Style

My Beauty Uniform: Felicity Aston

My Beauty Uniform: Felicity Aston

Felicity Aston is a polar explorer and Antarctic scientist. In 2012 she became the first woman to ski across Antarctica alone (!) and now travels the world leading expeditions and speaking about her work in the polar regions. When she’s not on expedition, she lives between Kent, England, and Reykjavik, Iceland, with her husband and toddler son. Here, she shares what she’s learned about fear, the strongest lip balm, and the old-school drugstore moisturizer she brings on every trip…

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

So, what IS a typical day like for a modern-day polar explorer?
If I’m on an expedition, my day starts by waking up in a tent, in a sleeping bag next to someone who starts out a total stranger but very quickly becomes not so. Then you spend an hour getting dressed, melting snow for water to make breakfast, and getting your stuff sorted for the day. Then you pack up your camp and supplies onto a sledge, and move on. Then about 12 hours later, you unpack, build your home, make food and do everything as quickly as possible so you can get to sleep before doing it all over again the next day. You spend some time looking after yourself — your feet in particular. Your feet are the most important part of your kit.

That makes sense. How do you take care of them?
It’s amazing how many people arrive with their feet in a pair of socks and don’t see them again until the end of the expedition. But it’s so important to have a good look at your feet every day, to see if you’re getting sore patches or blisters, what’s going on with your nails, etc. If they’re in socks, they’re always going to be a bit damp, and won’t be able to heal properly. Some people spend a lot of time putting creams on their feet, but I just make sure I give them time in the open air each day.

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

I have to admit, I feel slightly ridiculous asking about your “beauty routine” on a polar expedition. But then again, skin care must take on a whole new meaning in that environment.
Yeah, it’s really important! In the morning, I slap on generous amounts of the highest factor sunblock that I can find. Doesn’t matter what brand, but I often wind up using children’s sunblock because it has the highest SPF, and it’s thicker on your skin (so it also helps protect from the cold, wind and extreme dryness). You have to remember, in places like Antarctica, there is no ozone protection. You’re under the hole in the ozone layer, so you burn quickly and severely. I’m constantly putting on lip balm because you wouldn’t believe how quickly your lips suffer. I like Labello with a high SPF.

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

Okay, your skin is amazing. Let’s talk moisturizer.
In the evening, I clean my face with my luxury item: a wet wipe. I give it a good rub to get off all the excess sunblock, snot, and god knows what else I’ve got on my face by the end of the day. It’s always a little bit frozen — everything is — so it’s a bit like using a cold compress on my face. Then I put on a generous dollop of the thickest, strongest moisturizer I can get.

What kind?!
You know the old-fashioned Nivea? That comes in a tin? It’s BRILLIANT. I slather it on and it really moisturizes my skin overnight. On many expeditions, I’m the only woman, or one of just a few, and the guys tend to laugh when I get out my big pot of moisturizer. But when you’re in a really dry environment like Antarctica, if your skin is sore and your lips are cracking, you’re much more susceptible to cold injuries and serious problems. Sometimes I’ll convince the guys to try some and they’ll dip a tentative finger in and dab some on their forehead — and I’m like, ‘No no no, you’ve gotta get a good handful and rub it in until your face can take no more.’ And then at the end of the trip, they come back looking like they’ve been dipped in a vat of acid, with skin peeling off and lips massively swollen and cracked — and my skin’s generally all right. I feel vindicated!

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

As an explorer, what drew you to the polar regions, specifically?
I’ve been on expeditions in desert and jungle environments, and they were wonderful, immensely rewarding experiences. But there’s something about the polar environment that keeps pulling me back. I wonder if it’s something to do with where I grew up, in southeast England. Snow was a very rare, exciting event. School was canceled, we went sledding, and this world that I knew was transformed into a different place. Perhaps that’s when I started equating snowy places with adventure. I think it’s also something to do with the fact that these environments are at the edges of the globe. Looking at a map, my eyes always wander toward the fringes — the places I don’t know anything about. I’ve always been driven by that strong sense of curiosity: Who’s there? What would it feel like to be there? And then you suddenly realize the only way to answer these questions is to go there and find out.

You’ve spent much of your career in Antarctica — a place most of us can only imagine. What did you learn about that place that you’d want others to know?
People tend to think of Antarctica as this tiny place on the bottom of the map. But it’s enormous (twice the size of Australia!), and it has a huge impact on our daily lives. Whether it’s the temperature in New York today or the fact that it’s snowing here in Reykjavik — that can be linked back to what’s going on in Antarctica.

Felicity Aston

I bet your hands need a lot of TLC, too.
The main issue I have with my hands in wintertime — not just on expedition — is that the skin around my nails cracks. I feel like such a wuss when I come back from a trip and people are expecting to hear about terrible injuries and gore, and I’m saying, ‘The skin on my fingers cracked and it was really sore!’ But, you know, it’s like that paper-cut agony. The best thing is zinc oxide. There are a million different brand names, but any zinc oxide cream will do. You rub it into the skin around your fingers and it works wonderfully.

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

Okay, this may be super obvious but I’m guessing you can’t wash your hair on expedition, right?
No, you can’t. It stays under a hat. But you know, when I come back from an expedition, my hair is in the GREATEST shape. That whole thing about washing your hair less frequently? It’s true. My hair obviously gets super greasy and horrible when I’m on the trip, but when I do come back and wash it, it’s shiny and thick and amazing. So, even when I’m at home, I try to cut down on washes.

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

I imagine your beauty routine — and all your routines — are very different when you’re at home.
While I spend part of my life in the outdoors, I’m often home in front of the laptop. It can take years of planning before you get to do the exciting stuff. I also do a lot of speaking around the world, so I’m often working on that (or driving to or from the airport). And I have an eighteen-month-old little boy now, so like most new parents, my days at home are structured around him.

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

What does your bedtime regimen look like?
I’m actually making the switch to organic products. When I was pregnant, I started looking at the ingredients in products and it freaked me out. So, now I use Dr. Organic for everything: shampoo, deodorant, hand cream. It just makes me personally feel more secure. And I love all their varieties — argan oil, aloe vera, tea tree, etc. I’m a total convert.

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

In 2012, you became the first woman to ski across Antarctica alone — a 59-day, 1,000-mile journey. Among other things, that’s a long time to be alone. What was that like?
Yes, that part — the being on my own part — was the hardest thing I’ve experienced in my entire life. It hit me immediately. Those first few seconds after the plane left me, I was struck by the full weight of my aloneness, and the responsibility that came with it. That was the most frightening part of the expedition. People often ask how I conquered the fear — but honestly, I don’t think I did. I found a way to keep going in spite of it, but the fear was always there. I learned a lot about myself during that expedition.

