where you need a car, so most of my public crying has been in a car on the highway. Actual public place? CVS, when my doctor called to tell me I had a miscarriage**

    *Special shoutout to that doctor, who was so compassionate and sad with me on the phone. Also that he called me rather than having a nurse who doesn’t know me make the call (as the nurses are the ones who call with test results).

  100. Lauren says...

    15 years ago, I was engaged. I was so, so, in love. But my family did not accept this love. Slowly, month by month, they wore me down. I decided I couldn’t live my life cast aside from everything I ever knew. I was only 25 and was too immature to understand the cruelty. I only wanted to please. I told my fiancé goodbye while standing outside a DC metro station. He told me to come by later when he was out and leave the engagement ring in his kitchen, slip his house key under the door. I sobbed. I sobbed as commuters made their nightly descent into the train station. I was only 25 and had so much to learn. But that pain still washes over me sometimes like it was yesterday.

    • megs283 says...

      I spent my college and post-college years in DC. SO MANY TEARS. I believe my biggest breakdown was on the RI Ave Red line platform, when I realized that I had lost the expensive digital camera that I was using for an internship. And I was graduating. And my dog had just died. And I had just been dumped. God bless that woman who consoled me!!

    • megs283 says...

      Oh, and Lauren, this meltdown was also 15 years ago. HUGS to our past selves!!!!

  101. Meg says...

    I love this! I can get so embarrassed when I cry in public, which happens all the time in NYC—usually I try to a) find a quiet/remote place or b) will just keep walking blocks in circles. Most recently, I got the tears when I was having a difficult day at work, and I found a semi-quiet place to cry outside in downtown Manhattan. A man walked by me and was like “I wish I could cry, too.” Made me feel a little less lonely/embarrassed for sitting outside on the street crying!

  102. Recently, after the final couples therapy session with my soon-to-be-ex-husband, we decided to get dinner at a local Mexican restaurant (we’re on friendly terms and queso seemed like a logical pursuit at the time). Right as the entrees arrived it hit me: this is the last time we would eat there, or anywhere, as a pair. I tried to keep it together but ended up bawling and had to go sit in the car while he paid the bill.

    I feel so much love for, and kinship with, public criers.

  103. kash says...

    My first serious boyfriend and I broke up officially – and finally – on 15th and 6th. It was preceded by about four hours of breaking up, and ended at that spot after we were both resigned to our relationship’s end and agreed on a last walk together. When we got to that spot, we hugged and kissed and sobbed for about 20 minutes before going our separate ways.

    Honestly, as absolutely horrible and sad as it was, it solidified my love of New York City. Those who walked by us kept their distance but seemed to express quick, knowing looks, sending telepathic hugs. It was a sticky and incredibly hot summer day, making our tears and discomfort feel natural, osmotic. It felt like NYC was doing everything it could to comfort us through that moment while signaling how right this was.

    P.S. Julia I absolutely love your work :)

  104. Lynn says...

    I’m always crying on planes due to the books I’m reading. I personally enjoy seeing people crying in public. It’s such a stark reminder of humanity. I mentally give them big hugs and physically give them my most comforting puppy dog eyes.

  105. Kelly says...

    As a midwest girl, my crying is largely confined to my home, my car, and my office and every so often, my local Panera. In most of those locations, it happens with only me as a witness. I think there’s something to be said for crying in a public place where other people observe it and maybe even share with you in your grief – even if their own grief has a different origin.

  106. AC says...

    Junior year of college I was a resident advisor to mostly first year female floor. A month in, I got this horrendous stomach bug which left me sitting in a stall, in our communal – highly trafficked- bathroom, throwing up in a bucket simultaneously. To make it worse, a group of residents came into the bathroom, while I was essentially exploding, and started laughing/letting everyone know it was the RA in that stall. I sat there, for at least 2 hours, hostage to my illness and hysterically crying. It’s been more than 7 years and I get still get teary eyed thinking about how awful that was. Also, college students, be nice to your RA, most of them are good eggs that sometimes get a stomach bug and have no choice but to deal with them in the gross communal bathroom.

