Design

Have a Lovely Weekend.

North Fork lavender fields

What are you up to this weekend? We’re visiting friends on the North Fork, and I’m looking forward to skimming stones on the rocky beaches. (At 39 years old, I finally figured it out!) Also, you may have noticed that our site crashed during a couple days this week, which resulted in a lighter week than usual; all is fine now, but the only sad part is that we lost hundreds of smart, funny comments. Please re-comment if you notice yours is missing! Thank you so much, and here are a few fun links from around the web…

I recently had a slice of flourless chocolate cake and now I want to make one myself. So delicious.

I moved in after our first date,” and 14 other women on getting married quickly.

The joy of missing out. (NYT)

Great news! Nordstrom’s Anniversary Sale starts today, and I’m eyeing this, this and these.

What Sex and the City would look like in 2018. Fun to read.

The paint colors in this English apartment are spot on.

In praise of drunk cleaning.

Have you seen the 2 Dope Queens HBO special? Highly recommend.

“The most popular dish in my Indian household is a slice of toast.”

Care/of offers awesome personalized vitamin packs, and they are giving readers 25% off with code CUPOFJO25. (Valid for new customers only.)

And more than ever, we need to keep helping separated families. Thousands of children – including some under age five – remain in government custody after being separated from their parents. Says the ACLU: “Terrible stories are coming out every day: children forced to represent themselves in court, toddlers unable to recognize their mothers after time apart and babies returned to their parents covered in lice and rashes.” Here’s how to help.

Plus, a great reader comment:

Says Jane on morning routines: “I once read an article that compared being a morning person to adding a 25th hour into the day. Instead of a perfectly curated morning routine, the author simply woke up an hour earlier than everyone else and did what felt best — reading, walking, writing, maaaaaaybe yoga. I love the idea of giving yourself a free hour for ‘me time’ in the cool, calm, quiet morning.”

xoxo

(Photo by By Jenna Park/Sweet Fine Day. Sex and the City via Emily.)

  1. Wow, that NYT article on JOMO was insightful and helpful. Thank you for sharing!

  2. Vaishnavi says...

    Toast! That was so funny to read. I’m a South Indian immigrant who grew up in the US – we don’t eat toast as much as folks from North India (because we eat SO much rice haha. I’m almost 30 and honestly can’t remember a day in my life when I didn’t eat rice at least once a day). But toast was (& still is) always our go-to when we want a break from traditional rice and curry :) My favorite is toast with a thin layer of lime or mango pickle + cucumber + sweet onions + tomatoes + a pinch of salt & pepper. Turn it into a sandwich by topping with a slice of toast with coriander chutney spread on!

  3. Amelia says...

    The NYT piece is great but the author neglects to credit the women who coined the phrase “joy of missing out” back in 2016. Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman (two incredible ladies who have been featured on COJ!) podcasted about this in their episode called “Joy of Missing Out” which you can listen to here: https://www.callyourgirlfriend.com/episode-50-joy-of-missing-out/

    So if you liked the NYT piece, you’ve got Ann & Amina to thank :)

  4. I’m working with a group called Immigrant Families Together. Our mission is to (through crowdsourcing and private donors) raise the bonds to get the moms released, and then support them in reunification with their children and beyond. One mom at a time. If you/any reader wants to help this effort: https://immigrantfamiliestogether.com/

  5. Nina says...

    I love toast with less than typical toppings. butter and pesto. butter and garlic salt (a lazy person’s version of garlic bread). mayo and sliced tomatoes or cucumber. so…I read an article about toast a few months ago that said for best flavor it should be slightly burnt but I just can’t get into that…I would love a poll: toast color – mine is dark golden

  6. Drunk cleaning! Hahahaha. I just wrote about Rage Cleaning. I think this might be my answer? And the flourless cake is on my to-do list now. The ingredient list is right up my alley: simple and short. Thanks!