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

Like what?
Well, I learned that although I’m very grateful for the experience, it’s not something I ever want to do again. With no other people around, every single emotion I had would be immediately, intensely expressed. So, if I felt upset, I would be bawling my eyes out in catastrophic sadness. If I was irritated by something, I would be furious, throwing my poles on the ground and shouting to the sky. If I was scared, I’d be shaking and petrified. My emotions swung so hard and fast that it made me feel as though I was going mad. It did teach me about myself — and about people in general. The human body and brain are capable of infinite resilience. You see that, when people survive huge traumas, and yet go on to lead fulfilling, rewarding lives. You see people in survival situations, going beyond what seems humanly possible, both mentally and physically. The difference with my trip was that it wasn’t survival. It was my choice to be out there. I learned my limit.

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

What was it like, transitioning back to regular life?
Some things were strangely difficult — like going to the grocery store. After living in a tent with what I needed and nothing more, I was overwhelmed by all the choices. I’d be standing in the bread aisle staring at a million different kinds of loaves and literally couldn’t make a decision! The energy of all those tiny decisions sapped my strength. Social interactions were strange, too. Although I was going through the motions of regular social behavior, it felt like the real me was actually sitting in the back of my brain somewhere, totally disconnected. It took a year before these two parts of me came back together as one, before I felt truly present again.

So, you felt like different versions of yourself?
Before that expedition, I had always assumed that I was intrinsically me. I thought Felicity was a specific, definite thing: this is who I am, these are my values, this is how I react. But out there, I realized that me, my character, is the space between all the people that have huge influence in my life. When those people and outside influences were taken away, suddenly my character didn’t have a form anymore. I felt fluid. It made me realize just how much the people in our lives help shape who we are — and how absolutely essential it is to surround yourself with others that reflect the values and the character that you want to have. People who are good for you.

Felicity Aston's beauty uniform

Thank you so much, Felicity! Her book, Alone in Antartica, came out in 2014.

P.S. More women share their beauty uniforms, including an HBO writer and a transgender advocate.

(Fifth photo by Katrina Jane Perry. All other photos courtesy of Felicity Aston.)

  1. Elena says...

    Very VERY good article! Thank you very much for the great content!
    I used to use Nivea as well but since I learned that it contains microplastic which pollutes the waters (and probably not so bad for your skin and organism either?) I don´t buy it anymore. There are some good vegan options instead!

  2. neha says...

    The Absolute Best kind of Beauty Uniform!! More of these, please!!

  3. Violeta says...

    Bookmarking this one. So inspirational and wise. Thank you Jo and team!

  4. MG says...

    This was awesome.

  5. Sam says...

    Yes please, more like this

  6. EC says...

    This. is. dope! Please, please continue to feature more inspiring women with wide-ranging perspectives like this. The world conspires to put enough of the same kind of content in front of my eyeballs (thanks to Instagram’s algorithm, I never ever need to see another thin privileged lady in Kamm pants again) but this blog keeps things real and human. Thank you for all you do to bring us these voices.

    • Emme says...

      “I never ever need to see another thin privileged lady in Kamm pants again)” This made me laugh haha. But I agree, more like this! so inspiring!

    • Barbara says...

      OMG hahaha the Kamm pants! Thank you for this, I keep wondering if pants like that would look good on me, and it’s probably because of the instagram algorithm!

    • EC says...

      Ooh, Karen Ramos seems amazing. I love her voice and energy. Followed. Thank you for sharing these!

  7. Wow! Best beauty uniform yet!!

  8. Michelle says...

    I live in Montana where it was -20 last night. I spent part of the night in the barn checking on a newborn calf. I can’t believe how raw my face has felt all day. I’m going to the store first thing tomorrow to pick up Felicity’s recommendations! If her Nivea moisturizer works in her daily conditions, I’m sure it can handle mine (which now seem like a tropical vacation in comparison).

    • Sasha L says...

      Hi Michelle, oh man, calving season in this brutal cold snap. I hope your calves are all ok. -22 at my house this morning, my little heeler stepped outside and jumped right back in. It was up to -3 for our dog walk tonight and we were all kind of giddy that it didn’t really feel that cold.

  9. Sierra says...

    Hahaha I just put the baby to bed and robotically turned Netflix on to some random show about gold diggers (not the women, but like actual gold diggers in overalls with bandanas) and Felicity was on the show :)

    • liz says...

      whaaaat which show? — going to try to find this tonight! haha

  10. Jess says...

    I’m really curious – did she do any expeditions while pregnant?

  11. MHS says...

    Incredible! Thanks for featuring her!

  12. Emily Winer says...

    Wow. Please please please keep featuring more women like her. Absolutely amazing and inspiring.

  13. Charlie says...

    Such a fascinating post! I’d love to hear more from her. Especially interested in the questions about emotion + how it changes in the wild, when there aren’t other people around to help you check yourself and normalize. How much of us is based on those around us and perception? who would we be alone?

  14. Mariel says...

    If anyone ever asks me why COJ is my favorite blog, I’ll just point them here. Every other lifestyle blog would simply list a bunch of things I should buy. In contrast, COJ picks fascinating people, asks the kind of questions that yield profound answers, and gives us more than fluff. Thanks for providing a perfect balance of light and thought-provoking, ladies!

  15. proleta says...

    This is so inspiring! I love the variety of your beauty routine content.. kudos!

  16. Rachel says...

    Absolutely love this. Clearly an incredible person and role model.

  17. Ksm says...

    Omg those last few lines really hit me hard. Thank you so much for this interview, this is so effortlessly deep and introspective that it’s difficult to put in words. Thank you Felicity and cupofjo.

  18. Brittany says...

    This was absolutely amazing! I loved her unique perspective, and it not being about physical beauty things at all. The part about being alone and outside especially resonated with me. Stripping yourself of who you’re told you are by friends, family, society, really just any influence both subtle and not so subtle is freeing on so many levels and one of the reasons I love backpacking alone.

  19. Robin says...

    Thank you!! I loved this.

  20. Christy says...

    Whoa 😮 Wow. This was suuuuper interesting. I wonder if I could do what she did…probably not. Very cool interview, very cool lady. Wow.

