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The Women’s March and Beyond

Best Photos of the Women's March

Wow, what a weekend! Did you march on Saturday? What was your experience like? Our team was marching in D.C., Manhattan and upstate New York, and it was incredible to see people pouring onto streets around the world. Here are a few great moments (and we’d love to hear about yours)…

Best Photos of the Women's March

All that pink in Washington! I marched in Manhattan (the streets were packed like sardines!) and here’s Cup of Jo editor Megan on driving to Washington: “I could feel the magnitude of what we were about to do before we even got to D.C. On our way down, we stopped a handful of times — we were a car full of ladies, including one pregnant woman, and we had to pee! At each rest stop, the parking lot was PACKED with busses and caravan carpools, and inside we were greeted by a sea of pink hats. We were all in this together! The excitement was palpable.”

Next are a few awesome shots of the Women’s March on Washington by Cup of Jo friend and photographer Ana Gambuto.

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

Best Photos of the Women's March

One of Stella’s most moving moments was when a little girl climbed a tree with a megaphone and led the crowd in singing “This Land Is Your Land.” Plus, some other favorite photos from the weekend…

Women's March in Chicago

Women's March in Paris

Women's March in New York

Women's March in Antarctica

A very inspiring slideshow of marches all around the world, including Chicago, Paris, New York and Antarctica!

Women's March best signs

How cool are these signs of badass women, including Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan and Eleanor Roosevelt?

Women's March funny signs

Women's March funny signs

Made us laugh.

Women's March best signs

But our question today is: What to do now? Here are three things we’re doing today…

* Check out The Indivisible Guide, which lays out how to have the most impact. They also have an excellent email newsletter.

* Support great journalism and the freedom of the press. We’ve been subscribing to many, many newspapers and news magazines. A few ideas: The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, your local NPR station or your hometown newspaper.

* And, if you can, consider donating to organizations you believe in — perhaps the ACLU, Planned Parenthood or the Committee to Protect Journalists, which is dedicated to the global defense of press freedom.

Do any of these appeal to you? Do you have any other ideas or plans?

P.S. How to follow the news, and raising race-conscious children.

(All photos by Ana Gambuto for Cup of Jo, except: the pink overhead photo is a screen capture from an MSNBC broadcast; the Chicago, Paris, New York, Antarctica photos were from The New York Times; the photo of the historical women’s heads by Kirsten Luce; the introverts sign photo by Susan Kaufman; and sign guy photo by Amelia Kaheny.)

  1. Carolyn says...

    I marched with a busload of women, men and a 6 year old from Kansas. It was one of the most meaningful things I have ever done. We left Thursday night, arrived Friday night to our host families (after the bus breaking down on the road 90 minutes from our destination), got 4 hours of sleep, then marched, hopped on the bus and got back Sunday night. We are all energized to continue the fight. I wrote letters to my two senators today.

  2. The photos from the Women’s March are some of the most inspiring I’ve ever seen. What’s more empowering than millions of people standing up for equal rights and with spectacularly sarcastic signs too!

  3. Thanks so much for this post! Saturday was amazing. I marched in St. Petersburg, Fla. where more than 20,000 residents marched that day. It was the biggest demonstration in the city’s history! Thank you for being a constant resource of inspiration.

  4. Melisa says...

    Thank you, thank you, thank you again for stories like these! I’m having a postcard-writing party with some friends this weekend, and participating in a charity event with my children at a local hospital. I don’t think I’ve made as many phone calls to government leaders or written as many emails or signed as many petitions or donated to as many important causes in my entire LIFE as I have in these last few months. I’m doing so for my children, for the millions of women who marched, and for the billions more who were with us in spirit this past weekend. The collective energy of this movement has already pulled me out of some pretty dark moments, because it’s clear to me now, more than ever before, that we’re in this together. No one is alone, because we have one another to lean on. I wish we didn’t need to reach rock bottom in order to get here, but I’m very grateful to be a part of this new era where we are collectively lifting one another up. That’s far more powerful than any one man could hope to achieve.

  5. I marched with my daughter, mom, and friends in OKC. I was a little nervous in our very red state and as it was my 7 year old’s first experience in that setting. It was awesome and with no problems, just a lot of unity and shared enthusiasm to go forward and work together. A lot of different issues were represented and coexisted well together. The gathering was maybe less diverse than I’d hoped, but with a strong showing by the native community and great leadership from a wide spectrum of groups. It was very encouraging and motivating for what comes next as the battles locally and national are likely to be intense.

  6. Marina says...

    Democracy Now is a wonderful news source! I can always trust them to be reporting on what is really going on, in this country and globally, and giving me information on what matters. It is woman-run and founded (go Amy Goodman!), and the journalists are predominantly folks of color. You can access them at democracynow.org

    • Julia B says...

      Agreed on Democracy Now – a solid source for factual news!

      Ms. Goodman is usually pretty unbiased, but this morning even she couldn’t hide her emotions. She seemed pretty annoyed with everything that Trump did yesterday. Also, she accidentally called him Drumpf, which gave me a much needed laugh (check out “Last Week Tonight” if you need a reference)!

  7. Alexis says...

    My husband and I flew to DC from LA with a group of friends. So worth the trip. To see the throngs of people with so many clever and heartfelt messages marching through our national monuments in the very center of our government was incredibly moving. People were so respectful and warm. The best part was seeing how people would stop to photograph and admire kids holding signs. Seeing them feel acknowledged and important and that their choice to say something mattered and they THEY mattered – well, we need to make sure our youth, especially our girls, feel that.
    If you swing left, check out this org. that is working to enfranchise people and overcome the gerrymandering that gives the GOP congressional control despite having fewer votes overall: https://swingleft.org/

  8. Kendra says...

    I marched yesterday (Monday the 23rd) in Salt Lake City, Utah. I took my two daughters (4 and 2 years old). It was a blizzard and the entire drive up (about an hour drive from where I live) I kept wondering if I would even be able to get there. We marched to the state capital where the legislature was meeting. It was so moving. I gave my daughters a quick little explanation of what we were doing and why we were doing it and got choked up. I was so touched by the literal support I had. Pushing a double bob up a hill in a blizzard is hard work! And so many people gathered around me and literally helped push, it was a perfect metaphor for the march. While there were so many different reasons why people were marching that day, I’m glad that my girls got to see their mother taking a stand on what she believes, and that when we stand together we’re never standing alone.

  9. Maureen says...

    I marched in Phoenix, AZ ( a red state) with 20,000 other people, more than I expected. My mom, my sister, and myself all marched together. It was an inspiring and powerful day.

    ” Here’s to strong women. May we know them. May we be them. May we raise them.”

  10. Amanda says...

    We marched in Helena, Montana and there were 10,000 people there! Thank you everybody for your helpful suggestions on things to do moving forward. We are already got a group together, but we didn’t know where to start. This is amazing!

    • Traci says...

      Hooray for 10,000 in our sparsely populated state!! Do you mind sharing what group you started?

  11. I also drove from NYC to DC this weekend and had similar experiences to Megan. Two things I don’t ever want to forget:

    – The Wendy’s was out of salads at the rest stop off the highway. How funny is that? I can’t imagine that happens too often.
    – On the drive back came upon a fairly fresh car accident between two cars of ladies coming back from the march. I assume they were strangers before the accident. By the time we passed them, women from the two groups were hugging one another.

    <3 I think the weekend energized us all – we'll need it for this long, uphill battle we face.

  12. Amalia says...

    I don’t see much of this in the comments, so I wanted to add some of what I’ve learned about some other perspectives on the marches. While the moment described in the post does sound moving on the surface, I’d point out this Twitter thread, from a Native woman named Debbie Reese, who reminds us how offensive “This Land is Your Land” is, a fact that did not occur to me on my own as a white woman.
    https://twitter.com/debreese/status/823490997074137088

    I joined the march in Boston despite some reluctance to align myself with the many (not all! I get it) white women (and also, goddamnit, men!) who could not find the humility to hear or accept the feedback they received from women of color prior to the march and who then, at the marches themselves, by a number of accounts, patronized, mocked, silenced, and otherwise alienated women of color, who had the magnanimity to hope for better and came out to represent themselves.

    Ultimately, I’m glad I added my body to the count, showing this administration that they do not have a mandate. (I carried a BLM sign, if you’re wondering.) On the surface, my experience was similar to – if perhaps more boring than – many of yours and I didn’t personally witness or feel any of these upsetting moments. But that certainly doesn’t mean they aren’t real, and I’m tired of seeing people say that it’s divisive to raise these issues. And I’m really tired of seeing white pro-lifers whine in comment threads about feeling rejected or alienated by this march when they should, to be frank, head to the very end of the line for feminist grievances.

    I’d like to recommend another perspective that ends in a call to us on this theme, from Kara Brown at Jezebel:
    http://jezebel.com/i-want-to-trust-the-womens-marchers-1791491466

    As we (white women) take our next steps, and make our next mistakes – and really, we should! there is a lot to fight for, and we can’t wait for perfection – I do hope we’ll all keep our minds wide open to different perspectives and have the courage to receive criticism. So many of us are new to activism, but so many others have been around a while. Let’s be respectful of that, and let’s also be brave.

    • Katie says...

      Thanks for sharing these brave, kind, and honest words. I certainly learned a lot from them, and also realize my need to, yet again, step back and reflect, and be more thoughtful of the diversity of experiences of those all around me, especially those who don’t share my skin color, ethnic background, and other cultural components. <3 & peace

  13. Fung says...

    I marched in DC. Breath-taking. And in awe of the human spirit.

  14. My teenage daughter and I marched in Portland, OR. It was an amazing experience, and I am so happy we both got to experience it. Now to keep the momentum going and do everything we can to enact change.

  15. Callie says...

    I marched in San Francisco. It was exhilarating to participate and also to see the response all over the world. Immediately after I posted a photo on Instagram (of a sign I made acknowledging my mom as my personal champion) another woman left an anti-abortion comment. It was disappointing because I felt like march opponents disregarded the entire message of the march because they reduced it to a pro-abortion rally. Every election you hear people say they voted against progressive candidates solely because of the abortion issue, which is so frustrating. So many women voted for Trump/against Hillary because of it. It makes me sad because they are giving up so many other advancements for women because of one divisive issue. I am strongly for Roe v. Wade and feel we must keep safe abortions legal, but I also wish these women knew that we also would like to help women AVOID unnecessary abortions with birth control and education. How do we find common ground with these women and work for better lives for all women?