  7. Emily K says...

    Omg that chocolate is AMAZING. Definately you should make it, it was very easy!

  8. Christa says...

    The SATC ‘episodes’ AND the illustrations were spot. on. perfect. Loved it. Thanks for the share!

  9. Nikki Parton says...

    Generally, I don’t cook, because it stresses me out to no end and rarely goes well. (Thank goodness my husband enjoys cooking!) However, seeing the recipe for the flourless chocolate cake sparked an afternoon of rare culinary curiosity in me. So I bought what I needed and followed what was a simple recipe. People! This cake is great, and a must try for anyone! Rich, decadence with a slight crunch on the outside and smooth on the inside. My husband and I both love it. Thank you so much for the culinary win!

  10. Fernanda says...

    Totally up for drunk cleaning! Washing dishes with a glass of cold beer makes it go faster and pain free! Don’t recommend it before cooking, though! ;P

  11. Claire says...

    These Friday roundups are so fun! Love the JOMO concept. I’ve been changing my morning routine lately to include reading poetry first thing. It is so enjoyable and I think has a positive impact on my brain and outlook for the rest of the day.
    Also- I can’t drink while cleaning (I just can’t tolerate alcohol very much any more), but I do dance or sing while cleaning, because I play music to help me get through it. Often hits from Motown or the Beatles, but Beyonce or Bruno Mars will also do the trick.

  12. Martha Salvatore says...

    I have lived on the North Fork my entire life and happy to say it has always been a very unique place and I never
    take it for granted.
    The farmers, local fishermen and all the vines have kept it intacted.
    Love your bog. Helping me with my 4 grandchildren now.
    Grady, Parker, Charles and Fiona
    July 21 2018 jamesport

  13. Jamie says...

    My husband and I were engaged after about 20 days of seeing each other in person over 9 months. The most common question I received after telling people I was engaged was “who to?” We’d actually known each other for 6 years but lived on opposite sides of the world. Anyway, we’ve now been married for 7 years! So great to read about others’ leaps of faith. Sometimes you do just know.

  14. Kat says...

    3 cheers for toast! It’s a fave here down under too. Avocado toast (avo toast) is a classic Aussie breakfast that I have eaten, without fail, at least 2xweek since I was 2 years old. It’s best on a robust sourdough, with a little sprinkle of salt and black sesame seeds and maybe a touch of feta crumbled over. A squeeze of lemon or lime is a nice but unnecessary addition. That and a flat white = breakfast of champions forever.

  15. Shei Bayley says...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-OF0OaK3o0

    Intrigued by this story (link above) I don’t believe in coincidence, but coincidentally I share a birth date with the triplets, and I was adopted. CAN’T wait to watch it

  16. Hannah says...

    If anyone misses SATC, I would highly recommend Younger! Also created by Darren Starr and featuring a variety of awesome, fierce women (with faults, of course) navigating life all over NYC. Many aspects of these new stories have already been on Younger!

  17. Beth Kollar says...

    Is every parent giving the hardest eye roll to Jane’s comment about waking up early for extra “me time”? Haha! What a distant memory sleeping in is! I haven’t slept passed 7am in literally 6 years. In fact I’m stoked if no one is up before 6:30am. I say, sleep in while you can!!

    • MelTown says...

      Yes! I’m not generally one to wake up early by choice, but the odd times I have tried to wake up early to accomplish something at least one kid senses I’m awake and gets up to hang out (or demand breakfast). I’ll get them back when they’re teenagers! Haha.

    • Amanda says...

      Me! Eye-rolling so hard. My pre-schooler wakes up by 6:30 (but often 5:45) no matter when I put him to bed. Waking up an hour earlier just means I get one less hour of sleep. Sure, I could go to bed an hour earlier, but I go to bed at 10pm as it is. If I went to bed at 9pm, all I’d have time for in the evenings is cleaning.

    • stephanie says...