  21. Jessica says...

    This was very interesting but I really wonder how she balances her work with her son. I would have loved more on that. Maybe a “parenting while in Antarctica” post would be appropriate here. Hehe

  22. Loooooong-time loyal reader, first-time commenter. This post was so absurdly wonderful! I think absurd is the operative word, though. To read these beauty questions put to an explorer felt strange, and the interviewing voice clearly felt strange about it, too. While Felicity answered the questions with enthusiasm and grace, she seemed to quickly steer the conversation to other areas of importance to her. Reading this Beauty Uniform in particular has made me think, for the first time, that asking *any* womxn about their beauty routines is (or, rather, should be) an absurd thing to do! Why has it taken reading about an explorer to make me realise this? We *all* have areas of profound importance and influence and effort and struggle in our lives, big and small. Should the beauty products we use really be a big topic of conversation? I love how each interviewee in this series finds ways to bring their joys and ideas and challenges into the mix. And each person also brings nuance and wonder to broad definitions of beauty. Maybe the whole ‘beauty’ focus of this series is just a fun trojan horse to usher in some really brilliant, contemplative thinking. But I think I’d rather the thinking be front and centre, rather than a bonus. Associating feminity/femmes/womxn with ‘beauty’ can be an act of self-love/care but I worry about what else could be going on: auto-objectification and a soft kind of advertising/consumerist encouragement.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Oh! We actually edit the conversations we have with these women down to talking points // so for example we will talk for 1-1.5 hours and cut the rambling conversations down to tight questions and answers (this is a standard journalism practice). So any feeling that she was steering the answers away was actually just a matter of our editing process to include content about both beauty and explorations! Thanks so much xoxo

    • Nina says...

      I felt exactly the same! I have always loved that these posts cover more than just beauty, but in this case the beauty part seemed particularly irrelevant to the point where it felt a bit strange. I love the series and CoJ’s approach with it, but maybe there is room for something else… a series where women’s lives and expertise aren’t added on to a beauty or design post but where the main focus point is their jobs/expertise/outlook on life.

  23. Laura says...

    I love this so much! Thank you!

  24. Jillian says...

    Wow! This is one of my favourites of this series. So good.

  25. Caitlin says...

    This was awesome!

  26. Gabrielle says...

    This is such a great interview that puts into stark contrast how ill-suited the title of this column is. Stressing physical beauty, make-up and fitness regimes seems out of tone for a blog that (generally) values growth, reflection, challenging yourself and learning about others people’s experiences, idiosyncrasies and philosophy.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      We think of it as a mix of beauty products and what makes people feel truly beautiful and in their element — I’m a big believer that all things can bring you joy, from scientific discoveries to a great rosy blush. We strive to embrace it all!

    • Cay says...

      Beauty routines are intensely personal rituals. They are often a direct way into a person’s innermost thoughts, emotions, and sense of self.

      The idea that “beauty” somehow stands apart from “serious” issues like, as you say, “experiences, idiosyncrasies and philosophy” is a bit misogynistic – the idea that the feminine must be frivolous. We are all complex people with many facets, and our personal care choices are reflected in that.

    • Christy says...

      I like beauty stuff, and I’m not a shallow person. Beauty stuff isn’t fundamentally frivolous; it has just been characterized like that as another way to belittle women. Women are asked to make themselves beautiful, so they learn about beauty and, being resilient and resourceful creatures, turn it into something fun, creative, and enjoyable. Then the same people who demanded they make themselves beautiful mock and belittle them for being interested in making themselves beautiful! Can’t win! Lots of cool, smart women have elevated the beauty routine into something meaningful, nurturing, and/or artistic, and I think we should celebrate that. Maybe it’s the men who are missing out at this point. Beauty stuff is fun as hell!

    • Charlie says...

      Christy I love your comment!

    • Sasha L says...

      Christy, thank you for your answer. I have been struggling with this idea – is beauty frivolous? I think I agree with you! That is only because it’s seen as feminine that it is both held up as a standard for women, and then diminished as silly when embraced by women. If individual women find beauty rituals to be a source of creativity and expression and self care and happiness, then yay. And let’s also please hold up sisters who choose not to conform to traditional ideas of beauty for women. It should be our choice, and it’s meaning should be all ours too.

    • liz says...

      yes, love Christy’s comment!

    • Barbara says...

      I actually thought this post in particular highlighted that beauty/skincare is not a trivial “women only” thing. I laughed out loud that the men don’t take care of their skin properly (my husband rarely accepts my offer of sunscreen) and pay for it later. In Felicity’s case, taking care of her skin is a part of taking care of her health while on these trips. It’s wonderful!

    • Amanda says...

      I love how Cay described intertwining beauty and our complex selves. I’m an engineer; I work on machines and get dirty. My skin cracks from coolant and polish that sneaks in under my gloves. Does putting on lotion and makeup make me better at my job? No. However, I add layers of moisturizer and tinted foundation to protect my skin from the environment of dust and grease. The result of that is clear skin, which boosts confidence, right or wrong. And with a little mascara or blush some days, I promote that we don’t have to be completely devoid of femininity to do a job that’s predominately male. I think that’s the ultimate goal here is to show that we can still be aware of beauty while doing what we love.

    • Zoey says...

      I wish there was a way to “like” or upvote Christy’s comment, because she is SPOT ON. I spent time working at a women’s magazine when I was younger and have myself struggled with these same issues — I couldn’t understand why the staff there took the beauty (& fashion) stuff so deathly seriously; it’s not like it’s of life or death importance. I see now that I had internalized misogynistic views because I myself enjoyed beauty stuff but didn’t feel like I had permission to do so lest I come across as vapid or shallow. It took time and maturity for me to eventually get to a place where I could say to hell with men’s double standards (and it’s always the men who belittle women for wanting to look good when they’re the ones who’ve conditioned women to believe that a fundamental part of their value comes from how good they can make themselves look!), I’m going to do as much or as little as I want beauty-wise, their approval be damned. I like myself and my own interests and I don’t have to justify it to anyone!

  27. L says...

    Wow. This is seriously cool. Thanks for rocking so hard (Jo, Kelsey, Felicity, commenters, etc.) Love this community so much. xo

  28. Jess says...

    That was brilliant. I loved it. Insightful and fascinating. And how she described a wet wipe as her ‘luxury item’ had me chuckling!

  29. Alison says...

    This was so refreshing. Has to be one of my favorite beauty uniforms yet. As someone who loves to hike and recently went on a 50 mile hike over the course of several days in Peru, I was in shock to see the two other women in our small group putting on mascara/make-up daily. Being in the outdoors is one of the things that has allowed me to peel back all of the expectations and embrace myself naturally. I also agree that skincare has never been more important! …and taking care of my skin/wearing less make up has made my face look better than ever. Loved, loved this beauty uniform and hope to see more like it. <3

  30. L8Blmr says...

    fascinating! such a diverse woman…mother, explorer, cerebral, funny, tough (59 days out there alone!), girlie (that fabulous polka dot blouse!)… fabulous! I also really love what she said about fear.

  31. Kate says...

    Holy crap! You are amazing, Felicity!

  32. jennifer says...

    Yes! This was the best Beauty Uniform yet! I found this so fascinating and useful as I am outdoors a fair amount as well, though recreationally, and am always struggling with simplifying skincare. Thank you! Plus, such an amazing woman to boot!

  33. Keri says...

    Oh my god, this was so interesting!!!

  34. Marie says...

    Wow! Just wow.

