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Family Separation: How to Help Now

Family Separation: What's Happening After Trump's Executive Order

We know readers often come to Cup of Jo for a pick-me-up, and we had regular editorial posts planned for today. However, like so many of you, we’ve been consumed by the news of children being taken from their parents. “Would posting about it again be too much?” we wondered. But after thinking it over, we felt it was important to follow up with this big update…

HERE’S THE BASIC UPDATE

On Monday, we wrote about how families entering the U.S. to seek asylum were being separated. Yesterday, Trump signed an executive order calling to end his family separation policy. But there are two reasons why this isn’t a real solution: It doesn’t reunite the thousands of families who were already separated, and it paves the way for children and families to be imprisoned indefinitely.

A QUICK RECAP

Why were families being separated at the U.S. border in the first place?

If you need a recap, here’s our post about family separation at the border. Basically, families fleeing violence, rape and murder in their home countries were crossing into the U.S. to seek asylum. It is not illegal to seek asylum. But because of the Trump Administration’s new “zero-tolerance” immigration policy, parents are now being prosecuted for crossing the border, and more than 2,300 children — even infants — were taken away from them.

Where are the children?

Children were transferred to shelters including tents, old warehouses and former big box stores. Here’s a leaked recording of toddlers sobbing for their parents. Three distraught siblings at a shelter were told that they weren’t allowed to hug. There is no plan or timeline for reuniting the families. Many, including the U.N,, call the new policy “immoral” and “inhumane.” The president of the American Academy of Pediatrics calls it “child abuse.”

WHAT’S HAPPENING NOW

Yesterday, Trump signed an executive order meant to stop his policy of separating families at the border. Although this sounds like good news, there are at least two major reasons why his executive order is not a real solution.

What are the two problems?

1) It doesn’t reunite the thousands of families who were already separated.

Although incoming families may stay together, there is still no plan to reunite the thousands of families that have already been forcibly separated. They’re not grandfathered in by the executive order. This means that those 2,300+ children are still separated from their parents, and may not be reunified for months or years. Lawyers and advocates told The New Yorkers that there’s no protocol for keeping track of these parents and children concurrently, or for keeping families in contact with each other while they’re separated. “This crisis will not abate until each and every single child is reunited with his or her parent,” says Anthony D. Romero, the Executive Director of the ACLU. Without a clear process, however, it’s possible some of these children and parents will never see each other again, reports New York Magazine.

2) It also paves the way for children and families to be imprisoned indefinitely.

Trump’s plan would keep incoming families together — but in federal custody. Right now, because of a 1997 decree known as the Flores settlement, immigration authorities cannot keep children in detention, even if they’re with their parents, for more than 20 days. But Trump’s executive order says that he wants to be able to detain infants and children with their parents indefinitely, without due process. This could lead to babies and children being locked up with their parents for months or even years.

What are experts saying?

“This executive order replaces one crisis for another: children don’t belong in jail at all, even with their parents, under any set of circumstances,” says Anthony D. Romero, the Executive Director of the ACLU.

“Family incarceration is not a solution or a reasonable alternative to family separation,” says a spokesperson from the Florence Project, an Arizona non-profit legal organization. “The experience of being incarcerated is traumatic, and countless child welfare experts have spoken out against family detention.” It’s also extremely hard for families held in detention to access the resources they need to fight their cases.

“The best solution would be releasing families to sponsors or placing them in community-based alternatives to detention programs, which are less expensive and much more humane,” says Kevin Appleby, a senior director at the Center for Migration Studies.

WHAT WE CAN DO TO HELP

Attend a protest. MoveOn is organizing big rallies in Washington, D.C., and around the country on Saturday, June 30th. On Thursday, June 28th, the organizers of the Women’s March are holding a protest in Washington, D.C. Let’s stand together.

Donate. There are many fantastic organizations working to support families affected. Please join us in donating to The Florence Project, RAICES, Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights and ActBlue.

Call your congresspeople. If you want to find out who your senators and representatives are, and how to contact them, go here and enter your zip code. Tell them you’re extremely concerned about the children who have been separated from their parents and how they’ll be reunited; that children shouldn’t be detained indefinitely; and that your vote depends on their response.

For fellow New Yorkers: Hundreds of separated children were quietly sent to New York City this week. At least 239 children — some as young as 9 months old — are right here, thousands of miles away from their parents. The East Harlem-based non-profit charged with caring for these children is looking for Spanish-speaking families to serve as foster homes. If you’re interested, please call the agency at 718-860-1656. Council member Mark Levine is accepting donations of children’s clothing, diapers, wipes and toys at his office, 500 West 141st Street (212-928-6814). UPDATE: Levine’s staff received an enormous influx of goods, and is now asking people to consider making a donation to the non-profit organizations that are providing legal and social service support to these children in NYC.

Thank you so much for reading and for being such a smart and compassionate community. Please share if you have other ideas for how to help. Sending all our love, as always.

Family Separation: What's Happening Now

“There can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way in which it treats its children.” — Nelson Mandela, May 8, 1995.

(Photos by John Moore.)

  1. My heart breaks for these children and their families. I plan to participate in our local march on June 30. And please please please everyone, VOTE. Thank you for sharing this important post!

  2. justine says...

    Reading, sending donations and contacting my member of parliament here in Canada to show my support. I can think of almost nothing else for the past two weeks. I am consumed by it. Thank you for fighting this evil with clear, timely, helpful information. Much love to you and your team. Now to look at flight information for protests in DC next weekend. Please keep up this topic. We can get back to lighter fare when (if…. ) things improve. #novemberiscoming

  3. Quinn says...

    I’ll add to the chorus – thank you for a second post on this. I have been reading CoJ for years and, like a good friend, you always seem to know when conversations on serious issues are needed.

  4. Anneka says...

    Thank you Jo and co. for providing such clear reporting on this issue, and importantly for being so tuned in to the language that you use. I have loved this blog for so many years and feel like i’ve grown right along with it.

  5. Emma says...

    Thank you so, so much for this post and your compassion and generosity. I started reading Cup of Jo in high school and have just graduated college – very proud to have come into adulthood while reading and being inspired by you. xo

  6. CL says...

    When I was 4, I was separated from my family and put into foster care. I will never in my life forget the experience of crying out desperately for my mother alone in a dark room. Trauma takes moments to form and a lifetime to process. My heart breaks for these children.

    I’ll be in DC for a work trip next week and am attending these marches. We all need to rise strong.

    Thanks, COJ.

    • Kim says...

      I am so sorry that happened to you. I can’t imagine. Hugs to you.

    • Nancy says...

      <3

  7. Hayley says...

    Thank you for posting about this, Joanna. Everything else seems so petty right now. Like so many others, I am heartbroken and angry. It is important that we all continue to educate ourselves, donate, and help in any other ways that we can.

    One more thought. While we’re all walking around like exposed hearts in response to this issue, let’s use that energy and compassion and intentionality to make an impact in our immediate community. Dig deep and be kinder and more generous than you thought you could be to your spouse, your children, your neighbors, your coworkers, strangers you encounter on the street. While our differences may seem more apparent, each and every one of us has the same joys, pains, and sorrows. Let’s break down barriers, find commonalities, and move forward in this beautiful, sad, confusing world together.

  8. Lauren says...

    I have to join the chorus here. I’ve been reading CoJ since sophomore or Junior year of college, which was 10 or so years ago now. I feel like I’ve grown up with this community, and I remember mentioning it in first my internship interview. (I work in PR, and blogs were a big topic of discussion back then.) Even on vacation, I make it a point to check in. That’s the background.

    My point is… I thought I loved this blog back then, but it’s nothing compared to the connection I feel with you all now. I am so freaking proud of Joanna AND THE COJ TEAM (#girlboss) for how this blog has evolved and particularly how you’re handling the insane political climate right now. Waiting for a new post yesterday, I found myself worrying… What’s up? Is everyone okay? I should have known. Yep – they’re just doing the EXACT right thing at the EXACT right time with a sense of mindfulness and careful forethought. How do you guys always kill it, regardless of the circumstances?

    Anyway, enough fangirling, but let me end on this: thank you, thank you, thank you.

  9. Elizabeth says...

    Thank you so much for using your large platform for good again and again. If even one previously misinformed person (or someone who has somehow managed to switch their empathy off) is swayed by your calm, clear presentation, they might then teach their children the values our country is so sorely lacking. I think that’s the only hope we have at this point.

    • KL says...

      sorry… I thought this would be attached to someone’s comment about what they are seeing in Australia!

  10. Sara Nachtman says...

    I have followed your blog for eight years, and this is my first comment. Thank you for your humanity, and for using consistently using this space to help educate your readers and bring more compassion to the world.

  11. Dianne says...

    Saying thank you as well and the reader comments have been EXCEEDINGLY helpful as well. Calling congresspeople who are already vocal on this issue IS helpful and Sleeping Giants will help me get my money out of these evil-doers hands. Thank you thank you thank you also for admitting that this is troubling ALL of you – there is strength in numbers. People are watching – protest, call, vote, vote with your money. Thanks y’all!

  12. Laura says...

    Thumbs up for the follow-up and update. Proud of “my” blog.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, laura, i’m tearing up. thank you xo

  13. Me says...

    Thank you! Our society is in dire need of clear and concise facts. What is happening now in this country is shameful and beyond words.

  14. Donna says...

    Incase anyone reading wants to help hands-on, you can volunteer to be a child advocate through the Young Center. They will pair you with a child and you can help navigate the system. I was feeling pretty hopeless too and I was grateful when someone posted this link. Don’t give up! They are counting on us. Even with 3000 children there are more than 3000 of us who want to help. We can never make this right but we can make it better. We just can’t lose focus. Thank you Cup of Jo – you are brave and wonderful warriors. https://www.theyoungcenter.org/volunteer-at-the-young-center/

    • Lauren says...

      Thank you for posting this!! I am looking into it now.

  15. This blog truly helps change the world and helps set a moral code. Thank you for all you do here everyday.

    • Laura says...

      AGREED!