    • Leslie says...

      Great comments Callie. I’ve been feeling similar feelings of frustration of women turning their noses up feminism over this issue. Considering all of the ramifications of being pregnant in this country, how prevalent domestic violence is towards pregnant women, and how difficult it can be to have access to birth control, having legal access to safe abortions seems like the only option. But…there is this part of me (some of it stemming from my religious beliefs) that is conflicted about the ethics of abortion as a form of birth control. However, I am not at all conflicted about the amount of gratitude I have for the great women and feminists that have blessed my life, my husbands life, and my son’s life. Women’s rights are human rights and lift the conditions of all people.

    • Callie says...

      Leslie, thank you for your thoughtful response! That’s exactly the kind of discussion I’d like to be able to have with women on both sides of the debate. :)

  16. ACW says...

    Thank you!

  17. Darnelle says...

    750,000 in Los Angeles my favorite posters said:
    “IKEA has better cabinets” and “Trump likes Nickelback”

    Made me laugh

    • Maureen says...

      Just laughed out loud at these. A much needed laugh for this subject!

      Maureen

  18. I marched in San Francisco and brought along my two young boys.
    It’s a fight I never thought I’d have to fight. In little ways every day – yes, but not publicly like this, and I think it is very important to involve our kids.
    To contribute to this movement, and support women’s rights are I designed (free) stickers (for texting) to help women express themselves in an uninhibited way while showing support. There is nothing like facial expressions to show attitude. My characters are beautiful, diverse (4 characters available), and sassy. AND they all wear Pussy Hats.
    A sticker is worth a thousand smirks ;-) – I’m keeping them free so anyone can have as many as they like. If I can, I’ll keep them up for the next 4 years ;-) Use it to text your friends, show your attitude, and keep as a souvenir (not sure what iMessage stickers are? – we have the world’s easiest tutorial on the website).

    Enjoy, and please share with your friends Thanks! http://www.tellestickers.com

  19. Thank you for this post and all the comments! Marched in Seattle. Unforgettable.

  20. Annie says...

    My mom and I traveled by school bus down to DC for the march, and it was an incredible experience! There was such a feeling of positivity and hope, that we are not alone, and that we will stand up and fight for each other. It was so wonderful seeing the native Washingtonians come out of their houses and cheer us on, honking their horns and waving from their cars, crossing guards high-fiving people, police officers and National Guard officers smiling and looking relaxed. It’s honestly the best I’ve felt since the election.
    There is also a feeling that this is only the beginning, that we will dig in and fight for what we believe. Tonight my father and I are going to a gathering outside our local representative’s office to protest Trump’s cabinet picks. In two weeks, the group that organized our marchers is having a postcard party. We all just need to keep this momentum going! We can and will make a difference!
    My fave sign of the march: “Women are the wall, Trump will pay” :)

  21. Alli says...

    Thank you, thank you, thank you for continuing to discuss, ponder, question the recent election, inauguration, and Women’s March. I greatly appreciate you discussing these important topics that are often ignored in other blogs I read. Please continue them and please don’t hesitate to dive deeper. Thank you for including more diverse stories on your blog from women globally. It isn’t going unnoticed.

  22. Kelli says...

    I took my 2 year old daughter to our Women’s March in little Omaha. I was blown. away. I was expecting maybe 1,000 hardcore marchers, but we had over 15,000+ women, men and children marching in a flaming conservative red, less populated state. I was so inspired and proud of my community. It felt amazing to realize we had a community, where before I felt isolated. xoxox

  23. gpc says...

    I marched in Birmingham, Alabama. We started in the historic Kelly Ingram Park, which in the early 1960s became the epicenter of the nation’s Civil Rights Movement. It is also just outside the doors of the 13th Street Baptist Church. It was an incredible day. Let’s keep the momentum going!!

  24. Jaclyn says...

    I saw a 11-12 year old girl holding a sign she obviously made herself that says “I WANT MY WHOLE DAMN DOLLAR” with a little drawing of change on it. HERO. I cried a lot. There was an overwhelming mixture of pride and fear as I marched and watched rally. But we are not alone and the march proved that.

  25. Tanith says...

    Love that you all went! It was incredibly empowering to have so many people marching (many for the first time, including myself!). It made me so happy to see it was a march that included almost 50% men as well (at least in Seattle!). The buses were so full that my friends and I ended up walking all the way across the city just to make it to the march on time (buses being full was amazing to see!) It was still unfortunate that most of our march was silent, some groups tried to start chants but it never really stuck. But every now and then a wave of cheers would erupt in a wave, and everyone joined in. The emotion was incredible <3 It felt good to be a part of something, and I hope that everyone who marched Saturday continues to show up peacefully for many more marches that support different types of issues. <3

  26. Even though I would have loved to march, I was not able too logistically. But I love how this march did not just inspire woman in the United States but all around the globe. I live in Germany and just watching this from my couch felt so empowering. Realizing people can unite and form a voice to be heard is very important. Not everybody living on this planet is able express ones opinion freely. It is great, that a developed country such as the United States can set such examples.
    I also loved the pictures!

    • Liz says...

      There were 7 marches in Germany! I marched in Frankfurt!

  27. rashell says...

    my eleven year old daughter and i marched in los angeles. it was a powerful yet peaceful march. i am beyond words. it was amazing!

  28. Elizabeth says...

    As to what we do now…A friend of mine has worked with some colleagues to develop a program they’re calling “My Civic Workout.” You can sign up here: https://www.mycivicworkout.com/. It’s a weekly newsletter, and every week they provide you with information on a pressing social/policy issue plus 5, 10, and 30 minute “workouts” that help you do something about it. Plus there’s a cute animal video at the end of each email as a reward. I think it’s a great way to stay current and involved. I just got this week’s and it’s actually all about how to capitalize on the momentum of the Women’s Marches!

  29. Supporting press freedom and journalistic excellence is no doubt an important thing to do, but your recommendations for directing that support are very conservative – mostly big, mainstream media (with plenty of corporate advertisers in the case of the NYT, WSJ, WP) that will keep feeding you what you already know/want to hear. ‘Democracy Now!’ would be my suggestion for a news organisation that really needs our support, and in return will help us all step outside our bubbles/comfort zones to become the ever-broader-minded citizens the world is crying out for: https://www.democracynow.org/ . And an excellent examination of the role of the media in shaping society is the documentary film ‘Manufacturing Consent’ – 25 years old now but still pertinent: https://youtu.be/YHa6NflkW3Y .

    • Tyler says...

      came here to say this :)

    • Luna says...

      Really good comment!

    • Tanith says...

      I agree, there are many more organizations in need of support.

      Mother Jones is also a great publication to donate to and get a subscription to! http://www.motherjones.com

  30. Emily says...

    I just read in The Independent that the “Preserve the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities” petition on the White House website is not registering signatures. Given that the climate change page and civil rights pages were removed from the site on Inauguration Day, I don’t believe this is a mistake or a glitch. It underscores the importance of reaching out to Senators and Congressmen directly through phone calls and letters.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/president-donald-trump-arts-funding-nea-neh-cpb-prs-npr-petition-white-house-a7541631.html?utm_source=Publishers+Weekly&utm_campaign=05ac3f2914-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_01_24&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0bb2959cbb-05ac3f2914-305071969

    • I tried signing and found that my signature was not counted and I got error pages–which forwarded to pages to stay up to date with Mr. Trump–when I tried to share it.

      Um, not to sound all dramatic, but is this the end of democracy? Erasing the voices of the populace?

  31. Laura says...

    I’m all in favor of the message behind the marches, but I also wonder how many of these people voted or worked to get out the vote? If millennials had turned out in greater numbers in November, Trump would not have won and we would perhaps not feel the need for such a march. I hope marching helps salve their wounds and alleviate their guilt, but to me, it’s too little too late.

    • K says...

      I feel similarly, but along the lines of race, not generation. A majority of white women voted for Trump, as compared to the 93% of black women that voted, often begrudgingly, for Hillary. If white people reckoned with their own friends and family, Trump wouldn’t have won.

      So I wouldn’t blame the millennials. They turned out in great numbers during the primaries and voted for Bernie, but the democratic party had other plans.

    • Jules D says...

      He lost the popular vote. By almost 3 millions votes. One of the slogan of the march was ” We are the popular vote”.

    • Jamie says...

      I (sort of) agree. I’m all for the marches. But to me, it seems there was not much support going around for Hillary before election day. Maybe it’s bc I live in a red state, but before the election it seems like on my facebook feed everyone was either for trump or still rooting for Bernie, even though he was no longer in the race. No one seemed to like Hillary but me. Then after the election, my feed is full of people upset that she didn’t win. Where was the support before?

    • TC says...

      I disagree with K’s idea that “if white people reckoned with their own friends and family, Trump wouldn’t have won.” I am an outspoken (white) liberal amongst an extended family of conservatives. I grew up in a conservative, rural area of an otherwise liberal state. I marched on Washington because the system is broken. I marched because I recognize the privileges my race and class have afforded me and I am scared for the future of people that weren’t born with those privileges. I vote in every single election, local and federal. The notion that I, as a white person, could’ve persuaded my family to vote against Trump, and that would’ve changed this outcome, is short sighted in the greatest degree.

  32. I marched in NYC and the best moment was when a father picked up his daughter so she could see over the crowds. She looked up 5th Avenue and down 5th Avenue seeing the sea of people in both directions and exclaimed, “It’s like pi! It goes on forever!” #thefutureisfemale

    • Katie says...

      LOVE this.

  33. Sarah says...

    I marched in Indianapolis with over 10,000 other humans. I grew up in the Bay Area and come from a family of socially and politically engaged folks going back generations. I marched in SF with my parents and grandfather against the invasion of Iraq and walking down Market Street with my grandfather that morning is one of my most treasured memories. I took my three-year-old son along to the march on Saturday and I am happy to be raising the another generation in my family to fight for what is right, especially now that we have recently relocated to a red state where voicing our opposition isn’t just preaching to the choir. Resist!