    In love with Felicity. What an incredible woman!

    And to CupOfJo – thank you for doing this. Getting your readers <3

  35. j says...

    amazing article, amazing person, love the her introspection

  36. Colleen says...

    I love how interesting all the women in this series are!

  37. Oh my gosh, this was my favorite one of these yet! What a cool job, but what an ever cooler person. And her skin! My god. I cannot.

    How do you pick the people that you profile on here? They’re always so interesting.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thanks for your note! we choose people in many different ways — sometimes they’re friends, sometimes they do work we admire, sometimes we scout on instagram or the web for great candidates, sometimes we get pitched by their publicists, sometimes they just came out with a new book or show. thank you for asking!

  38. Amy says...

    I don’t usually comment on this series, but I just have to say that I LOVED this one. Fascinating! Thanks for putting it together.

  39. Beck says...

    Best “beauty uniform” of all time. I love Cup of Jo so much…y’all are perfectly unique, real, and always interesting.

  40. Maddy says...

    What an incredible woman, scientist, mother, inspiration, the list goes on!

    Thank you for sharing a glimpse of your life, Felicity!

    xoxo

  41. Cara says...

    WOW- I loved this one. She is so beautiful and so interesting! I love reading about her experiences and the way she talked about being on her own for nearly 2 months. I was thinking about that, like “oh my god, yes! I would be doing the same thing! Yelling at the sky because no one is around!” and it just makes you realize a lot.

  42. AJ says...

    Ace. Super cool and living the dream!

  43. Audrey says...

    My favorite insight is the thousand tiny decisions we have to make in life is stressful.

  44. Capucine says...

    THIS. I have never, not ever, been more lit up about a beauty interview than when I saw the headline for this one. What this woman does to care for her body in wild nature day in and day out so she can still integrate back in the urban environment, I really want to know. Can this be a regular feature? Beauty practices of adventurers?

    When I go out with my family camping in the wilderness, there is this weird disjointed feeling about skincare where some of it that makes sense at home just gets subjected to the cold light of day in the woods and shows up for the ridiculous practice it is. I’ve got my kit down to almost nothing now, just actual essentials and it’s become all I use at home too; I don’t like that feeling of absurdity when I get out in the real. Like the Emperor’s New Clothes. This woman knows more about the essence of things (lotion and otherwise) than I ever will, and hearing how she integrates it is really, really vital info. (Coming back from her trek alone sounds like my journey back from being with the dying and death of loved ones. The grocery store! Social situations! A year to integrate my inner and outer selves!)

    Just, MORE OF THIS. The realness of a woman’s perspective who is out in nature a lot is such a refreshing slice through urban life.

    • L says...

      Exactly. As I begin my return to society after my own emotional polar expedition I could not agree more.

    • Rae says...

      I loved this comment Capucine (and I LOVED this Beauty Uniform as well). I very much relate to feeling foolish lugging a bag of skincare & makeup when camping & traveling. And I relish the simplicity of my now minimal routine. I also have experienced other isolating experiences that require re-entering life.

    • Robin says...

      YES

  45. Lesley says...

    Really, really liked this post. So much insight.

  46. Elspeth says...

    Can I just say how much I love the variety of these beauty uniforms? All the women are so different and unique and I’ve learnt something from each of them. Thank you Cup of Jo family ❤️

  47. S says...

    Wow – this is my favourite beauty post, not only because we get to benefit from all the INCREDIBLE wisdom she learnt through her journey, but also because of how practical her routine is. I am a firm believer that the market which tells women we need 5 different products each for the morning and night is just about $$$. Have you seen the meme for how many products women have versus the market sells 1 bottle for men that covers: shampoo, conditioner, body wash, dish detergent and car cleaner? Both hilarious and sad.

  48. Sarah says...

    I loved this Beauty Uniform so much! Felicity looks a lot like me, and she reminded me of my mom (who decided to backpack 60 miles for her 60th birthday and whose daily routine consists of lotion and a bar of soap :). It’s so refreshing that you recognize and share beauty uniforms of all types– seven-step skincare routine or not. Thanks, CoJ!

    • Elizabeth says...

      I’ve been looking for something significant to mark turning 30 this year and I think hiking 30 miles sounds like the perfect idea. Thanks to your mom for the inspiration – she sounds like a wonderful woman!

  49. Kristen says...

    I LOVE that this is framed as a Beauty Uniform and the assumption that a badass polar explorer would have as much to say about beauty as an NYC beauty editor. What a fantastic interview…and also some incredible photography! I never want to sleep in a tent on ice, but that image is beautiful.

  50. Lori says...

    Love this. She has some really wise words in there – in fact I copied the part about how important it is to surround yourself with people who are good to you and sent it to my daughter in college.

    On another note, I’m never without my Nivea in a tin, it’s fantastic!

  51. Elizabeth says...

    WHAT A BADASS!

  52. mb says...

    “When those people and outside influences were taken away, suddenly my character didn’t have a form anymore. I felt fluid. It made me realize just how much the people in our lives help shape who we are — and how absolutely essential it is to surround yourself with others that reflect the values and the character that you want to have. ”
    Her level of introspection and self-knowledge were astounding. Felicity is an inspiration–not just for those seeking adventures, but for anyone who desires to know themselves better!

    • Mary says...

      Yes! I loved this quote too! It’s all sorts of amazing. I think I’ve read it five times now. I love her clarity and wisdom. It makes such sense to me and what’s more offers hope to people who feel trapped in their lives/bodies/personalities… all we have to remember is that it’s all fluid so we can change it. Sooooooo good!! 💗

  53. Denise says...

    Thank you for featuring an outdoorswoman and a scientist! Hearing about her alone time vs. time with people is really interesting. Plus, lip balm, moisturizer, and foot care are an excellent beauty focus.

  54. Elisabeth says...

    This is the best “Beauty Uniform” yet! While I love all the profiles, it’s refreshing to read about someone who is doing amazing things, and whose beauty uniform is primarily lotion and a wet wipe. Actually, my young (3 yo) niece currently wants to be a polar explorer, so I passed the profile along to my sister to share with her. A REAL female polar explorer! What a wonderful person to look up to!

  55. Kara says...

    This was such an incredible and inspiring post. Thanks for sharing!

  56. agnes says...

    Three things I love about this post (copying the CoJ style): that it’s still called “Beauty uniform”, even if the content is more about living life to the full and freedom and a woman who couldn’t care less about make-up and creams and has no uniform at all (it shows your sense of humour; don’t ever change the title); that I so relate to her: after a one year trip in adventurous conditions, the first time I went to the supermarket I came back with nothing, I felt absolutely overwhelmed by the quantity of every thing (especially the yogurts) 3. THE COMMENTS. I think that part of our beauty uniform here is to read the comments on this blog! makes me happy and grateful.