  16. Maureen says...

    These migrant detention camps for children have been in existence for years. They are run by so called non profits that re I’ve millions in government contracts. Reports are coming out of horrific abuse, drugging, no background checks for employees, attempted suicides and suspicious deaths. It is happening on American soil and someone is benefiting financially. Look to see if there are detention centers in your state and write, call and email your reps. Mom’s are having parties to do this together. This abuse is made possible with your tax dollars. It’s disgusting!

  17. thank you for posting again, I have been so sickened and saddened by what’s happening that the usual compartmentalization in order to function is impossible.

  18. Megan says...

    Like you guys, I’ve been totally unable to function normally this week. I don’t know which part of this nightmare is the worst:

    1. Vulnerable immigrant families who came to our country seeking sanctuary from unimaginable violence were met with authorities with guns who stole their children.

    2. These authorities lost track of the children. Because many of the children they took are so young they don’t know their parents’ full names, nevermind their contact information, it’s unclear how they will be reunited. (My son is 2, the same age as many of these children stolen from their families. He knows me as ‘Mommy’ and that we live in ‘the blue house’. If this happened to us, how would we ever find each other? How could I live without him?)

    3. These children are being held in facilities under guards who creating permanent trauma and emotional damage on children– tearing apart siblings, not allowing hugs. (https://www.newyorker.com/news/as-told-to/a-physician-in-south-texas-on-an-unnerving-encounter-with-an-eight-year-old-boy-in-immigration-detention)

    4. The facilities where these children are being held are being operated in secrecy. Even those in the highest elected offices in our nation are being denied entry– including senators. State *governors* are unable to obtain information about the children being carted to their states.

    5. One out of three Americans support this happening.

    If this can happen to these families seeking asylum, who is safe in America? If there are so many government agents willing to enact such shockingly inhumane policies in secrecy, where would they stop?

    I’d decorated my place for the fourth of July. This morning, I took down my flag.

  19. Courtney says...

    I want to thank you for continuing to post about this issue. It has been a little disheartening that others in this space haven’t used their platforms to do so. Thank you for being a place that offers pick me ups and critical calls to action.

  20. Sarah says...

    Thank you for posting, and continuing to post about this. I’ve felt so heartbroken and helpless these past few weeks. We can’t let this become a one news cycle issue.

  21. Melinda says...

    It is so wonderful you’re highlighting this situation, and keeping up with practical ways for folks to get involved. But on both this post and the last one you focus heavily (in this one, exclusively) on asylum seekers. It’s important for we who support immigrants to acknowledge that not everyone crossing the boarder will (or should) meet the criteria for asylum. There are people just seeking economic opportunity, often having already made connection to employers already but don’t have access to any legal routes. And, of course due in large part to drugs and human trafficking, there are people crossing the boarder who are deeply involved in criminal activity. I believe strongly that the unified voice of the American government should be – regardless of why you entered illegally, you will be treated humanely, with due process, and with particular care for the well- being of children (meaning we take separation from parents deadly seriously and it’s a last-resort only). The zero-tolerance policy was heinous, the executive order is inefficient. But when I contact my representatives I’m not just demanding family reunification, I’m asking for what advocates have been seeking in vain since well before this current administration- true comprehensive immigration reform. There should be accessible and affordable routes for immigrants to enter this country with legal status, there should be robust funding and sufficient staff to coordinate services for asylum seekers, there should be funding and processes to protect minors and others who are the victims of human trafficking across our borders. And, it should go without saying, there should be whatever resources necessary to ensure family reunification. We’re going to be dealing with this tragic disaster for years to come. We need to work to ensure it doesn’t ever happen again.

  22. Emily says...

    Thank you for sharing this information.

  23. june says...

    Thank you for clear details and facts. The thing that bothers me the most about people shouting “good” and “you break the law you pay the price,” is this: Most of those people are against illegal immigration and immigrants being in “their” country (which is odd, since as far as I know we’re all immigrants,) however no one stops to think about this: why separate them at all? Why not just turn them away and send them back? And now we have thousands of undocumented, immigrant children flowing into an already overcrowded an overburdened foster system. These same people complained about immigrant’s children getting free school lunches and healthcare. Guess how much it’s costing to feed and house and transport these children and maintain them in the foster system? If you want to send people back, fine. I don’t personally agree with that. But separate children from their parents and then holding those same children here hostage and then also complaining about the services and monetary drain of “immigrants” on our system borders on not only illogical, but insane.

  24. Heather says...

    Also can I just suggest everyone finds their representative’s phone numbers and then saves it as a contact in their phone?

    I always had the impulse to call, but the hurdle of finding their numbers prevented me from doing it every time I wanted to.

    But this Monday I found them, saved them and now have called every other day to follow up. Ask specific concrete questions of the people you’re speaking to and tell them you will follow up and more importantly, you’re watching, donating, and voting accordingly.

    Once you start doing it, it becomes easier – these people are here because they’re supposed to represent us. They are our employees. We should be able to call them when we need something from them. Like….ensuring we stop the inhumane treatment of separating legal asylum seekers from their parents.

    Use your voice!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      great idea, heather, thank you!

  25. Louse says...

    Please keep posting about this. I’m so angry and heartbroken. My 14 month old daughter has been sick with this croup this week. She’s needed more comfort than usual. As I’ve held her every night I’ve cried, knowing there are parents who can’t do the same for their little ones.

    • Donna says...

      Same – mine is only 12 weeks and I cry every time she cries because I can hear those kids. We have to keep speaking up. They are counting on us. Hope your little one is better soon.

    • Dana says...

      Same. My 6 month old son was in the hospital yesterday (he’s fine now) and he has needed a lot more comfort from me. It was a scary and overwhelming place for him and he clung to me throughout the day. I cry thinking of the babies and children who are without parents right now. Toys, video games, playgrounds mean nothing if you don’t have the safety of your family :(

  26. Rebecca says...

    Thank you for posting on this topic; it’s not too much. Cup of Jo has an awesome opportunity to impact tons and tons of readers – and you’re doing it!

  27. becklesnwu says...

    The fact that you take time to address issues like these when they come up is the #1 reason I still read your blog when I have stopped following so many others. Thank you for being brave to use your platform this way.

  28. Tiffany Cain says...

    This is so important- I appreciate you keeping the spotlight on this.

  29. Lizzie says...

    I’m finding it fascinating that Cup of Jo is providing more reliable reporting on this issue than NPR. Yesterday NPR referred several times to the families being separated as arriving “illegally”. It was due to CoJ’s coverage that I knew this was not so. Thank you for being an important voice at an awful moment in history.

    • That’s an important point that’s also frustrated me, Lizzie. I love NPR and generally feel like they offer really comprehensive reporting, but on this issue their language hasn’t been precise and I’ve found better clarification elsewhere – CoJ, Vox, Twitter. So frustrating.

      Anyway, thanks to the CoJ team to being so committed to this issue and so committed to sharing clear facts. We love you!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      Thank you so much, Lizzie and Bethany.

      NPR is actually correct — we’re saying the same thing. i’ll explain:

      many migrant families came to legal ports of entry to the U.S. (in order to seek asylum from horrific rape, violence and murder in their home countries), but recently the border agents have been turning them away, saying that there was no more room. (this is not true.) therefore, their only option for seeking asylum was to cross without a visa into the U.S. — often by taking a raft into the U.S. that isn’t currently a legal way to enter the U.S., as NPR says, but it IS legal, once you’re on U.S. soil, to seek asylum. so, they were entering the U.S., and then turning themselves in to seek asylum.

      historically, if you’re an asylum seeker, once you’re on US soil, it’s legal to seek asylum — so you’d go to a family detention center together and the asylum process would begin.

      but under trump’s “zero-tolerance” immigration policy, he says that he will prosecute adults for illegal entry *regardless of cause of circumstance*. this is what is new and different. so (instead of asylum-seeking families simply being detained together and starting the asylum process), parents are now being taken to federal court and their children are ripped from them.

      does this make more sense?

      it’s explained here, too, if this is helpful:
      https://cupofjo.com/2018/06/family-separation-what-you-need-to-know/

    • Debbie Elliott says...

      Lizzie –

      I heard that too. No qualification in the reporter’s statement. No mention of refugees. I’ve started to hit back at them on Twitter when I hear them repeat lies, misstatements, propaganda. Ditto several other news organizations. Infuriating!

  30. KL says...

    Honest moment here– I was really annoyed when there weren’t more of your typical posts yesterday. And when I came here this morning to check the website, I had a twinge of *okayyyyy we get it.* Talk about privilege… But I stopped and checked myself, which is something I feel so many of us need to do. We have a culture of “what’s next what’s next what’s next,” and I’m so guilty of getting swept into it. But these are humans. People’s lives. And not just their lives now, but for these CHILDREN, it’s the rest of their lives whether they’re reunited with their families or not. I can’t even begin to imagine what these families are going through, and what the impact of this will be on them FOREVER. It’s so important that people keep talking about this, and for me (and I bet a few others) to be reminded that THIS is what matters, that we MUST keep talking about this. If no one talks about it, it gets swept under the rug, and nothing gets done about it (the famine in Yemen anyone?).

    • Lindsay says...

      Good for you for being honest about this, and for checking yourself. It’s such a common reaction to horrific things we feel powerless to change. We want to look away and return to our comfortable lives and our ignorant bliss. Every American needs to check our privilege, readjust our focus and work hard to find places where we can do better, be better, show better. We have to tirelessly fight the voices that tell us there’s nothing we can really do so we should just go back to spending our time and energy on stupid things that don’t matter. Thanks to Cup of Jo for keeping this in front of us and helping identify ways we can all help.

    • Lindsay says...

      Good for you for being honest about this, and for checking yourself. It’s a common reaction to horrific things we feel powerless to change. We want to look away and return to our comfortable lives and our ignorant bliss. Every American needs to check our privilege, readjust our focus and work hard to find places where we can do better, be better, show better. We have to tirelessly fight the voices that tell us there’s nothing we can really do so we should just go back to spending our time and energy on stupid things that don’t matter. You may not be able to fix everything, but you can pay attention and be good in the world. As Glennon Doyle says, you can do the next right thing. Thanks to Cup of Jo for keeping this in front of us and helping identify ways we can all help.