    • Sasha F says...

      Hi there Sarah! I’m in Indy too, wanted to have coffee with like-minded people about follow up plans. Would you be interested? Text 317.210.3747 if so. Solidarity!!

  34. Dani says...

    Since the election I have felt compelled to get up and do something. As an American living abroad I yearned to be at the various marches in the US with my friends and family. I was delighted that a march was organised in Belfast, Northern Ireland where I live. I wasn’t expecting much but I wanted to be there. I was shocked when I arrived! There were so many people there who felt the same way as I did about the new Administration and all wanted to get up and do something. While many of us were Americans the vast majority were local men and women who wanted their voices heard. I was so proud to be apart of that chorus. The Women’s March has suggested 10 actions in 100 days. The first action is writing your Senator…. new Administration has already given me plenty to say. https://www.womensmarch.com/100/

  35. KTMB says...

    Congratulations to all that marched and those who did not march. I love our country.

    I have a question – Trump signed the gag order stopping all federal funding for international abortion. An expected Republican move.

    My question is why did International Planned Parenthood now refuse ANY federal funding just because of the gag order on abortion? International PP said it’s +$100 million USD. International PP offers more services to women than just abortion.

    • melissa says...

      For an answer directly from Executive VP for the Federation of PP and Action Fund check out Democracy Now. Amy Goodman covered this by interviewed a senior rep from PP. https://www.democracynow.org/ (Go to today – Tuesday’s – show.The interview starts at 18min (but several minutes prior includes coverage).

    • NPR also addressed this today – in order to get any kind of funding, the organization cannot have ANYTHING to do with abortion. It cannot offer it, it cannot educate about it, it cannot provide pamphlets, it cannot describe the benefits or dangers. So they would have to essentially scrap the notion that something called abortion even exists to receive federal funding.

  36. Maggie says...

    In response to the #notmymarch

    “Say thank you. Say thank you to the women who gave you a voice. Say thank you to the women who were arrested and imprisoned and beaten and gassed for you to have a voice. Say thank you to the women who refused to back down, to the women who fought tirelessly to give you a voice. Say thank you to the women who put their lives on hold, who –lucky for you — did not have “better things to do” than to march and protest and rally for your voice. So you don’t feel like a “second class citizen.” So you get to feel “equal.”

    Thank Susan B. Anthony and Alice Paul for your right to vote.

    Thank Elizabeth Stanton for your right to work.

    Thank Maud Wood Park for your prenatal care and your identity outside of your husband.

    Thank Rose Schneiderman for your humane working conditions.

    Thank Eleanor Roosevelt and Molly Dewson for your ability to work in politics and affect policy.

    Thank Margaret Sanger for your legal birth control.

    Thank Carol Downer for your reproductive healthcare rights.
    Thank Sarah Muller for your equal education.

    Thank Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Shannon Turner, Gloria Steinem, Zelda Kingoff Nordlinger, Rosa Parks, Angela Davis, Malika Saada Saar, Wagatwe Wanjuki, Ida B. Wells, Malala Yousafzai. Thank your mother, your grandmother, your great-grandmother who did not have half of the rights you have now.

    You can make your own choices, speak and be heard, vote, work, control your body, defend yourself, defend your family, because of the women who marched. You did nothing to earn those rights. You were born into those rights. You did nothing, but you reap the benefits of women, strong women, women who fought misogyny and pushed through patriarchy and fought for you. And you sit on your pedestal, a pedestal you are fortunate enough to have, and type. A keyboard warrior. A fighter for complacency. An acceptor of what you were given. A denier of facts. Wrapped up in your delusion of equality.

    You are not equal. Even if you feel like you are. You still make less than a man for doing the same work. You make less as a CEO, as an athlete, as an actress, as a doctor. You make less in government, in the tech industry, in healthcare.

    You still don’t have full rights over your own body. Men are still debating over your uterus. Over your prenatal care. Over your choices.

    You are still objectified. You are still catcalled. You are still sexualized. You are still told you’re too skinny or you’re too fat. You’re still told you’re too old or too young. You’re applauded when you “age gracefully.” You’re still told men age “better.” You’re still told to dress like a lady. You are still judged on your outfit instead of what’s in your head. What brand bag you have still matters more than your college degree.

    You are still worse off if you are a woman of color, a gay woman, a transgender woman. You are still harassed, belittled, dehumanized.

    You are not equal. Your daughters are not equal. You are still systemically oppressed.

    Estonia allows parents to take up to three years of leave, fully paid for the first 435 days. United States has no policy requiring maternity leave.
    Singapore’s women feel safe walking alone at night. American women do not.
    New Zealand’s women have the smallest gender gap in wages, at 5.6%. United States’ pay gap is 20%.
    Iceland has the highest number of women CEOs, at 44%. United States is at 4.0%.
    The United States ranks at 45 for women’s equality. Behind Rwanda, Cuba, Philippines, Jamaica.

    But I get it. You don’t want to admit it. You don’t want to be a victim. You think feminism is a dirty word. You think it’s not classy to fight for equality. You hate the word pussy. Unless of course you use it to call a man who isn’t up to your standard of manhood. You know the type of man that “allows” “his” woman to do whatever she damn well pleases. I get it. You believe feminists are emotional, irrational, unreasonable. Why aren’t women just satisfied with their lives, right? You get what you get and you don’t get upset, right?

    But don’t worry. We will walk for you. We will fight for you. We will stand up for you. And one day you will actually be equal, instead of just feeling like you are.”
    ~ Dina Leygerman, 2017

    • M says...

      Thank you Maggie for posting this quote.
      TAHNK YOU.
      I feel frustrated by the challenge of reaching those women who are culturally brainwashed into believing the myth of equality.
      As I said early in this thread:
      We must educate ourselves about this point of view and educate these women about their rights.
      We must communicate with each other when we need guidance in our attempts to educate and communicate with these women.
      I will reiterate:
      We can be EVEN louder.
      Implicit with “turning up the volume” is the enlistment of additional enlightened voices – clearly, this is our very difficult charge.

    • Annie says...

      Thank you! This is amazing!

    • Jen Vercelli says...

      This is so awesome! Thanks for posting.

  37. These pictures really made my day. I have been watching everything that’s been going on in your country from Germany, and I’ve been overcome with fear and frustration many times. But seeing you all rise your voice really makes me happy. We need feminism and equal rights going forward instead of backward. Please keep on marching!
    Lots of love from Germany

  38. Lauren says...

    Listen Up! The Republicans need to get the message from the majority of Americans that we value and need the benefits of Obamacare. Here’s how we do that.
    On January 23rd, everyone who feels that way (our numbers are legion) sends a note to Donald Trump with a simple message:
    “Don’t make America sick again. Improve Obamacare. Don’t repeal it.”
    One envelope for every ACA supporter in your household…even if they are under 18 years old.
    Just that simple message. Put it in an envelope, and put a stamp on it.
    On January 23rd, mail it to:
    Pres. Donald Trump
    1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW,
    Washington, DC 20500
    Can you imagine the picture of 53 MILLION letters arriving at the White House by January 26th? It will be a mountain. That image might help deter the Republicans from killing the most substantial improvement to American healthcare since the discovery of Penicillin.
    Do it today! Drop it into a mailbox near you on Monday, January 23rd.
    Please send this email to 20 (or more) of your friends, neighbors ann fellow Americans. Ask them to do the same.
    This also helps out the US Postal Service, with about $20 Million of stamp sales.
    Don’t send emails to Trump…they don’t photograph well.

    • Maria says...

      Unfortunately there is no value to Obamacare when all our vets are being deprived of decent medical care and our elderly citizens are left with many NON COVERED services and very high copays for a short government approved list of medications. A lot of the people who are posting here are not well informed. I work in the medical field , since 2008 and can tell you Obamacare is not working.

  39. Erin says...

    I marched in NYC as well! It was such an overwhelming experience and I am so proud to be a Woman today. It wasn’t a moment, it’s a movement!! Excited to continue to speak and act on behalf of those who can’t or won’t. Even though I identify as very liberal, this is a HUMAN movement. Regardless of political party, age, gender, race…with Liberty and Justice FOR ALL <3

  40. LB says...

    My 5 month old daughter, husband, and I marched in London. As an American abroad, it’s amazing to see how much this election has impacted every country and to see so many people galvanize around it was absolutely heartening and inspiring. I was so proud to take part and have my daughter there to; I can’t wait to tell her about it when she’s older!

  41. We marched in Nairobi, Kenya. I wasn’t sure I was going to go until the day before because I was afraid it might be dangerous. I was so wrong! It was the most loving, peaceful march I have ever witnessed. Nairobi stands strong and huge supporter of our movement!

  42. I love that straight outta patience tshirt. Saturday was amazing.

  43. Sera says...

    I marched in Seattle. It was truly an unforgettable experience. My favorite moment was actually seeing two men on the sidelines (one man in his mid 30s and the other looked to be his father) with signs that read, ‘I’m with her’ with arrows pointing down between them…where a little girl, no older than 5 was watching. She held a sign that I honestly couldn’t even read because when I saw her I just started weeping.

  44. L.M. says...

    Marched in Oakland with my husband, our three sons, my mom, one sister, her two kids, and our extended family. There were traffic jams in our sleepy Berkeley neighborhood getting to public transportation, and the trains were beyond packed. The march was amazing. I saw my kids’ teachers, our friends, fellow parents, neighbors, coworkers, doctors, and local shopkeepers there. It felt like so much of my world was coming together to show that we will stand strong against the tide of hatred that’s come into Washington. My kids can’t wait to march again.

  45. Lily says...

    I didn’t march and it broke my heart. I live just far enough from D.C. that it’s a big effort to get there (I know, thousands made that effort and more) but close enough that there was no local march. I’ve talked to other women in town who feel the same — we missed out on something big! I recently moved from Boston, and it was heartwarming and heartbreaking to see so many people come out in a town that still feels like mine.

    On a day of empowerment, I felt strangely immobilized. I am trying to figure out my own quiet resistance.