    • YoungDirectionless says...

      Right? Supermarkets, and sleeping with walls! So weird. I also loved how intense and just f*ing cool this was!

    • mims says...

      yes! when i feel down, i come here to CoJ and read comments. So much collected wisdom. But I would never want it in book form. That would spoil it.

  57. Amy says...

    LOVE this beauty uniform! We’re having unusually cold weather here right now (I won’t tell you how mild it actually is; it’s pathetic) and I need *all* the hand cream. What a cool profession to learn about, and a fascinating woman to gain insight from!

  58. Courtney says...

    Kelsey, you are an excellent interviewer! Always enjoy your pieces. COJ, could we have an “intro” post to learn more about Kelsey?

  59. Erin says...

    This is so profound, and I will be thinking about it all night. “Before that expedition, I had always assumed that I was intrinsically me. I thought Felicity was a specific, definite thing: this is who I am, these are my values, this is how I react. But out there, I realized that me, my character, is the space between all the people that have huge influence in my life. When those people and outside influences were taken away, suddenly my character didn’t have a form anymore. I felt fluid. It made me realize just how much the people in our lives help shape who we are — and how absolutely essential it is to surround yourself with others that reflect the values and the character that you want to have. People who are good for you. ” It makes me think about people in this world who are really, chronically lonely, and how a big part of their distress may be not having the “form” that you take for granted when you have people in your life.

    • liz says...

      great quote and great comment- thanks for this

  60. sbe says...

    My absolute favorite one to date. This: “The human body and brain are capable of infinite resilience. You see that, when people survive huge traumas, and yet go on to lead fulfilling, rewarding lives. You see people in survival situations, going beyond what seems humanly possible, both mentally and physically.”

  61. Catherine says...

    Thank you for this.
    Love the Beauty Uniform page – some levity, some good advice and sometimes, unexpectedly, some pretty thought-provoking comments!

  62. Lauren E. says...

    Giggling over the men and the moisturizer. I gave my husband some night time wrinkle cream to try and he rubbed it into his forehead with gusto. I asked what he was doing and said, “Trying to massage out the wrinkles!” Face. Palm.

  63. Damn. Felicity just had me clapping at my desk and applauding her statement about surrounding ourselves with good people. What a courageous and beautiful human. LOVED this beauty uniform!

  64. Charlotte says...

    Wow, just wow! This was fantastic on so many levels. Thank you, Felicity for sharing your incredible experiences. I feel so inspired and empowered.

  65. Fiona says...

    So inspired! Thank you!

  66. Linnea says...

    Oh my gosh, this is my favorite beauty routine yet– her comments about what she learned about herself, and how we are shaped by others, is just beautiful. And I love that it is such an unconventional take, proving yet again that Cup of Jo is a place for all of us <3

  67. Katherine says...

    Absolutely incredible. My favorite routine yet.

  68. Sarah Kay says...

    Loooong time COJ reader and someone typically obsessed with all the beauty uniforms. This was by far the most fascinating. I totally got the “silliness” and when I saw who was being interviewed at first I was like … what could she possibly have going on for a beauty uniform? But this was fantastic and MESMERIZING and so interesting. Well done, guys.

  69. Ashley says...

    I loved this so much. Thank you.

    “The human body and brain are capable of infinite resilience. ”

  70. Lisa says...

    I loved this piece! I wonder if you might consider doing follow-up pieces about the work – the actual work for which we need the uniforms. What education, training, skills do you need to do the work? What does the work itself look like? My scientist brain wants more details.

    • Heather says...

      Love this idea – something focused on the specifics of how people got their current careers and the ins/outs of them!

    • Emily says...

      I LOVE this idea!!!

    • Molly K says...

      Yes!! Especially for science jobs! I would love to read about that!

  71. Becky says...

    OMG zinc oxide for my cuticles!

    • Leni says...

      I’ll be trying this out tonight!

  72. Rachel says...

    THIS is my favorite Beauty Uniform yet. Beauty encompasses so much more than makeup and skincare-designed-to-fix-flaws-and-aging. While I’m an avid user of both of the latter (took a deep dive into Korean skincare, thanks to CoJ, and have never looked back), I love this interview for its reminder that we are so much more than all of that. Also, ditto to all the commenters who are like: YAY FOR WOMEN SCIENTISTS!

  73. Sarah says...

    Like everyone else, I loved this interview. What an all around badass. Would love to see more features on women in diverse and unconventional fields. I also agree that much of the lifestyle content out there features ppl in design, fashion, style so I really loved seeing someone from…science!

  74. SAR says...

    Badass. I like what Felicity had to say about fear.

    Would love to know about the gear she uses.

    Thank you for posting!

    • Christina says...

      Week of Outfits? :) kidding….but not.

    • Rue says...

      I am SO here for a week of camping/expedition outfits!

  75. Hilary says...

    I LOVE Cup of Jo for introducing me to women I wouldn’t otherwise know about and whose lives are so utterly different from my own. I’d love another interview with her about how she got into this field, advice for women in traditionally male jobs, juggling parenthood with travel (and what I imagine not much connectivity).

  76. Kathryn says...

    This was mesmerizing. What an incredible perspective to get
    To hear – and incredible woman. Thank you!

  77. Sarah says...

    Wow, coolest (no pun intended) beauty uniform so far! So impressive!

  78. Rue says...

    I’m also a field scientist, and you know what, I really should start using the title “explorer” more! Antarctica is on my bucket list, but a lot of this is exactly how my job works too. Lots of planning, then being the only woman in a tiny community of tents, face wipes as the best connection to the outside world.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      you definitely should! :)

  79. Char says...

    I know many other people have said this, but this was amazing! Thank you!

  80. Cynthia says...

    Felicity is amazing and her skin is beautiful.

  81. liz says...

    yes, another bad ass woman! we need these stories shared!

  82. Mona says...

    I LOVED this!! What an amazing lady!!!

  83. Essss says...

    Favorite beauty uniform ever, thank you!! What an inspiring human!

  84. Lucy says...

    Yes!!! Feature more women like Felicity, more women like Samin Nostrat. Less women from with perfectly curated lives and wardrobes. I want to aspire to someone’s character, live Felicity, not their picture-perfect life — which seems to be on display on this site sometimes. I think this is why I like beauty uniforms more, they delve into interesting topics about the subject.

    • Diana says...

      It’s a balance, isn’t it! I totally agree with your comment, this was incredible as was Samin, but at the same time when I do want to learn about cool brands and new skincare stuff the perfect-lifestyle people come in handy. (even when I do eye-roll at their $400 rompers or whatever.) I like that Beauty Uniform has turned into more of a wildcard!

    • Amanda says...

