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8 Ways to Help After Charlottesville

8 Ways to Help After Charlottesville

How can you wrap your head around what happened in Charlottesville — how it came about and what to do now? We’re trying to keep educating ourselves, speaking out and supporting organizations that help. “Not one of us can rest, be happy, be at home, be at peace with ourselves, until we end hatred and division,” Representative John Lewis has said. Here are a few things to read, listen to and do…

WHAT TO LISTEN TO

8 Ways to Help After Charlottesville

The Code Switch team.

These days, it’s especially important to have a great source of news and push yourself outside your bubble. Two podcasts we highly recommend: Code Switch, an eye-opening weekly NPR podcast hosted by journalists of color who address the trickiest questions about race in America. And The Daily, a 20-minute weekday podcast from The New York Times. (Yesterday’s episode included first-hand footage from a correspondent in Charlottesville; and today’s episode detailed a city councilor’s experience during the fight over the Robert E. Lee monument, and the chain of events that led to this weekend’s violence.)

It’s Been a Minute is another podcast to add to your playlist. Host Sam Sanders took on the topic of “Charlottesville and White People” in his latest episode. For his part, Sanders sees the hashtag #ThisIsNotUs, which went viral in the aftermath of Charlottesville, as unhelpful. “Even if we don’t think we’re part of the problem, we’re part of the system that has a problem,” he says. “That means that every day we have to ask ourselves what we’re doing to make things better or worse. And a hashtag like #ThisIsNotUs… that’s just a cop-out.”

WHAT TO WATCH

A Vice News reporter goes behind the scenes with white nationalist leaders and gives a scarily close-up look into the events over the weekend in Charlottesville, from the torch march on Friday to the deadly car attack the following day. The footage is extremely hard to watch, but try not to look away: It gives an inside look at what went down from the eyes of both the protesters and the counter-protesters.

Don’t Be a Sucker — a 17-minute anti-fascist film from 1947 that has reemerged online since Saturday — is a cautionary tale against complacency.

WHAT TO READ

How We Got Here: A Charlottesville Reading List (Longreads). Charlottesville didn’t materialize out of thin air. These nine gripping articles trace the movements of the past two years that helped fuel last weekend’s events.

Is There Any Point to Protesting? (The New Yorker). It would be easy to feel powerless and defeated, but here’s why we shouldn’t stop resisting: “What was the Women’s March about? Empowerment, human rights, discontent — you know. Why did it matter? Because we were there. Self-government remains a messy, fussy, slow, frustrating business. We do well to remind those working its gears and levers that the public — not just the appalled me but the conjoined us whom the elected serve — is watching and aware. More than two centuries after our country took its shaky first steps, the union is miles from perfection. But it is still on its feet, sometimes striding, frequently stumbling. The march goes on, and someday, not just in our dreams, we’ll make it home.”

WHAT TO DO

The civil rights organization Southern Poverty Law Center created an online handbook, 10 Ways to Fight Hate, that’s full of ideas big and small on how to bring about change in yourself and your community. “Use whatever skills and means you have,” it urges. “Offer your print shop to make fliers. Share your musical talents at a rally. Give your employees the afternoon off to attend.”

If you are able to, here are three places to donate:


8 Ways to Help After Charlottesville

During times like this, when you can feel devastated by the news, it’s encouraging to take action and notice others around you doing good. This week we saw cookbook author Julia Turshen make huge trays of mac and cheese for a friend in need and local phone bank volunteers. “Home cooking can sustain, fuel, balm and bolster communities,” she said. And Wes Bellamy, the young vice mayor of Charlottesville, is helping to reunite his city. “The Charlottesville that I know is a place that will rally around each other,” he says. “And we are going to love each other. And we will be stronger because of it.”

8 Ways to Help After Charlottesville

Wes Bellamy, the vice mayor of Charlottesville.

P.S. Raising race-conscious children, and getting the news.

(Top photo by Elizabeth Brumley via Boston Herald. Code Switch photo by Matt Roth for NPR. Mac and cheese photo by Julia Turshen. Last photo by Ryan M. Kelly via The Daily Progress.)

  1. What I love about you and your blog is when terrible things happen in the world, you always check in with your readers and ask if we are doing okay and remind us to take care of ourselves. And then when we feel helpless you give us ways to help and a plan of action. Thank you so much.

  2. Annie says...

    Jo, thank you for this post!! I completely agree with other posters who said that interior design and style posts just don’t seem very relevant in times like these, when it feels like our country is going crazy. It would be awesome if you made these maybe a monthly column, I always find myself discovering a new group or organization through either the post or the comments. Plus, it seems like “community engagement” (or whatever you want to call it) should be part of everyone’s lifestyle at this point. :)

    I found this op-ed to be super helpful, it talks about using humor during counter protests.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/17/opinion/how-to-make-fun-of-nazis.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-right-region&region=opinion-c-col-right-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-right-region&_r=0

  3. I’m supposed to be writing syllabi for art classes right now and it just seems so. futile. in the face of what’s going on. Thank you for this; I really needed it today (and I’m very well aware other folks need it SO much more than I do). I’m inspired to have a studio sale, proceeds going toward SPLC, etc. Anyway, thanks for helping me to feel less helpless and take some (more) action. xx

  4. Thank you for posting this! Not knowing what to do or how to help is kind of paralyzing in itself, so ideas, organizations to donate to, etc. is very helpful! Code Switch is amazing, I have been listening since November.

  5. Thank you.

  6. Camila says...

    I would love to see this post labeled as “politics” instead of “relationships”. There’s no shame in talking about politics and you guys should own that. Is an important part of a democracy.

    • Asri says...

      That’s a great point :)

  7. Karolina says...

    Thank you for this post. We all need to speak up and be outraged, without giving into hatred. No matter who we are, where we live. Even though I’m not an American and I currently live in Asia, I feel deeply affected by what happened in Charlottesville. This kind of actions, this kind of rhetoric can’t be simply shrugged off because they’ll eventually reach us – that is the nature of violent hate.
    Even though I have been born many years after WWII has ended, the devastating consequences had a big impact on me, as they had on my parents and their parents, who were lucky enough to survive. This is where this kind of hate leads and this is why we can’t stop at being angry, no matter our nationality.

  8. Another Cville resident here. What a horrifying weekend. I had a tension headache and my shoulders and neck hurt all day Sunday from hunching over my phone all weekend, watching and praying as things unfolded.

    And Trump? I can’t. I just can’t.

    Charlottesville Abundant Life ministry does great work in our community and has for years. Tutoring, mentoring, summer programs– they are a steady resource in the community and would benefit from anyone’s donation!

    http://www.charlottesvilleabundantlife.org

  9. Valentina says...

    Thank you so, so much for speaking up and using your platform. I appreciate your willingness to lean in on these issues, especially in such difficult times. It’s certainly easier to stay silent and I applaud you for doing the harder thing. You’re a lovely role model.

  10. Thank you for posting this. Charlottesville is my home, and I have been a school librarian here for six years. I don’t have words yet for what has happened here, and I don’t yet know how the city will recover, or how long it will take. As an educator, I am eagerly awaiting my students’ return to school next week so that I can hold them, love them, and begin the many conversations we will have about our world and what we can do to nurture it.

    I work with an organization called Books on Bikes that rides bikes into Charlottesville neighborhoods loaded with books to deliver to students over the summer and winter holidays, when their school libraries are closed. We also bring popsicles, teachers and other loved and trusted faces, and open laps and hands for holding and story reading. Our community in Charlottesville has come together to make our organization a success – a local bike shop provides free service for our bikes, our public library donates books for us to give away, and local schools provide us space to store all of our goodies. We rotate between six neighborhoods and have given out thousands of books and popsicles over the years. We love Charlottesville and our students, and have been touched and humbled by the support that our city has received.

    If you’re looking for an easy way to reach out, we have an Amazon Wishlist on our website full of books that, if donated, go straight into the hands of Charlottesville children. Or simply check out our website or Facebook page to see the real faces of Charlottesville. You won’t see them on CNN, but they are what we’re really made of.

    Our website: booksonbikescville.org
    or Facebook page: facebook.com/booksonbikes

    • Hi Sarah, I don’t know if you’ll see this but I just ordered some books off your wishlist to be sent to the library. I love what you are doing, and as a current library and information science grad student, it’s inspiring to say the least! Thank you for all that you do – I’m going to share this other places, too! :)

    • Thank you, Hannah! We are so thankful for the support that we have received. We had our big end of the summer event last night and visited all six neighborhoods in one night on a school bus packed with teachers – it was fabulous. Thank you so much for your donation. It means even more coming from a fellow librarian! If you’re on your way to becoming a school librarian, then you can start your own chapter of Books on Bikes when you start teaching. There are branches all over the US now!

      I love being a librarian and helping others to love their jobs, too. If you ever want to chat about all things library, I run a blog at http://www.fitzbetweentheshelves.com. Shoot me a message there, I’d love to collaborate or talk books :)

  11. Shannon Merrell says...

    thanks so much for posting this, really appreciate it.

  12. Thank you for not being afraid to stand on the side of what is right. I feel such liberal-vibes from almost every writer I follow online (writers who never fear to suggest open-mindedness in fashion, decor, music, etc), yet no others have been willing to be straightforward in condemning racism. I understand that it can be tricky to mix politics into lifestyle blogs (how could you risk losing a reader, even if they are racist!?), but Cup of Jo… I deeply admire that you do not throw diversity on as a guise. I have read comments that throw a little shade at the sameness of your staff, but is it not more important that your team has open arms to all who are different? Your team truly sees beauty and talent and wonder in different people and different cultures, perhaps even putting it out to readers who might not have seen things so clearly on their own.