      I would have when my kids were younger, but they’re young teens and for the last couple years, I have been doing this. Their sleeping later coincided with my mid-40s inability to sleep, and I definitely can’t sleep past like 5 or 6am. Something to look forward to…

  18. mindi says...

    I really liked the JOMO article. At the end of the school year, on a particularly crazy day, out entire school district’s Internet server went out. People were in a panic – I had back to back classes, kindergarten through 5th grade, all doing research using online databases (I’m the librarian). I grabbed books (which I always encourage), encyclopedias, maps – everything I could – and made stations for students to use. I had quick, on the spot lessons on how to use an encyclopedia, which the 5th graders LOVED. At the end of the day, every teacher I spoke to commented, “What an awesome day! I didn’t have to answer a single email!”

  19. Ruth says...

    Love this blog, there have been very few posts this week! Would love to see more than one post per day.

  20. Sara says...

    This has nothing to do with any of the links above (which were amazing, as always), but I have a question that I thought others could me with. I have two boys, 6 and 8. We were having lunch today at a casual chain restaurant. My 8 year old needed to go to the restroom. I asked him if he wanted to go to the men’s room by himself and he said no. So, I told the waitress not to clear the table and the three of us went to the woman’s restroom together. When we got there, my 6 year old decided he needed to go to. So I put one in one stall and the other in another and stood nearby (but still in the restroom) and waited. When they were finished and all three of us were washing our hands, another woman came out of the stall and made quite a scene that I had two boys with me in the restroom. My boys and I were really flustered (I’m sooo not good with confrontation) and I said “sorry” and got us back to the table and paid the bill as quickly as I could. It got me thinking, At what age should I be sending my oldest alone to the men’s room? Is it the same or different awkwardness with Dad’s and daughters?

    • Olivia says...

      This woman is nuts and an A hole. They can go to the bathroom alone once they’re in middle school and too “cool” to be accompanied by their mom.

    • I still take my son to the ladies room with me sometimes, and he’s 11. I’m sorry that woman was odd about it. I would never think it strange to see a mom with her kids in a bathroom. And I would never send my son to the men’s room alone unless it was a place I’d been before and was comfortable with and I was standing outside. Maybe I’m just wonky that way. :) Follow your gut. Amy

    • Summer says...

      No, that lady was either nuts or out of touch. Regardless of the type of restaurant, I would never be surprised to see a mom and her sons in there.

    • t says...

      You do what you think is right for you and your family. If it bothers other people just apologize and move on and don’t give it another thought.

  21. Dana says...

    We both “knew” on our first date, and have been inseparable since the moment we met. Out first date came after each of us had a life of travel and dating and work and adventure. Once we met, we knew we’d found our match, and didn’t care to spend any time apart. We moved in officially three months later, got married on our one year anniversary, and now have a 7 month old. I can count on one hand the days we’ve spent apart. We’d both become jaded about love, and especially about “love at first sight,” but lo and behold, there it was.

    • We are so similar! After dating throughout university, I enjoyed being single and travelling the world for nearly two years before meeting my now-husband in line at Starbucks in my hometown. We introduced ourselves and three months later were engaged. It felt very interviewy (do you want children, through adoption or biological, where do you want to settle, do you have debt, can you cook etc.) but it worked for us. Neither of us were at the stage where we wanted to serial date and with equal parts consideration to one another and luck, we’ve been together over ten years and have two kids together. Sometimes it just all works, doesn’t it?

  22. Shannon says...

    I have never heard it called “skimming” stones, always skipping! I guess it must be regional like soda/pop/coke. Now I’m wondering what else people call it!

    • Ashley says...

      Same. Skipping for sure.

    • t says...

      skipping. also soda and tennis shoes.

  23. KB says...

    Glad it was a site crash (which, in the scheme of things, though really stressful….will be forgotten about soon) and not something wrong with anyone on the CoJ team or their, respective, families. Keep up the great work!