    But, for what it’s worth, I know that the millions of women who marched are only a small sampling of those who wanted to, and who are unwilling to be content with the world in its current state.

  46. Rachel says...

    I marched in Oakland with a group of friends and my husband. It was energizing and inspiring. So many amazing women and smart kids that give me hope for the future. I plan to continue the actions by hosting a postcard writing party next. I was feeling depressed by the news and the march reminded me that we’re powerful and numerous and especially important, that we’re not alone and we can get things done when we work together.

  47. Theresa says...

    I marched in Eureka, CA, in far northern CA (Humboldt County). There were thousands of folks marching and it was a good turn out for a small town. It was great! I am ready for what’s next!

  48. Julia says...

    Thank you for this post! I marched along with about 8,000 others in Spokane, WA. Great energy in the air and such a loving, supportive environment. Wonderful to support and witness support for women, LGBTI folks, immigrants, people of color, indigenous people, people with disabilities and special needs, and every other minority in America and around the globe. Stay nasty!

  49. M says...

    So unbelievably proud of every single person who marched on Saturday. And to the people in other countries who participated one way or another: THANK YOU. I am in awe, truly. To everyone: you have no idea how grateful I am and how full my heart feels. We are family and I am with you.

  50. Joanna R says...

    I marched in Seattle, my sister marched in D.C. and my mother marched in Ft Worth. :)

  51. Mandyh says...

    Marched with over 7,000 in Eugene, OR with four generations. I asked my 3 year son what he felt was important to say at a march for women and girls and he said, “Don’t touch girls privates.” So that is the sign he carried. It was very emotional to march with so many people and hear male voices echoing “Her Body, Her Choice”.

  52. Kristen Reid says...

    We were sick, it was pouring, we stood for hours, our signs disintegrated and we were chilled to the bone.

    It was one of the most wonderful, empowering, hopeful, uniting moments in my life. I will remember it forever and I’m so lucky to have experienced it with my baby boy and my loving husband.

    – Portland, where we marched in peace

  53. Em says...

    I marched with my children in Boise, Idaho. It was a breathtaking scene. Hearing from friends throughout the day marching around the country was beyond incredible. Let’s continue to step up and speak out!

    • Carla says...

      I marched with a group of women in Boise Idaho as well. It was peaceful, respectful and Oh so powerful!

  54. I marched with 750,000 people in Los Angeles! I’ve never been prouder of my city (or my country!) and the people from every walk of life that came out in force. Love was radiating off of everyone there. Magic.

    • Grace says...

      I was there, too! xo

      Took the Metro in from the Inland Empire and got lucky enough to catch a train going in before 10am. I’ve never seen the Metro so packed! It was amazing seeing so many of us making herstory. I feel even more energized to keep fighting for what’s right.

    • Melody says...

      I was there in Los Angeles as well. It was truly amazing!

  55. EGray says...

    I went to march in the town closest to mine, Ketchum, in Idaho. It is a very small town, but known for the ski resort, Sun Valley. I was expecting a few women to show up, but there were a thosand of us! (Ketchum has a population of about 3000). It was the most amazing experience. I took my three year old son, and we marched together all over Ketchum. It was the balm I needed, and I think many others needed, after the election, to know we weren’t alone and that other people are just as concerned about human rights and the state of the planet. It gave me hope that the future will eventually be brighter.

  56. I LOVE this!

    I marched Detroit Saturday with my mom, husband and our 10 month old son. My sign: “It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness” there “When they go low, we go high” and “Do the MOST good!” (quotes from Eleanor Roosevelt, Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton.

    My thoughts on what to do next is bring your kids. Let’s break this cycle of complacency then disaster then protest then change. Let’s immerse our kids in how government works and how they can make a difference now so it’s not foreign to them later. It is our right, privilege and duty to be involved in our democracy. I bring my son Lucas to Democratic Club meetings – he gets a little fussy sometimes but everyone loves to see a baby and want to hold him. They’re excited to see young blood and don’t mind an occasional distraction. He’s been to the ballot box with me three times (including the primary at 5 days old). We’ve done one march and I know there are more to come. We’ll get out the vote and knock on doors too. I’ve got a townhall meeting with a state representative on the calendar.

  57. SK says...

    I’m continuing to be active in a ‘white people organizing other white people for racial justice’ group on my college campus… There are similar organizations across the country – see Showing Up for Racial Justice (http://www.showingupforracialjustice.org/)… I’m hoping to get more involved with organizations such as Resource Generation (https://resourcegeneration.org) to better work in solidarity for equity as someone who grew up with wealth. Other organizations for ‘allies’ to work in solidarity include White Noise Collective NYC (http://www.conspireforchange.org – recommended by a friend – “conspiring at the intersection of white privilege and sexism”) and the also NYC-based North Star Fund (https://northstarfund.org/).
    I’m looking to learn more about and work to resist other forms (all!) of oppression that I am complicit in, particularly ableism/working for disability justice.
    And I’m going to start ~coming out~ as queer to family and friends in a more traditional way. Despite knowing the vast majority of people in my life are supportive of me and all queer people (and many know or probably have some idea), I haven’t wanted to for a few reasons – possibly partly because of my own internalized homo/bi/queer-phobias, but also because I didn’t believe it *should* be necessary (as in, ‘people don’t come out as straight, why should I need to’). But I increasingly feel that it’s important that those who care about me and who I care about know that “I’m here and I’m queer,” and that visibility (which I am privileged to be able to consider) can be a political act of resistance and resilience.

    I’m excited to keep looking for ways to be involved from y’all, and I’m inspired by the incredible mobilization that this has incited/ignited. Thank you for giving voice to that here.

    • Laura-london says...

      Good luck with coming out – a scary but hopefully uplifting time in your life xL

  58. Susan says...

    I marched in Chicago and it was an incredible experience. Our first clue about the day was the packed El trains — so full to bursting we couldn’t get on! After 4 packed trains, we had to find another way downtown. The energy there was so strong and so positive; the feeling of solidarity was so reassuring. It was a very emotional experience. The crowd was so much bigger than expected that the march portion was cancelled — but it didn’t matter, we marched anyway, flooding the streets, shutting intersections down. It was my first such experience — but not my last! Resist!

  59. Laurel says...

    I marched with my husband and two sons (ages 4 and 1) in Canberra, Australia and felt so connected to women all over the world. Really inspiring and so wonderful to read comments from across the planet. Rise up!

    • Sarah says...

      Another Cup of Jo reader from Canberra, Australia.
      Love how so many women are coming together near and far! X

  60. Melanie says...

    I marched in DC – an AMAZING experience. We got there early, and in every direction, there was a sea of women. It was so, so inspiring… the mood was uplifting, positive, and supportive. We met wonderful people, both women and men, some who had traveled great distances (one woman I met spent 20+ hours on a bus with her 14 y.o. daughter), spent hours on their homemade signs (oh, the signs were AWESOME!), brought their young children, etc.
    Personally, I feel energized to roll up my sleeves and get more involved and I have already started that process. But there’s a heaviness I feel too…I feel that women in my circles really didn’t respond to my appeals to join me in this experience. And I’m still puzzled as to why. They are supposedly strong women, anti-Trump (in fact most if not all supported Clinton), regularly post feminist memes on their facebook page…but yet don’t DO anything. Maybe it’s too easy to get insulated in a comfortable suburban bubble where your lives revolve around your kid’s activities? I’m struggling a bit in how to react – find new friends? try to explain why our actions matter? I don’t want to sound preachy. And it’s not solely because they didn’t attend the March. There’s a lot of work to be done NOW, but the apathy/hypocrisy is a real downer. I definitely would like to find more energized women to connect with, like those who are in the Baltimore area, so if there are groups out there, please let me know!!!

    • Jackie says...

      Great comment. I don’t have any advice right his except to look at groups that exist or have started up in your community. Or start your own group!!
      Why did you mention Baltimore, just curious. I’m new to this city. :)

    • Erika says...

      I am in Baltimore, let’s start a group!

    • Mary says...

      I’m in Baltimore too! I’m also slowly exploring how to be an active participant here. Shoot me an email! maryqiu02@gmail.com

    • Jen Vercelli says...

      HI Melanie, great comment. I feel similarly about a few of my friends, even some that marched but won’t put in the time to go further. I think connecting with like minded women in your area is a great idea. I marched in D.C. with my friend who lives in Ellicott City, MD (I live in LA). Is that too far from Baltimore?

    • Amanda D says...

      I’m in Baltimore too! Are any of you in the “Together we will – Maryland” FB group?

    • Melanie says...

      Thanks!
      I live just outside of Baltimore (b/t Baltimore and DC), very close to Ellicott City actually. If there are like-minded people, my email is melchat1@hotmail.com
      Mary, I’ll email you.
      Amanda, I’m not familiar with the “Together We Will” group, but I’m curious.
      Still in the process of exploring local groups, etc.

  61. Mary Kathryn says...

    I marched in Austin, Texas along with 50,000 other Texas women. Wendy Davis spoke and gave me goosebumps and brought tears to my eyes. Hundreds of little girls attended the march, proclaiming that they wanted to be feminists. That gave me so much hope.

    The night of the election, I wore a red pantsuit to a results-watching party at a hotel. I was so disheartened but, as I was leaving, I spotted a girl in a blue pantsuit and we stopped to take a picture. It turns out she was with another old acquaintance of mine, who was wearing a WHITE pantsuit. We took our red, white, and blue pantsuits across the street to a martini bar and cried together. I left that night with two new amazing, powerful female friends and we all marched together on Saturday. More than ever in my life, this election has made me feel so much more connected to strong women and, in turn, empowered to use my voice.

    • Amanda says...