    Beyond your suggestions (which I am thankful for at a time where I feel more than a little helpless), I feel reassured by the goodness you project, and the unity I am reading in these comments.

  13. Thanks so much for covering this topic and offering such a broad variety of ideas.

  14. Lisa Hayward says...

    Thank you for this post!

  15. Dewey says...

    Another rec: https://www.safetypinbox.com/

    Safety Pin Box is a monthly subscription geared towards white people. Each month you get a box with tasks and assignments that include “data collection, personal development, influencing your networks, and showing radical compassion.” It’s an awesome way to put money directly into the hands of black women and work on being true allies. Highly recommended!

  16. cynthia says...

    I came from Pinterest looking for a paint color and found this post which I needed more than any decor hint. Thank you so much for the links and addressing this.

    I know as a white person I’ve had a learning curve in terms of rooting out the unquestioned assumptions that enable bigotry. I detested the blatant racism I saw around me as a kid, but still had/have my moments of “white fragility” on being faced with unpleasant truths from people who’ve been othered. Being an ally often means shutting up and listening to what people tell you about their own lived experience.

    Ta-Nehisi Coates’ book “Between the world and me” and Claudia Rankine’s prose poem “Citizen: An American Lyric” are terrific works that gave me some real a-ha moments. But reflection has to lead to action, too. I’m deeply concerned about the erosion of voting rights and the harm that could be done with this lie about non-existent voter-fraud. This presidential commission w/Pence & Kobach of Crosscheck infamy is a recipe for voter suppression and disenfranchisement. Certainly for minority voters, but for the entire country. And that too would give the despicable white nationalists a victory.

    Thanks to the commenters here too. It’s encouraging to find decency breaking out on the internet.

  17. Nora says...

    Thank you. More of this, please! We need to keep confronting racism, sexism and hate.
    To the commenter who made a distinction between a Trump voter and a Trump supporter: when a presidential candidate brags of sexually assaulting women, stirs hatred against all Mexicans and Muslims, mocks a person with disabilities, and refuses to disavow the KKK, he is simply not fit to be the leader of the free world. These examples are from his own mouth, not taken out of context, and not as reported by the so called “fake media”. They were all spoken/shouted by Trump himself during his candidacy well before he was elected. Often. Unequivocally.
    Every single person who voted for Trump, regardless of the reasons they gave to themselves or others, is responsible for the hateful, divisive and frankly incompetent government we now have. And those who didn’t vote at all are also culpable. “All that is needed for evil to flourish is for good men to stand by and do nothing.” Voting is not a game, it’s an enormous responsibility. Now we all have to come together to right this disaster. And that starts by taking responsibility for it.

  18. Jessica Nare says...

    I really value Cup of Jo for using its important platform to take a stand against racism and injustice. Thank you thank you thank you!

  19. Amanda says...

    One of the big challenges is what to do when hateful groups converge. In San Francisco we’re hearing that a permit has been granted for Aug 26 for Chrissy Field for a group much like the one that initially was permitted in Charlottsville. Many of us want to say that what they have to say is not welcome here..or anywhere. To have a counter protest potentially invites an interaction – one desperately hopes a safe one – and definitely invites more media attention, etc to them than they would get otherwise. We need ways that we can respond without engaging them. Ways to say this is not ok and not how we treat people without giving them the attention they crave.

  20. Anita says...

    Hi Jo, as a long time reader I have never commented, but I feel compelled to post some thoughts up here. Whilst I agree with majority of commenters here who applaud you for addressing this issue, I also agree with the few others who are saying that listening and donating money are just not enough. It is crazy to me that the world has gotten to this point (with Brexit, Trump and right wing movements and governments across the world gaining more strength) and unfortunately just talking and reading about it isn’t going to help. As a born in Britain Asian, I STILL get asked where I actually come from… I know it’s not from a rude place but there is ignorance everywhere. Please try and promote what you speak by widening your stories to include more people of colour, and perhaps as one commenter suggested, look into where your staff and models also come from.

  21. Sallt says...

    Thanks again for proving that lifestyle bloggers don’t have to stay silent on the IMPORTANT and devastating things happening in our country today.

  22. Heather says...

    Thank you so very much for posting this. I follow a lot of blogs, and in this moment in time, the fact is, I really don’t care about the best blush to use or what the hot color for fall will be. While we need that kind of escape some of the time, I think we also need to take time to face the tough realities in our country right now. I really appreciate that you include content such as this.

    • Monica says...

      Well said, Heather. Was going to make a similar comment.

  23. Jane says...

    Joanna, as a brown woman, I truly want to thank you for consistently using your blogging platform to spread love and peace on the internet and for talking about the importance of racial/gender/cultural diversity and unity. My hope and prayer is that despite what we see in the news, America WILL change and together we can finally put an end to the history of hatred and oppression that continues to rear it’s ugly head into our neighborhoods and cities. Truly, thank you.

  24. Lauren says...

    And don’t forget to VOTE. Volunteer your time to support elected officials and political candidates who stand up against racism, anti-Semitism, bigotry, and violence. Run for your office yourself!! Make noise. This isn’t the future we want our children to inherit.

    • Ellen says...

      Vote or maybe even run for office.

  25. Grace M says...

    Joanna,

    Thank you so much for this. After I commented on your other post, I thought about a few things.

    1. Given how thoughtful and comprehensive your post, you were probably already working on it when I had asked.
    2. I asked the same thing of a few other bloggers whose blogs I read, and my comment was quickly deleted. No one wanted to step away from their happy dandy upper west side life to acknowledge some of the harder truths.
    3. Reading these other comments, I feel such kinship to these women. And it warms my heart to know that we aren’t just a community who talks about nice pants and shoes and decor. Don’t get me wrong, I love all of those things, but in the face of violence, oppression, and hatred, they. don’t. matter.

    Thank you!!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you so much, grace. xo

    • Sasha says...

      Grace, #2, really?? Wow, that just makes me so sad. Who exactly are they afraid of offending? When people are not free, nothing else matters. I hope you keep speaking up on those other blogs. I think this community, a group that is not afraid to speak up here, is why CoJ has such a huge and devoted readership. It’s not only the right thing to do, to speak out, but also the smart thing, business wise, imho.

    • SAME SAME SAME <3

  26. Sophia F. says...

    As everyone else has said, thank you so, so much for this post, and for your continued willingness to step in to the political and social fray in this country on the side of what is, at this point, moral right and human decency.

    I have a question that I think a lot of people like myself (white, privileged women who give a damn) may have, and I’d love to see a blog post on it – what is the actual best way to talk to people to whom you are close about their racism? For context, four months ago, in the context of a… very heated discussion, I confronted my father and stepmother, older Boomers who consider themselves liberal, on their racism – they don’t believe in systemic racism, for instance, nor that the criminal justice system consistently works against POC, and they share some very troubling views about ‘work ethic,’ etc. I was armed with facts, and statistics, and sympathy, and it did NOT go well. Think there are some behavioral psychologists/experts on race in America who could weigh in on this?

    • Andrea says...

      I would do a book trade with them. They propose one book for you to read/something to watch and then you propose on for them. A Colony in A Nation is a good starter. Then you talk about the books, which hopefully leads to discussion of experiences and underlying ideas.

    • Caitlin says...

      I would also be really interested in a post addressing this. Although I grew up in the DC area, now I find myself living in the south, surrounded by people (who I love!) that often have different opinions than I do. Most of them would never consider themselves to be racist, however I find myself cringing occasionally from comments I overhear that show blatant racism and don’t know how to address without attacking them or coming from a purely emotional place. I’ve tried a few times and, like Sophia, it has not gone well. As another privileged white woman, I’d love advice on how to speak up in the smaller ways.

    • Ellen says...

      Oh gosh I fourth the need for a post exploring how to respond. Being in Louisiana, there is a lot of chagrin over taking down the Confederate monuments and my husband and I discuss ad nauseam about how to respond to those who share these views with us thinking that we would agree! I read two excellent posts that help address commonly-cited reasons for preserving the Confederate statues. This one, from SPLC on how the statues represent “heritage” – https://www.splcenter.org/20160421/whose-heritage-public-symbols-confederacy

      And this one, which answers Trump’s questions about “where does this all stop/are we going to erase George Washington/what about so-and-so” (which I hear ALL the time) – https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/15/arts/design/trump-robert-e-lee-george-washington-thomas-jefferson.html?emc=edit_cn_20170816&nl=first-draft&nl_art&nlid=15767834&ref=headline&te=1&_r=0

    • nina says...

      I recently had this come up. After the election my husband and I found out that a couple we are close with were much more conservative and slightly more racist than we had known. It just hadn’t come up prior to November 2016. For a few months after, the husband would constantly engage us in discussions. And we just kept responding. The wife wanted nothing to do with it because she is the only one of her friends who isn’t very liberal/progressive and I think she was already having these discussions all the time. I don’t think I truly changed the husbands mind, but I think I opened it a little. Some people are racist because they just don’t know, not because they are horrible people. I think its worth it to talk and talk and talk and know that you aren’t trying to change anyone’s mind, you’re just trying to let a little light into a very dark room in their head. Good luck.

    • Anne says...