  31. Thank you for risking your readership by speaking up and helping the rest of us figure out how to do something. Some friends and I decided to inundate the US Border Patrol offices with postcards appealing to their humanity. It might have been in vain but we can only hope the postcards affected whoever picked them up.

    I think about the last scene in Schindler’s List often. He is being lauded for his efforts to save Jews during the Holocaust and his response is “I could’ve done more.”

  32. Stephanie Kokinos says...

    Joanna and team: As always, thank you. This is so incredibly helpful. Thank you so much.

  33. Mado says...

    Hey Cup of Jo team, i think the vast majority of your readership feels like this is never too much!
    I do not come here for a pick-me-up but rather for the variety of subjects you tackle, whether serious or slightly less so, and the way you treat them. Somehow, the tone is always right.
    I don’t live in the US but am still horrified by this situation and donated some money to help, because as a teacher, a sister, and just a human being, this whole situation felt so wrong and inhumane.

    So thank you thank you thank you for all that you are doing, and please keep using your voice and your platform the way you do.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you so much, mado xoxo

    • Katie H says...

      👆 What Mado said

    • Jeanne says...

      I want to chime in to support this sentiment. I love your fun posts but I can get “pick me up” topics anywhere. These posts….these are the words that carry real weight and real meaning in the world. They make a real difference and why I feel women’s voices carry so much weight. This is what makes me love Cup of Jo. Thank you CoJ staff for your bravery and your voice.

  34. meredith says...

    Thanks for doing an update on this. Perhaps COJ should dedicate one day a week (maybe from end of summer to election day) to political posts or at least about important races in states where it is possible to flip a house or senate seat from red to blue. It is imperative that we incapacitate this dangerous president and removing republican control of the house or senate or (dare to dream) both will accomplish that. We all need to step up with time and money and our voices and our votes and get this done.

    • Leah says...

      Actually I would be into this! I do come here for style/beauty/cooking but would love a small mix of political posts too!

  35. Sbe says...

    Thank you

  36. Leni says...

    I’m raking my little family to protest outside the American embassy in Berlin, Germany at 4.30pm today. Join us if you are local. We are also going to attend the protest on June 30th in Berlin. I feel so helpless and heartbroken for the children and parents who are separated.

  37. Kate says...

    “Without a clear process, however, it’s possible some of these children and parents will never see each other again“

    This part of your post has made my heart ache, and turned my stomach into knots. Those poor confused babies. I can’t even imagine the heartbreak of this for those people seeking asylum.

    Watching ‘handmaidens tale’, and reading these articles, It’s life imitating art in the most tragic, terrible way.

  38. Ana says...

    Thank you for this. For those of us outside the US, there isn’t much to do besides donations; somehow, that you keep posting and talking about it makes us feel that these abusive actions are still be holding accountable and not forgotten by a signed order; nor by a ridiculous jacket.

    Thank you.

  39. Heather says...

    Thank you, thank you, thank you for posting about this again. It’s important that we all know the crisis isn’t over – its not over for these families so we shouldn’t lose sight of it either.

    Also thank you for putting it so clearly – its a great resource for me to send to others and even use when I call my representatives.

  40. CathyMA says...

    This post sounds hopeless to me. We wanted families to stop being separated, and we got that. Now, we’re still not happy at all? To me, keeping families together is step 1.
    I am very upset the children already separated don’t have any clear timeline for when/if they will be reunited with their parents. It’s an outrage!
    However, families seeking asylum must be vetted. Unfortunately, because of the dire situations in their homelands, there are so many of them that it will take time. I keep hearing more family judges are needed at the border, but do we even have many more that states already stretched thin in family law (I’m looking at our current foster care system) can spare a judge? We must also respect the citizens of this country asking to be a host.
    Solutions to enormous problems come slowly. Besides working on the situation at the border, our govt should be working with the governments of the nations these people are fleeing from. It must be asked, WHY are so many abandoning their homelands, and what can be done?

    • Bec says...

      Indefinite detention is what is being proposed as the alternative to family separation. It’s not as horrific but it does still contravene human rights laws. My own country (Australia) has horrific detention centres that press aren’t even allowed in to as a way to “discourage” asylum seekers making their way to our shores by boat.
      People are abandoning their homelands for a lot of reason but many of these reasons are contributed to and/or worsened by the way countries like the US and Australia run their foreign policy. It’s a shame that war is so good for our economies.
      This is all a very simplistic answer but I think it’s great that widely read sites such as CoJ continue to talk about this!

  41. Anna says...

    For any Boston residents: Place and Gather (26 Common Street Charlestown) is collecting donations thru Monday afternoon, 6/25. They are accepting diapers, wipes and clothing.

  42. Pria says...

    Anybody watch Handmaids Tale?…This is how it all starts. So scary.

    • Paulette Reschak says...

      Watching and you are correct. Things are starting and it is very scary.

    • Tyler says...

      YES! I’ve had the same terrifying thoughts too. And this week’s episode particularly hit home. I bawled the entire time thinking of these poor kids.

  43. CR says...

    Thank you, thank you, thank you. It’s never too much. It’s not enough.

  44. Bets says...

    Thank you for writing this. This is so upsetting I’m so many levels. And the “I don’t care, do u?” jacket. How heartless can you be?

    Another option to contact Congress is through this texting bot called Resist – text “Resist” to ‭504-09‬ and it will respond asking for your contact info so it can look up your Congress people. Then you can choose who to contact, and type out a communication to them. The system then sends it directly to the Congress people’s office (usually by fax, sometimes mail). I have this number saved in my phone so I can easily reach out when crises like this happen.

  45. Cynthia Putnam says...

    As I, and my fellow Canadians, look on in horror at what is happening to the US, most recently with separated families, I am so heartened to read that there will be protests and people like yourself helping your citizens with information as to how to help these families. Your blog brought tears to my eyes as I know there are still many, many good people in your country who are appalled at this latest atrocity. Also, none of us are fooled by the POTUSs latest executive order. I believe that people can tolerate a lot, but when it comes to children, most of us, even hardened criminals, draw the line. I think I can speak for many in Canada who are with you in this fight, don’t give up!
    <3

  46. Gillian says...

    As Canadian immigrant to the UK and a mum it is sooo hard for me to hear about what is happening in the US. I can’t stop thinking about it. Thank you for raising so much awareness and offering so many ways to help.

  47. Andrea says...

    I am in Australia and find this very distressing. Can I ask what the Obama administration were doing previously in regards to this issue. We have had images here showing that the ‘cage’ situation was similar in the Obama administration.

  48. Bec Barnett says...

    Thank you for continuing to speak out about this! I have been heartened by you and a few other blogs I follow speaking out, many have not.
    This is heartbreaking but so too is indefinite detention of refugees which is what we do in Australia…we have a long history of removing children from their parents too!
    Glad to be part of a community speaking out.
    Thank you

  49. AP says...

    Really admire the way you have covered this extraordinary issue. I just wish there was a Cup of Jo equivalent here in the UK to bring to light some of our UK-based issues and how we can help. Great work you are doing.

  50. vveronika says...

    I’m from Europe and these articles you are sharing are very useful to understand the situation. We have an immigrant issue here too and our government is also struggling to handle the situation with care, mindfulnes and in an intelligent way.
    I understand that some of you, and Trump supporters are worried about gangs, violence, losing jobs BUT: kids (no matter where they are from) should never ever be treated like that and everyone should agree on that whether she/he is a Trump supporter or not.
    And about gang violence: well, gun issue is a serious problem as well and not just because of the gangs but the shootings going on in schools which have – in my understanding – nothing to do with gangs.
    CoJ is a great platform – keep posting these things and inform your readers. I also believe that people who show less understanding now – but are open to understand this matter – can change while reading the posts and even comments. Europe is far but we do care for these families and its good to see all these nice comments from people who are willing to help.

  51. First time reader here. Found you via Design Mom. Thank you for speaking up when so many other “lifestyle” blogger choose to remain silent and post about their vacation houses or closet makeovers instead. <3

  52. Joanna says...

    Thank you. Please keep doing this.

  53. Sarah says...

    Kids In Need Of Defense (supportkind.org) is another worthy non-profit to donate to. They provide direct legal and social services to these vulnerable kids.

  54. Frin says...

    I also want to thank CoJ for posting about this again. What Tim Grierson posted on Twitter about how “Being angry all the time is exhausting and corrosive. Not being angry feels morally irresponsible” is super true. It feels morally irresponsible to go about and pretend nothing is happening, so thanks for keeping the attention on this.

  55. Liz says...

    Thank you for continuing to bring this into the light, and for helping to show others the way to make an impact to end this cruelity. I hug my babies tonight and pray for those who aren’t able to.

  56. Shena says...

    Thank you for doing this and for doing something about this devestating human rights emergency.

  57. Emily says...

    Thanks so much for these posts, and especially for posting concrete, actionable items. XX

  58. Sarah says...

    Thank you! I called and emailed my senators and representatives today. First time doing so! Good to start.

  59. Lisa says...

    Thank you for being willing to engage in these important discussions. I’ve been craving the truth these days and Cup of Jo has provided a truthful voice. This is hopeful to me in these dark days when other lifestyle blogs and accounts I follow are simply ignoring what’s going on around them. Ignoring the pain and needs of our world isn’t a lifestyle I’m interested in.

  60. Echoing what others have said — thank you for using your platform for something of such importance. I hope others will follow your lead — now is not the time to be silent.

  61. Dalia says...

    Thank you for this update! I donated based on your last post and I really hope that the poor children separated can be reunited with their parents as soon as possible. I am Canadian and I have always felt the US was out neighbor and similar to Canada but as of late I do not recognize the US anymore. It has changed and I am left wondering if it was always like this or if the current administration brought the worst out of the country. I really hope that Trump will not be elected again!