      I think there is room for all women’s beauty uniforms on this blog. That’s what makes it SO interesting–that we can all be women yet not let that us box us into following any certain standards. I find anyone’s daily routine (and their differences from my own)fascinating!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes, we try to feature a diverse group in all ways — style, location, career, budget, marital status, family structure, body shape, etc etc. thank you for appreciating it! https://cupofjo.com/tag/beauty-uniform/

  85. Des says...

    This is my absolute favorite interview you’ve done in a while—and you’ve done some good ones lately. I really like how you explored the depth of her experiences, I hope I can learn more about her!

  86. Diane Lancaster says...

    What an amazing voice. This in particular really struck was profound to me-But out there, I realized that me, my character, is the space between all the people that have huge influence in my life. When those people and outside influences were taken away, suddenly my character didn’t have a form anymore. I felt fluid. It made me realize just how much the people in our lives help shape who we are — and how absolutely essential it is to surround yourself with others that reflect the values and the character that you want to have. People who are good for you.

    • Sara Johnson says...

      I caught my breath reading this, too.

    • Diane says...

      it was so profound to me I lost my ability to put together a proper sentence :)

  87. Emma says...

    I loved this! So, so interesting!

  88. I loved this so so so so so much. I want to be her when I grow up. What a beautiful person!!!

  89. Rebekka says...

    Wow, what an amazing Portrait, Thank you!! I LOVE Nivea, it smells like my grandmother and I used it myself for quite some time.

  90. Katie says...

    Wow. Just…wow! This was so inspiring and is hands down my favorite Beauty Uniform. Felicity is an inspiration!

    I can also relate to the aloneness. I went, by myself, on a two-month trip to Bali, Indonesia, to work with a humanity foundation. I was quite young at the time, 19, but it shaped me in so many ways. I was an emotional wreck when I got there, thinking: “What have I done?” But then you learn that you are your own best friend and you go through the motions until you then think: “I’ve got this.” It was the best experience of my life and I wouldn’t trade that for anything.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that’s incredible, katie. thank you so much for sharing.

    • Becky says...

      Sounds like an interesting trip Katie! It’s funny- I totally read Felicity’s account of loneliness to be because of the all-consuming emptiness of literally not having another human around for hundreds and thousands of miles. Whereas Bali is a wonderful vacation destination full of people! I suppose that shows how there are different versions of being alone :)

  91. Lindsey says...

    WOW!! Felicity is incredible, and I immediately want to read more of her writing. What a fascinating, intelligent, brave woman! This is the best beauty uniform, because her soul is shining forth so bright and beautiful!

  92. Allie says...

    LOVED THIS

  93. Shannon says...

    How timely! I’m in Minnesota where last week it was actually colder than Antarctica. I need as many cold weather tips as I can get!

  94. Em says...

    One more thing- the only shame about these beauty uniforms is that sometimes they’re so intimate that you fall in love with these people and want them to be featured more. But that’s unlikely to happen because it’s beyond the scope of what this blog is. I guess if anything, it teaches me to put myself out there more and keep introducing myself to new people, asking about their stories and finding that connection. How have I forgotten about such a rudimentary part of life?

  95. Paula says...

    WOW. WOW. Amazing person and life.

    I felt that way about childbirth. It really taught me my own limits and living on my own since 13 taught me how resilient we all are.

    And slightly off point, but YES!!! Nivea! Used it all my life, as do most women in Eastern Europe! I feel vindicated for always skipping the fancy moisturizing lotion suggestions from friends/magazines, etc.

  96. Carly says...

    Not sure if this was deliberate or not, but kudos for not asking her if it is hard to do this work as a mother – a question virtually never asked of a man (polar explorer or otherwise). I was curious about the answer given that I have two small boys and travel for work , but was more pleased at CoJ for allowing this piece to focus on the woman as explorer and lotion lover ;) Thank you!

    • emma says...

      I agree- but maybe we SHOULD be asking it to men. I am the work traveler in my relationship. My husband often holds down the fort as a single parent while I’m out traveling for work and making money (he works too- travel is just required for my job), and it is hard- for both of us (but also worth it for the many reasons we have decided to do this as well). I would have appreciated hearing how she manages to balance family and this incredible adventure that is her life.

    • Kelsey Miller says...

      It was! In interviews like this, I try not to get into mom stuff unless the subject raises it. If it’s relevant, great! If not, no need to ask the question they probably get in every other interview (if not every day of their lives!). I’m glad you noticed and appreciated that!

    • KL says...

      Great observation, Carly!

  97. Heather says...

    ‘But out there, I realized that me, my character, is the space between all the people that have huge influence in my life. When those people and outside influences were taken away, suddenly my character didn’t have a form anymore. I felt fluid.’

    Wow! That was really amazing and such a treat to read. I loved her insights into human character – thank you for delivering such diverse content that makes us think about our lives.

  98. gfy says...

    Very much appreciate this one. . . The question that comes to mind though is how does one finance a life like this? Do her speaking engagements pay enough to provide a living and fund the treks? Is she independently wealthy? I’m really interested in how women support themselves financially – where specifically does the money come from? How long will she do this and how is her career shaped – by what framework? Etc. . .

    I loved her tips and hope to see more women with unusual lives. It makes me feel so proud – and inspired!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh i’m sure the treks are sponsored and funded, and she is in high demand for speaking (i mean, what an incredible perspective!), and she has written two books — plus, she does important research. i imagine there are a lot of revenue streams from her from explorations and research and just the overall amazing work she does. hope this helps!

    • Tricia says...

      If she is a scientist in academia, I would guess that many/most of her expeditions are tied to funding she has secured through grants. My spouse is a scientist at a university and a large portion of his time is dedicated to securing funding for his ongoing and future research, to support both himself and those he employs in his lab (the constant writing of grants is a big endeavor to add to one’s teaching and research load). Much of his funding comes from government entities, some from foundations and the like. It is very competitive and as you can imagine a big source of stress.

    • gfy says...

      Interesting. . . thank you both for your speculations!

    • Lauren says...

      Yes grant writing is an huge part of academia, and it can be pretty disillusioning!

  99. Em says...

    By far my favorite in this series. That last paragraph is a think piece in itself.

  100. Dani says...

    My favorite beauty uniform yet! she is amazing!

  101. Kristy Johnson says...

    I loved every single word of this. How insightful! Thank you so much for sharing.

  102. Jenny says...

    I came here just for the moisturizer information. As a Minnesotan I’m always looking for something for extremely dry cracked skin, that is also affordable. Indeed, I forgot about Nivea. And it comes in a tin – another thing I am trying to do use use less plastic. I wonder if the tins are recyclable. Thanks. Great article. Inspiring!

    • Sarah says...

      Costco sells large glass bottles of Nivea! It’s a staple for my son and I! I imagine as an old woman, I’ll look back with great fondness to the winter evenings after stories have been read, and lights are out, singing our bedtime songs while I slather it on his red, winter-parched hands. That smell will bring me back always.

