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Are You Going to the Women’s March?

Women's March on Washington: What to Know

A ton of anticipation is building for the Women’s March on Washington on January 21st. Many of our friends and relatives (like Joanna’s awesome mom) are already making plans to go. Are you? If you’re thinking about it or wondering how you can participate without traveling to D.C., we spoke to Breanne Butler, one of the march’s national co-organizers, and found out eight things you might want to know.

The basics. The march begins at Independence Avenue and Third Street SW in Washington, D.C., beginning at 10:00 on Saturday morning, January 21st. The Women’s March on Washington is meant as a show of solidarity for women’s rights and overall human rights. You can officially R.S.V.P. here – more than 500,000 people already have.

The march matters. A huge gathering in the capital will get lots of public attention. If history is any guide, the march could have real impact on issues and help inspire the next generation of Gloria Steinems and Angela Davises. “Thousands of regular Americans have transformed into leaders since the election,” Breanne says. “I’m a chef and I’ve never gotten closer to politics than kitchen politics in my life! But somebody out there is going to see the march and say, ‘I can get involved, too.’ It could be a little girl and it could be the start of her revelation. We have the power to create new and future leaders.”

It’s a march for everyone, not only women. The organizers emphasize that their agenda includes supporting equality for all, including immigrants, religious groups, those who identify as LGBTQIA, people with disabilities and anyone whose rights might be threatened — not just women’s issues. “If you believe in the future of all Americans, then join the march,” says Breanne. “It’s not enough to share a Facebook status message about the change you want to see. This is the people’s first big call to action for the new presidential administration. Come and be a part of history.”

It’s not about the new president. The march is scheduled, symbolically, for the day after the inauguration, but it was fueled long before the election. Breanne says it’s limiting to think of it as a reaction to Donald Trump. “If you’ve ever broken up with someone, you know you’re thinking about it for a long time first. And then they do something and you’re like, ‘Sorry, I’m done.’ It took the election to galvanize this march, for women to stand up and say they’ve had enough of misogyny and inequality. This is much bigger than the election, though. We’re fighting for human rights.”

Your state coordinator can help you get there. Most states have a local Women’s March chapter, and organizers can help answer questions and coordinate travel to D.C. in group buses or car caravans. (Update: buses are now sold out.) They can also point you to lodging, including schools, churches, community centers and local homes. (Airbnbs are still available, too, and here are more lodging ideas.) To find your chapter, google Women’s March and your state, or search on Facebook. Also, MarchMatch can help organize carpools or bus ticket sponsorships.

Safety is a top priority. Many people, understandably, are concerned that the crowd will be rowdy and they’ll feel unsafe, especially if kids are in tow. But Breanne insists that it will be a peaceful march. “It’s not a protest, it’s more of a meeting. We want to start a conversation that becomes an ongoing dialogue over the next four years.” She says the co-organizers have been working closely with security throughout the planning of the event. “It’s normal to have some fear, but we’re ready. I would be sad to hear that that stopped anyone from coming.”

Don’t sweat the (packing) details. It will be cold and busy in Washington, but most of what it takes to prepare for the march is common sense. Dress in layers and comfortable shoes, and bring water and snacks. The museums and public institutions around the Mall will be open if you need to warm up. You don’t need to make a special sign or banner, but if you’d like to carry one, go for it. Breanne says the march has the grassroots, inclusive feel of 1960s and 70s movements. “The other day I was looking at the leaflet created for the 1963 March on Washington, the biggest rally in American history. It’s amazing how straightforward it was. They said to bring two sandwiches, but not ones with mayonnaise in case they spoiled. I would give most of the same simple advice today.”

If you can’t go, you can still participate. Hundreds of “sister” marches and events will be happening all over the country and the world. You can search them here by zip code. Organizers are also hoping to raise $2 million to pay for the march, and you can donate here or buy merchandise here to lend financial support. A few other ideas: give a pair of warm gloves to a friend who’s going, loan your car for the drive to D.C., sponsor someone’s bus ticket, or consider opening your D.C. area home to a march participant.

Women's March on Washington: What to Know

Will you be going? Have you ever marched before? Any other tips you’d give?