  62. Bless you, cup of jo team. Thank you, thank you. Excellent job.

  63. K says...

    Like so many of us, I’ve been struggling to keep my head above water this week with the onslaught of heartbreaking stories. (I also work with incarcerated populations, so I recognize – and respect – the argument that the outrage over border separations is disproportionately loud, given the effect of mass incarceration on families every single day. Still – it’s not a zero sum game, and this one has just shaken me deeply.) My husband is also upset, but not to the degree that I am – or at least, he expresses it differently. He agrees that is appalling, has offered to look up some charities, has listened as I expressed my hopelessness, has suggested a few ways to help (some of which I have done, like calling reps and donating)… and then goes about his day. Bike rides, beers with friends, etc. Rationally, I understand that his reaction is probably “healthier” than mine – and that it doesn’t serve us well to have one of us on their phone at 3 am reading the news, let alone both of us! Yet my heart feels like I want to shake him and say “How are you not crying? How do you not care?” I was wondering if anyone else has experienced a feeling of loneliness in their relationships over this issue (or the many other causes for concern that we’ve had since the election). Hoping for some perspective from this insightful community.

    • Ana says...

      I feel exactly the same. I’ve been deeply affected by these stories and by what’s happening with immigrants seeking asylum not only in american borders but also here in Europe (I live in Portugal). I can’t simply read the news and go about my day as if nothing’s happening and this week has been a nightmare. I look at my 2 year old daughter and have to hold my tears so I don’t cry in front of her but my husband barely seems affected. That’s why I appreciate this community so much, reading all the reader’s comments makes me feel less lonely and a little more hopeful.
      Thank you, CoJ team.

    • DIanne says...

      Yes to all you’ve written. My latest perspective on it is that my partner actually really needs me right now — while it seems like he is not as outraged, he too is struggling like me to find a balance between providing a loving house for our family and a calm way to talk through strategies to feel like we are helping is whatever small way we can. Trying to balance this feeling of outrage and not getting consumed by the outrage has been very very difficult for me, and I am realizing it is hard for him too. And how we interact can make it better or worse sometimes. Feeling like I did one thing each day, be it commit to stand at a protest, send donations, or write a few lines to my fb friends to keep us all motivated — small ball, but in the end, it will win the fight. And better with him as my partner and continuing to feel like we are both rowing together against this terrible tide with understanding when we each need a break…

    • Angela says...

      I’m sorry you are feeling lonely. My husband and I process things differently, and after 18 years I’ve learned to just tell him my feelings and ask him to explain his and to keep talking until we figure it out. We don’t always agree, but at least I know why. Just keep talking and listening to your partner.

    • Nadege says...

      I’m struggling with this too…

    • Lacey says...

      You aren’t alone! I sometimes wish my husband was better at this. I sent him some organizations to look at for donating and he has yet to look at my email- 2 days later. I don’t know your husband’s circumstances, but I know my husband’s work week has been insane and he is also taking grad school classes online. Sometimes I am able to to remind myself of this and that he has a harder time multitasking/taking in lots of different types of information at once. I may have to remind him or tell him I want to talk about it in a more direct way.

      Of course I still get annoyed or wish it were different at times. I am human. :) Anyway, just wanted to chime in.

    • K says...

      It is a little incredible how much it helped to hear “you aren’t alone” and “I’m sorry you feel lonely.” So simple, yet so meaningful to me today! Thank you so much for the responses. I’m typically more of an internet lurker, but you’ve inspired me to reach out (in person and online) and pass along the support.

  64. Eboni says...

    thank you for this info. it makes me feel less powerless.

  65. Bea says...

    I have just signed up to sponsor a child through Save the children. It’s not one of the Mexican children separated from their families, but still, so many children in the world need help, support and love. These recent events gave me the push to finally act on an idea I’ve had for years.
    https://support.savethechildren.org/site/SPageNavigator/sponsorship.html#!/

    You will find a link here with a letter to senators about the Keep families together act, you just need to fill in your zip code and sign it: https://savethechildrenactionnetwork.org/

  66. Erin Bumgarner says...

    THANK YOU

  67. Heather says...

    Thank you so much for all these updates. It’s so much easier to read your voice than watch the news. Donating now!

  68. Brittany says...

    Another post is NOT too much. I truly cannot express how much it means to me that you use your platform to speak out about this horrific issue and to direct readers to resources. Thank you.

  69. Kelsey says...

    Just reading the part where you crossed out that one address and explained there were already enough donations brought me to tears. I am living on the edge these days. Thanks for these posts this week, CoJ. 💛

  70. Kim says...

    Thank you so much!

  71. Katie says...

    Thank you for helping us feel informed and inspiring action in us all!

  72. Lauren says...

    thank you thank you thank you

  73. Katie says...

    I really appreciate that you took the time to not only write one informative post but also to follow up. I’ve been wondering how to help now that the executive order has been signed – thanks for rounding up the information here. :)

  74. Joanna and team, thank you for clarifying the BIG loopholes in the Executive Order which would keep children detained indefinitely and not reunite children, who are already separated, with their parents. We have to keep this issue in the spotlight so I am so glad that you posted about it again. These are the times in history we will look back on and wish we had done more

  75. Sherry says...

    Thank you. I really appreciate you curating the topic and ways to help. It’s hard for me to wade through all of the media sometimes.
    I’ve called and donated and honestly probably wouldn’t have actually done it without your post.

    • Caroline says...

      Me too! These informative posts emboldened me to call my reps and donate to the Florence Project. Although my stomach has been in knots over this, I probably wouldn’t have known how to take action without these posts. Thank you, COJ team!

  76. joy says...

    THANK YOU.

  77. Amy says...

    A few questions: Does anyone know if there are lists of where these detention centers are located around the country? Is there anything that lists how/where to help state-by-state?

    Also, I’m so curious to know about corporations (airlines, etc) who may be supporting or enabling these policies. I’ve donated already, but I’d like to also take a stand with my money on a daily basis.

    • Lauren says...

      https://www.ice.gov/detention-facilities

      also, pay attention to your local news and immigration activist groups in your community/nearest city. they are trying to hide these children from the public.

    • kim says...

      Thanks CoJ. A friend of mine posted this on FB, and I reposted it. I’ve emailed the names, and not had bounce backs, and googled some of the names, and seems legit. Good luck. Solidarity from Canada. And don’t be distracted. He is doing far worse things behind the scenes while we’re all distracted.

      Another way for you to protest the separation of children from their parents at the border and their subsequent detention in jail-like facilities. Sleeping Giants has discovered the names of groups contracting with the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), to “store” these children. These groups are making enormous amounts of money from the administration’s evil policy of family separation. It’s time to write/call them and ask to end their contracts to enforce this evil policy. We know who they are and what they are doing. One rule— please be respectful and polite— you will be more effective that way.

      You can email or call them:

      1) We now know the names of two contractors that are coordinating these child concentration camps.

      1.) MVM Inc.
      2.) General Dynamics

      Here are the emails for General Dynamics’ PR team’s (h/t Shannon Coulter at Grab Your Wallet) – as she says, we’re going to make them work for their paycheck:

      lryan@generaldynamics.com
      Carol.Smith@gd-ms.com,
      DDuBard@nassco.com
      david.hench@gdbiw.com
      Mark.Meudt@gdit.com
      porterr@gdls.com
      rafael.moreno@gdels.com
      heidi.fedak@gulfstream.com
      heinz.aebi@jetaviation.ch
      laurie.vanbrocklin@gd-ots.com
      dbarrett@gdeb.com

      📝Here’s an email template:

      Hello,

      It has come to my attention that your business is holding immigrant children in jails.

      They are children and asylum seekers. They should not be separated from their parents and they shouldn’t be in concentration camps.

      Please ask your leadership to back out of this contract as there is no way to justify this.

      Thanks,
      [You]

      2) We’ve learned that they’re building a new child concentration camp in Houston.

      Southwest Key Programs has signed a lease with the owner of the warehouse at 419 Emancipation Ave.

      We have a lead on a part owner of this property, which they plan to use to incarcerate children as young as Newborns, after separating them from their parents:

      David Denenburg
      Denenburg Development
      david@denenburg.com
      (713) 922-7099

      PLEASE DO NOT SEND HARASSING EMAILS OR CALLS. That’s not what we’re about here. Be smart. Make a point. Send articles about what his building is being used for. He may not have been aware of this when the property was leased.

      📝Here’s a template:

      Hi David,

      I wanted to bring to your attention that a building you own in Houston, 419 Emancipation Ave., will be used by Southwest Key Programs to imprison immigrant children whose parents are seeking asylum in the U.S.

      If you weren’t aware of how your property will be used, it’s not too late to act. I urge you to back out of this lease now and to refuse to profit from this immoral practice.

      You should not be profiting from crimes against humanity. Please act now.

      Thank you,
      [You]

      3) Phoebe Novakovic is the CEO of General Dynamics, which has a lucrative contract with the Office of Refugee Resettlement, the department enforcing Trump’s policy of detaining children away from their parents.

      📝Her email address is
      pnovakovic@generaldynamics.com

      If you contact her to let her know your thoughts on the matter, please be respectful. Your words will have more impact if they are respectful.

      ——-

      4) The FOURTH known company working to separate children from their parents at the border appears to be:

      TRAILBOSS INC.
      http://trailbossinc.com
      907-338-8243
      trailboss@trailbossinc.com

      Please contact them and ask that they cease transporting children apart from their parents.

      Here’s an email template 👇🏽
      —–

      Hello,

      I’ve learned today that your business is transporting immigrant children to jails along the border.

      These are children and asylum seekers. They should not be separated from their parents and they shouldn’t be in concentration camps.

      There is no way to justify taking part in the business of separating children from their families. Therefore, I’m urging you to back out of this contract IMMEDIATELY.

      Thanks,
      [You]
      Manage

      TRAILBOSSINC.COM
      Home Page – Trailboss Enterprises

    • Stacey says...

      Sleeping Giants has been posting lists of companies profiting from these centers and is updating on the status of airlines who are and aren’t transporting the children. They have email addresses of executives you can contact and even some email templates. I access them on FB but I think they also have a twitter page.

    • Kim’s comment with email address and templates is so helpful! I’ve now emailed everyone on the list and shared it on FB. Thank you. <3

  78. Jennifer says...

    Thank you, Joanna and Team. 100% with y’all and grateful for your priorities.

  79. Natalie says...

    Does anyone know how/if we can help the children being held in Homestead, FL? I live nearby and would love to do whatever I can (teacher here), but am not sure where to start to find out any information. THANK YOU, CoJ team, for continuing to post thorough, calm, and helpful information about this!!