    • M says...

      AC, I am so sorry. This sounds miserable and you sound brave!

  107. Jenn says...

    I used to leave my first stressful publishing job on my lunch break and cry (quietly) in Fishs Eddy and ABC Carpet. I was 22 and felt like all I could do was make mistakes. I would look at and touch all these beautiful objects I couldn’t afford and imagine what it would be like to feel at peace and settled and happy, just popping into those shops for fun and not to hide tears from co-workers. I recently went back (at 36) and felt emotional all over again. I felt compassion for that younger self who was just figuring it all out and nostalgia for the freshness of that time when everything was just possibilities. And I felt that peace that seemed so elusive then. I could have bought almost anything I wanted, but I didn’t leave with a thing.

    • EJ says...

      I’m in my 20s, work around the corner from Fishs Eddy and often pop in there to console myself with their funny kitchenware after a cry sesh. Sometimes I buy a mug. Sometimes I touch everything in the store and leave. It’s heartening to know this has happened before me, and will (likely) continue on after me—we’re all on the Fishs Eddy comfort continuum!

    • Jenn says...

      EJ—dish solidarity, sister! Fishs Eddy would wrap its arms right around us if it could, I think.

  108. Natalie says...

    Once while going through a particularly difficult breakup, I broke down crying to my friend on the M train. An older woman came up to me and said, “I’m so sorry you’re so sad. Whatever you’re going through, it’ll get better.” She was so kind and reassuring, and I felt that she genuinely cared for me during our brief interaction.

  109. Karen says...

    One Christmas I was flying home to see my family and my boyfriend dropped me off at JFK for my flight. Well, my flight was actually out of La Guardia! So I hopped in a taxi and went there. Unfortunately with all the holiday crowds, I didn’t get through the line in time and missed my flight. After all that stress and disappointment , I broke down in tears at the ticket counter. You can be sure I never made this mistake again!

    (I have also had the break-up cry on the subway.)

    • megs283 says...

      oh man, these posts are bringing me back. I used to live in DC, and one time I arrived at Dulles for my flight home to Boston…and found out that the flight actually left from BWI.

      TEAARRSSSSSS

  110. Kara says...

    The post office last week in Austin. I was 39 weeks pregnant, sleep deprived (thanks 3 year old beloved child), and trying desperately to do This One Thing, which was return a pair of glasses with a wonky prescription. This required mailing them to China, and the email the representative from the company sent me had an address with a bunch of names of places listed, with no indication about which was the street or city or province. It made filling out the customs form almost impossible, and the lovely postal worker trying to help me was equally perplexed. She got it figured out for me, but not before the exhaustion and hormones took over and left me clutching the desk pen and shaking while sob-whispering “I don’t know what the city is.” Oy.

  111. Mym says...

    I’ve ugly-cried at airports. People leave you alone at airport terminals.

  112. Amy says...

    So many places! At a work volunteer event when my mom texted me about a family member’s cancer diagnosis (how do other women feel about the judgment of crying at work?). I was holding a shovel and just started bawling in front of everyone.

    In coffee shops, on park benches, walking around campus during grad school when you are just so overwhelmed. I long ago stopped feeling a lot of embarrassment over crying in public and have come to view these moments as a natural part of experiencing emotions even when they are sad or painful.

  113. ANDREA says...

    I don’t think I’ve ever cried so much in public as I did on the subway on 9/13/2001, having to go back to work after the WTC. It was really traumatic to be back on a train when, two days before, the first plane hit when I was in the Park Place station heading to the WTC.

    So many tears joined by so many other commuters that day.

  114. Val says...

    When I was 52, my mom had cancer and my father did too. We needed to place my dad in a nursing home down the street from my mom’s house for 6 weeks. One day I was crying/walking from the nursing home to my mom’s house. A very tiny older lady (who looked to be a street person), stopped me and asked “Who do love more, the momma or the papa?” It had the sensation of a dream come to life.