      THIS! It’s impossible to talk to people who don’t want to listen. I’ve always lived in the South (also a white, privileged woman who gives a damn) and now that I’m in my 30’s, I’ve spent so long biting my tongue, it’s like I don’t know how to even speak anymore.

      I could write a book on crazy stories I’ve been told, but one that still gets me: I was always told that no proper southerner ever carries $50 bills because it’s bad luck [due to Grant being on it]. Still to this day, I have that momentary pause when I get a $50 and then remember how INSANE that is.

      Jo, thank you so much for sharing this. I can’t wait to check out those podcasts! Also, Ellen, I really appreciate those links, especially about the monuments.

  27. adriane says...

    Thank you so much – from a long time reader in Charlottesville. I appreciate you speaking out because this really matters.

  28. Ann says...

    I am so glad that you chose to address what is going on. What is happening is not politics. It is behaviour that should not and cannot be tolerated no matter where you come from politically, geographically or religiously.

    I am not American – I am Irish and happen to live in China. Tonight I sat at the dinner table and answered questions from my children about how and why the nazis got back and who were the KKK. They couldn’t fandom why people would behave like this.

    For those who voted for Trump, you may have wanted to shake up politics and shake up Washington but this is beyond dinner party chat. This behaviour should not and cannot be accepted.

    I believe in the United States of America.

    One World. One Race. One Love.

  29. Victoria says...

    Thank you.

  30. Thank you so much for this post.

  31. Molly says...

    One of the terrible things about this situation (to me, as a Christian) is how embarrassed I am. SO many people do things, in the name of Christ, that are completely anti-Christian. I’m sure many of these white nationalists identify with Christian but would be hard-pressed to defend their racism in the context of TRUE Christianity.

    Please read this article by pastor Tim Keller, of Redeemer NYC. I think he hits the nail on the head…

    https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/article/race-the-gospel-and-the-moment

    in the meantime, I think what most of us can do to fight racism (particularly those of us who live in segregated areas, as I do – my kids schools are probably 80% white, our church is about the same) is to simply befriend people of different ethnicities. Even if it doesn’t seem to come naturally, be purposeful about seeking out a diverse community, for your own sake and for the sake of your children.

    • Alison says...

      I feel the same way, Molly. I sometimes feel like I have to describe myself as a Christian, but with a caveat. The stipulation being that the God I know and worship teaches love and diversity not hate and fear. And I always love hearing Tim Keller’s perspective. Thanks for sharing.

  32. Beth says...

    Thanks for posting this. I know you like to be a refuge for your readers, but I have avoiding coming on the site the last couple days fearing I’d see a post about interior design or outfits. I love those posts but this week just feels too heavy. I was so happy to see this post. Thank you for being another white voice that steps up and says “Not OK” in the face of the white supremacy and hatred happening in our country.

    • Amanda says...

      I agree. As you say in your post “Use whatever skills and means you have.”
      Using your platform on a widely read blog is an important step to bringing this conversation and our broad ownership of it to a large group.
      Thank you

  33. Rachel says...

    Thank you for this and please continue posting articles like this. As a white woman I am deeply ashamed that 53% of white women voted for Trump. I feel a personal responsibility to take action and speak out. Thank you for these resources, let’s get to work.

    • Trish says...

      I just read ‘Women of the Alt-Right’ in Harper’s magazine. I highly recommend it. It is definitely scary, but worth the read. This should be a time where we all take a long hard look at our white-privilege (I am white) and understand it is woven in all aspects of our lives. Honestly, when I really reflect on it, this is a volcano that has finally let loose. Thanks COJ for sharing:)

  34. Thank you, Joanna and the entire editorial team, for sharing this. As someone who lives in Charlottesville, less than a block from where the car attack happened, getting through the days right now is a struggle. Yesterday, I saw a mother visiting Heather’s memorial with her son, who was probably four years old, and explaining to him why there were so many flowers on the street. It made me grateful that my own son is only eleven months, because I don’t know how I would find the words to help him understand what happened.

    There are constant reminders of August 12th: piles of flowers on the street, portraits of Heather and unity signs hung in shop windows, reporters and tv crews still filling the pedestrian mall. They are hard to look at, but also such a relief, because what happened here shouldn’t be forgotten in a single news cycle. There is a deep vein of ugliness, bigotry, and violence running through the history of our country, and we need to remember and confront it at every moment possible.

    Seeing blogs like yours share ways to do that is a step in the right direction, even though every step feels like too little right now. Thank you for the work you do here to educate, encourage, and support your readers.

    • Andrea says...

      Katharine: Just extending my condolences to you as a citizen of Charlottesville. I lived through 9/11 in NYC and know how displacing terrorism feels. I read one commentary this weekend stating how the person felt as through their city was invaded by terrorists who effectively shut down the city and that resonated. Unfortunately, the terrorists in this case are us.

    • Sarah says...

      Thank you Katherine and Andrea. As a white resident of Charlottesville, it’s been really hard to figure out how to hold my pain while recognizing that both the nation and our town have a lot of work to do. It means so much when people acknowledge the experience of those who live here.

  35. What a great post! I too, felt lost and saddened by this weekend’s events. This post has given me productive action to get educated, involved – and to connect with others who are doing this same. Well written, as always!

  36. Kiana says...

    Jo, thank you as always for taking a break from the levity of summer topics, and using your voice.
    I haven’t read through all the comments but I have something to add to these great suggestions. LIBERALS, before you post on facebook or retweet something on twitter, check your source. There are as many made up and purposefully inflammatory posts written for leftists as there are for conservatives. Make sure that what you post is something you have read through and verified to the best of your ability. It sounds like a waste of time but it is IMPORTANT. When you do the same thing as the right and post incendiary comments you are stooping to their level.
    SECOND, please do not regard people as a monolith. There is a great difference between a Trump supporter and a Trump voter. I voted for Hillary but she was not my candidate and I didn’t support her position on a few issues but I voted for her. There are people who voted for Trump who are not racist, not sexist but who voted for him despite all of those things (and perhaps cringing all the way) because they believed he’d be a better president for their issues than Clinton. You must not discard these people. Chances are they are amongst your family, neighbors or friends. Get into a calm dialogue with these people, listen to their point of views without refuting them. You DON’T HAVE to agree and you won’t. But you must LISTEN.

    • Escondista says...

      I am struggling to see how someone could be pro-life or pro-small business but overlook every character issue he presented during his campaign and vote for him.
      I am not so upset that my friends and family did not vote for Hillary but I am absolutely horrified that this man told us who he is on the campaign trail and they put him in the highest office of the land.
      So… yeah I’m having a hard time seeing the difference between a trump voter and a trump supporter.

    • Maureen says...

      We are talking about neo Nazis marching the streets and you are telling Liberals to not be incidendiary? You have got to be kidding me…!

    • Cooper says...

      My formerly-conservative husband (still my husband, just now a liberal :) introduced me to the idea of having a conversation with the goal of seeking clarity, NOT agreement. It’s really interesting to watch him engage with his Trump-supporting family – he’ll sometimes just calmly repeat the same question, like “Is it okay that Trump refused to denounce White Supremacists?” as they exhaust all their excuses. Your point about sources is so important. That was what made all the difference for my husband – he went from absorbing hours of conservative talk radio to listening to more nuanced reporting from NPR, podcasts, and you know, the local news, and he suddenly saw the world so differently.

    • Courtney says...

      There are different levels of racism. Someone who can overlook blatant racism, who can vote “despite” of it — because it doesn’t impact them personally — is most definitely on the spectrum of being racist.

    • Rachel says...

      “When someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.” — Maya Angelou

    • Laura says...

      There is a difference between a supporter and a voter, but it still sounds like a cop-out. Either way, they chose to vote for someone whose campaign was brought to popularity by hate, maybe because it didn’t impact them directly.
      “History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.” -MLK

    • jet says...

      sadly, there is no diff. between a trump voter and supporter.. he did not hide what he was during the campaign. and sorry but we dont need to listen to any more from trump voters,

    • Laura says...

      Jet – sorry I didn’t elaborate on my point. I meant, maybe there is a difference between someone who publicly supports him and his social views, and someone who chooses to ignore those views because they feel he’s the “lesser evil” so they voted for him. It’s still a cop out. Even though they may not belong to a hate group, their vote went to someone that was also supported by the neo-nazi movement. People that voted for him now need to realize that “MAGA” has different meanings to different people.

    • Kiana says...

      I’m aware that this is a very difficult time in our country and that the public mood is very polarized but I didn’t think that a comment encouraging dialogue would be as controversial. I was trying to heal not further divide. For the record, I was not advising getting into a frank dialogue with a white supremacist although I think these people need more love and compassion than they realize because they are clearly broken individuals.
      For those who say they have nothing to say to a Trump supporter, I envy your position. Clearly you have no close family members who voted for him who you can’t easily cut out of your life. Clearly you can just disregard half the nation who voted for him as racist and that’s that. I am a child of immigrants, a Hispanic mother and an Iranian father. Two groups targeted by Trump during his administration and the campaign. Surely I can’t have family members who voted for him right? Wrong. But why you ask? Why do people vote against their self interest? Well that’s a tricky question. My Iranian uncles believed Trump would be tougher on terrorism by Muslims (or those misguided individuals calling themselves Muslims) in the US and that he would scare the hell out of extremists in the middle east. My Hispanic side of the family is a little different. They do not gain at all by the Trump administration’s policies.
      So why vote for him? I think you are forgetting what a powerful role media plays in our elections. If you watch conservative media, your outlook on the world would be very different. If your friends and community were all conservatives, that would be the only perspective you had. Simply telling such a person “you’re wrong, these are the facts” would accomplish nothing. That is not the way they think and your obstinacy will only make them cling tighter to their beliefs.
      That is why I suggest listening. I suggest dialogue or at least keeping the means of dialogue open by not dismissing them from your life or offending them by calling them names. I do not believe that anybody is irredeemable.