  80. Vale says...

    I feel you on this. Thanks Jo xx

  81. Emma says...

    I just have to join the chorus: thank you, thank you CoJ Team for continuing to post on this critically important issue!

  82. Thank you CoJ for your visibility and coherence on this issue. It makes me feel as though you recognize and respect your readers as full human beings, capable of valuing beauty and art and home just as much as the politics and policy that shape our domestic and foreign affairs.

    I donated today using these links, and have shared them as well <3

  83. Caitlin says...

    So many thank yous to the Cup of Jo team for these posts.

  84. Nam Aster says...

    I am somewhat gobsmacked by the folks saying thank you to COJ. Call your representatives. Talk to your friends who voted for this administration. Be open and honest that children are being traumatized in our name. Nearly 53% of white women (of voting age) voted for this administration. As women, we need to understand that our votes or lack of voting have serious consequences!

    • A says...

      I’d focus on talking with friends who did not vote, rather than trying to change the minds of Trump voters.

    • Nam Aster says...

      @A – I actually think it is more productive to talk to folks who voted. They took their civic duty seriously as such, there is a higher probability they will vote again. I have spoken to Trump supporters and their hatred of the Clintons were the driving force for why they voted the way they voted. For me, it is about actively listening to those who believed (for better or worse) that having this administration was non-consequential.

    • CR says...

      Can’t we do both? Thank COJ for making this topic a priority AND donate and call our representatives? One does not preclude the other.

    • I’m with you Nam. White women gotta gather their fellow white women. 53% is appalling.

    • Claire says...

      Vet your statistics please. I don’t believe this is accurate information.
      59.7 % of the voting population voted in the 2016 election, just sightly more than the percentage of those who voted in the previous election.
      There is more analysis of the women voters in the following article, from Atlantic Monthly article titled “Women Aren’t Responsible for Hillary Clinton’s Defeat”. Here is an excerpt, link to full article below .: “A majority of women backed Clinton over Donald Trump, 54 percent to 42 percent. Exit-poll data indicates that 94 percent of black women and 68 percent of Hispanic women voted for Clinton. “If only women voted in this election [and no one else], Clinton would have won,” commented Kelly Dittmar, a scholar at the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. “I think that this narrative about Clinton failing to win white women really overshadows the strong support she had among all women, and women of color in particular.”
      https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/11/hillary-clinton-white-women-vote/507422/

    • Leslie in Oregon says...

      To clarify Nam Aster’s 53% statistic: What Nam Aster meant is that 53% of white women who voted in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election voted for Donald Trump. This 53% figure came from the exit polls conducted by Edison Research for the National Election Pool (the consortium of news organizations that conducts the exit polls), and it has been widely cited and accepted across the political spectrum.

  85. Jess says...

    Thank you for your humanity in using your platform for good, and trusting that your readership has a soul. You are on the right side of history. Thanks for bringing us along with you by keeping these precious children before is. Let’s keep fighting for them!

  86. Ruth says...

    As so many readers have written, urging us to call our like-minded representatives and say thank you, I say thank you to you CoJ team. Your considered, considerate, informative posts have brought me to tears, but I am so grateful for them and for you, and your commitment to this issue.

  87. Shelley says...

    Thank you, Joanna and the Cup of Jo team. Please keep posting about this.

  88. Emily says...

    Thank you so, so much for your advocacy for these vulnerable families, and for the good information you share with us, your community of readers. I am a US citizen living in Canada, and these posts help me feel more connected and galvanized. Also, I’m a political scientist, and I really appreciate your thorough research and nuanced presentation of these complicated problems.

  89. Heather says...

    My husband and I speak Spanish and are dying to host one of these children while we work to find their parents. We are in the DC area.
    Does anyone know how to volunteer for this?

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes! i just did a quick google search (so there might be more options with a more in-depth search) but here is one place to start: https://www.lirs.org/become-a-foster-parent

    • Another Heather says...

      I’m also in the DC area, Spanish speaking family and would like to foster one of these children until they are reunited with their parents. Looking into this, but have found no clear answers yet. I called my Congressional Rep, and his office said they’ll get back to me with info. Please share here if you find anything.

    • Kate says...

      I know this is a different topic/not as pressing as the current issues being discussed, but I followed the link to become a foster parent but am disappointed to see the only way is through Lutheran Family Services, who are not pro-choice. I’d love to foster through an organization that supports women without judgment.

  90. Estee says...

    I think it’s great that you are continuing to post / update. Visibility is crucial. We can’t let this this issue leave the public eye. That is our power, to keep raising our voices, using our platforms to make sure we get these innocent children the help they need and back to their families.

  91. ABBY says...

    THANK YOU. I wish more bloggers with influence would follow in your steps.

  92. Sanaa Murray says...

    Bless you.

  93. Thank you, thank you, thank you for this!

  94. K says...

    Always appreciate your approach, Team.

  95. Carolyn says...

    Thank you x

  96. Lauren says...

    Thank you for posting about this again. You have a nice way of breaking down information for people who may be confused or uninformed. I think that in times like these, it is important for those with a platform to use it. I do come here for a pick me up daily, but it doesn’t turn me off to see content like this. It reminds me of the quote you posted a while back about “wholeness”.

    • Jessica says...

      Totally agree – thanks so much CoJ. Fun stuff is nice, but the reason I always prefer *this* blog over others is the “wholeness” and especially the frank, informative way you bring attention to deeper issues of both mental and societal health.

  97. Lyra says...

    Thank you for keeping this news front and center. We must continue to make our voices heard until a plan for reunification is made. Government sponsored kidnapping is not ok! Let’s continue to shout it from the roof tops!

  98. Leslie in Oregon says...

    I’m writing to add my voice to the chorus of commenters thanking COJ for its posts about this issue. For those who can, taking a stand, and providing information and resources, about this horrendous situation,as COJ is doing, is critically important. It activates and instructs those who are looking for ways to help the victims of this Administration’s terrible policies and practices regarding immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers as well as those looking for ways to effectively advocate for change of those policies and practices.

  99. I stand with so many others thanking you for consistently speaking up and offering effective and sustainable (and, of course, humane) solutions to this horrific crisis, among others. Nothing boils my blood more than folks remaining silent, particularly those with high numbers of social media followers. BUT what snaps me out of that has been witnessing those, like you, whose impact is HUGE and thus creating waves of movement by way of a media presence and generous donations to organizations on the ground helping. Heros, truly. And although there are terrifying historical parallels, I am hopeful that this time around there will be enough of a humanitarian shift to not have history repeat itself. We’ve missed the nipping it in the bud stage, but I hope we’re collectively able to cut it off at the next pass. I believe in this movement. It’s necessary and powerful. And it’s wonderful to know I’m not alone in the fight. Thank you so much.

  100. Robin says...

    Thank you so much for this post. I feel like I keep checking my news feed and Instagram and feeling overwhelmed and hopeless and furious and it’s so nice/reassuring to know other people are similarly unable to move on from this. Hugging my kids extra tight after donating to RAICES tonight.

  101. Becca says...

    Thank you! I know it’s hard to speak out on these issues, but I agree with you that treating children and vulnerable families humanely should not be controversial. This is too important for us all to just go about business as usual. Thank you for taking the risk and using your platform to speak out.

  102. Thank you for using your social media power to bring forward these horrendous news

  103. Wendela says...

    Thank you for this important and informative post. Good work, CoJ team!

  104. Stephanie says...

    Have you all heard about The Comfort Campaign? They’re collecting letters, drawings and stuffed animals for the separated children. There’s a local event taking place in CA, but we’ll be sending our care packages from Nashville.

    I saw a flyer on Instagram and emailed them at thecomfortcampaign@gmail.com with a few questions. They were quick to reply and I’m sure would welcome more donations.

    Their slogan made my eyes well up with tears:

    Long-term plan: Change policy.
    Short-term plan: Love.

    • Amy says...

      Thanks for posting this. I’m all in for that plan.

    • Kristian says...

      Stephanie,
      Could you share a bit more about the campaign (where to send things, if there are any guidelines about what to give/say or not to send/say etc.)

      I’ve been looking for more info about the comfort campaign online and keep coming up empty. Thank you!

  105. Jane says...

    Thank you, Cup of Jo, for posting and re-posting about this issue. I was also horrified to read about the awful things happening at our border, and I’m so happy to see you using your platform to raise awareness.

    Let us also not forget that however horrifying, this type of behavior is nothing new for the United States. We have committed eerily similar atrocities against slaves, against Native Americans, against Japanese Americans, and against MANY other people of color throughout this county’s short history. We need to speak to and acknowledge that history if we want to see any fundamental and systemic change to the way the United States treats ALL people of color. It is easy to blame Trump for what is happening now. And he should be blamed. But these atrocities have been happening in this country – literally – for centuries. What should we do about it? Step one is always to acknowledge that we have a problem. A problem that existed long before November 2016.

    • Jen says...

      Thank you for stating this truth.

      Speaking to my fellow white women in the CoJ community:

      Yes, we must show love. Yes, we must be kind to one another. But most importantly, we MUST get far more “comfortable being uncomfortable” learning about, speaking up about, and ultimately dismantling the systemic racism and white supremacy that is this country’s foundation.

    • C says...

      I can not agree with this more. I am Canadian, but we have our own long, sordid history of separating indigenous families including (but not limited to) the Residential School system. I truly believe if we can really take a painful look at the reality of our history, we can be motivated to change the way we think and behave in all aspects of society today.

    • So true.

  106. Sara says...

    Thank you for these important posts!!!!

  107. Katherine says...

    Thank you for your continued coverage and updates on this horrific situation. From Melania’s jacket to Ivanka’s tweet which essentially thanks the kidnapper for releasing the hostages, to 45 himself and his all white, all male board making decisions about immigration, it’s just too much (as if this administration wasn’t already). I’ve shared your previous post many times and will do the same with this one. Thank you, thank you, for your voice and support of what is morally right and necessary.

    • Kate says...

      That jacket made me sick, what an insensitive and cold hearted kick in the guts that was.