      I marched in Austin, too. It was my first time in Austin (and Texas, for that matter); I was just there for a few days for work. I was a bit nervous to join the march because I was unfamiliar with the area and didn’t know what to expect safety-wise or vibe-wise. I am so so glad I didn’t let that stop me! What an amazing day – an experience I will remember forever. It didn’t matter that I didn’t have any friends with me; I felt like everyone I talked to was a friend! The energy was unbelievable and it was the first time I’ve felt hopeful in months. Austin now holds a very special place in my heart :)

  62. sara says...

    i marched in toronto where they expected 10,000 and had 60,000 people turn up! my sister marched in halifax, nova scotia. i marched with my fiance’s 6-year-old niece (at her first protest) and 3-year-old nephew. the toronto organizers also used the march as a platform to address domestic/municipal issues that affect cis/trans women and minorities/underprivileged people, on top of protesting what’s going on in the U.S. pretty inspiring!!!!

  63. Genevieve says...

    I marched in tiny Columbia, MO! We don’t have more than 150,000 people in our city, but we had at least 3,500 at our march & rally! So proud of mid-Missouri :) I marched with my future mother-in-law, and it was awesome!

  64. I marched in Boston where we had a great atmosphere, too. I lived in Istanbul before and participated in the Gezi Park Protests in 2013, so I think every form of demonstration is very important. We should never give up.

  65. Alison Briggs says...

    I am so interested in knowing more about what to do now! Write to our local officials? Petitions? What are the things that matter the most and help get things moving and changed. Would love to see different suggestions posted if you ave ideas!

    • Carolin says...

      Hi Alison, I have been marching in Germany. We have several elections coming up so I feel very inspired by the women’s march! I have been following the website of the organizers and they just launched a new campaign: 10 actions in 100 day. Maybe you want to check it out? I will try to pick some of the ideas up and “translate” them into my political and cultural environement here. Find it here https://www.womensmarch.com/
      Greetings from Düsseldorf, Germany! Carolin

    • Katiek says...

      Thanks for sharing – that’s exactly what it feels like we need to do: remove all of the long-term politicians who have been too bogged down by special interests or time spent on the job or who knows what. Regardless, they aren’t getting it done. The Dems didn’t when they were the Supermajority and it’s time to get all the special interest money out of Congress. If this group can get that done, it will be a whole new day.

  66. Rana M. says...

    My family and I went to the March on Washington and it was one of the most empowering and emotional moments I have had. My parents always said that hundreds and hundreds of years ago women thought they could be equal but couldn’t say it out loud, then they graduated to saying it behind closed doors and then finally the went public and it took years to achieve what we have now.

  67. Lindsey says...

    I was at the march in Raleigh, NC and it was amazing! I’m having my first child in April (a girl), and while I was reluctant to decorate her nursery in the traditional pink, I’ve already decided there’s going to be at least one pink thing– a aerial shot of DC during the women’s march, with that beautiful sea of pink caps. Saturday was the perfect antidote for the last few months of worry and fear–a dose of hope that I badly needed. I can’t wait to do more.

    • I love your idea to put a photo of the march in a child’s nursery!

    • Ali says...

      I was in Raleigh too! I teared up a little as we marched into Moore Square; it was incredible seeing all the people gathered together.
      I don’t know if you could hear the speakers, but this line has really stuck with me – “You either stand with women, or you stand in the way”.
      Great gameplan for NC 2017 – http://www.jeffjacksonnc.com/gameplan-2017/

  68. Leah says...

    I marched in Denver and it was an incredible experience. I took the bus downtown and the entire bus was filled with men, women, and children wearing pink hats and holding their signs. It was incredible meeting my neighbors and feeling a such a strong sense of community. Once I got downtown, I was floored! So many people and so many creative signs. The city of Denver only expected 40,000 and there was over 100,000 people! My heart was overfilled with pride and love for my city. I’m feeling hopeful and ready to fight.

  69. Farrell says...

    I marched with family and friends in Montpellier, VT. It was so inspiring to see men and women of all different ages come together and peacefully express their concerns regarding gender injustices and reproductive liberties. The highlight though, was when Bernie Sanders arrived unannounced to speak to the estimated 15-20k Vermonters. It was pretty cool. Oh, and funnily enough, I ended up having lunch at the same restaurant as Senator Sanders afterwords! All-in-all, it was an incredible experience.

  70. Tiffany says...

    Yassssss!! That is all.

  71. Keri says...

    My four year old daughter and I marched in Auckland, NZ and it was awesome. Such a great, peaceful, empowering atmosphere and it was wonderful to be able to participate in a global way.

  72. Bettina says...

    I marched with my mom and longtime friend in DC. What struck me besides the magnitude of the numbers of people and the emotions of the day, was the KINDNESS of everyone there!!! Way to go ladies.

    The Women’s March is having a 10 Actions/100 Days campaign. Please post this link on your website:

    https://www.womensmarch.com/100?source=direct_link&amp;

    • Amy says...

      YES! My sister and I met up in DC to March together and I was so impressed with the kindness of everyone. It was so crowded there was hardly room to stand, but you would hear “wheelchair coming through,” “baby coming through”and the crowd would part like the Red Sea. I even saw one girl almost in tears because there was a long line to a restroom and everyone just moved her to the front.

  73. Tina says...

    I marched with my daughters and friend among an estimated 15,000-20,000 people in Vancouver, Canada, in solidarity with our sisters south of the border. What amazing energy, wit, and collective concern we all felt – it was beautiful. My hope is that this interest, concern and awareness continues and grows!

  74. Laurel says...

    I marched with my son who took his first steps last Tuesday! I like to say, “He learned to walk so he could march!”

    • Oh that brought tears to my eyes! What a milestone indeed!

  75. Marched in Boston and am still getting teary over photos of marches all around the world. Just wanted to say how much I love Sign Guy :)).

  76. Erin B. says...

    We’re having letter writing parties. We’re going to supply stationary and stamps, and do it BYOB style. We’re also asking that people consider bringing a few dollars to throw in for a donation to ACLU of Alabama (home state of Jeff Sessions!). We’re lucky to live in a blue state (Massachusetts), so it seems more important to send the money where they need it more. We’re also inviting people who are less politically active, and who may have missed the march — so that they’re encouraged and become involved too.

  77. Jessica says...

    Marched in New Orleans! What a powerfully healing and galvanizing experience! The international matches were really touching and incredible.

    Onward we go! Who runs the world? Girls! Who changes the world? GIRLS!

  78. KG says...

    Today resistancemanual.org was featured in The Upworthiest’s daily email. Resistance Manual is a Wiki administered by the people at StayWoke.org. The site tag line is “Action begins with information.” It has a great layout of icons for 14 Trump/GOP Agenda Items, e.g. Obamacare/ACA, and for each agenda item it shows
    – Recent Updates
    – Trump/GOP Strategy
    – Projected Impact
    – Vulnerabilities in Their Strategy
    – How You Can Resist
    Nice way to break down a mass of material into digestible chunks!

  79. beth says...

    I marched in Seattle and loved it! Even spotted former Governor Christine Gregoire in the crowd!

    I have to say, I’m saddened by the rhetoric now around divisions within feminism, intersectionality, references to peaceful marches and contrasts with other marches (BLM), pointing fingers at white women, the feeling of Pro-Lifers being excluded (not in Seattle, but friends felt that way), etc. I’d love for you to continue the narrative that this movement has started — the good and the bad. I only felt goodness this weekend (along with soreness – 4 miles walking!), and I hope that can be maintained…

  80. I marched in Seattle and the turnout was amazing. I have to say, even thinking about a little girl leading a crowd in a patriotic song gets me teary! My husband stayed at home with our 3 year-old daughter but she is surely a reason I got out there (although there are many reasons). Watching the news of the marches all over makes my heart happy to be a human. Thank you for sharing the bit on the news. So important now. The Women’s March on Washington site also has 10 actions for 100 days. I’ll include a link…

    https://www.womensmarch.com/

  81. Sara P says...

    I marched in the San Francisco March, and it was a wonderful experience. It was rainy and cold, but that didn’t matter. There was such a feeling of solidarity and community – it was the first time I’ve felt hope since the election. We’re in this together, and it felt like that.

  82. laura says...

    Best moment- an 88 year old woman who rode the sf muni by herself hooked up with our group of women- she carried a picture of the statue of liberty that she had painted herself. She said there was no other place for her to be than at the march, She had marched before, she will march again if she needs too! Another friend spoke of the police officer directing people marching saying,” go to the left, keep going to the left, to the left, the country needs to move to the left, ” Each person, protesting in their own way, but all together- what could be better? Only positive change….. that would be better

    • mary says...

      love this comment so much!

  83. Oh Joanna, wasn’t it magical?! I marched in Santa Barbara, California and I’ve never felt more proud… of this town and of the over 5 million people who marched worldwide. It was positive, focused, respectful, and peaceful. More than that even, the massively empowered FORCE still has me on a high. I love my daily political actions and have no desire to stop doing my part in this truly awesome galvanizing + history-making movement. So SO proud.

  84. Ingrid says...

    I didn’t think of the march as a protest, but rather a chance to come together for the good of all. If women are treated fairly, the whole world will be a better place for men, as well as women and children. That only makes sense. Three generations of women (from 2-70) and two generations of men “marched” together in Indianapolis. Everyone was friendly, polite, and kind. We supported each other for whatever reason we were all there. It brought tears to my eyes to see so many wonderful people in one place, in defense of equality and freedom. (This IS America, right?)

  85. Meghan says...

    I am marching in he March for Life. Can’t wait ?

    • Sarah says...

      Wish I could be there! For all the inclusiveness that this Women’s March touted, me (as a woman) and my beliefs were asked to stay home. Good for you! I will be there in spirit!

    • Kate says...

      Good for you!!! We need more women like you!

    • H says...

      Wish I could be there!

    • Emily says...

      I’m glad to hear that! Frankly the un-invitation (they were invited in and to sponsor the event too until PP got involved) of feminist pro-life groups like New Wave Feminists and the Life Matters Journal kept me from marching this past weekend.

  86. Emma says...

    Marched in S.F. with my husband and new born and many many many female friends that had never marched or protested before! Still feeling high from the peace and sense of community felt.

  87. Heidi says...

    My husband and I marched in our little town of Menomonie, WI. It’s pretty conservative here, and we had around 400 people come out for it. It was so incredibly moving to be part of something so huge. I used to work for and am a huge supporter of Planned Parenthood and have been political for years, but haven’t marched in a very long time. Everyone was so happy and there was spontaneous hugging! But it’s just the beginning! On to contact Paul Ryan and try to find a nice way to tell him I am against everything he’s doing to health care.