    • KS says...

      @COOPER I love what you wrote. Ever since the election, I have tried very hard to understand both the side of the story. I am brown women with extremely liberal upbringing but I see myself leaning towards the center after the election.
      Every issue in US has become a partisan issue, which is a problem. I am an avid supporter of women’s right, abortion (sad that these two are considered issues)and climate change. But I know many people who are too but may not agree with Paris accord if it requires shutting of coal mining once and for all. Many supporters of abortion may not agree that govt needs to fund Plan Parenthood and why it cannot be privatized. And I don’t agree but I understand. Some may argue isn’t it the same thing. But to me, it is not. Also if a common person doesn’t want to pay extra 300 $s per month on insurance, it is understandable. I am pro AHA but if someone says they are not I wouldn’t judge them. Once a 90 year old white privileged fellow church goes told me that she doesn’t see people like her kids and grand kids on television anymore white, blonde-hair, everyone is black haired, without any ounce of bigotry or hatred but sad concern, after a little shock, I tried to understand where she is coming from. It didn’t bother me much, coz I looked closely on television and found it right. As much I love that we as the minority have a voice and representation, I don’t feel it is fair to judge her for her concerns. It is important that we don’t get sucked up with what is trending topic in media and read and analyze and not judge.

  37. emily c says...

    joanna and staff – i add my thanks to those of your other readers. through the years, but especially this past horrific year, you continue to make us proud with your bravery, humanity and strength.

  38. Leigh says...

    Bravo cup of jo. I also love the podcasts lists that Design Sponge made years ago about young people of color, black writers, african american girls doing podcasts: http://www.designsponge.com/2015/04/13-amazing-female-podcasters-to-follow.html

    Everyone’s hearts are heavy watching US events from abroad in particular, and it is truly shocking to see the President’s implicit support for hate, division, intolerance, cruelty and these events and movements… so soon after and while there was/is: the Holocaust, segregation, slavery, police brutality, racism in the US. Wake up America, this man is tearing apart the country.

  39. Annie Green says...

    We have to stand up and be counted. I am English and lay awake until the small hours last night thinking about the events in Charlottesville, the move towards an acceptance of right wing extremism and, in my country, a profound unwillingness to recognise what is happening here, a shoulder-shrugging acknowledgement of corruption, big money and erosion of freedoms. Now is not the time to lose heart but to link hands. Courage!

  40. heather says...

    Thank you so much for this post. To quote what someone else above said, “It feels so surreal when blogs just ignore the reality of the world right now.”

    I know many people want their blogs to provide a chance to escape the real world for a while, but in the current state of our country it’s just not acceptable for anyone with a platform and audience to not speak up. Just being able to “escape” at times is a sign of our (white women’s) privilege, the fact we’re capable of tuning these things out even for a bit because of the comfort and safety of our own lives.

    I hope this post is part of an ongoing series of additional discussions on these issues. As others have noted, it does seem in recent months like there’s been a more dedicated effort on Cup of Joe to address important issues, and to feature a more diverse set of people and their stories, and that has been so great to see.

    • NE says...

      Hear!! Hear!!
      Thanks Jo and team for using your voice and platform for making the world a better place (as much as a cosy safe place!)

    • Janet says...

      I, too, hope “this post is part of an ongoing series of additional discussions on these issues.” It is not enough to always react. Why not invite different voices, much like your ‘parenting in’ or ‘week of outfits’ series?

  41. Leah says...

    What sad times we are living in. Thank you for speaking up, it is heartwarming to read this and the beautiful notes below. Ray of light in this dark day. 🙏🏻

  42. Amber L Fitzner says...

    Thank you for writing this. It is so important. I have been following you and some other bloggers for years and have noticed in recent months I cant bear to follow the ones that don’t speak up

  43. Serena says...

    As an outside observer from the opposite side of the world may I ask, with all sincerity, why this particular event is so shocking to Americans? Some of Trump’s most senior advisers are known white nationalists. To me it’s no wonder others are inspired by this.

    • Barbara Jane says...

      I keep hearing the phrase, “It’s not surprising, but it’s still shocking.” Which is to say that yes, we see these people being elevated in our government, being trusted by our president as advisors, and we know that it inspires hate in people. But it’s still shocking to see it come to life this way; we generally assume that it won’t come to violence, that nobody would outright admit to being a nazi in 2017 America. I think it’s good that we’re shocked – we don’t want this, we don’t like it, and hopefully that shock will push more to action. It’s sad, and scary, and crazy, and I hope that those who supported Trump for his “policy” (whatever that is) but do not support his white supremacist fan club will speak out against these events and against Trump condoning them.

    • Paula says...

      Nothing shocking here. I have lived in the US for 30 years now. Racism is here and always has been here.
      And while I appreciate public forums such as this even talking about this, listening to podcast and baking food isn’t going to fix anything. I’m sorry, but this is where Americans like to take that self patting approach to “activism”. I’m not saying, go out and get killed, but fundamentally, everything has to change. One of those things is public education and what we teach children here. As an Eastern European, with school aged children in an American public school, I am shocked that slavery is not drilled into the children, the way German history, Nazi history, and Holocaust are into our kids’ heads in Eastern Europe. Both, are/were evil. Both should be totally banned. The Confederate flag, all monuments-should be banned-illegal! Instead, everyone is talking about history and protection of freedom of speech. How absurd! Sure, it’s history, but it is simply a WRONG history that should be thought in terms of “this should never happen again”. And I mean that about everything: podcasts, protests, affirmative action-it’s all whishy whooshy (sp??) stuff- everything should be law, square and simple. WE should not talk in workplace about inclusion and diversity-it should be a law, it should be a law that we have people of all colors/faiths/genders and what not included. None of this: “best” qualified candidate. We often don’t get the best qualified candidate b/c POC are oppressed from so many opportunities. Of course, this alone will not solve any of the problems. I am a white woman and I cannot tell you how many times I have been told by white, European looking americans, to go back to my country based on my accent alone. What we saw in Charlottesville is not new-it’s just #45 and the environment he created with this election made it okay to now show it in plain sight, not in some dark and illegal corners of the internet.

  44. Kaitlin says...

    Oops mixed up my Crooked Media pods. I’d say Pod Save the People (hosted by Deray) is a must listen. Although I also enjoy Pod Save America, I think Deray’s pod brings new perspectives that we all need to hear right now.

    • Jody says...

      Agreed! I loved what Wes and Devin from UVA’s Black Student Alliance had to say and it was so interesting/important to hear their perspective. They seem so thoughtful, wise and articulate.

  45. Kaitlin says...

    Thank you for this post. I’d also recommend listening to Pod Save America. Deray does a great show about justice issues that affect us all and he’s been doing great interviews with political leaders.

  46. Andrea says...

    Thank you.❤️

  47. Molly says...

    As much as I appreciate you addressing this, I am disappointed in the list offered. If there is a time to push people out of their comfort zone, it is now, because staying in our comfort zones is what got us here in the first place. It is not enough to listen/watch, or donate your money. We need to be confronting people in our daily lives when they share view points that are problematic, such as blaming both sides, or trying to defend indefensible actions. We need to be calling out racism in all of the insidious ways it presents itself. For a lifestyle blog like yours, maybe it would be worthwhile to think about why there’s never been a black writer on your team. We have to push others, and we have to push ourselves.

    This is coming from someone who organized as a student at U.Va. and who has friends and family members who organized against the white supremacists who descended upon Charlottesville this past Saturday, just for some context. People literally put their bodies and lives on the line to confront the terrorism that is white supremacy. I think it’s reasonable to ask a little more of ourselves as a result.

    • Riley McCormick says...

      Yes yes yes. Thank you.

    • Capucine says...

      I would like to share that for me, your fire is palpable and galvanizing, but I don’t know what to literally do with your exhortation. If the suggestions in this post aren’t any good, can you give more? I live in a California beach town where racist comments and behaviors to my face are extremely rare. Racism is present in my community, no question, but it is almost never voiced aloud. So I’m left with the ‘not enough’ efforts like donating, voting for local candidates that champion migrant issues, listening to news, raising my children to respect with heart…I wish there were big huge things I could do. Can you tell me more? It’s a white, wealthy, educated PC world I grocery shop and go to my kids schools in. I hear your anger and know it is valid. I care. But I won’t get many opportunities to hear blunt rascism. How would you like to see underground rascism daylighted and changed?

    • Paula says...

      agreed. I subscribe to the “think globally, act locally” – do you have an uncle who tells racist jokes? confront him. Do you have a local charity where you can get involved that helps POC or immigrants with “bettering” their life; be it Obamacare applications, social security navigation, tax returns, welfare, immigration papers, etc? So many times, I see Americans fly to Africa to build homes and start churches even though, domestically there are so many problems here: number one problem for school aged children in the US is hunger!!! Go to your local public school, and see how you can help! Or, take a closer look at your employer! I work for the largest University in my region and I hardly can find POC across the departments in any capacity: from a secretary to faculty. Why is that? Well, I got myself on a bunch of council meetings where I now ask those questions, I grill the HR process, why aren’t we getting this amazing mix of people as candidates, just same old same old. Basically, I don’t believe you have to put your life on the line-if that’s not your cup of tea. However, pay attention locally and while you can listen to a podcast and throw together a community pot luck, make things a bit more tangible as well.