  103. Gwen says...

    Thank you for highlighting Felicity today.
    And showing us that beauty comes from within us.
    Thank you!

  104. Sadie says...

    Being from Alaska, this is my beauty uniform. Slather on whatever moister you can find and keep moving. :)

  105. Sasha L says...

    I loved this post so much!! Felicity’s book is next on my reading list. As a person who enjoys being alone, being outdoors, the farther away the better, and LOVES life in a tent, and also can’t survive five minutes without my chapstick, I happily relate.

    Also, I would love to see a week of outfits, always looking for tips on cold weather gear.

    “Surround yourself with people that are good for you,” so wise, beautiful, accomplished and inspiring. Thank you Felicity!

    • Mims says...

      I love outdoor winter sports and snow camping, I have found the Columbia insulated snow pants with Omni Tech super well made and warm. Spent a night camping at 25 F below and never took them off. I do take off my socks and inspect my feet and then put them in down booties for the night. I also ADORE the Mountain Hardware Windstopper tights, they don’t make them anymore, but I have found a pair gently used on ebay as a spare pair. They are (were?) really well made and made skiing/cross country toasty. Still have not found what I consider perfect coat. I have several pair of Sorel snowboots: warm, well made and cute!

    • Sasha L says...

      Mims, the perfect coat! It’s the holy Grail isn’t it?

      Thanks for the tips. I bought a Patagonia recycled wool quarter zip top at our outlet last summer, I’ve been wearing it just about every hike this winter. It wicks sweat and keeps me from catching a chill on the down hike, and warm enough with a down jacket if I’m moving. My darn tough winter weight full length hiking socks have been keeping my feet really happy. I’ve ditched snowboots for goretex Merrill hikers and kahtoolas microspikes. Feet are only getting cold when it’s below zero.

  106. Amy Ward says...

    Great interview! Where did Felicity get that gorgeous lavender sweater?!

    • K says...

      I AGREE!! Sweater details, please!

    • Trish says...

      Ditto!

  107. Kimberly says...

    This is an amazing article. Felicity, thank you for your candor and genuineness, particularly when talking about your character and what it is that truly shapes you. So insightful

  108. Julie says...

    Maybe one of my fav beauty uniforms ever!!

  109. Lindsay says...

    LOVE this profile! What an amazing woman!! I would love to see more profiles of kickass ladies doing the unconventional :)

  110. Hayley says...

    Go Blue! :-) I hope you’ve found a good community in the A2! xoxo

  111. Jill says...

    Wow, what an amazing woman. Thanks for publishing such a great beauty uniform column.
    This comment is absolutely fascinating too – ” I felt fluid. It made me realize just how much the people in our lives help shape who we are — and how absolutely essential it is to surround yourself with others that reflect the values and the character that you want to have.”
    What an extraordinary insight to learn on a ski trip across the Antarctic!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      agreed! so fascinating.

  112. Bindi says...

    OMG, I just fell in love with her! Wow, she is incredible, and beautiful! Great choice, COJ!

  113. Kaitlin says...

    Well isn’t she just so incredibly fabulous!

    I find her so inspiring and relatable and beautiful- comfortable in her own skin. My husband and I did a through hike of New Zealand (like their version of the Appalacian Trail) so I can relate to some of the sentiments shared here- especially the portions about caring for your feet and setting up/breaking down camp every night.

    The way she described the fear of the plane flying away made me choke up.

  114. Hayley says...

    I loved this beauty uniform! What an interesting person she is (although I was hoping for a mention of climate change, too). More women like this, please :)

  115. Jess says...

    I loved hearing Felicity’s perspective, and her interview reminded me of the polar explorer character in Leni Zumas’ book Red Clocks (which I loved and highly recommend).

  116. Karin Connor says...

    Thank you for your commitment to women in science. To many websites for
    Women focus on glamorous women in design, art styling and fashion, which leave us in the sciences feeling like chopped liver! Thank you for focusing on women who think big, get into the science and show us the inner ( and outer!) beauty of them too.

  117. Rachel says...

    Wow! Thanks for continuing to broaden to include all kinds of women. Y’all always find the coolest women that I never knew about who just make me proud and honored to be a woman like them. Bring on all the artists and doctors and lawyers and designers!

  118. Sarah says...

    Wow, this was incredibly wise and enriching to read. Thank you!

  119. Linnea says...

    Agree with everyone before me, this is one of my favorite features! What a badass! Thank you for featuring AMAZING women like Felicity!

  120. Laur says...

    I am a daily reader of CoJ and THIS is the best profile to date! How inspiring!!! Thank you!

    If I could ask a follow-up question: what are Felicity’s plans? what’s NEXT? she has a toddler now, as do I, and that changes a lot (for me)…. but I’d love to hear her personal goals.

  121. Annelies says...

    I love this series. Cup of Jo has their “beauty” related content NAILED. Authenticity is beautiful. Also, I challenge you to find any woman that doesn’t like to feel aggressively moisturized.

    • Diana says...

      lol aggressively moisturized. sounds about right!

  122. Annelies McConnachie-Howarth says...

    I love this series. Cup of Jo has their “beauty” related content NAILED. Authenticity is beautiful. Also, I challenge you to find any woman that doesn’t like to feel aggressively moisturized.

    • Adrienne says...

      “Also, I challenge you to find any woman that doesn’t like to feel aggressively moisturized.” Haha! #truth And WOW to Felicity and her whole outlook on life. I’m amazed when I read about women who are actually living their lives this way. She’s humble and beautiful and so real. Love, love, love the wisdom of surrounding yourself with people who are good for you.

  123. Courtney says...

    What a brilliant voice to hear from! I love hearing from an adventurer. Felicity’s take on a beauty uniform resonates with me (probably the most of any in the Beauty Uniform series). I work in international disaster relief, so at no point do I need “office wear”. I’m either on construction sites in other countries or at home behind a computer, so taking care of my body and wearing proper footwear is important in getting through the day-to-day of work. When I’ve spent days on site, it feels especially luxurious to take care of myself with things like super thick moisturizer and giving myself foot massages. I love the balance of being physically engaged on work sites, spending time with local communities and then getting to write, plan, and report from home. I once told a friend that I feel like I get paid to live the way I want to live, and she replied, “That’s success!”. I wouldn’t have known how to define success before that, but she was right!

    • Jess says...

      How did you get into this field? I have an MPH and disaster relief feels very hard to break into.

    • Courtney says...