  88. Abigail Atkins says...

    Marched with my dog, my daughters and my husband. It was so encouraging to know and see and feel in my bones that this is not going away. That this movement represents everyone on the outsides. And I’ve started taking next steps. I’m meeting with new and old friends and hopefully strangers and we’re signing our postcards together for the 10 actions for the first 100 days. I’m also a white woman and I think now i listen. I watch and listen to those who are far more oppressed than I am and follow their cues and add my voice to theirs.

  89. EM says...

    I marched in Spokane. I’m 35, and this was my first political demonstration! Our march started a little late because so many more people showed up than expected, and the best part was hearing parents explain to their small children why we were there, why it was important enough to stand around in the cold for.

    I have felt so alone since the election–how could so many people that I know and love value things so differently? But finding so many compatriots has given me renewed hope. Real conversations, real expression of my heart and seeking real expressions from the hearts of others will banish the fear and the hate.

    • Jessica says...

      Yes! For me too, I feel so much less alone after the election. It has been surprisingly difficult for me to stop dwelling on it. But seeing so many people marching with me in New York was cathartic and inspiring.

  90. Rachel says...

    I marched in DC with my girlfriend. Here are my most memorable moments:1. John Kerry walking his dog with marchers!
    2. Girl smoking a joint turns to her friend in a particularly crowded spot and says ‘I told you LSD during the march would be a bad idea’.
    3. Impromptu dance party that doubled as a rally cry for passage of the Equal Rights Amendment.
    4. When a dude started yelling for protesters to jump the fence at the White House a bunch of women shut that shit down.
    5. Planned parenthood volunteers and others standing calmly in front of the anti-choice protesters so no one had to see them.
    6. Kids in tiny pussy hats.

    • Abbie says...

      I’m for freedom and equality and immigration and respect. I can’t imagine that vagina hats communicate that. I can not imagine my level of offense if a group of men marched around wearing penis hats, dressing in penis costumes, or putting them all over my children. Our strength is not best displayed in body parts; our strength is shown in actions that call on intellect and graciousness.

    • Katiek says...

      I really appreciated the PP volunteers in front of the anti-choice protestors with their large graphics. The PP volunteers were changing “Love trumps hate.” It was such a nice way to soften what could have been a horrible part of the day. The DC March was amazing.

    • Kate says...

      With respect, Abbie, it was Trump who lowered the tone, not women. The pussy hats were a humorous reappropriation of the demeaning term he used to describe women, and that is empowering, not degrading.

  91. Paige says...

    I work at a coffee shop in Sonoma County and couldn’t get out of my shift on Saturday. I was so disappointed that I wouldn’t be able to participate in the march but I did what I could. I wore all black funeral garb on Friday in protest of the inauguration, and Saturday I wore a white outfit in honor of the Suffragettes. I got to speak with women and men who were on their way to or from either the local area marches or the one in SF. I felt a stronger connection than ever with our customers and community from those conversations, and I’m grateful for that.

  92. Susie says...

    I marched here in DC with my 10-year-old daughter, friends and neighbors. It was completely amazing and the vibe was so positive. Cool side note? We saw Emma Watson in the crowd. Her-freakin-mione. And she was clearly having a blast.

  93. Katie says...

    I marched in DC!

    My friends and I discussed the importance of being for rather than against. When you are against, you start arguments and spur hate. When you are for you open dialogue and build communities.

    • Caitlin says...

      Yes! I set out for the march with the same idea.

  94. I marched in Amsterdam with my one and a half year old daughter and my 36 week pregnant belly (another girl!) The march was inspiring and amazing, and it is was so wonderful to feel a part of the movement even from all the way in the Netherlands. I also loved sharing the experience with my girls; even though they won’t remember it, I want them to know that they were a part of this momentous occasion and that I was out there standing up for them. I hope by the time they are grown up, maybe with daughters of their own, that so much of this will be ancient history.

  95. Marki says...

    I proudly marched in Phoenix with my sister, daughter, and husband. After feeling so isolated in my frustration and disbelief over the turn of events the past few months (largely spent reading news articles alone in my office), it was an indescribable rush of emotion to stand side by side with thousands of others who felt the same way. I don’t think I’ve ever felt so connected to such a large group of people – it was life-changing and life-affirming, like I physically felt the meaning of the word “solidarity.” Also, how awesome that the marches were so peaceful?!

    • Lisa says...

      Love
      Love
      Love
      I live in CA, but my dad’s people are from that area.

    • Alya says...

      I grew up close to there. Wish I could have joined them.

  96. Judith N. says...

    I marched in Copenhagen, Denmark and it was one of the most reassuring and pleasant experiences of my life. Being 24 years old and being born and raised in The Netherlands, I had never marched before (just to say that growing up in a welfare state usually does not give you much reason to protest). Thanks to Cup of Jo I got to know about the march on Washington and realized that I had no other option than to go to the local march here. Being the daughter of a career women and a housewife-man (as me and my sisters lovingly call our dad) I felt like a had to chant, scream, applaude and laugh (!) for and with those women and man who don’t have the liberty to lead their lives the way they wanted or under restrictions that limit them in doing so. When I arrived at the US embassy by bike (feeling a bit alone – I didn’t know anyone else who was going), my eyes teared up by seeing all those colorful, happy people who all wished for the same too.
    Over here, in Europe, we have our own ‘Trump-like-caracters’ to deal with and to feel and experience that the ‘whole world’ could unite in one kind voice, saying ‘it will be alright, let’s be kind’ was everything!

    • Liza says...

      I marched in Copenhagen too! It was so peaceful though a bit quieter than it’s American counterparts. I didn’t see a single demonstrator and thought, this is what we’re aiming for. There were so many families and it was an amazing blend of expats and locals. I loved how many Danish teenage girls were there. They were taking pictures on Snapchat and talking about typical teenage girl things while they marched, but they were so strong and committed. They were there without their mothers and had chosen to spend a precious Saturday afternoon marching. What an amazing generation! When I spoke to them they seemed surprised that I was impressed that they were there. Of course they were there! Did I think they had not seen what was happening to women in the United States and all around the world? I had been heartbroken when I realized my trip meant I was going to miss the one at home, but the opportunity to march with women on the other side of the world for all of the same reasons was actually a highlight.

  97. Leslie says...

    I marched along with my husband, 1-year old daughter, and 100k other supporters in Portland, OR. My favorite sign was held by a boy, maybe he was 2, “Don’t do mean things.” It really can be that simple. Thank you for your meaningful posts xoxo

  98. Anna says...

    An action idea:

    My friend took 25 Facebook friends that wanted to take action after the election. He divided that group into 5 – 1 smaller group for each work day of the week. On your designated day, you take an action. You can make a call to your rep, join a protest, attend a lecture, donate to a cause, volunteer an hour, etc. We keep tally of what we do on a spreadsheet so we can watch our collective action power grow. We’ve been doing this since the election and we have made more than 100 calls, sent almost 500 emails, made 150 donations for a total of more than $3500, organized two progressive book clubs, taught 10 citizenship classes, volunteered 10 hours for progressive candidates, and read 25 books on issues important to us. On the days that you are not active, you know 20 other people are acting on your behalf. We can celebrate our achievements together and keep each other accountable. If 25 people can make this much impact in two months, imagine what could happen if we all organized this way!

    • Emma says...

      What an amazing idea! I’m meeting with a group of friends and friends-of-friends this week for the first time to discuss political action steps, and if we have enough people, I’d love to make something like this happen.

  99. Victoria says...

    I LOVE CUP OF JO

  100. Marcy Levine says...

    Thanks so much for this post. My husband and I marched in Madison, my daughter and niece in Green Bay, my other daughter in Portland, my sister-in-law in St. Paul, and 2 more nieces in Napa. We had a group text going and sent pictures and comments all day long. It was a wonderful experience. It was so good to see so many people like us. We will not be quiet anymore. We will not stop.

  101. CP says...

    Sally, are Canadian? Becuase here in the US women do make less than men (http://www.aauw.org/research/the-simple-truth-about-the-gender-pay-gap/ ), particularly women of color, and while access to affordable healthcare has improved (thanks to the ACA), many people are still spending way too much of healthcare as a proportion of takehome pay. Compared to most other developed countries we rank pretty low on the quality of our healthcare and very high on what we pay. And the ACA is now under assault with no proposed program to replace it, so good luck to people hoping to keep affordable healthcare (btw, the ACA also reduced the pace of the rise of healthcare costs in the US since implementation).

    Am down with getting the special flying super power. Or maybe if women could get an extra hour in the day to get all the extra stuff done that we do, like household work and childcare….in addition to working full time outside the home….we can dream, right?

    • Winter Blue says...

      Sadly, women in Canada have also not achieved gender equality in pay…

  102. Dagny says...

    In the top picture, that girl’s outfit is straight up INCREDIBLE. I’m totally into the politics of the post too, but I wanted to make sure someone called out that style.

    • Ellen says...

      I know the whole thing is great but the “no no no no…” pants are beyond amazing!

  103. Tracy Short says...

    Canadian beavers support American pussies!

    • ally myerberg says...

      love!

    • Karen says...

      ?

  104. Sara says...

    I marched in Michigan, the best sign of the day “I can’t believe I’m still protesting this shit” held by a badass 70 year old woman

    • Sharon says...

      I saw a pic of this one and smiled :)

    • Lynn says...

      I laughed at a similar sign at our march in Atlanta! Badass women must think alike! ☺️

  105. Maggie says...

    I marched in San Diego and set up monthly donations to Planned Parenthood, the ACLU & Human Rights Campaign immediately post election.

  106. Ceridwen says...

    I’m from Melbourne, Australia, and it was so fantastic to see the images and watching it unfold via Instagram. A march was held in Melbourne too. There has been an awful, tragic event in Melbourne on the Friday before so I think for many the marching was a way of people connecting after that event also. Athough I was away at my parents house so not marching, I had felt linked with those marching when we looked at the amazing artwork in the posters and signs. Interestingly, and perhaps luckily for her, my young daughter didn’t understand the need to march! So we explained as best we could and in a constructive, positive way. We also explained that many girls and women need support and to be able to show how strong they are; that many girls have to struggle daily. We also explained that here, in this event, people are showing what is important and valued even when there are those who have a more negative, self-centred message or agenda. We are strong together. Women are powerful. Sharing the images to my daughter, I felt so proud and filled with a sense of hope and global community. We are hopeful together, we grieve together, we laugh together, we take action together.