  24. Liz says...

    I may get a bunch of flack for this but here it goes. What is so wrong with Trump’s “”zero tolerance” immigration policy, which called for prosecuting all adults who illegally cross the border”? I agree that children should not be separated from their parents, but shouldn’t we prosecute those who do illegal acts?

    • Caitlin says...

      Liz,
      The problem with this policy is that it’s prosecuting adults (and their children) who are NOT crossing the border illegally. Seeking asylum (which is what an overwhelming number of people coming in from Central America are doing) is an internationally recognized legal process that these people have every right to apply for, and they can come into the US to do it. Most are trying to enter through legal ports of entry, but Border Patrol are, in many areas, preventing people from even coming through these ports:
      https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/at-the-us-border-asylum-seekers-fleeing-violence-are-told-to-come-back-later/2018/06/12/79a12718-6e4d-11e8-afd5-778aca903bbe_story.html?utm_term=.e9bf4186c8b8

      Thus making the only option for a lot of these desperate people to enter illegally, be captured by ICE, and then apply for asylum.

    • Claire says...

      Liz- good for you for asking your question! I admire that. This is such a complex issue- and it can get so heated- but it’s good to keep talking about it and asking for more discussion and clarity. it seems like there has been some confusion and misinformation around the topic, and as the situation continues to evolve.
      (I appreciated Caitlin’s clear, precise response too)

    • Wendy says...

      What’s wrong with it? It’s inhumane on its face. Particularly in a region that we as a nation actively destabilized over many generations. Immigration is a difficult topic, but automatically criminalizing people – children! – escaping violence and hardship is fundamentally cruel. Also, the so-called “problems” commonly attributed to undocumented immigrants by the media on the right are largely fabrications and distortions.

  25. Julie says...

    I work out in the mornings, but Wednesday is my morning off. Lately, instead of sleeping in, I make coffee and read. It is probably one of my new favorite things. Here’s to getting up a little earlier for yourself!

  26. Janice O'Kane says...

    I basically moved in after our first date too! At five weeks he asked me to marry him, at eight weeks we eloped. It’s now 22 years later and we’re still going strong! I will say you really don’t know all of each other’s quirks after eight weeks, we definitely had an adjustment phase. As the song says though, “love will keep us together”!

  27. TL says...

    A friend of mine swears by cleaning up after a gathering before she heads to bed. Loading the dishwasher with all the glasses and small plates, collecting empty bottles from far off corners and giving sticky countertops a wipe down is much easier while you’re still feeling the glow from the good conversation and the few drinks you had.
    There might still be some deep cleaning to be done the next day, but at least the bulk of the process is complete before the hangover kicks in.

    • mindi says...

      Oh my goodness, I am going to admit here that I was that girl in college who went around *during* the party: recycling bottles, wiping counters, picking up cigarette butts (it was the 90s?). It felt so much better to wake up to a house that was somewhat clean than to go, “sweet lord, what happened here?!” Thank goodness my roommates were (and still are) my best friends. :)

  28. Martina says...

    I love the Idea of JOMO, also for our over-scheduled kids. My 15 year old son just quit his soccer team because lately he felt that besides school he wasn’t able to do the very demanding practice schedule any more. Not an easy decision after ten years, but he’s so relaxed ever since. I fondly remember the time when the kids were young and in the afternoon, we would just stroll around the neighbourhood and stop every ten steps …

  29. Katrina says...

    I am all about the buzzed, post-party cleanup. There’s nothing worse than waking up with a hangover and a disaster of a house. 😂

    • Amy says...

      Me too! I’ve tried a few times to be mellow & just head to bed. Inevitably, I’m incapable of relaxing knowing what’s waitin for me in the morning, so I get up & get it done. A gift to my future self!