  108. Thank you, thank you for posting this. This post informs us with so many tangible opportunities to help these separated families. I am physically aching with grief for these babies and their parents. I hope that little by little we can take these actions to reverse course on a tragic moment in our country’s history.

  109. Abbey says...

    I can’t tell you how much I appreciate these clear, calm updates!! Thank you, thank you, thank you!

  110. We have to keep talking about this until change starts to happen.

  111. Cailin says...

    I once heard a story about the Masai tribe in Africa who would greet each other with, “Kasserian Ingera” meaning, “And how are the children?” stemming from the belief that if the children, the youngest and most vulnerable, are not well then the entire tribe is not well. I keep thinking of this and how we could answer if we were asked today. It says a lot about our country that the babies are not okay. Thank you for continuing to post about this and offer ways we might help.

    • Katie N says...

      I love this. So true. Thank you for sharing it – it will stick with me.

    • Nadege says...

      Let this be our greeting too until the children are returned.

    • Courtney says...

      That’s beautiful!

    • Lucy says...

      I love this.

    • Laura C. says...

      Let’s do t-shirts with that BEAUTIFUL sentence and sell them and donate the incomes to the wonderful organizations that Joanna has suggested. I’m in.

    • Cailin says...

      Laura C.—yes! I love that idea. I would proudly wear one.

  112. CAROLYN GUADARRAMA says...

    Thank you for posting this. The terror that is being brought on these children in the name of “following laws” is outrageous and heart wrenching. Each day that passes I imagine my own children’s terror being completely alone and forcibly separated from me and it is a horrifying thing to consider. Until every single one of these children is re-united with their families we cannot stop. How can we look our own children in the eye if we turn our backs on these kids?

  113. sarah says...

    Thank you for your continued coverage of this tragic situation. It’s all I can think about as I hug and hold close my 3 little girls. Most importantly, thanks for providing information on ways to be politically active, whether that be through protest, donation, phone calls to representatives, etc.

    What an amazing use of your platform! Love you guys!

  114. Meg says...

    Thanks for posting Joanna.
    We need this dialogue as much as we need your other awesome content.
    SF people activate – Saturday, 6/30, 10am, Dolores Park.

  115. Karen says...

    On your first post I commented that living in Europe (Belgium) made it difficult to really act. But the news of the separation at the US-borders is covered daily on national media here. On social media, people are speaking up and there are even protest being organized in the larger cities. So, I was wrong. Anyone can speak up, wherever you are. We too can sign petitions, we too can call on our politicians to speak up. We can ask our governments to condemn these cruel, inhumain decisions. We can ask our politicians to question the American ambassadors. We too can donate. And we have to speak up, because that’s what every sane person with a heart should really do. I think the famous poem of Niemöller explains it very well. In the end, we have to speak out.

    First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Socialist.

    Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

    Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Jew.

    Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

    • Donna says...

      Thank you for this. Anyone, anywhere can speak up.

  116. Jen riley says...

    I can’t tell you how thankful I am that you continue to acknowledge this tragedy. Please don’t think that because readers love fashion, travel and design they’re not aware of what’s happening or committed to changing it. Post on.

  117. Stacy says...

    Thank you. Way to use your platform to make a statement and urge us to action.

  118. Clare says...

    Thank you for posting and thank you for keeping up with this! It’s so important this issue stays front and canter.

    I just wanted to add that I heard a social worker being interviewed on NPR, and she asked that people NOT protest at the sites where children are being held, as it can add to the massive trauma they’ve already experienced.

  119. Lucy Macdonald says...

    This is just horrific. Having two young children I can’t even comprehend the pain they are going through. I feel a little helpless being all the way in New Zealand but I appreciate knowing the real (no matter how unimaginable) story through you.

    Ps. I’ve read your blog religiously for years but I never usually comment (very loyal ghost reader here) but I just can’t hold back on this. It’s so awful and my heart goes out to them. x

    • Hayley says...

      Hey Lucy, fellow NZer here and totally agree on the helplessness. A couple of things that have made me feel a tiny bit better: calling Winston Peters’ office to ask that we as a country publicly condemn the US Government actions, and checking out what the Red Cross in NZ needs to help resettle refugees here (online – good lists from around the country).

  120. Joy says...

    Thank you for this.

  121. mariel says...

    Thank you for your excellent ongoing coverage of this issue. It’s hard for me to think of anything else right now. Keep it coming!

  122. Lia says...

    I want to echo the thanks others have given to you. I have been driven nearly to distraction these last few months by what is happening and seeing your advice is helping me cope. Keep it up!!!!!

  123. Mallary says...

    Thank you, COJ team.

  124. Anne says...

    I am sorry that you had to do a second post on this (sorry this is till happening in our country), but I really appreciate you continuing to shine a spotlight on this. I am so heartbroken thinking about those families.

  125. MT says...

    Thank you for provinding an update.

  126. edie says...

    This conversation sure has evolved quickly! On Monday afternoon, people called for a swift end to the separation of families at the border. We got that. Moving forward, everyone will be together.

    Now, just a mere three days later, the conversation has evolved into how it’s “inhumane” to detain people who have tried to enter this country legally. It seems that this was never really just about families being separated, but about folks disliking the idea of strict immigration policies.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      not at all! there is still NO plan for the reunification of families who had been separated. The 2,300+ children who had been torn from their parents’ arms are still separated from them, and there is NO plan or timeline for bringing the families back together. we are still fighting for these unaccompanied children!

      please read the post and try to really understand what is being explained here. i think you might agree once you read carefully. thank you so much.

    • edie says...

      I’m really trying to understand, Jo. Really! And while I agree that (most) of these families deserve to swiftly reunited, I wonder….

      ….if tomorrow POTUS helped to reunite all of these families – but still detained them until their claims could be verified – would you be satisfied? When it’s all said and done, I don’t think you would be. As I said Tuesday, this is a much note nuanced issue than just “we need to keep these families together.” This is about people’s beliefs regarding democracy, sovereignty, and protection. I’m not afraid of these families, but it’s naive to assume no peril can come to us when we let down our guard.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you for your note. of course this is a more nuanced issue, and i’ve read literally hundreds of articles about it over the past week, including all the heartbreaking updates and nuances, and thought leaders’ opinions and debates and suggestions. it’s a complicated issue without one clear solution. but there are definitely more humane, moral and less expensive policies than a) separating families or b) detaining families, children and infants indefinitely. i’d be happy to comment/write more about them when i’m less exhausted! thank you for trying to understand the issue here.

    • edie says...

      Dearest Jo, I don’t agree with you on many issues, but I respect your opinion. Thank you for making me think deeper on this issue. I’ve come back to this post (and Tuesday’s) several times and each visit has made me think more constructively about this issue. Much love from the Midwest.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      much love to you, too, edie.

    • Giulia says...

      As a very proud immigrant, working hard and passionately in a country that let me in and let me play a part to enrich it, I’d like to say, however obvious that may be, how immigration is enriching on numberless (culture, language, ethics, tradition, food…) levels for the country that receives it (far outnumbering the cons). And, at the cost of saying something banal, the USA is nothing but a country of immigrants, since everybody but the very native Americans can say not to be immigrants. A few years or hundred years shouldn’t make us forget that. Love to all, and thank you for this place of calm intelligence.

    • Kate says...

      Jo and Edie – I just want to pop in and say that this was a beautiful and respectful discussion to follow. What a strong community of women we have here on COJ that all may feel empowered to thoughtfully voice their stance.

    • Ali says...

      For me, the conversation has always been about how current enforcement of immigration policy is unfair. I don’t want children in prison, and I definitely don’t want them in prison without their parents.

  127. Katie says...

    Thank you for posting. It’s sad to see many blogs I follow carry on posting about fashion and lifestyle with this going on. It speaks volumes to the COJ team’s humanity and commitment to it.

  128. Carol says...

    I spoke with someone at Mark Levine’s office. They said the centers are inundated with donations and are so grateful, but they are not able to accept more for the time being. They ask that you send financial donations to any of the nonprofits helping the children or immigrants in the city.

  129. Kim says...

    Thank you for continuing to address important political issues. I love the make up (Glossier addict here) and clothes, and house tours, but this is what really matters.

  130. Alex says...

    Thank you for posting about this. This issue is horrifying, confusing, baffling and incredibly upsetting. I have been so proud to see many women I admire, yourself and Gemma included, posting constantly about this issue and spreading the word on how we can help. It is so easy to feel powerless, but this week I have seen the impact of advocacy both big and small.

  131. J in LA says...

    Thank you so much.

    I don’t know if this is a dumb question, but is it worth contacting senators if you live in California? I know Kamala Harris and Diane Feinstein have been very outspoken against these atrocities.

    • Callie says...

      California National Guard soldiers are assisting the federal government implement its zero tolerance policies, separating families, putting toddlers in “Tender Age” migrant shelters, Jerry Brown is keeping them stationed there to assist. His office phone number is (916) 445-2841

    • Monica says...

      I often wonder the same thing. Hope someone can weigh in on this!

    • Jordyn says...

      I live in California and have called them every day. Yes, they are on board, but I want them to know how important this is to me. The more people who speak out for injustice the better. It always matters :)

    • Lauren says...

      I wondered the same thing with regard to my wonderful New York senators and congressman. But I write every day, if for no other reason so that they can honestly say they’ve been inundated by their constituents. And I also think it inspires them to know we support them. So yes, email them every day.

    • Dana says...

      You can send your senators an email to thank them for being outspoken and continuing to fight. :)

    • AJ says...

      I don’t believe it is as helpful to contact the senators who are already in line with our beliefs. However, I DO think it would be helpful to contact our local representatives who are conservative. This is the case where I live in California. It might be helpful if and hopefully when legislation for immigrant families is voted on in the House.

    • Jenni says...

      I am in California and my understanding via people in “blue” offices is that it DOES matter, especially so our senators and reps can use the calls as proof that their constituents still want action on these issues. If you scroll through Facebook/Twitter comments on their posts, you will see there that there’s plenty of people who are attacking what they’re doing, and so it’s important to stand up against that and let them know that so many of us who voted for them are appreciative of their work. Our calls matter! (And also consider looking for your nearest swing district to donate time/money to, if you are inclined to help flip a district blue this fall.)