  107. Sarah says...

    I marched in Los Angeles, and felt nothing but positive vibes! I was VERY nervous, the last time I was in a large crowd was in Nice, France on Bastille day, and as you can imagine that didn’t end very well. But this was very important to me so i decided to ignore my PSTD and just do it. Man oh man I am so glad I did, i was on an energy high all day from being there and being around so many positive amazing people. Old, young, male, female, singles, families, people from all over the map. It was an unforgettable experience, & I’m so proud to have been a part of something so much larger than myself.

    • Rach in Oz says...

      Sarah, I was really moved reading this – good on you for getting out there and finding the strength to do that. Very best wishes to you!

    • m says...

      Sarah,

      I was in LA as well, and I applaud you for facing your fears and being a part of the march! It was a powerful, inspiring, and uplifting experience that I will NEVER forget!

  108. Four friends and I took the bus from NYC to Washington to march.
    To see this sheer crowd of the most diverse group of people, the love and friendliness and creativity of everybody was super empowering.
    The display of political awareness and being informed gave me great hope that we can resist the Trump agenda.
    I am a photographer and I hope you do not mind if I share the link to my blog where I posted a lot of photos from the march: http://gudrungeorges.blogspot.com/

  109. Amy says...

    I marched in NYC and it was the most inspirational thing I’ve ever done (my first march!), one of the best parts of the day is when I met-up with a group from my town (YAY Sleepy Hollow/Tarrytown!) in Grand Central Terminal and was greeted by several members of the various clergy from the town who lead our group through Grand Central with our signs held high. The love and acceptance and sense of purpose was incredible.

  110. Meggles says...

    As always, thank you, Joanna. Appreciate the action ideas. I was at the Boston march–one of the most meaningful experiences of my life.

  111. My husband and I marched in NYC and I will never forget it. I was so teary imagining our first lady president somewhere out there, perhaps atop someone’s shoulders in the crowd. As we neared the finish, the bells of Saint Thomas Church on Fifth Avenue rang out in Hallelujah and I LOST it. It was such a powerful day.

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      oh my gosh, sounds like an incredible moment!

  112. Jodie says...

    I marched in San Francisco with friends, my husband, and our 10 month old twins…in the pouring rain! One babe slept while the other did his best to cheer along with the crowd. It was the most peaceful, and kind crowd I have ever marched with.
    I would like to add one more to your list of great journalism outlets to support- ProPublica- a wonderful nonprofit that is dedicated to journalism in the public interest. https://www.propublica.org/

    • Shauna says...

      My fiance and I marched in rainy San Francisco too! So much love in the air, it was a truly uplifting feeling amidst all the negative political rhetoric of late.

  113. Jess says...

    Marched in LA! So proud to be an Angeleno! 750k strong in the streets!! Amazing to see the turnout everywhere and so moving!

  114. Bailey says...

    I marched with friends in Shreveport, Louisiana . It was a wonderful day that I will never forget!

  115. I’m starting a women’s action hour group (I’m tempted to call it Women’s Hour of Action Meeting just for the acronym, but maybe it’s too cumbersome?), which brings together stay at home parents and folks with flexible work schedules to act on those action items together. It can be hard picking up the phone or writing a letter when the stuff of life gets in the way, but company can embolden you! We’re also planning to visit legislators at their offices, and track down our lawmakers at all sorts of events!

    • Ellen says...

      Great idea — I like the acronym too.

    • Bridget says...

      This is a great idea and I love the acronym – WHAM!

  116. Brianna says...

    My partner and I went to our local march in Anchorage, Alaska. All that day it had been near whiteout blizzard conditions but it did not dampen the drive of the thousands of people that showed up. The event gave me a venue to release some stored energy from these past few months and making connections with like-minded individuals was quite restorative.

  117. I posted on your last blog about the march that I was nervous about safety. Thanks to fellow CoJ readers who chimed in! I decided to go, and didn’t regret it for a second. The experience was incredible, and to me what I kept thinking was that with the help of our fellow marchers, we ”took our city back.” It was disheartening to see so many Trump supporters in D.C. (an overwhelmingly liberal city), and it was like a breath of fresh air to see so many women out marching for our rights! I feel so inspired to help keep this momentum going, so thank you for this post, too!

    • MK says...

      You are amazing, Nicole! So happy you went and were happy that you did.

  118. jenn says...

    …..and the Monday after one of the biggest global women’s rights marches in history, our administration does this:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/donald-trump-abortion-men_us_5886369be4b0e3a7356a7910?

    …do we have a right to be upset now?? for those complaining that there’s so much “hate”, please tell me how taking family planning funding away from poor countries can’t instill hate for things like this… we’re not even 1 week into this administration for pete’s sake.

    • I just saw that as well. Talk about an emotional roller coaster.

  119. I was in LA for work over the weekend so I went to the march there. What a beautiful, beautiful day. We had a nine year old girl in our group and as she got tired, her mom told her, “you’re making history and you’re going to thank me for bringing you someday.”

  120. valentina says...

    To everyone commenting here who went to DC: please consider donating your leftover SmarTrip cards to Martha’s Table, an organization that is collecting cards to help those in need. These cards cost money (in addition to the bus or metro fare) and the money on them can help people get to the grocery store, a job interview, their child’s school, and more.

    Martha’s Table
    2114 14th St. NW
    Washington, D.C. 20009.

    • Sharon says...

      Love this idea….

    • Erin B. says...

      I have two cards that I’m going to send!

  121. Bethany says...

    My husband and I, son and his girlfriend, marched in Chicago and it was amazing. From my vantage point, up close to the speakers, and given that I’m short, I couldn’t tell how many people were really there until we started walking and hit a high point in the park and could see all the people on Michigan Avenue and marching through the Loop. It made me gasp and there were so many times I just wanted to cry for joy. So many men and women smiling at each other, admiring each others signs and hats! I’m 53 and I’ve been pretty complacent since college–voting and donating when I can, but, girls, I’m getting busy!!!

  122. Robyn says...

    My daughter lives in DC and participated in the march. She said it was such a beautiful and uplifting experience.

  123. Jess says...

    I marched in D.C., and it was such a meaningful day. I still tear up whenever I think or speak about it. Cup of Jo team, your December post about the march really inspired me to go – THANK YOU. I really appreciate all of your political posts. <3

  124. Jennifer says...

    I am forever changed after marching last Saturday. I plan to keep the momentum going by participating in the 10 actions/100 days initiative. https://www.womensmarch.com/100/

    • Justine says...

      thank you for sharing!

    • Lisa says...

      We are doing the 10/100 where I live!

  125. Alaina says...

    Thank you for this! These photos make me so proud.
    I’ve started using IssueVoter.org to stay involved. You choose political issues you care about and then they send you email alerts before Congress votes on new bills. The emails include very readable summaries, and you just click “support” or “oppose” to send your opinion to your representative. They update you on the outcome of the vote, and keep a scorecard of your rep’s voting record (yay, accountability!). Voting on specific bills makes me feel like I’m having an impact all year, but also just knowing the bills exist is a huge step for me!

    • What a helpful site! Thanks for sharing.

  126. Emily Clark says...

    I have to be honest, I was often confused by what I saw on social media and news of the march. Was this march pro women/diversity? Or anti-Trump? I still saw a lot of hate. And at this point, I think it’s important to remain positive and as hard as it is, supportive. And that’s supporting causes we feel strongly about, supporting each other, and supporting our country. I just don’t see how the Trump hate is productive at this point in time.

    • valentina says...

      I believe that letting Trump know that his words and his actions, which are filled with hate toward the people he should be representing, will not be tolerated. However people want to express that to him is up to them.

    • Kate says...

      Hi Emily,

      I obviously can’t speak for all of the dozens of marches held around our country and the world this past weekend, but I attended the D.C. march, my sister-in-law and my 14 year old niece attended the NYC march, and my good friends travelled to Boston for their march. All were peaceful, positive, heartfelt, intense, forward-thinking and determined (and often funny!). As everyone is human and has their own interpretation of events that frames it, people will take away different experiences. But I can tell you, from my point of view, none of us saw or heard or witness any hate. Just love for our country and our fellow humans. There was laughter, smiles, cheers, support, and openness from all I saw – and that includes the members of the National Guard and police in D.C.

    • t says...

      I was worried that it was all going to be anti-trump but I think it transcended that immensely. To me it feels much more pro women/diversity/love than anti-trump. Still some anti-trump (and that is fine for others- not me) but so much more than that.

    • Brianna says...

      Your perspective is interesting, Emily. I think it is an important aspect to consider; being malicious will not heal anything. Yet, from my perspective, I don’t see disagreement and criticism as disrespect or hate. What I saw on Saturday was disagreement, criticism, and some aspects of reflecting Donald’s brutal honesty back to him. All a part of the job as POTUS. Some may be impassioned about it but Donald has put many families personally at risk. We are scared and asking him to be accountable for his actions. That was just my experience of the march which may be different than yours. Thank you for your perspective. That is a line that I do not want to cross.

    • Sharon says...

      There was so much hate rhetoric during his campaign that I think most felt compelled to let him know that they heard it and they will take him to task on making sure that the US does not lose all the progress that has come through years and years of work.

    • Lisa says...

      I completely agree. I feel like a lot of the comments have been hateful towards women who have different political views. I’m not a racist or mean spirited person. I love my family, friends, strangers and my country. I always loved this blog, but the comments are starting to make me feel like a bed person for having different views on certain subjects. I feel like it’s more hurtful than loving to women.

    • Julia E says...

      Amen

  127. Michelle says...

    I just got chills looking through this post. I marched in NYC and it was just… incredible. And to find out that marches happened all over the country and in over 70 countries! Hope not fear. <3

  128. Cristina says...

    I went to the March in Washington, DC with my fiance and loved every minute! Amazed by the size of the crowd and the positive energy all around. It gave me a lot of hope for our future. The signs were so entertaining too!