      Jess, it definitely feels that way to me, too! For me, and I think for many in the humanitarian world, it has taken being dedicated enough to work at something for years without pay (followed by finally getting paid a little!). An MPH would definitely be useful in this field! At the same time, field experience is extremely valued, and experience usually takes the form of unpaid volunteering and internships, even with a degree. For me, all of that time spent is valuable for me as a person and also shapes the value in my work. One thing that comes to mind if you have an MPH is Global Health Corps – they do fellowships where you use your own direction and expertise, working with a local co-fellow, towards any variety of global health initiatives. MSF (Doctors Without Borders) is sometimes competitive to get a foot in, but could also be a good place to look!

  124. Amanda says...

    This was one of my favorites, so amazing!

  125. J. says...

    Wow this was fascinating from beginning to end!

  126. Sarah says...

    Woah, that was such a fascinating read. I expected to be reading about lotion and then I find myself leaning in to the computer to really focus on her story.

    The part about not conquering fear but moving forward with it, is so true. I’ve kept moving a lot more than I’ve conquered!

  127. Sarah says...

    LOVED this. I was especially fascinated by what she learned about being alone for such a long time, and what that revealed for her about the fluidity of personality and sense of self. Thank you for covering such a range of people and experiences!

  128. Sarah says...

    Wow!!!!

  129. bethany says...

    Wow, this interview is stunning and poignant. I’m so glad amazing women like Felicity are out in the world, doing amazing and hard things, and willing to sit down and share what they’ve learned with us. Beauty inside and out.

  130. Renee says...

    Thank you so much for this post. I live in MN and often am doing winter camping excursions in areas such as the Boundary Waters Wilderness (nothing as hardcore as Felicity) and spend a large majority of my winter hours outdoors. This is the most meaningful beauty uniform I’ve seen. Felicity – if you haven’t yet you MUST try One Love Organics Skin Savior product. It is my number one, hands down, ride or die winter beauty product. It has a coconut oil base so doesn’t freeze when on outdoor expeditions in below zero temps (and can be used as a cleanser and moisturizer, plus blocks the wind). On all of my outdoor expeditions I have my kids (and husband) in tow and it is great to have a non-petroleum based product to put on their skin.

    Again, thanks for this post. Although my winter excursions aren’t nearly as extreme as Felicity’s, I can relate to the emotions and insight she has gained from her experiences and it is wonderful to learn from another woman who is out there loving winter!

    • Lauren says...

      Just a PSA that that ^ One Love cream is $50 for less than 1/4 cup and is just made of coconut, soy, jojoba, meadowfoam, and oat kernel oils, and orange peel wax and beeswax, mango seed butter, chia seed and rosemary extracts, and Vitamin E.

      (just trying to save people some click-over time lol)

    • Renee says...

      I agree $50 is a bit of a sticker shock, but it’s worth it. I’ve had the same jar for three years- a little goes quite a long way. I bike commute in the winter, run, ski and spend extended times out door winter camping in pretty cold conditions. Before I started using this product, I would break out quite a bit from the extreme temperature changes my skin would go through and had to get multiple skin calming facials every winter. This stuff just protects my skin so much…..I’ve saved more on skipping facials, and the product has lasted three winters, it’s worth it. Just want to put that out there for all you extreme weather ladies.

  131. Claire says...

    Whoa this was so cool & inspiring to read!!!! I love it when scientists get featured. :)

  132. Danielle says...

    This was the best ‘beauty uniform’ yet! All of the women you interview are hardworking, but I really love how unique and challenging this woman’s life seems to be. Please more like this!

  133. Kelly says...

    Amazing! What an extraordinary woman and what an adventurous life! Grateful that these explorers and scientists are working so hard to improve our world. She is so smart to take care of herself in that gruelling environment. I will be taking her recommendations on skin care products to help me get through this winter! The dry and cold winter in Canada is not very kind to my skin, so these products are sure to help. Thanks for this lovely post!

  134. Charmaine says...

    As a woman who regularly goes on multi-day backpacking trips, this is the first My Beauty Uniform post that I can really relate to.
    Loving the variety here; seeing people of all different walks of life.

    • Sasha L says...

      Me too! I want a big list of all her gear, although it’s probably all crazy expensive. And how she keeps warm. (My dog sleeps in my bag with me, for warmth and protection, but she doesn’t mention a dog. I also wear a warm hat + a fleece balaclava hood over that, and sleep with my mummy bag upside down, so my face is covered).

  135. esra says...

    This was the best thing you’ve ever posted. More of this, please!

  136. Rachael says...

    AMAZING. Loved this so much. COJ just reminds me every day that women are freaking amazing.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i feel the same :)

  137. Ro says...

    “When those people and outside influences were taken away, suddenly my character didn’t have a form anymore. I felt fluid. It made me realize just how much the people in our lives help shape who we are — and how absolutely essential it is to surround yourself with others that reflect the values and the character that you want to have. People who are good for you.”

    Was just scrolling down to see if she has a book and am so glad to see she does. This woman has a way with words and such incredible insight!

  138. jenn says...

    love her! I’ve always wanted to go to Antarctica..just to visit of course, lol. thanks for the interview, Felicity!

  139. Lisa says...

    Utterly amazing.

  140. I want to be her when I grow up!

  141. Laura says...

    This has got to be one of my favorites of this series. Incredible content. Thank you!

  142. Isabel says...

    Such a cool and inspiring post! I have a burning question, though: what kind of jacket (brand, material, any layers?) and cold weather gear do you use? I’d love to know! Thanks.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      she’s currently on an expedition but we’ll reach out to ask her when she gets back!

    • Isabel says...

      Thanks! I always wanted to know how to properly layer up, especially now the weather is swinging into such extremes :(

  143. Jackie says...

    This is such a cool interview. Thank you for sharing, Felicity- I have so much respect for your courage and tenacity! I also really appreciate the cold weather skin care recommendations.

  144. Fascinating!

  145. Wow! This is so inspiring. And I don’t mean in a “I want to go on a solo expedition to Antarctica” sort of way – but in a “I can do whatever I put my mind to” and be true to myself kind of way. Also – I love her no nonesense approach to just using what she needs and looking amazing and healthy because of it. Thanks for an awe-inspiring profile!

  146. Becca says...

    Quick typo: “I your beauty routine — and all your routines….” is missing a verb (“I bet”?).

    Otherwise–this is totally fascinating!!

    • Emma says...

      Other typo : the ’to’ versions of me should be two

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you!!

  147. Sarah says...

    What a badass!!! I love her! I’m such a wimp, I cried when my dad dropped me off for grad school in ANN ARBOR!!

    • Jess says...

      Sarah, this cracked me up at my desk. hahahaha. right there with you.

  148. JB says...

    Amazing, amazing, amazing and kudos to CoJ for this type of content. More, forever, please!

  149. “The human body and brain are capable of infinite resilience. ”

    I feel the need to carry this sentence with me every day. I’m probably going to embroider it onto something, if I’m being honest. One of my favorite interviews ever on CoJo!