  115. celeste says...

    This is great timing. I believe in taking people at “face value” – just left a boss that said people were “too sensitive”.

    I cried at my first annual review, cried when my preteen daughter says mean things, cried hugging my dog tied when my brother chewed me out over the phone. And each time I think Angelou “people will always remember the way you made them feel,” and it’s not overly positive at the moment.

    • Rosie says...

      The problem with that quote is it works both ways. As a manager, I remember when a staff member makes me feel incredibly uncomfortable because they cried at work. I often feel very manipulated when it happens. I find myself hesitating to provide necessary feedback and am less likely to take a risk on someone who is so crushed when they fail. If you feel like you’re going to cry at work you need to excuse yourself even if it feels awkward in the moment, cry in the bathroom or outside, and then go back, and finish the meeting. Do not sit in front of your manager blubbering. They will never forget it and that is not a good thing. There is nothing wrong with being sensitive and needing to cry as long as you hold it in until it is appropriate. Not being able to control your emotions as an adult is a red flag.

  116. Michelle B says...

    I’m a native Texan who now lives in Chicago, but I spent a year post-college in NYC. My first week of work at my new job I left the office, walked to a CVS to buy concealer and mascara, then went straight to a Pret-A-Manger where they had a single bathroom with a lock. I cried in peace, put my makeup back on and went back to my desk. Grateful that NYC had lots of good places to cry (and maybe to buy a sandwich in after).

  117. Laura says...

    Once I was supposed to meet up with a guy I was in an on-again-off-again thing with to see a concert, and he called to cancel while I was outside a Rite Aid near the venue. I distinctly remember sobbing on the phone with him saying that he needed to stop blowing me off because I was in love with him (the first time I’d said it to him), while sitting in the pharmacy section inside. Someone, I don’t remember who, handed me one of those little packages of tissues and I’m very grateful to them.

  118. H says...

    I’m in the midst of a sudden and unexpected divorce and I’ve cried all over the place. 33rd Street and 3rd Avenue, Madison Square Park (this morning, in fact), Central Park, at least 8 different restaurants (and counting!), the bus, Sammy’s Roumanian Steakhouse (at a bachelorette party, no less), walking down various avenues, and at work (a lot). On several occasions, the friend I was with cried too. I used to find it embarrassing, but it’s just human.

    • Rezia says...

      Sending you love and light, H.
      It is totally just human.

    • GJ says...

      H – I can’t imagine what you’re going through and I’m so sorry you are. Sending you big hugs. xoxo

    • josephine says...

      So sorry you are going through this, H. And so good that you can cry about it and know that it’s just human.

    • RN says...

      I went through something similar two years ago. It feels like it will never get better. You will always be in the tunnel. And then one day…it gets better. Your life will not be what you expected it to be or what you planned, but it will be beautiful nonetheless. Sending a hug from the other side.

    • M says...

      H, I’m going through the same thing. I’m so sorry. I’m linking arms with you & saying we’ll get through this… in the meantime know I am thinking of you.

    • H, I went through a sudden and unexpected divorce six years ago (and cried all over the place in my town, but not in NYC). I cried with strangers in public (and overshared); I cried alone in public. I cried walking home from work, walking to work, at work, at home…all over the place. It was incredibly hard. Hang in there….

  119. Laura says...

    I’ve cried at the park on Spring & Mulberry in NY after a tough day at work. After a 20 minute balling sesh I ran into duane reade and bought a new orange nail polish to cheer myself up. Sometimes the smallest act can turn the whole day around.

  120. LV says...

    The better questions is, ” where haven’t I cried in public”? I’m an emotional basket case apparantly!

  121. El says...

    Does anyone else cry in movie theaters during the previews? I am so moved by even the slightest bit of dramatic music or emotion on the big screen, and somehow I’m less “ready” for it during the previews. Every time the first sad-seeming preview starts to roll I think “oh right, here come the tears!”

    p.s. I love this post and the illustration. :)

    • sara says...