P.S. On being a feminist and five ways to get involved.

(Bottom photo from People Magazine.)

  1. Glenys Patmore says...

    Last summer I booked flights and hotel for my daughter who was finishing an International Politics Degree, as a gift for her to see the first woman President, the day of the elections, she asked me if we were going to cancel and then I saw the March, this is so important for women everywhere. I will be flying in from BC Canada and my daughter from London UK. We really want this to be heard and make a difference.

    • Susan says...

      Hello, from BC Canada! We are as well going to be there from ?White Rock, BC. Canadian/American family.

  2. We are going and bringing our 2 y/o daughter – I feel proud to start her early in standing up for what is right!

  3. Olivia says...

    I’m a protest photographer so I cover a LOT of protests, marches, events, etc. My biggest tip is that bathrooms are going to be hard to get to, or the lines will be incredibly long. I try not to drink water and chew gum when my mouth gets dry to avoid needing to go.

    Also, I really recommend stocking up on a tea from Traditional Medicinals called “Throat Coat.” Your voice will undoubtedly be sore from all the chanting, and a cup of this brew is a real life-saver.

  4. Julia says...

    I’m in my mid-60’s and so pleased to see the energy of all this. My advice is warm layers, comfortable shoes, food and water and a flexible attitude. It will be a human and therefore imperfect experience. It can be the start or continuation of what you’ve already decided to dedicate yourself to in the next few years. Others will try to trivialize, scorn or ignore this event or what you do and will do. Don’t let them. Participate. Be a reporter about it. Speak up early and often and in the way that works for you. It’s the hope of the opposition that we will be silent or discourage easily. Enjoy the event and dedicate to the long haul.

    I will be marching in NYC in memory of my 1940’s feminist mother and in honor of my father who fought in WW II against the Nazis.. I march for my daughter, nieces, granddaughters and grandnieces.

    I have voted in every election since 1972 and been on the losing side before. Then it felt like losing an election. This time it feels like danger of losing the democracy. I have no intention of allowing that to happen without speaking up early and often.

    • Anna Bodine says...

      Julia said :” I have voted in every election since 1972 and been on the losing side before. Then it felt like losing an election. This time it feels like danger of losing the democracy. ”

      These are my feelings, exactly, and I’ve voted since JFK. I’m almost 83, and not in best health. But I will march this time if it’s the last thing I do. (And if it is, I will be proud of adding my voice and my body to this effort.)

    • Ellen says...

      Well said, thank you.

  5. Lynn says...

    I certainly hope it is a protest! I go to enough damn meetings; we need to take it to the streets and protest. Please stop saying its not.

    • Sheila says...

      Agreed.

  6. Mary Jo Kahn says...

    In a crowd this size, your cell phones probably will not work. It will be easy to get separated and almost impossible to plan to meet someone if it requires navigating through the crowd.

  7. Kirsten says...

    My husband, son and I are coming from Denver, even though there is a sister march in Denver. He bought the ticket for my birthday (the day of the march). Best present from a man :) See you all there!

    • Susan says...

      You have a great husband and are raising a great son!

  8. Blair Flynn says...

    I can’t wait!!

  9. sandra beerends says...

    if you have a backpack and you decide to go into a smithsonian museum on the mall etc. you will have to check it and be prepared for long lines of people waiting to enter..

    • Be The Heroic You says...

      Hello Sandra Beerend.

      Good for everyone to know.
      You made me think and after reading your post I tried finding links with more good advice. All I have to share is the official site: https://www.facebook.com/events/2169332969958991/

  10. Thanks for sharing the details.

  11. I am going with my daughter. I am flying in from Salt Lake City to Los Angeles to meet her, and from there we will fly to D.C. where we’ll meet up with a friend and her three children. I am excited, a little nervous, and very grateful we can participate in the Women’s March.

  12. Shellie says...

    I will be on one of the MANY busses making the journey from Richmond, VA! I will be with members of my Unitarian Universalist church and our friends and co-journeyers. We will march for EVERYONE who is fearful, threatened and feeling marginalized. It will be a privilege to do so.

    • Paola Parsons says...