    • Totally agree with you on this one!! :)

  30. Emily says...

    Something in the drunk cleaning article made me think of how much our culture depends on alcohol to get through things, and how often people have struggles with drinking and don’t even know it because it’s seen as socially acceptable to have a few drinks each night after work. However, those sorts of things make someone qualify as an alcoholic, and I wish people would be smarter about their dependence on alcohol.

    • Jenn says...

      Here here.

    • Kirsten says...

      I won’t say that I’ve never had a beer while doing the dishes after work, but I really agree, Emily. It made me really sad to think about someone carrying around so much perfectionism that cleaning was a paralyzing task until one or two beers in–and I don’t mean that in “there is something wrong with this person” way but more in a cultural way–I think she isn’t alone and there is a reason using alcohol to “get through stuff” is so normalized. I completely agree with the sentiment of the article, and I absolutely believe in the philosophy of engaging in work tasks in order to “reconnect with the physical essence of life,” in the words of the author, but something about doing that via a buzz that drowns out self-criticism seems like the wrong way to go about it.

    • Laura says...

      That’s interesting, as I just saw a headline about how the rate of liver cirrhosis among millennials from alcohol abuse is surging. in a similar note, someone i work with mentioned how they were shocked when their 8-year-old made a collage that included the phrase “rosé all day”. i’m not sure if it’s just me but it does seem like drinking to cope with stress is becoming more and more celebrated in pop culture. or maybe it always has. i don’t know. i don’t know what i’m trying to say here!

    • Courtney Tait says...

      I too have become more aware of the ubiquitous nature of alcohol in our culture. There is so much advertising geared to women in particular (rose all day, etc., mommy wine, etc.) that make excessive alcohol consumption seem like the normal and acceptable way to deal with stuff. The recent article another commenter mentioned was really eye opening on the sharp increases in liver disease, particularly in millenials, due to alcohol. There is also a growing trend of sobriety happening, with instagram accounts like @hipsobriety sharing this kind of information through a feminist and cultural lens. This would be a really interesting topic for COJ to explore. Here is the article, if anyone’s interested: https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/deaths-liver-disease-are-surging-drinking-blame-n892521

    • Laura C. says...

      I do agree, Emily. It’s nice to enjoy a glass of wine at a party or a beer at the pub with friends, but for cleaning up? My dad had problems with alcohol and that (as well as smoking) caused him problems that led him to death.
      I choose to drink for enjoying it, sipping your glass of red wine, and not for doing a proper cleaning.
      But I confess: I drink a little wine while cooking risotto on Sundays ;) It’s legit!

    • Michelle Bengson says...

      Laura I love your comment! My thought process exactly.

    • Olivia says...

      I completely agree. To me, anything more than a drink per day (and even that!!) is abnormal! Just…why? That said, we are trying for a baby and the desire for alcohol becomes much greater when faced with not being able to drink at all for an entire pregnancy. All I wanted last month was to try the new Angry Orchard hard cider/rosé. As disappointing as it was to get a negative pregnancy test, you better believe I went out for a six pack of hard cider and proceeded to drink one outside every single night…haha

    • Stef says...

      Thanks for your comment. I really agree and I wish blogs like A Cup of Jo would be more mindful of their posts about alcohol and the messages they are sending around drinking. Women (and men) are dying while our culture shoves alcohol as a necessity to cope with anything (i.e. cleaning) down our throats. I urge the editors to read more here: @tellbetterstories2018

    • Lacey says...

      I had the same thoughts, Emily. Several of my closest friends (late 20s- early 30s) have been struggling with this recently and it has made me ultra aware of just how persuasive drinking and alcohol is in our culture. I’m not against having a drink or two occasionally, but after seeing how easily alcohol can be abused, I’ve started reevaluating why I even feel the need to have a cocktail every now and then anyway.

    • Cara Mills says...