    • Emma Bee says...

      I live in the bluest congressional district in one of the most liberal states in the US, with fully Democratic congressional representation and I still contacted my representatives about this issue. I think it’s extremely important that they know their constituents fully support what they’re doing and want them to continue to do more.

    • Rachael says...

      I live in California and I still called and left messages with both. I will call again given this development – more still needs to happen. I know that they are on our side, but it can’t hurt to help them feel supported. Also, if you have any creative ideas for how to solve the family re-matching, I am sure they would be keen to listen.

    • MG says...

      My understanding, as a fellow Californian—proudly represented by Harris, Feinstein, and Barbara Lee—is that letting them know that you support their outspokenness is important. Call and tell them that you are outraged and that you want them to continue fighting for these children and their families.

    • Jules says...

      Yes, definitely! If your congressperson does something you appreciate, let them know! A constant show of support for decisions like these goes a long ways toward making the will of their voting-base known, and can prompt continued efforts. And my mother would say it’s just plain courteous to say “thank you”…

    • Rachel says...

      I think it’s always worth the call if you have the time – even if it’s only to thank your senators for doing the right thing. It lets them know they have your support as they stand up for what’s right, and that you are a voter who is paying attention.

    • A says...

      Yes! You can call and say thank you for the work they have put into trying to fix this problem. Politicians are human and like nearly everyone else, they respond to positive reinforcement.

    • Sarah says...

      Yes!! Great question. It’s incredibly important to call and thank your reps when you support their actions. They hear from their critics all day long – voicing your support is so helpful in letting them know they’re doing the right thing.

    • Lauren says...

      I’m no expert, but I did! I thanked them for being leaders on this issue and urged them to please do what they can to support reunification of these families. Both of the staffers I spoke with were lovely. As Feinstein is up for reelection this year, I think it’s important that she hear from constituents.

      At the very least, I think it’s an easy time to practice calling your representatives. I want to be comfortable contacting my legislators, and I find it to be really good preparation for those times that you oppose your legislator as those calls are certainly more daunting.

    • Lauren says...

      I’ve never posted before, but this question is worth answering – and the answer is yes. It is absolutely, 100% worth contacting the elected officials who share your views and are willing to speak out on them. I promise they are hearing from those who disagree – and they need to know they have voters in their districts and states who have their back. They need to know which issues are priorities for their constituents, and they need to be thanked when they do the right thing. In addition, it’s worth remembering that the quality of voter contact matters – but so does the quantity of it. The elected officials standing up for children and families should feel positively overwhelmed by the outpouring of support for their positions. Thank you to everyone who is weighing in and speaking out. Keep it up. And thank you to CoJ for being so willing to use your platform for good.

    • Leslie in Oregon says...

      Thank you for asking this question. Senators Harris and Feinstein need to know just how much their constituents support them on this issue. For many different reasons, they need to know, and to be able to show, how many of, how much, and why, their constituents support their position on an issue. So yes, it definitely is worth contacting one’s congresspeople, even if they already agree with one’s position on this (and any) issue.

    • Ellie says...

      Yes, I think it’s always important for your voice to be heard and counted. (Fellow blue-stater here…I understand the frustration.) I read a good suggestion in a comment on Cup of Jo a few days ago: Call a Republican rep or senator who is up for re-election in another state and vent your spleen. Tell them that if they don’t make a move in a positive direction on this issue you will cut a big check to their opponent. I found it to be very cathartic. (And maybe helpful?)

    • Sarah says...

      Same question! Also in California.

    • I used to work in a senator’s office, and based on my experience, I’d say that elected officials ALWAYS care about what their constituents think. (Not so much hearing from people who live in other states, unfortunately.) So even if your representatives are already taking action, it’s useful for them to know that you stand behind them and want them to keep pushing.

    • Annie says...

      Yes–even the senators who are publicly outspoken on these issues still listen to their constituents’ views. However, there are also other things you can do. Contact your House representative and give him/her the same message, as the House Republicans are currently attempting to put together an immigration bill that would cover this and other issues (it was supposed to come up for vote today but they can’t get it out for a vote because there is no consensus within the party). Alternatively, since we just had a primary, call the offices of your district’s front-runner and second-place primary candidates (particularly if either of them is a Republican or a nonincumbent) and put pressure on them to take a public position on these issues prior to the midterm elections. Those candidates are the ones most in need of your vote. And don’t forget state and local-level officials. Implementing humane policies for those children who are already being detained can be greatly influenced by vocal state and local officials.

    • J in LA says...

      From the original poster: THANK YOU!!!! Cup of Jo readers rise to the occasion once again. Thank you so much for your intelligent, informed, gracious responses. I’ve never been very politically active but this has lit a fire under my ass. Again, THANK YOU!

  132. Jenni says...

    Thank you thank you thank you for sharing all of this information. The confusion around what the executive order will actually do is overwhelming, and the fact that there is no plan for these children to be reunited is devastating. I so appreciate the work you and the Cup of Jo team do to bring awareness to these issues; please keep it up!

  133. Ivy Farias says...

    I am in Brazil so I believe we should also use social network to write that we not agree with that. Other thing I did: I gave some money to International Anisty and asked as gifts for my birthday donation for IA.

  134. Leigh says...

    Hi, i just tried calling the east Harlem number about fostering. Can you double check that it is the correct number? Also, can you provide the name of the agency? I was not able to reach anyone when I called. Thank you.

    • M says...

      I want to call too, please continue to post how to help in NYC!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you for your note! the number appears to be correct, and the agency’s name is: http://cayugacenters.org/contact/

      also, if you are a spanish-speaking family who is interested in fostering, and you live in (or can travel to) brooklyn, there’s an info session on monday. here’s a note from a friend: “We have pulled together a first Brooklyn info session for next Monday 6/25 from 5:30pm-7:30pm to be held at 61 Local (the address is 61 Bergen St, Brooklyn). They have a room upstairs– if you just walk to the back you should see the entrance. We will be trying to put together a second one for July, I don’t have a date yet, but it is at least somewhat contingent on turn out for this one, so please try to make it to this one if you can!”

  135. Ann says...

    Thank you for writing this informative post. The crisis isn’t over, just because this executive order was penned. I appreciate you using your platform to take a stand. <3 It can't be easy to do, knowing that not all your readers will be happy with your choice. Thank you for your courage.

  136. Leanne says...

    I too was horrified by the family separations, and I was glad for the executive order. I want the families who have been separated to be reunited.

    But as terrible as the US Government’s response has been to the migrants, the migrants are simply a symptom of the real problem: growing gang violence in Central America. The quote at the end of this post is apt, but it seems to me that US society is far more responsible and caring of its children than societies in Central America, who have allowed this gang violence to persist, and for so many families to be treated this way.

    I understand that the situation is complicated, but I am frustrated that the political situation in that part of the world has become so unstable, and I am very angry at the corruption in Central American governments that has put so many young children at risk.

    • Duck says...

      Geez, Leanne ever heard of walking a mile in someone else’s shoes before you judge? Much of the corruption you speak of in Central America has been a direct result of America’s involvement in that continent’s politics for America’s own political and corporate gain. Read a history book.

      And honey: the US isn’t more responsible and caring of its children than those in Central America. Newsflash: it’s a lot easier to be more caring and responsible when you’re not navigating daily violence and instability. 2nd newsflash: there are many, many American children who have not been well looked after but usually they’re poor so I guess you’re not thinking of those ones.

      Your comment reeks of judgement and othering.

      LASTLY if you read the post correctly you’ll see that there is no plan to reunite the children (contrary to what your comment says) who’ve been separated with their families. That is NOT what the executive order is about.

    • mado says...

      In 2009, the elected president of Honduras was ousted in a coup. The US government chose to support the coup leaders rather than the elected president (contrary to the UN, the EU, and the Organization of American States). This is only the most recent glaring example of more than a hundred years of the US intervening in Central America, usually to support dictators friendly to American economic interests over leaders popularly elected. Now we are closing our borders to people from these very same countries. I encourage you and anyone curious to do a little reading on the history of US imperialism and Central America.

    • Helen says...

      I don’t mean to be too glib but you do know that the US created and then perpetuated that gang violence, right? This history is crystal clear and is (at least) a century long, and continues with our drug wars.

    • Reem says...

      I just want to second Duck’s reply! It is so frustrating that people think America is innocent and exceptional in all things despite an abundance of evidence, both historical and current. The lack of compassion is annoying, but the willful ignorance is infuriating. I’m sorry. Thank you to the other replies for being so wonderful in their responses.

    • Leah says...

      @Duck – your tone is both aggressive and dismissive! I definitely think that the US has a long way to go in terms of caring for its own children, particularly children from minority groups. You’re making a gross assumption to say that I don’t care about poor children. And I meant my (separate) sentence about reuniting families as a separate idea from the sentence beforehand. You are assuming that I assumed that the executive order had anything to do with reuniting families. I did not make that assumption.

      I do have some knowledge of Central American politics and history, and I also have some knowledge of America’s involvement in that history. Much of that involvement is inexcusable.

      I am absolutely not judging the families who are migrating to seek a better, more peaceful life in the United States.

      However, if you read in my comment that I am judging Central American drug lords, I certainly am! And while I know that the US has been too involved in Central American politics historically, absolutely no part of me thinks that Blanco and] other MS-13 gang members (and other gangs!) are strengthening their gangs for anything other than personal gain. It’s greed, pure and simple. An ugly greed that is making life for many in Central America harder.

      While I do not think the United States should continue the history of US imperialism in Central America, I also do not think that the United States is entirely to blame for the rise of these gangs, and for what seems to be endemic corruption in certain parts of the world. Thinking that would be another form of racism: people outside of the United States are just as capable of operating democratic governments and peaceful societies as those inside the US (if not more!).

      @Mado – I know. I hope we learn from that episode and see the devastation that has wrought. But I also believe those coup leaders should bear some responsibility.

      @Helen – yes, I know. And part of me actually thinks that drugs should be legal – all drugs. The drug wars have failed miserably. But again, I do not believe the United States should bear all responsibility for these gang wars. And I wish, in a better world, that these gang leaders would be brought to justice.