    • Mary says...

      ALL OF THIS!!!!!

    • Katie says...

      I agree, thank you! One thing that readers can be thinking about or acting on is where their children go to school. Readers of this blog may or may not come across overt instances of racism that they can speak out against. But, it is likely that many readers of this blog live in gentrified or gentrifying areas yet drive their children across town to school. I work in a lovely little neighborhood school that is in a beautiful old town neighborhood filled with mostly educated, liberal families. And yet our school is 97% free and reduced lunch and 75% Hispanic because all of the families who’ve bought the cool, but affordable old homes drive their kids across Main Street to the school that is more white.

      When people say – “now is the time to know what you would have done in the civil rights era” many people thing they’re “ok” because they’ve gone to a march or protest. But the choices we make every day matter just as much or more than the once a year or even once a month actions. If you live in a diverse neighborhood and take your child to a less diverse school (even for a “good” reason like a special science or arts program), please picture the young Black girls who integrated schools in the 50s. It’s horrifying to think that you would be a parent who was scared of those beautiful little girls….and yet schools are more segregated now than they were 40 years ago and it us parents and readers of this blog who are making these choices that contribute to this number.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      thank you for this! this thread is very helpful and constructive.

      this SPLC list from the post offers more things to do on a large and small scale: https://www.splcenter.org/20170814/ten-ways-fight-hate-community-response-guide

      i agree with the comment about confronting people with problematic viewpoints. we are working on a post along these lines and will share in the next few weeks.

      i agree it would be a HUGE positive in so many ways to hire a woman of color. we have a very small full-time team (four hires total, since cup of jo started) but are hoping to be able to hire another writer/editor soon. we work with a diverse team of writers and photographers, but it’s so important to have a diverse full-time staff, as well. we actually have interviews this week with two amazing women of color, so please stay tuned.

      and i COMPLETELY agree about schools — we are very committed to sending our children to public schools, and toby’s elementary school is up-and-coming and very diverse (both racially and socioeconomically), which is a huge reason why we love it and want to support it so much. for example, in his first grade class last year, there were only three kids who identified as white; and many students live in the nearby housing projects. we try hard to help the school in its mission to support all the kids and families and their various needs. we are trying to teach our boys to help/give themselves — for now, that means things like if they have a lemonade stand, they donate 25% of their earnings to the school. i’d love to keep learning more about how to do this.

    • Molly says...

      Hey there! Sorry for not responding sooner. I’m a teacher in my first year, so I’m a *tad* overwhelmed. But y’all pick up the thread so well. I appreciated all the responses.

  48. Malissa says...

    Thank for sharing this comprehensive info and for using your highly visible platform in this way. Charlottesville is my home (though I’m currently living abroad), and I’m heartbroken. But, sharing with the world the things we can do to pull together is really thoughtful and practical. So, thank YOU.

    • Sarah says...

      Malissa, I know what it feels like to be gone while this was going on. I was only out of town for the weekend but I am sure that being in a different place, especially outside the U.S., and feeling strong ties to Charlottesville has been a complex set of emotions.

  49. ECH says...

    Thank you for this.

  50. Theresa says...

    Thanks for this post. I’ve been feeling so sad and helpless over this, your post helped me refocus. Thanks!

  51. Seconding lots of the folks here who have recommended Crooked Media podcasts: Pod Save America (https://getcrookedmedia.com/here-have-a-podcast-78ee56b5a323), Pod Save the People (https://getcrookedmedia.com/pod-save-the-people-56bc42af53d), and With Friends Like These (https://getcrookedmedia.com/with-friends-like-these-aeee91fa31da).
    Covering progressive issues as well as ways to get involved, these conversations have saved me from despair over the state of our union. Highly recommend this week’s bonus episode from Pod Save the People where host DeRay Mckesson talks with organizers from UVA’s Black Student Alliance about what it’s been like on the ground in Charlottesville and what’s next for the movement.

  52. Courtney says...

    Thank you Cup of Jo for addressing this. It is essential we ALL speak out, and it’s getting harder and harder to see silence from other bloggers.

    For any of you looking for ongoing ways to help elect people who stand for justice, there is a wonderful postcard-writing effort that targets various special elections across the country. Through handwriting postcards to voters, you can make a difference even in a state or city other than your own. Please consider this cause–it’s also a great way to bring together folks in your circle to write postcards, talk, and support each other in these difficult times. https://www.facebook.com/TonyTheDemocrat.org/

  53. Kirsten says...

    Thank you so much for drawing attention to this!

  54. Laurie says...

    I can’t thank you enough not only for the respectfully, thoughtfully written post, but also for the multiple answers to the question “what can we do?” Complacency is not an option. Thank you for your help.

  55. Christine Hart says...

    I feel completely demoralized.I can’t believe such evil exists in a country which I felt privileged to live in for 17 years and where 3 of my children still live. My youngest son is serving in the US army and I am horrified that his commander in chief has allied himself with the most reprehensible faction I can think of. Truly a nightmare.

  56. Linh says...

    Thank you so much.

  57. Thank you so much for speaking out.
    None of us have the luxury of staying silent now.

  58. Taryn says...

    Following both Julia *and* Grace have been such inspirations for local action. They’re wonderful examples.

  59. Thank you. It gets worse and worse…

  60. Shelby Savage Gibson says...

    Thank you for sharing these resources from your platform. I live in Charlottesville and work for the University of Virginia. I graduated from UVa in May and it was one of the most frightening moments of my life to see a group of *literal* nazis descend on the campus that I was so honored to receive my M.Ed from. Our community is hurting and we are trying to put the pieces back together.

    Two more organizations to consider donating to if the images of our students being attacked moved you deeply are:

    1. The Black Student Alliance at UVa. These young students have organized and worked to advance their message in our community. I am honored to share space with them.
    https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1535/16-uva/index.aspx?sid=1535&gid=16&pgid=1199&cid=2383&dids=409&BLEDIT=1

    2. The Brody Jewish Center – Hillel at UVa.
    https://secure.lglforms.com/form_engine/s/jML0Uah5iSxU5YZKzwBFkg

    thank you for the love and support. xx

    • Leah says...

      ❤️

    • Thank you! I will be donating to both.

  61. Emily says...

    Thank you for this post and for sharing these great ideas with your readership.

  62. Carolyn says...

    I am deeply grateful for your post on Charlottsville. Thank you for helping me understand how I can get involved. You should be very proud of the work that you do.

  63. Neha says...

    👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽

  64. Jeanne says...

    Thank you Cup of Jo. I can’t wrap my head around the fact that people and the President are supporting Nazis. What awful times.

  65. Thank you <3

  66. Rachel says...

    Thank you. As a Jewish mother to jewish children, I am so scared. Seeing others stand-up for what’s right, really helps

    • Nancey says...

      <3

  67. I’ve been reading your blog for quite some time now, but this is one of the best posts I’ve read on here. Thank you for writing an intelligent and well thought out post rather than just something along the lines of “this is not us.” It’s important for all of us to work towards understanding one another, and I think this list is a good starting point. As a brown girl, I really appreciate you speaking about these issues, as it’s often easy to look past things like this if we don’t consider ourselves to be part of the problem. And just overall, thank you for including posts like this on your blog, rather than skimming over real-life problems as they’re deemed too heavy for lifestyle media. ❤️

  68. mika says...

    Thank you so much for acknowledging this.

  69. Thank you for this post! I listened to the It’s Been a Minute Podcast and it was enlightening. I plan to do further reading and listening tonight.

    After attending a local Women’s March, my mom started a stationery business called Postcards for Protesters. We’ve been looking for ways to help after Charlottesville, and will likely share some of these ideas/this post on social media (https://www.facebook.com/PostcardsforProtesters/).

    I found Indivisible’s guide particularly useful in urging our members of Congress to do more in the wake of what happened: https://www.indivisibleguide.com/resource/members-congress-enough-respond-charlottesville-terrorist-attack/

    And also this list of charities: https://medium.com/@SaraJBenincasa/what-to-do-about-charlottesville-dfc7d6636d56

    • Shelby Savage Gibson says...

      Charlottesville resident here – a local art space, New City Arts Initiative is hosting a Letter Writing day in Charlottesville. You can write a positive note to our community and share love by mail. Please send notes to the gallery to the gallery at P.O. Box 1293, Charlottesville VA 22902.

      xx

    • Thank you for the suggestion, Shelby! A postcard is on its way. The letter writing event sounds wonderful and bolstering.

    • Fiona says...

      What a wonderful idea – I find writing notes of support to be a lovely, healing activity while I pull together the logistics of additional actions – if anyone wants additional suggestions as to who could appreciate a card or a note of support, here is a wonderful list, plus explanations as to who did what to merit the support – https://docs.google.com/document/d/1VluQr1LHoKmO7-3JedMEcY0FEyOwjBITcZVpg0lUZE8/mobilebasic

    • That list is so helpful, Fiona! It’s important to acknowledge the good that IS being done, even in awful circumstances. Thank you for sharing. I will be writing to the people listed. I posted it on the Postcards for Protesters Facebook page, as well.

  70. Bobby says...

    At times like this, I try and remember the following:

    Do all the good you can,
    By all the means you can,
    In all the ways you can,
    In all the places you can,
    At all the times you can,
    To all the people you can,
    As long as you ever can.