      Shelly, I am also in RVA and have been trying to figure out transportation for myself, my husband and two-year-old daughter. Can anyone join your group? Where is you church located? I can contact them myself. Thank you so much!

  13. Kimberly Stafford says...

    I am coming from Houston, TX and will be there the 19th through the 22nd. This is my first trip to DC. Looking forward to marching!

  14. Karen Wollman says...

    I marched for civil rights in the 60’s & 70’s. We Need To Do This. We Cannot go backwards. We’ve come to far. I’m marching for my son. He was brought up in an era that he saw gay marriage passed so he can marry who he loves. I’m marching for my 10 year old great granddaughter so she can grow up to know she is equal in everything. Being able to go to college and make the same salary as her male counterpart. I’m marching for me. I’m on Medicare & receive SS. This is my money that I’ve earned. I’m marching for the freedom every American has fought for over the past 200+ years. We are Americans. We are ONE.

  15. Kelly says...

    I’m in New Kent VA, about 3 hours from DC. Driving up on the 19th w/husband, daughter, daughter’s friend and crashing w/my college friend in Springfield. Then six of us are hitting the inauguration protests first on the 20th and then returning the next day for the Women’s March. Thrilled to see so many attending. One of my dear friends is an organizer for a Sister March in Miami and she’s been overwhelmed by the response down there.

  16. Karen Wilson says...

    Coming from Texas!

  17. Kari says...

    We are flying in from Chicago but the earliest flight we could get lands at 11! I’m so bummed this march is starting so early, given how many will be coming in that day (due to the cost of flights and lodging inauguration night). I may cancel my ticket and go to a local march instead of going 2 hours late.

    • Laurie Metter says...

      If even half the estimated marchers attend, it will take quite awhile to reach the Capitol. Please come and be part of history! You will never experience anything like it again. Check the Rallybus website; it’s a bargain and may even get you there sooner.

  18. Carol says...

    Me, my daughter-in-law, Carolyn, her mom and my friend are going from Connecticut and New Jersey . I’ve never been to a rally but now is the time. I’m marching for Carolyn. I want her to feel optimistic about her future. Love her so much.

  19. Liza says...

    I will be marching in Madison, WI!
    #RESIST

  20. Allison says...

    I am going! I live in Maryland, about 25 miles from DC. I was telling my husband about my plans for that day when he said, “but I wanted to go with you.” My heart flipped. Now we’ve got a babysitter and I’m so excited for us to go together! He already has some great poster ideas :)

  21. Audra says...

    I’ll be there! I live in Baltimore and work in DC, so I’ve luckily already got my train pass. My mom is coming down from NJ to march with me. It’s her birthday weekend, and this is how she wants to spend it :)

  22. Christina B says...

    I’m heading to DC by bus from Detroit!

  23. Anne says...

    Wow, this is amazing. The entire team behind a A Cup of Jo is a huge inspiration to women world wide, and each time I come here to the site, I always get confirmed why this blog is a true empowerment of women. Fantastic work Joanna and co! I would love to participate in the peace march, but I live in Aarhus, Denmark and unfortunately I cannot make it to Copenhagen that day where there actually is a march. I am a strong minority equality advocate, and volunteered for Hillary Clinton in the US election. However as the post says, the march is about something far bigger than the outcome of the presidental election. Time to get peache and human equality on this earth!

  24. Sara says...

    I’m headed to DC! I was gutted by the election and left wondering what country I live in, who my neighbors are, how we got here- it felt paralyzing and absolutely disheartening. Since then I’ve been trying to seek out the good, and take positive actions to support what I believe in. I’m excited for the march and the opportunity to join together in a collective way.

  25. Sarah says...

    Thank you so much for this post, and I’m so proud of all of you that are planning to bring your children! Teaching our kids to advocate for change is so important. Last summer, my kids and I marched in our Pride Parade, lobbied for a gun reform bill at our state capitol, and volunteered for Hillary’s campaign. When we heard about the Women’s March, my six-year old daughter encouraged me to go: she said, “you used your vote, now you need to use your voice!” It’s too much for us all to go, so while I’m in D.C., my mom, husband and kids will be marching in SF.