      I came to these comments specifically to see if anyone felt similarly. I cringed reading that story. Often times, I feel like I’m in the minority because I’m not big into drinking. I love a glass of wine here or there or a nice cocktail, but I feel like this image of being a “Mom who needs to drink” is being shoved down my throat by society. Do we really need a drink to make things more easy to handle, like cleaning too? I’ve seen so many women struggle with this notion of casual drinking that becomes a daily habit to deal with pressure. Three friends that went sober this year alone because what started as innocent habit became a crutch. But then again, I’m a former straight edge punk kid here, so I’ve always kind of felt that way.

    • Jillian says...

      My husband’s been sober since November and that has really made me see how much our friends and I depend on alcohol as a given in social situations, even as just the main event. Get together to drink. It kind of has shed a light on the amount of drinking we all do. We went to a wedding Saturday and he really saw how *what’s the right word?* we are when everyone’s drunk… yikes

    • Anne says...

      While I admit, I LOVE red wine while cleaning out a closet, I totally get what you’re saying here.

      My husband and I just had a conversation about alcohol being one hell of a drug. When I look back to 2010-2013, I cringe. I found myself salivating *at breakfast* for a drink. Lunch, I definitely “needed” a drink. It’s crazy how alcohol can affect your brain, and the subliminal ways it’s pushed in our culture (scenic vacation insta with a cocktail!) is a little scary. Anyway, I started giving myself days I could drink. I’ve still got plenty of improvement to make, but now I can easily stop at a glass or go over a day without drinking, but I remember how tough it was getting to 24 hours.

    • Connor says...

      Thanks Emily for starting this conversation. I agree with you. There are lots of people who are struggling or questioning how much they drink and why.

      Stef commented and said to check out @tellbetterstories2018 and there’s also Annie Grace with @this_nakedmind. Both are opening a dialogue (especially for women) and it’s not about judgement or shame if you drink. It would be an interesting topic for Cup of Jo – people who are sober curious

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      i hear these comments, thank you so much. i’m thinking a lot about this. xo

  31. Betsy says...

    Thank you for the link to the drunk cleaning article. Took me back to college, and put a smile on my face. I had the same 2 roommates for 3 years. We had a Thursday evening ritual. As everyone knows, Thursday is the big going out night in college. But in order to go out, we made a rule that we would clean our apartment first. If not, we didn’t get to go out. We certainly didn’t want to miss out on any of the fun. We would start drinking about 5. Turn up the music full blast, clean, drink, and laugh until our place sparkled. Never missed a Thursday night cleaning session. Of course we usually woke up on Friday to an apartment that wasn’t nearly as sparkly clean as we thought it was the night before. Ahhhhh…memories.

  32. Kate says...

    I’ve been happily celebrating JOMO for years!! FOMO is not a thing I experience very often, if ever. As I’ve gotten older I’ve become very content being wherever I am in the moment, and being happy for people who are doing whatever it is that makes them happy!

    • Cynthia says...

      I whole-heartedly agree. What other people have or do doesn’t bother me.

  33. edie says...

    those SATC episode ideas are surprisingly poignant – I was expecting something less substantial. I do miss that show — so interesting how it resonates with us to this day.

    Speaking of the show…..I love the scene where Miranda is looking at that house in Brooklyn and suddenly realizes, “Oh my god — I’m married!”

  34. Christie says...

    As an immigration lawyer, I want to thank you for keeping up the stories about separated families, but instead of focusing on that particular small part of the problem, I hope you can broaden the discussion. Detention of families has been going on for a long time, and it is getting worse. The conditions are horrible. But more than that: we are keeping immigrants in prison with prison populations or in private detention facilities run by large corporations. The conditions are deplorable and amounting to torture. Immigrants in deportation proceedings are in civil proceedings — not criminal. Violating immigration laws is a civil offense. There is no reason to treat them like criminals. There are alternatives to detention that have been proven effective — like 99.6% effective–and cost WAY less than detaining someone. We are detaining people because our government is cruel. Finally, the systematic dehumanization of our immigrants does not stop at the deportation side. The Trump Administration is changing policy after policy and are making it WAY harder for people to get and keep lawful status in the US. They are trying to put people in deportation proceedings for more reasons than ever before. There is one solution to this, and it is not one that I have heard you raise: Vote. Vote for candidates that support compassionate immigration reform. Educate yourselves on the issues. And Vote.