    So often it seems like there is so little we can do. BUT, e can do all the good we can, and often that means just being kind to the person standing next to us. I live in NYC, and went to Fairway market ( a large supermarket on the upper west side) Sunday night. As I walked in, a woman in a hijab walked in beside me, and a guy from Senegal (I asked) was stacking boxes. I said “At least in NY we can all walk together” I didn’t really know what to say, I was feeling so frightened. The woman in the hijab gave me a hug, and the man from Senegal joined in. It was a small moment of peace. Remember wherever hate has flourished, love and hope do as well. It may take longer than we would like for good to triumph, but the pendulum will swing back, unfortunately not without loss and bloodshed. In the meantime =, do all the good you can. Don’t worry if you can’t make the grand gesture, just do all the good you can. I know I’m trying

    • This comment brought tears to my eyes. As one of the links above expressed, “Hate is an open attack on tolerance and acceptance… It must be countered with acts of goodness”.

    • Shashi says...

      Such a beautiful moment in a time of such chaos. Thank you for sharing

    • Jillian says...

      What a beautiful comment. To echo someone else, brought tears to my eyes! Thank you, from the bottom of my heart, to Joanna and everyone at Cup of Jo for building a family of people who think differently, live differently, work differently, dress differently, believe differently, worship differently, raise children differently, build homes differently, debate differently, sometimes vote differently, and exist differently, but who all consider, befriend, demonstrate compassion, TRY, and love in the same exact way.

    • Thank you so much for this comment. What a moment of beauty, to share love with strangers. It brought tears to my eyes, too. I think of this often, how sharing kindness with those immediately around us is the first step we can take.

  71. Karen says...

    thanks – it is about humanity – and not solely political – and that can’t be swept under the rug. We cannot go backwards. I have relatives that died in the holocaust and to see these groups becoming more vocal is beyond scary. I appreciate your willingness to speak out. By the way, a small thing but I use Amazon smile to donate a percentage to the anti-defamation league whenever I make purchases. I try to make actual donations when I can afford to, but this is another way of sending money to a much-needed organization. And please, always, always vote in the smallest of local elections every single time. I am surrounded by people who are devastated by the current climate and still in my progressive college town a person who holds up hate signs everywhere has run for city council and squeaked through the primaries simply because not enough people voted. Please, everyone, vote in all your local elections and research the candidates – it matters.

    • Karen says...

      I meant to say thank you for your post.

    • Kirsten says...

      Absolutely agree with your comments on the importance of local elections Karen! My town just had it’s city council elections and only 10% of eligible voters showed up. I mean…I have lots of strong opinions on the way that our current election procedures do a lot to suppress voting, but I think we can do better than that!

  72. Reem says...

    Wonderful. Thank you.

  73. Thank you for posting this. I live in Cville where our little town has been turned upside down. We are grateful for the support and solidarity from people like you. xo

  74. K says...

    Thank you for posting this!

  75. Lindsey says...

    Just want to comment and say thank you, this is appreciated.

  76. Priya says...

    Thank you for posting this. While most lifestyle blogs avoid topics such as this, it’s so needed in today’s world. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate it.

  77. YES!!! all over this post. Thank you again and again for being amongst the force of good. ♥

  78. Shannon says...

    The podcast Left, Right, and Center is weekly and discusses the politics and current events. Just how it sounds, the podcast features someone from the left, right, and a moderate. The discussion is civilized and gives me a good starting place when I (often) feel like I do not understand a single thing about people who think differently than me.

  79. Melody says...

    Thank you for this article. While I know this isn’t a political blog, I was hoping you would speak about these horrible events and their greater context. I really appreciate that you understand the importance of addressing such matters.

    • aga says...

      It’s not a political blog, in the sense that it doesn’t regularly cover politics, but the person is political now more than ever because what is happening in the US is so far beyond politics. This is about humanity.

    • Melody says...

      Aga, well said :)

  80. Megan says...

    Thank you. This is needed.

  81. Sarah says...

    Thank you Lee. I will share these ideas. Thank you to Joanna too, for speaking up to your huge following.

  82. Diana says...

    Thank you for lighting the candle of hope and activism in this storm. I just added a donation button to The Southern Poverty Law Center for my upcoming birthday and encouraged all my friends and loved ones to support this important cause.

  83. jill c. says...

    thank you for posting this and for offering things we can do to feel empowered. xo

    • Ellen says...

      Thanks for sharing that. Just read the article and I very much appreciated her perspective. How do you decide what to do when you know the Nazis are coming to your town?
      My daughter attends UC Berkeley and the same pack of vile menace plans to descend there on the 27th. I am close enough to go, my husband and daughter say stay away and ignore them.
      I get the argument for ignoring them and hoping they whither away from lack of attention. But, my gut is screaming “Show up! Fill the streets! Dwarf their hate!” I want to be part of the solution, I just don’t know which way to do it. Are these groups growing because we are suddenly paying attention to them, or because we have ignored them for too long?

  84. Kate says...

    Thank you for hosting this discussion, and so many thanks to all the commenters who have added suggestions for direct action.

    This is not, of course, direct action, but if anyone is looking for something to read, you might want to consider the Charlottesville Syllabus, put together by the UVA Graduate Coalition to, in their words, “explore the local historical and contemporary precedents for this [white supremacist] gathering, to give it history and context, to denounce it, and to amplify the voices of community members most affected by this “alt-right” occupation of space.”

    You can find it at: https://medium.com/@UVAGSC/the-charlottesville-syllabus-9e01573419d0

  85. JMB says...

    I love Julia Turshen. Her and Grace make me really happy to be in the world by just following their Instagram accounts. I saw this Turshen post. It reminds me that hate is easy. Love takes work. And being of service to other people is a way to train yourself to love people that aren’t like you.

    • Kate says...

      Hate is easy. Love takes work. Wise words.

      Thank you.

  86. Courtney says...

    This is so important. Thank you for compiling and for speaking out. It’s so important that we condemn this racist violence in order to prevent further violence.

  87. Jessica says...

    Thank you SO MUCH for this post! Thank you for using your voice as a platform for help and change. We were all shocked by this weekend’s events, but my non-white friends were decidedly less shocked, mostly just resigned. We need to stand up for all. Thank you for staking a claim and helping!

  88. Thank you thank you thank you for this. It matters so much to me to see people with their sleeves rolled up. It’s how I’m holding on to hope.

  89. aga says...

    I love you guys for posting this. I live in Toronto and i am distraught over what is happening in your country. And, unfortunately it is encouraging white supremacists up here in Canada, too. There is a rally to Silence White Supremacists in Toronto on Sept 14 (https://www.facebook.com/events/1939091156346752/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22feed_story_type%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D&pnref=story), and I came across a GoFundMe campaing on Facebook for Heather’s family: https://www.gofundme.com/our-sisters-keeper-heatherheyer

    Love, peace, and solidarity from Toronto,
    Aga

  90. Thank you so much for posting about Charlottesville and what’s on my mind and heart 💗

  91. Fiona says...

    Thank you

  92. Laura says...

    If any of you are in MA, there is a “Free Speech Rally” (White Nationalist event) planned for this coming Saturday (Aug 19th). There are conflicting reports about whether the event is still on and supposedly no permits have been issued, but you can a) call the mayor’s office and ask that they not grant any future requests for permits from white supremacist groups (or that they require that no attendees bring weapons or armor) and b) attend the counter protest being organized on the common.

  93. Kerri says...

    I really like the “It’s Been a Minute” podcast in general and this whole episode is superb; but the best part of this one for me as a parent is how important it is talk to your kids about race. I know I’m guilty of thinking that my young kids just see colors of skin and nothing else, but after listening to the developmental psychologist, I see how that’s not true. They are coming to their own conclusions and you need to find out what they are.

  94. Emme says...

    Thank you for this. I will take it to heart and put this good advice to use.

  95. Justine A Clark says...

    Thank you for posting this, and thank you to all the commenters for your thoughts and insights. After the Charlottesville incident(s) hit the news, I reposted a meme about white privilege on my facebook page, which pointed out that this group of gun, torch and hate wielding white men all went home alive. The inference of course being had this been black, latino or Muslim mean doing the same, they would have most likely been met with government/police force and violence. An acquaintance replied to my post saying that calling out white privilege is a form of blanket racism against white people. We entered into a rather lengthy and thankfully respectful debate about this. Her take: that growing up poor and white in Compton she endured abuse and hate because she was white, therefore she has never experienced white privilege. My take: being white doesn’t completely protect you from harm and/or life challenges, but it does give you way more opportunities to overcome difficult circumstances and move safely through society as a whole.

    I felt like I was doing a lousy job of explaining the difference between being aware of white privilege if you were born into it, regardless of socio-economic status, and the concept of racism. I’m interested to hear the thoughts of the readers here. By way of context, like the personal who challenged my meme, I am white female. So I don’t think I’m best placed to speak about how white privilege impacts all areas of non-white lives, but I did my best.

    • Justine A Clark says...

      Sorry for all the typos!

    • p. says...

      I commend you for having a civil discussion with someone about this — that’s hard to do. I read this piece earlier this week, and I thought you might find it useful, too: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10213731165376351&set=a.2528425292923.2143708.1322173835&type=3&theater (via http://therewm.com/).

      I thought it offered some clear reasons why oppression isn’t just about experiencing hate and abuse from other people, it’s about experiencing it as a system that’s been used to prevent some people from marrying, voting, traveling, owning property, etc.

    • Lilly says...