  26. I love that you all posted about this! I am going and I’m so excited. The friends I’m crashing with all have other friends visiting too – I’ll get to meet many cool women who live around the country :)

  27. I am bringing my 7 year old. When we marched in the Climate March a few years ago I learned a great tip, write your phone number in pen or sharpie on your child’s arm. If you get separated they don’t have to worry about remembering the number. Great post.

  28. Emily S. says...

    I am excited to march in Oakland, CA!

  29. Rebecca says...

    Will anyone from cup of jo be at the March? Would love a first hand account!

    • Rebecca says...

      Please let us know if Cup of Jo will be doing a blog post from the march!

  30. Oh, if only I could go. It would be too expensive to fly over now that I live in Paris, and, well… school. I’ll be with all those there in spirit.

  31. I will be marching with a group of girl friends from High School. We are now all around 30 years old and have learned so much about what it means to be a woman in this society. We are embracing this march as an opportunity to participate visibly in this society in a way that will empower our people to activate and create positive change. This past election cycle was damn depressing and we are looking for the brighter side of life where women are afforded respect to do what they choose. We have to fight for our rights. See you there brothers and sisters!

  32. I’m marching in Los Angeles with a group of friends. Like some of you I don’t like big crowds either but feel I would regret not participating.

  33. Kristina M says...

    I live in philly and a carload of girlfriends and I will be there!

  34. Lyndsee says...

    Any tips for breastfeeding moms who want to go? I imagine the museums are going to be packed and the outlets will be busy with phone chargers. There’s no way I want to use a hand pump 4+ times throughout the day. Anyone know if there are accommodations for pumping? Just need a dedicated outlet and a little privacy (or not, haha).

    • Libby says...

      Do you have a battery pack? That has saved me many times! I’m hoping someone who knows more about the logistics will chime in, but I’m with you, mama!

    • Rachel says...

      I’m considering bringing my 9 mo old for that same reason. I live in the DC area and could walk from my apartment, but I can’t figure out how crazy it will be–I’m worried I won’t be able to make it back to him in time or pump.

    • Julia Holcomb says...

      Back in the day (1991) I used a hand-pump when I went on a daytrip to NY and left my twin daughters with my mother in the suburbs. No electricity needed. But you will still need a little corner to sit in; and it probably will be necessary to pump and dump, not to save the milk–but you could pump enough to stay comfortable and keep the supply going for when you and your child and reunited.

    • Blandine says...

      In those situations, I often use my hands to express. You still need privacy (or not) but at least the power outlet is no longer an issue.

  35. Coralie says...

    I’m French and I’ll be flying from Montréal where I live to the March in DC. But I’m worried about crossing the border. Do I tell the agent I attend the Women’s March? Maybe I’m being a bit paranoid?

    • You shouldn’t have to tell them that you are going to the march. They will normally ask you if you are going for business or pleasure. If you are going specifically for the march you would answer pleasure. Then they would ask what you have planned, how long do you intend to stay, when will you return, etc. To which the answers would be, I am going to Washington DC, I will see the sites (from your marching path;) ), I will be there for X days and will return to Canada or where you are going to on X day.

      If you want to say you are going to the march you can, it shouldn’t be a problem, but if you are worried about it, you can get around it without mentioning it by just mentioning the location, it’s a touristy place nobody will question your motives for going.

    • Coralie says...

      Hi Kristen! Thank you very much for taking time to answer me, I appreciate it a lot! It gives me a little peace of mind. Have a good weekend :)

  36. China Hoffman says...

    I’m going with several other friends – we’re driving down with a bunch of parents from the daycare where my son’s friend goes. No one wants to be gone too long, so our bus leaves at 3 a.m. that morning, then comes back at 7 p.m in the evening! It will be fun to be up at 3 a.m. for something other than a crying baby/toddler!

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      That’s a really cool idea, thanks for sharing!

    • Be The Heroic You says...