    • Thank you.

    • Jeannie says...

      Yes, yes, thank you. We must all VOTE!!! Critical, yet also as activist leaders (e.g. Angela Davis) proclaim: we must organize. We don’t have large enough movements yet. We need much bigger mass protests that are bipartisan, and inclusive of all races. It was powerful walking alongside so many during Women’s March last year, but I saw a very homogenous group in Oakland, CA. And, Black Lives Matter marches/rallies I attended also were fairly homogenous. We gotta join together!

    • Michelle Bengson says...

      Thank you for writing this, Christie.

    • Rae says...

      Christie, thank you for sharing this information. I have been wondering about the civil vs. criminal language used around asylum seekers and so appreciate this bit of clarification. I would love to see more articles on CoJ discussing broader topics of immigration.

    • Kim says...

      Thanks for this perspective, Christie.

    • Claire says...

      Thank you for this update, and the work you are doing. It must be a tough job, and I salute you.

    • Wendy says...

      Thank you for standing up for immigrants here and in your work.

  35. Julia says...

    I mean who doesn’t drunk clean!!? Best way to get the dirty work done! LOL, do I have a problem?! ;)

  36. Ro says...

    I am all about JOMO at 38! These Friday posts are my favorite. Every Friday morning I look forward to them showing up in my reader.

  37. Renee says...

    Since it’s the new trend to bring back old shows, I would love to see these
    episodes! I miss SATC so much. Come on HBO! Sadly I don’t think Kim Catrell would come back, she’s done. Bummer. :-(

  38. La says...

    Thank you for continuing to pay attention to the children being imprisoned at the border.

  39. T says...

    Is Lexi no longer part of the team?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Lexi was an amazing team member for three years. Then she had an (incredibly adorable) second baby and took an extended maternity leave. She is going to focus on new projects when she returns to work this fall. Thank you! xo

    • Olivia says...

      What about Ashley?

  40. Jenny says...

    I enjoyed the marriage article. I had a very short courtship with my husband — 3 weeks. We met on the first day of community college and dated very casually for a month. Then we moved on to date other people. Fast forward two years later, we meet again at the 4 year university we transferred to and within 3 weeks we were married! Been married 21 years!

  41. Lisa says...

    I actually enjoy ironing – I don’t do it drunk, but while watching a favourite tv show / movie. It’s so meditative and so *satisfying* starting with something all creased and smoothing it over.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      I feel the same way about folding and closet organizing. so calming somehow!

    • CLou says...

      Absolutely! Ironing with trash TV is my favorite chore. Also, the smoothing out of a wrinkled piece of clothing is very satisfying — it’s a “flow” kind of thing and one in which we get to see the final finished product.

  42. DC says...

    Cash donations are always the best! These families are going through hell and being treated like criminals when they are not. I’m so appalled and wish I could do more than just give money.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you!!!!!

  43. Are any other Sex and the City fans dying to see these episodes on screen?! SO much fun to read, it totally took me back to my sex and the city days. I own every episode….. man I miss this show. It was honestly a big part of my life ❤️

  44. Sandra says...

    Argh…I really want to see those SATC episodes! Although they already did an episode where Samantha meets another Samantha. But the rest…I miss the show so much!

  45. Samantha says...

    on* the North Fork ;)

    enjoy!!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh haha i didn’t know that! thank you, samantha! it’s so beautiful here.

    • Laura says...

      Oof, every time my husband’s family say they’re visiting us “in Long Island” I internally cringe.

    • Anna says...

      Also missing Mari’s perfect illustrations here! Will her features be coming back?Love following her on Instagram in the meantime. :)