  129. LS says...

    I marched in Chicago, while carrying and eventually nursing my 8-month old, with my husband by my side. I almost didn’t go, because I was worried about bringing the baby, but then on Saturday morning I saw a woman in my neighborhood walking to the train wearing a suffragette outfit. I was like, I can’t miss this.

  130. Stephanie says...

    I marched in Seattle Washington and have never felt more proud to be a woman. Seeing so many elderly women being pushed in wheelchairs and walking with canes, purposefully, next to young women and little girls, almost felt like a passing of the torch. I owe so much to the women who came before me. I vowed on Saturday that I will not let what they did and the progress that they made, be undone.

    One of my favorite signs from the day was carried by a man and it read, “I can’t tell my wife what to do. Neither can you.”

    • Jess says...

      I was in Seattle, too! My favorite sign was just a picture of a screaming Xena the Warrior Princess

  131. Valerie says...

    My boyfriend and I marched in Portland, about 100k people and 100% peaceful! It was a wonderful experience! I love and support your blog for the amazing content your team continues to produce, I’m checking out The Indivisible Guide now.

  132. Martha says...

    I wasn’t able to join the March here in NYC but the stories and photos I’ve seen over the past couple of days are just incredible. I am hopeful — and energized — for what comes next.

    In the meantime, I’ll be reading Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo’s “Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls” with my two young daughters. A collection of “100 tales of extraordinary women,” it is inspiring and heartwarming and so very interesting. Highly recommend!!

    • Samantha says...

      I bought that book for my goddaughter for Christmas. She and her mom read a badass lady story a night :)

  133. Tiffany says...

    I play bass in a feminist punk band and we were asked to play at the Women’s March in Raleigh, NC. What a truly life changing experience the whole day was. They were expecting 3,000 people or so and we ended up with 17,000 marchers. The day was electric, uplifting and just what I needed after the perpetual fog I’ve been in since election night. Thank you to all the women (and men) who marched throughout America and beyond. I have never felt more connected. I have never felt more valued. Love, respect and solidarity always!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      wow, so awesome, tiffany!

  134. Jen says...

    In regards to what else we can do, although I read all of the publications you suggest donating to, we need to target news media that people who voted for Trump read. How do we influence those companies to provide a more balanced approach to their reporting? If you read FoxNews.com for years and nothing else you understand why people begin to feel the way they do about Trump. Do we target their sponsors and advertisers? Should we flood their social media with fact-checking? I don’t know but am open to ideas!

    I also recently moved to the Midwest from DC and although I have heard on a number of occasions shocking statements (grocery store clerks, etc.) and even though I wanted to yell, I kindly reminded them in a quiet voice that not all of their customers shared their worldview and perhaps there is a time and a place to discuss those issues. The response I receive is always kind and frankly, a little embarrassed. I think at one point we were all a bit more respectful of those who we may not see eye to eye with. Perhaps when we all start showing each other that simple decent courtesy we can start having the hard conversations that we need to have to move forward.

    • Katherine says...

      This is why I refused to march. I am all for equal rights, etc., but I did NOT see myself represented in this march. It wasn’t a march for women, it was a march against the Right. The goal of this march wasn’t to bring women together to demand equality, it was a whole bunch of folks who just don’t like me because of what I believe. A little more open ears, and a few less people telling me I don’t matter and neither do my beliefs. These women are the ones keeping me down. If all you read is Fox, then yeah, you’re going to have one opinion, but if all you read is HuffPost then I hope you don’t think you’re informed. I’ll keep Buzzfeed on my hit parade if you check out the Blaze every now and then. Better yet, here’s an interesting piece from the NYT http://nytlive.nytimes.com/womenintheworld/2017/01/20/billionaire-george-soros-has-ties-to-more-than-50-partners-of-the-womens-march-on-washington/

    • Ali says...

      I found this a bit humorous. You ask for the “simple decent courtesy” of respectfulness – but it sounds like that’s what you got once you indicated you didn’t share their views (“the response I receive is always kind”). What more are you asking for? Perhaps they are not interested in moving “forward” in the way that you see it. But if they’ve been kind as you’ve said, why not let them be?

    • Ellen says...

      You are a wise woman Jen. Thank you for sharing these thoughts and experiences. I agree that there are companies profiting from so much division. The tendency to throw gas on the fire makes for a show you can’t take your eyes off while it burns down our civility and perhaps our democracy.

    • Mariela says...

      Katherine, if you say you’re for equal rights but this march didn’t represent you, than you are CHOOSING to not see what is in front of you. Either that, or you are straight up lying about being for equal rights. The vast, vast majority of marchers were there to preserve the progress we’ve made towards equality and fight against moving backwards. If you want to focus on a few who hurt your feelings regarding your right conservatism (which is very different than Trump’s brand of politics, or at least GOD I HOPE SO), than you are just as bad as them – dismissing this amazing moment in history that was almost entirely about equal rights that you say you believe in. Just so you know, you excluded YOURSELF from any ownership in this monumental day – no one else did that.

    • Kathy says...

      See, this is the problem. You hear a grocery clerk say something you disagree with, and you “kindly remind them in quiet voice” to shut up–how condescending! Would you have done that in DC or do you feel empowered in the Midwest because, let’s face it, you think you are morally and intellectually superior to people in flyover country. This is why Trump won.

      P.S. Before everyone piles on, I voted for Jill Stein. Couldn’t bring myself to vote for the war criminal or the fascist.

    • Mary Beth says...

      @Ali @Kathy – I think that it is important to consider context when reading comments online. I have no idea what the specific details of the grocery store encounter were and neither do you. I am an old woman now and a lifelong resident of the Midwest, I love it here. If I hear someone making remarks that attack values/people who I love and care about, I have always felt that it is a morally responsible position to politely state my objection. I have two nieces who are Jewish and for years I had many students of color in my classrooms. How could I not call out racism or antisemitism and still feel that my relationships with these important, much loved people in my life were not tainted by hypocrisy?

  135. Abby says...

    I was at the Brussels march the night before because we couldn’t march on the Saturday due to another protest. However, it was a great feeling to somehow “start this off” especially as we all got to light candles in the evening, sang “Imagine” and chanted in English, French and Flemish. It truly felt global in our own little way.

    • Summer says...

      That is so lovely about “Imagine”!

    • I was also at the Brussels march! I loved that we lit candles and that so many nationalities were present. It was emotional and uplifting.

  136. Sally says...

    I am still not sure what we are marching for. I see a feminist as wanting equal rights, not special rights. So do women want to be special or equal?

    • Caitlyn says...

      I viewed the march as a chance for women to show support for one another and other people who have felt disenfranchised or anxious about the president’s rhetoric. Until the news started referring to the march as a protest I never even conceptualized it as such, but rather a method of community building and a show of empathy and love.

    • S says...

      Is it special to want to be paid the same amount as a man for the same job?
      Is it special to want to have access to affordable healthcare for myself and my family?
      Is it special to tell my president, who has used rhetoric of divisiveness, hatred, and sexual violence, with my space and time and voice and sign that I want a leader who embraces inclusivity and tolerance?

      Did you know that our US Constitution still does not ensure gender equality? On the day of the march, senate democrats symbolically reintroduced this amendment to the constitution, which has never been been passed? http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/politics/bal-cardin-equal-rights-amendment-20170121-story.html

      Now that’s special.

    • Sally says...

      Is it special to want to be paid the same amount as a man for the same job?
      Is it special to want to have access to affordable healthcare for myself and my family?
      Is it special to tell my president, who has used rhetoric of divisiveness, hatred, and sexual violence, with my space and time and voice and sign that I want a leader who embraces inclusivity and tolerance?

      These are all things that women already have. We do get paid the same amount for the same job performance. We do get affordable healthcare – the we will still get. And our President will not endanger anyone – again this is the media and Mr Soros upsetting people into thinking that we are all unsafe.

    • Gemma Burgess says...

      I don’t think anyone is marching for ‘special’ rights. Did you see one of the the millions of people who marched all over the world holding up a sign that said ‘give women special rights’?

      Don’t get me wrong, I’d love special rights. Are they like special powers? If so, can I fly?

    • Mallory says...

      My two cents, respectfully:

      Unfortunately there is still a wage gap. Women overall make 80 cents to the dollar that men make, and it’s way worse for women of color. http://www.aauw.org/research/the-simple-truth-about-the-gender-pay-gap/

      The Unity Principles of the March aren’t looking for special treatment, only equality. You can read about them here: https://www.womensmarch.com/principles/

      I think it’s really important for women, even those who feel they are being treated equally by our society, to lift up all women (women of color, women in the LGBTQ community, disabled women, etc.). No one is free while others are oppressed.
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/10572435/Intersectional-feminism.-What-the-hell-is-it-And-why-you-should-care.html

    • Mariela says...

      Sally, your very simple question has a very simple answer: we want equal rights. Your idea of special rights is very odd and I have no idea where it would have come from. We have never achieved equal rights (fact), but the reason the march came to fruition now and with such overwhelming participation, is because the new president would actually like to move BACKWARDS in this respect. And none of us are willing to do that.

    • Rachel says...

      I think it’s possible that you are confusing the fortunes of individual women with the needs of the whole group. It’s possible (though I might argue unlikely) that you’ve never met a women who was assaulted or paid unfairly or discriminated against or harassed or denied health care and if so, that’s fantastic! But also, you might be surrounded by women with good luck or privilege or both (or that don’t feel safe enough to confide in you) and that’s something you might want to think about. What about the women that don’t have those things you get to take for granted? Are they worth marching for? The point is that those things do not apply universally to ALL women and until they do, all of us have a responsibility to work to get there. It’s about a better world for everyone, not just the privileged few. I personally don’t know many women who feel they are experiencing complete equality. However, even if this was foreign to me personally, I have to think, does it still matter even if it only helps someone I don’t know? I think it does. Everyone should get to feel as safe and respected as you do.

    • Amanda D says...

      @Rachel – Wow!! Such a wonderful response.