      Thank you for speaking up though! “Best placed” or not, myself and other poc friends have been discussing this quietly, but it really helps when white people actually speak up and don’t expect us to always be the ones saying something. These discussions are hard work! It’s exhausting and can compound a lot of existing trauma and anxiety.
      And, awfully, often white people aren’t going to listen to poc in the same way they would you, so it’s a help for you to use your position (I’m white passing, so I’m also often in that position of having white people listen better/or confide awful things to me they wouldn’t to visible minorities.) Your best was great.

    • Justine Clark says...

      Thank you Lily and P for your feedback. I think a lot of us who identify as white are afraid to speak up and out for fear of accidentally sticking our feet in our mouths. But I absolutely agree that we have the responsibility to speak and learn and educate as much as we can. As a previous poster stated, it also important that white people begin to examine how we each individually have and are contributing to systemic racism and oppression – for many of us that is complicity by silence and inaction.

  96. Betsie says...

    Thank you for this, Joanna. I humbly second the Pod Save the People recommendation above.

    I also add that what has been really eye-opening to me as a white woman this year, has been to really commit myself to listening to black people. Really, truly listen. Without arguing. Without defending. ESPECIALLY when my instinct is to explain, dismiss, or defend. This posture has revealed a lot to me about myself and ways in which I might be unconsciously hurting black people – not just my response to national events like Charlottesville, but also who I talk over at work, who I make space for on the train, and to whom I intuitively give the benefit of the doubt.

    • d says...

      It’s not just black people though. I would suggest you widen your audience to diversity in all forms- ethnic, gender, socio-economic. Start with ethnic if that’s what comes easiest to you, but as a brown woman I would hope you are equally committed to listening to us all.

    • I think the key thing is learning how not to defend, not jump to “Not all white people,” but just sit, listen as you say, and really absorb what it’s been like to be black in America all these years.

    • Emily says...

      You hit the nail on the head. So many white people only discuss race issues amongst other whites. WRONG! I’m white, and I’m trying to do more of what you are doing Betsie.

  97. This has been so sad, so devastating. It’s heartbreaking that incidents like these are occurring and that we have a president that handles it so poorly.

    One thing I did watch this morning that was a wonderful and interesting conversation was Brene Brown chatting on Facebook Live about the underlying issues. I’d highly recommend that as another resource for people seeking to understand.

    Thank you for not shying away from these important issues, Cup of Jo Team!!

    • I second Brene Brown’s Facebook Live video from today. Wow. When she spoke I immediately started crying because what she was saying made so much sense to me. If you’re struggling to put into words what you’re feeling or understand what is happening, Brene is amazing at putting the pieces together for you.

  98. Andrea says...

    Thank you, from a proud Virginian and southerner, for posting these resources. I still remember when MLK Day was officially Lee-Jackson-King Day in Virginia (and I’m only 35). Change is slow but I’m hopeful. Another great podcast is Upside Down Podcast; while not women of color they do talk about a lot of social justice issues. I especially recommend their interview with John M. Perkins, and I just saw their new episode is on gentrification. I’ve gotten a lot of good book lists from their podcast and hosts’ individual blogs. Another good one is Pass the Mic, produced by the Reformed (meaning Reformed Theology) African American Network. The discussions on their facebook group are also great.

    I also love The Bitter Southerner web-zine, which produces great articles. They have an article up today from a correspondent who was very close to this weekend’s events.

    • Rebecca says...

      It’s still Lee/King Day in Alabama, and Alabama still officially excludes Abraham Lincoln from Presidents’ Day (it’s specifically Washington and Jefferson’s birthday).

  99. Escondista says...

    So horrified for the state of our country right now and deeply stunned by apologists of this behavior.
    I would love a recommendation for letting go of my anger at people who voted for this administration. I constantly remind myself that my loved ones may have voted on a pro-life platform or because they believe that their family farms or livelihoods traditionally benefit from Republican leadership but I cannot understand how everything else about Mr. Trump’s character didn’t outweigh all of that. I feel an incredible amount of anger about how their choice affects my family and I cannot seem to move past my anger.

    • d says...

      I hear you. I’ve cut off several friendships with those who voted for Trump. I’m typically not that brash, but it was simply hard for me to fathom how their support for him and our friendship could coexist.

    • Lilly says...

      Respectfully, I wouldn’t let that anger go. Channel it into research and listening and prep for the inevitable awkward Thanksgiving dinners or Labour Day barbecues. Then bring it up. Have the hard conversations. Ask why. Give facts. Tell them how this affects your family. Ask them if it was worth it. Have the hard, awkward conversations even if it’s impolite because there’s a chance they might actually listen to the ones they love. They’re not likely listening to the rest of us.

  100. d says...

    I’m a person of color. And a woman. And I have never felt so fearful for my and my children’s future in this country. Since Trump’s presidency I have been met with an increase in incidences of racism targeted at me. Though they may be small (an elderly gentleman who I thought was going to comment on my cute child, instead whispered “cockroach” as we exited the bus) they have been devastating. Especially in NYC, where we expect more. Given how difficult it is to talk about race with those who feel my rights are inferior to theirs (I still try), I am convinced our hope has to lie with the next generation. We must talk to our children about race. We must work with teachers to raise it in the classroom. We must work with our libraries to order and feature more books showing children/people of color. We must do better.

    • Sasha says...

      My gosh D, I am sorry that happened to you and your child. Reading it made me feel physically sick, it’s hard to imagine what that feels like when it happens to you. You are so right, we must do better. Children’s books can have a big impact, what if we all donated one to our local library? CoJ, maybe could compile a list or find a great link of titles?
      My children loved Martin’s Big Words by Doreen Rappaport when they were small.

    • nora says...

      This. As a WoC and a mother, my heart is aching so badly. I am terrified of the world my young son is in, but I cannot give up hope – for him. Rallying, marching, and reading posts like this make such a difference. “If it is to be, it is up to me.” Nobody is going to fight harder for you than you, but we also need our white allies to step up.
      Something small but helpful is asking “How are you doing?”

    • Justine A Clark says...

      D – I am so sorry.

    • I wholeheartedly agree, D. And I’m so, so sorry for what you and your child have had to endure.

    • I am so so sorry. We suck sometimes, we white people.

    • Carrie says...

      That is HORRIBLE that someone said that about your child, but that is not a “we white people” thing, that is a HATE thing! An evil thing. Pure and simple.

    • B says...

      I read your comment as I am rocking my own baby to sleep. What a world. I am so sorry that this happened to you and your beautiful child. This week has brought a lot of tears. I think it is telling that you described this person as a gentleman. He went so very low, and you went high, as the former First Lady would say.

    • Escondista says...

      Oh my gosh I am so sad to hear about this, D. You and your sweet angel should only feel love and positivity.
      I hope your child can realize that person is sad and deserves pity.

  101. Rebecca says...

    Thank you for posting this! It feels so surreal when blogs just ignore the reality of the world right now. Complacency is not an option!

  102. Lauren E. says...

    Thank you for this. Truly, how did we get here?

    • Jessica says...

      I agree with Sasha. We live in a country that was established on stolen land. Our economy was built with slavery as a backbone. The USA has always operated under white supremacy. What happened in Charlottesville shows us that these people are no longer afraid to show their faces, because we currently live under an administration that is okay with their hatred.

    • Lauren E. says...

      I know, you’re right. I have lived in a privileged little bubble my entire life – born to tolerant, liberal parents, college at a super liberal university, and now in a friend group and industry that celebrates diversity. I am shocked over and over and over again at the racism and bigotry and hatred that still exists in this country. I’m trying my best to educate myself on the origins of the hate and expand my views.

    • Sasha says...

      Jessica, last night my husband and I had a discussion about what reconciliation, redemption, recompence for our nation, for the sins of slavery, misogyny, racism, theft, would look like. Where to even start, right? A truly just society would not shirk from telling the truth about our past. Nor telling the truth about our inheritance, especially white people. If ever any of us can live in peace, this work has to begin. Perhaps apologies, monetary retribution to descendents and the removal of monuments to slave holders could be a start. I would rather apologize, pay, and give up “heroes” than live in this America, where I cannot feel proud.

      When trump said something along the lines of what next, tear down the Washington monuments? As if that is ridiculous….My response, telling the truth about Our founding father would be an excellent start. Easy to focus on confederates as racists and traitors, but so were every single one of our founders, racists to the core and traitors to human equality and decency.

  103. SRK says...

    Thank you. I appreciate the resources on how to learn more and also help those that are impacted. What I would also love to see are initiatives dedicated to attacking the ‘snake’ and not just the ‘bite’. What are the circumstances in America that allow people to be drawn to the Nazi movement and how do we change that… has anyone seen helpful info that speaks to that?

    • t says...

      My assumption is that it is just like being drawn into any gang. The group feeds off of fears, insecurities, loneliness, etc and creates a community and declares their inherent value as greater than others. You take that and couple it with a racist president and obvious white privilege and it leads here (and worse I fear).

    • Laura says...

      I am certainly no expert, but I’d be willing to bet that many white supremacists have spent time “inside.” The prison environment seems to still be very segregated.

    • Dana says...

      I personally believe that we need to desegregate our schools. White people have notoriously moved their children away from diverse neighborhoods for school, and have resisted efforts to mix their districts. We’re raising our children in very divided communities, and I think it’s no wonder some of them grow up with an inability to be compassionate for others… Thanks CoJ for addressing Charlottesville on your site.

    • Lilly says...