      Hello Mariam and thanks,

      Participants who are not as creative can also wear something expressing their thoughts. As an outer layer (and later souvenir) we can choose WMW official shirts: http://merch.womensmarch.com/

      Or a shirt from the large variety found here: http://www.redbubble.com/shop/march+on+washington+womens-tshirts

      Or if some of the “male minded” participants don’t feel comfortable wearing any of those great options a more universal/not necessarily women oriented equality message here https://ex-aequo.myshopify.com/collections/all

      Whatever you are carrying and wearing, remember that you are part of an historical event which you get to tell your grandkids about in the future (or your friends’ and neighbors’ grandkids if you won’t have any of your own).

      I wish the best for everyone of us who can make it.

  37. Vicki says...

    I’m going for sure, though it’s a little trickier for me since I live in Alexandria, VA, which is right across the river from DC. Taking the metro is out, since it will be packed, driving into the city and parking would be a terrible mistake as well…considering going in on a hotel room with friends if any are still available…

    • Julia Holcomb says...

      I took the Metro to the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, in 2013. I live about 30 miles away from DC. It was certainly very crowded, but it was fun to be with the crowds,and security and logistics were handled well by the police and so on.

  38. Erin W says...

    I’m planning on going to the Women’s March Minnesota in St. Paul on the same day. I’m guessing it will be like -15 degrees F (Eeek!) but I’m excited!

  39. This is all so awesome, but large crowds of people make me so incredibly nervous. I tend to avoid parades and the like. Does anyone else feel this way? Any tips for overcoming it? I would like to be involved but just looking at photos of all these people together in one place makes my breath go short!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      I feel the same. Just the idea makes me really claustrophobic. I’m going to research and get back to you!

    • Erin W says...

      I’m also very claustrophobic and have issues with this, however the last march I went to didn’t feel claustrophobic. I would suggest staying on the edges or near the back of the march. If you’re near the edges it’s easier to step out of the crowd if you need to. It can definitely be overwhelming at times but I felt like it wasn’t nearly as anxiety-inducing as other crowd situations because we were all working towards the same goal and chanting together which made it seem more like a gathering of friends than a huge crowd (even though it was a huge crowd). Of course, everyone reacts differently to this kind of thing, so this is just my personal experience :)

    • Leah says...

      Same for me. I’m even hesitant to go to my local march. I think I will have to participate in some other way than physically being there.

    • nicole says...

      I feel the same. I hate that my fear is keeping me back, but the thought of this huge crowd makes me panicky. I think I’m going to try to find a smaller march closer to home.

  40. Kate Toussaint says...

    We’re heading to DC tomorrow to celebrate Christmas and you’ve inspired me. My 4 year old daughter and I will be doing our own walk as well as contributing financially. Thanks for your support of all people!

  41. Kristen says...

    I will be traveling to D.C. to march with a friend and her family!

  42. Lacey says...

    The march is very exciting and important! I will be marching in Austin, Texas. However, I think it’s really important to note critiques of the march by people of color. Highly recommend reading Brittany Oliver’s piece about why she does not support the march: http://www.brittanytoliver.com/blog/2016/11/16/why-i-do-not-support-the-one-million-women-march-on-washington

    As good intersectional feminist allies/accomplices of people of color, I think it’s important especially for white women (53% of whom voted for Trump) to listen to and center voices outside of the dominant discourse surrounding the march, particularly voices of color. Just my two cents.

    • Kristen says...

      Absolutely. I’m marching in D.C., but this did give me pause. I was dismayed by many of the reactions to the piece by white women on the Facebook page, as well, labeling any dissent as whining or attempts to undermine unity. It looks like the organizers are more cognizant of diverse voices now. I hope it continues to improve. We white women have work to do to educate ourselves and, as you said, listen to other perspectives.

  43. Erin says...

    Marching in Helena, Montana!

  44. Isahrai says...

    I am flying up with my 5 year old bilingual dual citizen daughter from Mexico to march in Austin (we don’t own any winter clothes!) We flew up to work for Bernie’s campaign, then to GOTV for Hillary and she was as defeated as I was when I told her the outcome of the election… not just the presidency but the entire tone of the election and the hatred that spilled out afterwards. To go and march and make a stand for women’s rights, immigrants’ rights, human rights is the least we can do.