      Me! I cry for commercials, previews, movies of all types, podcasts… happy tears or sad, you name it. Which means I have cried a lot in public.

  122. KL says...

    My favorite public cries weren’t mine. One was my always-stoic (now) husband’s and one was my “man’s man” dad’s. My husband cried as I was leaving the job where we both met and worked together. I was only moving to an office about fifteen minutes away, but he cried out in the parking lot at the end of my last day. My dad cried as he filled my gas tank just before I made the drive to Boston from Buffalo ten years ago. I’ve never seen him cry before or since.

    • Letty says...

      Oh my goodness. “I cried sitting at my desk reading about a dad crying when filling up his daughter’s gas tank for the last time as she was about to drive away . . . “

    • I love this so much.

    • Amy says...

      Same, Letty! I don’t cry much in public (save during nostalgic hymns at church) but the image of the weight of his daughter leaving hitting him as he fills up her gas tank…oh man.

  123. KL says...

    Woooowwww, timely. Just finished round three of a big, snotty, very public sob!

  124. katie says...

    Add me to the growing list of people who have cried (from a book, a break up, this blog) on the L in Chicago.

    Last year, I was traveling a lot for work so would watch QE on the plane. I BALLED on the plane during one particularly gut wrenching episode. If I remember correctly, it was the one with the gay black man who came out to his mom. I tear formed while thinking about it.

    • Amanda says...

      Oh my, I just teared up remembering this episode just now. Whew, that show!

  125. witloof says...

    Once I was on the BART train on my way to work, snapped open the San Francisco Chronicle, and there on the front page was a news story about someone I knew fairly well and liked very much who had been in a freak accident the night before and died. She was stopped at a street light and a construction crane fell on her car from a great height and crushed her instantly. I buried my face in my hands and started crying softly. The woman next to me asked me what happened, so I showed her the article. Whereupon she started telling me story after story of all the bad things that had ever happened to her, all of which, she insisted, were much worse than losing a friend that way. It was probably an effort to comfort me, but it was so intrusive and annoying.

  126. Rosie says...

    The fact that you can be alone, but surrounded by people is one of my favorite things about living in a city. I’m not at all self-conscious of having a mini breakdown because I have privacy in my anonymity, and I always try to give people who are having their moments a little smile in case that helps. That said, oh man, do I hate when people cry at work. I had a boss who used to cry when she was stressed during meetings, and it was just so uncomfortable. Excuse yourself to go to the bathroom or walk around the block. Even if you cry during a yearly review or if you have indeed screwed up and your boss is coming down on you, excuse yourself and then come back and finish the conversation. But crying on the subway/in the elevator/in Macy’s . . . it happens.

  127. Denise says...

    I’ve definitely cried on the MAX train in Portland, OR. I was in full weep & I was on my way home from the airport after an exhausting but wonderful trip. I always get weepy after a really good vacation. I like what Marie commented about other people looking with sad kind eyes but I appreciate that everyone left me alone.

  128. GN says...

    The first week I moved to NYC I cried on the corner of 23rd and 8th. I went into the nearby CVS and bought kleenex, then stood on the corner for a good half hour while I cried while talking to my mom over the phone. No one looked at me. At all. That’s when I realized that NYC is a great place to cry in public. New Yorkers are different than people in other cities. Did people not care? Or know that I needed space? Either way, it was exactly what I needed – to be left alone and let the tears flow.

  129. Sarah says...

    Chicagoan here. I listen to heart-wrenching podcasts during commutes, so I’ve definitely cried on the train during some heartbreaking This American Life or The Longest Shortest Time stories.

    I cry at everything — hello, Hallmark commercials! — so commute-tears are, on average, a once-a-month experience for me…

  130. Lisa says...

    Last time I cried in public was during a Phil Collins concert a few weeks ago. Experiencing the music live in stadium moved me so much and I really tried to hold myself together the entire time but failed when “In the Air Tonight” began and I could actually hear the deep sound of the drums in my practically deaf ear, too. Tearing up right now thinking of it 😅

    Have also cried in trains and train stations, mainly. Seems to be just the place.