      It’s tangential, but Rukmini Callimachi at the NYTimes has been covering how ISIS radicalizes young men for years, and she’s been pointing out some chilling parallels this week on Twitter. Her work at the paper might be a good place to start finding sources.

      It’s also interesting how many lovely people in this thread want to point to one institution (prison, schools). It’s not going to be one institution – almost all institutions are or have been deeply segregated, from schools to church to the justice system. It’s systemic. One institution is too easy an answer. Reading up on the history of why those lines were drawn is going to be another place to start.

  104. Hannah says...

    Thank you for not being silent about this – as so many blogs are. Listening to The Daily now and it’s just heartbreaking. I think sometimes it’s hard to listen to things like this that are painful to hear when there are so many other things out there that may make us feel good (I’m looking at you Instagram). We need to talk about this and be open about this and not be silent any longer. Thank you again, Joanna, for being a place where we can do that!

  105. Thanks for your wonderful suggestions Joanna. There was so much devastating news this weekend, and it added a gut-wrenching layer of anger for me to learn that James Fields Jr. lived 20 minutes from the lovely small Ohio town I grew up in. The Southern Poverty Law Center (linked to in your article) also has a map of hate groups that provides a sobering, but helpful by-location overview – https://www.splcenter.org/hate-map. Thank you again for a post full of positive places to start taking action.

  106. L says...

    I appreciate this post and understand the emotions (frustration, despair, anger, sadness, disbelief to name but a few) behind it. And I also appreciate that the resources you point to have a lived racial experience. However, events big and small that lead up to what happened this past weekend happen every.day. Where was a post like this when officers involved in shootings of innocent men and women of color walked free? (I did a quick search using your tool above and didn’t come across anything, so if I am mistaken truly let me know.) If we’re to be truly committed to understanding one another, support needs to be proactive and reactive at the same time.

    • Gina says...

      THANK YOU FOR THIS! My feelings exactly…we only ever see these posts AFTER the fact…

    • Colleen S says...

      Because she’d have to post several times a week on the subject. These events have gone up radically in the last few years, and sometimes multiple times daily, and keeping up with it as a lifestyle blogger would be detracting from the mission of the blog. Thankfully, she does keep her finger on the pulse and speaks out when large-scale events (like Charlottesville) happen.

    • Lee says...

      Yes! Speaking as a white woman—

      I would ask that Cup of Jo do a post on white privilege and white people’s everyday complicity in racist systems. How do we create new systems that honor all people? The first step is talking about our role in creating and perpetrating the problems.

    • t says...

      I think support has been proactive. Joanna has intentionally offered an increased presence on her blog highlighting POC and LGBT. It may be subtle in some instances (beauty routines and a week of outfits, etc) but for a lifestyle blog she shows a very diverse population. I recognize that you aren’t asking for subtle – you want and deserve outrage to be ever present and Jo, in this post (and previous posts) is offering resources for that ever present outrage.

      Here are a couple posts that are proactive and weren’t in response to any specific tragedy:
      https://cupofjo.com/2016/10/childrens-books-featuring-kids-of-color/

      https://cupofjo.com/2016/10/raising-race-conscious-children/

      https://cupofjo.com/2017/02/my-son-is-transgender/

      I think by means of this post and her posts in response to the election and the woman’s march Joanna is suggesting her blog isn’t enough and isn’t meant to be enough – we need to seek the outrage and listen and take action.

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      Thank you so much for this comment, T.

    • Laura says...

      I appreciate the CoJ team making this necessary post after the weekend’s tragic events. It reminds me that I need to keep seeking more information from other resources. Other days, though, I love this blog as an outlet and a break from the news. I’m a minority, first-generation woman and apart from my own experience, even following the news is draining. I still do it, but this blog serves as a reminder that there isn’t only hate in the world, especially with posts like Motherhood Around the World, etc. I don’t think the blog should follow what I’m asking from it, but I just wanted to provide an alternate opinion from a reader.

    • I think the issue here is that, as Colleen says, covering these issues fully would “detract from the mission of the blog” – the mission being that it exists to carry advertising. I fully acknowledge that there is substance here besides the sponsored posts etc, but it is a commercial entity with staff etc all paid by advertising revenue. That necessarily limits the political content – in terms of both quantity and scope; the overall tone of the site has to fit with advertisers’ wish to sell products (police violence doesn’t sell earrings…). That’s OK, but it’s not an environment for profound ongoing political discourse, so you have to look eslewhere for that. Sites not limited in this way include democracynow.org, theintercept.com, and beautiful podcast onbeing.org.

  107. Ana says...

    Thank you for this list! I just added these podcasts to my queue and bookmarked the articles and videos to watch tonight after work.

  108. Katie says...

    Thank you, thank you for posting about Charlottesville.

  109. Leah Klein says...

    Thank you so much for writing this. As a young Jewish woman in Boston, it’s scary to see what my grandparents lived through continue today. Our Holocaust memorial was just destroyed for the second time this summer. While I don’t think white nationalist thinking has dropped…it seems they have recently found their voice again. I am scared.

    • Sasha says...

      For what it’s worth Leah, hugs, and I’m so sorry you are scared. I think it’s an appropriate response to be afraid.

    • nora says...

      Leah, I’m sorry. We’re a biracial, interfaith family, and I am so fearful for my Jewtino son. It feels like all aspects of our identity as a family are being attacked. Oof, my heart.

  110. Katrina L. says...

    Thank you for addressing this and guiding us to helpful tools. Sometimes it’s hard not to feel helpless. Thanks again!

  111. Brooke Anderson says...

    As a Virginian, thank you for making this post. It is not the first white supremacist rally we have dealt with there and it will likely not be the last.

    We should all be voting and *actively* working towards ending white supremacist beliefs/systems in our world. Here is a`graphic that shows some of the ways white supremacy is being implemented/maintained in “socially acceptable” ways – https://twitter.com/emayfarris/status/896931744422744064

    Please everyone check out Pod Save the People podcast. Each week, activist DeRay Mckesson discusses news with a small group of other activists then talks to interesting guests (last week was Bill diBlasio).

    Here’s another list of books to read: https://www.bustle.com/p/17-books-on-race-every-white-person-needs-to-read-76401

    And if you haven’t already, watch these documentaries:
    – The House I Live In
    – 13th

    • Sasha says...

      Thank you for those resources Brooke.

  112. Lee says...

    I was on a call with the Movement for Black Lives yesterday and the BLM chapter in Charlottesville had the following requests:

    Financial support in Charlottesville for ongoing mental health and trauma counseling for local organizers as well as victims of violence on Friday and Saturday, especially people of color. You can donate directly to BLM Charlottesville’s Paypal account: https://www.paypal.me/blmcville

    Reinforce the following demands (From the Charlottesville Community):
    *On Aug. 30th, there is a hearing on Charlottesville city’s request to dismiss the case by The Monument Fund, Sons of Confederate Veterans, and other individuals, on the grounds the law they are using to challenge City Council’s decision does not apply to this particular statue. If the city wins, the Lee stature can be legally removed. We ask for your support in putting national pressure on Judge Richard Moore of the Charlottesville Circuit Court and urge him to dismiss the lawsuit.

    *Put national pressure on Mayor Mike Signer and Councilwoman Kathy Galvin—both of whom voted against removing the monument to white supremacy from our public park—to change their votes and stand united before the court date on Aug. 30th. Failing that, we ask for their resignation.

    *Put national pressure on the University of Virginia (UVA) to publicly denounce alumni Richard Spencer and Jason Kessler, revoke their diplomas, and commit to ejecting them from UVA grounds should they enter the campus again.

    • Tis says...

      THIS IS THE COMMENT THAT SHOULD SPURN US INTO ACTION.
      Podcasts are great, blogs are great…but it’s ACTION that will make a concrete, immediate difference, not listening to people’s thoughts, particularly white people.
      Lee was working with front-line people who are on the receiving end of this vile hatred. Lee has posted the specific actions they are asking of us.
      THESE ARE THE ACTIONS THAT WE MUST PERFORM IF WE WANT TO BELIEVE WE CARE.

    • Betsie says...

      Thank you for sharing this!

    • Thank you Lee

    • brianna says...

      This! One of the people at the protest was a student from my current hometown – he is not being expelled or fired from his campus job. The university president is currently dismissing what this person did as free speech, but there is concern from faculty/staff/students that he is going to come home and wreak havoc in our quiet little city, on a campus that should be a safe space for everyone.

    • Ellen says...

      Thank you!

    • Arielle says...

      Lee, do you have the best contact details to use for those reps.?

      Joanna, thank you as always for not only writing about worldly delights but also the real of what is transpiring for any given one of us as an individual or what is impacting us collectively as a tribe, community, nation. You rise to the occasion, through and through, and I am grateful to come back to your blog time and time again. It’s like touching base at home. Much care, Arielle

  113. Christina says...

    I also highly recommend Pod Save the World. They did a great bonus episode over the weekend with interviews with three incredible students from UVA as well as the governor of Virginia. Great podcast normally, but this was a fantastic episode and behind-the-scenes look. Thanks for this post!

    • Kari says...

      *Pod Save the People w/DeRay McKesson (Pod Save the World is Tommy Vietor’s international policy podcast) but yes yes yes to all the Crooked Media podcasts!

    • Kathryn says...

      Listen to Pod Save America too!
      Jon Favreau, Jon Lovett and Tommy Vietor all worked for President Obama. They have a great podcast; informative and funny! They interview interesting people in the political world and help give a voice to the progressive movement.