  45. Allie says...

    I live in Texas and I just bought my ticket to D.C. yesterday! Crashing with extended family and have already made an appointment at a local tattoo shop to get the date permanently inked. I have no doubt this will be one of the most powerful and wonderful days of my life. LET’S DO THIS!!

  46. Jess says...

    My mom and I (and my newborn) are planning on going to the one in LA. So glad it’s been organized on the west coast too!

  47. Lisa says...

    From Truckee, CA many of us are going to Sacramento, CA.

    I am hoping that not only are the marches well attended, but that all transportation routes to all marches are jammed!

  48. Giovanna says...

    I’m going with my mom, sister and best friend! My town in NJ is organizing buses (15 of them are full!) down to DC for the day. Too important not to make your voice heard right now.

  49. Ramsey says...

    Thanks so much for this great post, with so much useful info!! I was thinking I’d have to get myself to Washington to participate, but now I know that I can be a part of this great event here in Boston (much more doable for me because of my work schedule).

    • Chris says...

      My daughter and I will be there!!! We are coming in from Richmond, VA and are looking forward to seeing all of you!!!

  50. Ana says...

    Awesome! Thanks for all this information. Made me realize I can participate too.

  51. Christina says...

    My husband and I are going with our two daughters, ages 4 and 3. We live in Maryland and are hosting friends from Oregon and family from Philly. A number of my male and female coworkers are going too! For me, the march is an expression of the future I want for my girls. I also want to show my support for all of the groups Trump (and many of his supporters) so easily demean and disregard. Looking forward to seeing ya’ll there!!

  52. Bethanne says...

    I want to march in Washington, but too close to my due date. I’ll be marching in my city of Saint Louis!

    • Olivia says...

      Congratulations!!!

  53. I wish I could be of the gathering but will cheer you all on from England. I have only been on one march in London in the late 80s but my top advice would be: make sure you go to the loo before you start. Even if you think you don’t want to. I think Gil Scott-Heron got it wrong; this time, the revolution will be televised.

  54. Emilia D Peña-Disla says...

    Going to be there flighting in from Providence, RI with several teachers colleagues and couple of friends. This is about standing up for injustice and to inspire the future leaders of this country.

  55. Em says...

    Thank you for this post!!!

  56. Liv says...

    I’m organizing a sister march in Albuquerque, NM, and I’ll be marching in DC!

  57. MissEm says...

    I’m interested in going up here in Canada, and possibly bringing my daughters, but I’m wondering…I consider myself a feminist and supporter of human rights and equality. I’m also pro-life. Will the marches be explicitly in support of abortion (I realize that for some people abortion access is a big women’s rights issue and they will bring that concern to the marches, but I’m talking about official support or a primary focus)? In other words, YES I want to be part of a march that supports social justice, human rights, and the voices of the vulnerable and marginalized, but I don’t want to inadvertently bring my daughters to a largely pro-choice/pro-abortion march. Does that make sense? (Also, I realize there are people who don’t believe it’s possible to be feminist and pro-life – I respectfully disagree but that’s not a discussion I’m up for having here – I just want to get a better sense of what the march is about!).

    • Andrea says...

      My concern, too. I don’t know the answer yet.

    • bisbee says...

      Missem…just wanted to say…I don’t know ANYONE who is pro-abortion. Pro-choice, yes…pro-abortion? I think not.

    • Beth says...

      I’m wondering the same thing.

    • Katie says...

      One of my radical hopes for the next 4 years is that we can start to see strength together from women (and men) who have previously been divided by being pro-life or pro-choice. I think it’s becoming more and more obvious that while most of the Republic party is anti-abortion, they are in no way “pro-life.” I hope we can start to see more partnerships between people who support abortion rights and those who are pro-life in their opposition to abortion, but also in their desire for quality of life for mothers, babies and families, care for the Earth, actively working towards peace in war-torn places, etc. There is so much more in common between most women than just their viewpoints on abortion!

      I realize that this doesn’t actually help clarify if the march itself will be specifically focused on abortion or not, but I hope that we can start to be proactive in crossing the pro-life or pro-choice lines that were set by politicians, not mothers, sisters and friends. I’m trying to dream big about what sorts of changes and partnerships can come out of this dark and divided time. Truly working together for women, mothers and babies is so, so much bigger than abortion.