      I understand that that may never happen, and that in the meantime these families are simply trying to live a better life. But I thought it would be remiss to speak about the migrants without acknowledging what they are fleeing from, and who is responsible for that. My hope is that, eventually, there is peace in Central America, even though I may not see it in my lifetime. While it is horrifying & inexcusable for children to be separated from their families, the violence they are fleeing is also horrifying and inexcusable. If I were in their situation, I would flee too.

      But as a society, we need to look at why they are fleeing, to study it, to learn from it, and to work together to prevent that kind of inexcusable violence.

    • Leanne says...

      Just one more thought on this: I know that the United States did a lot to contribute to this gang violence, and to the instability in Central America. I do not believe the US is solely responsible – I do believe that gang members and corrupt Central American politicians bear a lot (most!) collective responsibility for the murders, violence, and crisis in Central America. So I don’t believe it is the United States’ responsibility to shoulder the aftermath of that violence alone.

      I fear that, as a repentance for the havoc the US has wrought in Central America, the US is bearing more responsibility than we should. I worry that, in saying something as oversimple as: “We caused this, we should help these fleeing families”, we are perpetuating a cycle of being overly involved, and ignoring more complicated causes for unrest in Central America.

      I certainly do not advocate for building a wall, or any other nonsense isolationist foreign policy. But I also do not advocate for simply opening our borders: simply opening is no more helpful than totally closing. There has to be educated, intelligent discussion on the reasons for this violence in Central America.

      I worry that in the rush to help these people, who are fleeing a horrible reality, we are not doing the work needed to fully understand the situation. I see all of these people saying: “How can I help? How can I help?” and I keep thinking: for every family who crosses the border, there are at least 20 families facing violent crime in Central America. It seems remiss not to note that we can help by being educated, and by learning about what these families are fleeing from.

    • Just tipping my hat to the people who have commented here and educated about the fact that the policies that the US government applies to parts of the world where we see asylum seekers coming from are often part of the reason for SO MANY OF THE PROBLEMS. We (The US) uses one eighth of the world’s natural resources. Food and energy. And the way we get those resources is by sometimes haggling with governments that aren’t fair or good to their own people. These things don’t happen in a vacuum. In the course of America a dictator most likely becomes a “dictator” in American history books when they stop playing nicely with America. Before then our nation as a whole turns a blind eye to many of the atrocities happening on the ground in those countries.

    • Anon says...

      @Duck I’m not sure your tone is any more helpful or less judgmental. We can disagree or share the facts that support our POV without condescending and alienating people who have a different understanding of the issues.

    • Jo B. says...

      Anon, well said. If we disagree with one other let us be respectful and remember that every has a right to their opinion even if it is different from yours. Being condescending and dismissive never furthers a conversation.

    • Helen says...

      @Duck I don’t think it’s a “another form of racism” to identify the imbalanced impact of structural systems of oppression and imperialism. Operating a democratic government is a bit more challenging if you are forced into trade agreements (both legal and illegal ones). The “certain parts of the world” that you identify are *always* the places where countries have been subject to corruption on a global scale. If you have to agree to the terms of global banks and powerful countries to survive, then you have little autonomy to create your own systems of governance that might be antagonistic to those same forces.

      Essentially, I refuse to equate having that level of structural awareness about the challenges facing a country with some form of “racism.” Racism is about protecting power and privilege, not recognizing its distinct manifestations across time and space.

    • Leanne says...

      @Helen – You said: “I don’t think it’s a “another form of racism” to identify the imbalanced impact of structural systems of oppression and imperialism.”

      (So hard to have this conversation over text and not in person!)

      My initial point was to question what is causing the unrest in Central America. While I understand that the US is responsible for some of that unrest, I refuse to believe that the US is solely responsible for it. To me, arguing that the US is solely responsible for the unrest is very close, ideologically, to arguing that only the US can fix it, that Central American people do not have agency and are not capable of having a civil society of their own, without US involvement. Perhaps “racism” was not the right word, maybe “colonialism” would have been better.

      Of course, there are many reasons for the crisis of violence in Central America. As you’ve said, there are unfair trade agreements, and many barriers to democracy. (Extreme poverty being one.) But I do not believe that unfair trade agreements are the sole reason for the gang warfare we’re seeing, and I do not think it is unreasonable to be frustrated with these gangs, with the actual corrupt politicians that are allowing these gangs to flourish. There are many villains here, and I do not believe that the US is the only one.

      Obviously, as I’ve said, I do not believe families should be separated. This is a terrible thing, and I am so glad for the outcry and the attention to the issue.

      But for every family fleeing and coming to the United States, there are another 10 suffering still in Honduras or El Salvador. Unless we can look at the reasons for their suffering, and have conversations like: “How can we make this better? What did we do? Which trade agreements should we change?”, that part of the world will not become more peaceful.

      Does that make sense? I honestly did not think that my first comment was so controversial, but I am glad to be engaged with. It is nice to be challenged.

      In my first comment, I should not have said: “it seems to me that US society is far more responsible and caring of its children than societies in Central America…” That was not well put. I meant: the Mandela quote is beautiful and true, but it applies just as much to the US as it does to Central America. Here we are, discussing the issue, calling our politicians, acting as a civil society, and being concerned for these children. And yet there has been very little discussion in this thread on the gang warfare that is the source of these fleeing families. These gangs are engaging in warfare for personal gain, even murdering children themselves, and driving these families out of their homes. That too is outrageous.

    • Gabriela says...

      Hi Leanne,

      I know people have responded before me but I would like to offer more information, if I may.

      – As previously stated by others, the US government has always been deeply involved in the corruption of Central American and South American governments.
      – It is advantageous for the US government to keep Central American countries in difficult political and social climates, because when a country is trying to fight a drug crisis, for example, it is not able to become economically stable. This means a number of things, but namely that the US is able to import Central American goods and ressources for very little money (such as Guatemalan coffee, which has become unaffordable for Guatemalans).
      – It also means that many US companies can keep producing garments in Guatemalan factories for very very little money, thus increasing their profit margins.
      – The US does a good job of protecting white, middle-class and upper-class children. Not so much with all the other children. Children all across the US are dying in their schools and black children are dying in the streets.

      The situation is indeed very complicated, but when things are complicated it’s important to inform ourselves and to look at things from a place of empathy.

  137. Julie says...

    New Yorker here: do we know if it’s possible for us to go to Cayuga Centers and be with the kids? (I’m envisioning reading stories, etc, some kind of small, calming acts.)

    • Emily says...

      Agreed! NYC ESL teacher and Spanish speaker here :)

  138. Jamie says...

    Thank you for these updates! Truly helpful!

  139. Madeleine Freeman says...

    THANK YOU, thank you, thank you for keeping up on this. Cup of Jo is a valuable resource because you have so many dedicated readers who visit every single day, and this news can’t just fade into the background. I donated to the Florence Project and RAICES this morning to aid reunification efforts, and it was the most depressing thing I’ve ever done.

    Not to be combative, but I do want people who identify as “conservative” to understand this: as mentioned above, indefinite detention is an extremely expensive waste of taxpayers’ money. I realize that’s maybe the LAST thing that’s important about this situation, but if you support detention, don’t bother calling yourself conservative, because that’s hypocritical. And the refugees are NOT criminals–they’re FLEEING crime. There’s literally *no* justification to be made for this situation, socially or fiscally. It’s cruelty, pure and simple.

  140. Vlo says...

    CAn we interview the d***head that heartily enforce this rule? As in the guy who said the kids cannot hug????? I want to get the people to sit down and actually tell their family and the world what they are doing!!!!!!

    • Carrie says...

      It’s mind blowing to know that there are men (and women??) actually physically taking babies and children from their parents. What job is worth that? It’s disgusting that they are making the wheels spin, so to speak. They’ll have to live with the echo of those cries for the rest of their lives.

  141. Emily says...

    Thank you for continuing to bring light to this issue. I’ve been a wreck all week and struggling to concentrate at work. As more ways to help come to your attention, please continue to share them with us. I’ve followed your blog for years and I love you all even more now that you’ve been speaking out for these families.

    • Emily says...

      I am another Emily also struggling over this issue and also unable to focus at work! I basically donated my entire weeks paycheck to RAICES and still feel helpless.

  142. Lesley says...

    Thank you.

  143. Katie says...

    My heart is breaking. Thank you for sharing. We must stop this.

    I’m trying to find out if there are any other opportunities to foster children. I live in San Diego, and don’t speak Spanish unfortunately… does anyone know?

    • AJ says...

      I saw on the news that there is a detention center in El Cajon holding young boys. I’m not sure about fostering opportunities but it might be worth looking into. There must be something happening in California similar to Texas that hasn’t been covered yet.

  144. Christine says...

    Thank you for returning to this unfortunate, yet important topic. You explain it clearly and factually – something that is difficult to do, but really should not be. I have been heartbroken and sickened by the events recently, and these families (mostly women and young children) are being made pawns in our divisive environment. Like many, I can’t wait to return to reading your wonderful posts about wardrobes, beauty products, parenting, decorating homes and shopping for perfect gifts, but simply can’t until these vulnerable human beings are safe and reunited with their terrified children.

    • Julia says...

      Joanna, this is soooo important and especially touches all your readers who love children – so please don’t ever again worry if such a topic might be too political! Your first post on this moved me to tears, so I’m very glad to hear more about the actual situation and how I can help.

  145. Claire says...

    Thank you, Joanna, for this timely update. I made a donation to Act Blue this afternoon, based on your suggestion Monday. It was an easy way to donate to nine nonprofits at once.

  146. A says...

    Thank you so much for your in depth discussion of these horrific events, and the resources for how readers can help. I really appreciate how you have elected to use your platform to discuss these issues.

    • Hani says...

      I feel 100% the same way. This kind of leadership is what makes me a loyal reader.

    • Ellen says...

      Absolutely. Thank you. This is the most appropriate thing to do when atrocities against infants and children are being carried out in our country.

    • Alice says...

      I was coming down here to say the same thing. So, I’ll just say ditto.

    • Lo says...

      Well said, thanks for being real and concerned and using your voice for good!!

    • Yvette says...

      Yep–ditto. Thanks for this post.