  131. Em says...

    I’ve definitely cried on the L (chicago!) – probably multiple times but one time I remember was after leaving a waitressing job that I just hated, when my manager had yelled at me and I was fed up, so I cried on the train ride home.

    When I was in grad school I would get so stressed out studying for finals that I would leave the library in tears and just pace up and down the subway platform waiting for the tears to stop, and for the train to come. (wasn’t grad school SO FUN)?

    Last year I had to put my cat down, and I had taken an Uber to the vet and then after it was done, the last thing I wanted to do was order another Uber so I could awkwardly cry in the back seat of somebody else’s car. So instead I walked 3 miles home crying.

    I’m not really a frequent crier but, when you live in a city and so much of life is done in public, it’s bound to happen. When I see someone else crying on the train or in public I never know quite what to do? Personally, I would way rather be left alone – being approached by a stranger would pile embarrassment on top of my sadness. But I imagine other people would be comforted by a stranger?

  132. Margaret says...

    Funny that this is even a question. Do people really care when they see another person crying in public? Are we supposed to believe that crying in public will have some horrible consequence from the people around us?
    I like to think that people 1. Don’t care 2. Assume that maybe you just got some horrible news and probably should not continue to stare at them.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh yes! this is celebrating it! i actually love crying in public, it feels so anonymous in the best way. i used to plan to call my mom and cry when i was upset about a break up or new baby overwhelm.

    • Margaret says...

      Besides, I mean social media kind of killed this whole “private moment” thing anyway. We post every detail of our lives online now. What’s a little crying in public these days?

    • Olivia says...

      Plan to call my mom and cry 😂 the scheduled emotional release is hilarious in this context but heartbreaking for overwhelmed, past you!

  133. Sam says...

    Sure have cried in public! I’m human, emotions come out wherever. Most recently, I cried at a Mellow Mushroom pizza restaurant after an extremely hard morning parenting my toddlers. The waitress was so sweet and tried to comfort me, but after the initial down-pouring of tears every time she said something nice to me I cried all over again.

  134. Lexie says...

    I moved to Portland, OR, from Nashville about three years ago. It was a challenging adjustment for me! My husband and I shared a studio apt for the first 2 years and I would sometimes sneak out to have a good solo cry. Now I look back at the street corners I stopped at and send little hugs to my former self.

  135. AM says...

    this reminds me of that episode of How I Met Your Mother where the characters talk about the ways in which you know you’re a real New Yorker. Crying in public/on the subway was one way. I grew up here yet only had one note-worthy public sobby moment on the F train!! Oh, F train…

  136. Marie says...

    It was me on the C train just yesterday. I’m in the throes of a tough, unexpected breakup with someone I thought I’d be with for a long time. Lack of sleep and overwhelming emotions led to a difficult commute the past few days. People looked at me with sad eyes and somehow I felt that made me feel a little better.

    • Y says...

      Sending you love and resilience, Marie. I’m in the same boat too. It’s so hard.

  137. Sarah Faye says...

    My husband got the news of his childhood pet, a golden retriever named Kona, passing away while we were having breakfast in Ikea. We carried on through the Ikea ‘ideas gallery’ after, stopping to huddle in a propped-up kitchen sequence to cry, wedging our sadness between bed frames and light fixtures. Tears would crop up spontaneously, and before you know it we’re just sobbing in Ikea.

    • Grace says...

      I’m so sorry about Kona! Pets passing away = cue all the tears. The only time I’ve ever seen my dad cry was when family cats and dogs died.

      I cried at a work holiday party when I found out my brother relapsed and was back in rehab. I found my boss and explained the situation before sneaking out the back door. That was the worst December ever. I was crying constantly.

      I also cried on a street corner in British Columbia after getting into a fight with my husband. We had been travelling just the 2 of us on a three week road trip and the frustration of spending that much time together and getting lost that day came to a head. A few strangers stared at us, but it felt so good to let the tears out.