    • Sophie Tuleburg says...

      There is no such thing as “pro-abortion.”

    • Jean says...

      Any large march will include a contingent of people who hold some views you don’t agree with. Perhaps this would be a good opportunity to show your daughters the importance of putting aside personal opinion to fight for human rights.

    • Diane says...

      Who is “pro-abortion”? I know a lot of people who are “pro-choice”. Respectfully, I don’t call you “anti-choice” I call those of you who are pro-life by the term you prefer and I’d recommend you do the same. Please think about it. Thank you!

    • MissEm says...

      Katie – yes! Totally agree! And to the couple of folks who expressed concern about my term pro-abortion…I know it’s not a preferred term and I’m sorry if I offended – we need more nuance in the discussion bc there are people who are pro-choice but find abortion itself morally problematic or at least distasteful, and people who are pro-choice bc they find abortion to be more or less negligible and even a positive option for women akin to a form of birth control – I read a lot from these varying viewpoints and do find some people to be more or less “pro-abortion” in that they believe that abortion is something to celebrate as an emancipatory symbol for women. Then there are people who are pro-life in that they are anti-abortion/choice about abortion but don’t consider other issues of life to be a part of that viewpoint (I find that problematic – I’m much more comfortable with a compassionate pro-choice position than a “one-issue” pro-life position), and people who are pro-life as part of a broader worldview that includes abortion but also includes issues around the death penalty, gun control, basic human rights, women’s rights, etc. I think the two terms – pro-life/choice – are limiting and lack the nuance that’s needed to have real conversation. I was trying to express that and not meaning to offend, but I will try to think of better ways to communicate that.

    • MissEm says...

      Diane – as I implied above, some people are anti-choice! It’s more about simply restricting that choice than promoting life at the expense of certain choices to them, and that might be an accurate way to describe that mentality, rhetorically speaking. But I get your point.

    • MissEm says...

      Jean – yes! Of course of course! We’re big on that in our family, and not afraid of other viewpoints. I’m not expecting that or asking if everyone will be on the same page about everything – I just want to better understand if the march’s focus on women’s rights equates that intrinsically/across the board with a pro-choice stance and if that will be reflected in the march’s…agenda, I guess. I know many people there equate the two, but want to know if that perspective is a given. Hope that distinction is clear.

    • Emily S. says...

      I appreciate your respectful question. As you mention in your response below, there certainly is nuance and many people are pro-choice while not necessarily ‘pro-abortion’ – whatever that means. It’s important to know though that the idea that women use abortion as a form of birth control, as you mention, is a huge misconception. It is a difficult choice to be made, but sometimes the only option. I’d rather a woman be able to make that choice than for the option to be taken away. Even before Roe v. Wade, some women had abortions– and many more were forced to do so in an unsafe environment, and had complications or died. The same will happen again, if rights are rolled back. Privileged white women (like myself!) would be able to have the procedure safely, if necessary, but others might not. It comes down to economic and racial equality then, too.

      Another way to think of it could be – long before any pregnancy, we need to support women’s rights because that way, women will have increased access to health care, education, and medical care, increasing access to birth control. Thus many fewer women ultimately need to have an abortion.

      I think choosing to abstain from a march ultimately saying, we won’t stand for the hateful speech and actions of our president, because of one belief some attending may hold which is different from your own, is limiting. I encourage you to go and voice your support! I am sure you won’t be the only woman there with your particular beliefs, either.

    • Leigh Wheeler says...

      I’ve never known anyone to celebrate an abortion.

  58. Meg says...

    I think a, “Hell ya!” is appropriate in this case. Marching in Toronto, Canada!

  59. This march is already giving me the chills. Thrilling!

  60. CP says...

    Hoping to march in San Diego with my four year old daughter but that is right before my due date with twins and walking any distance these days is tough! I donated and have been telling people about it and encouraging others to go. I hate sitting this one out!

    • Stacey says...

      I’m going to try San Diego too! Good luck making it.

  61. Anna says...

    We will be marching in Denver!

  62. Allison PDX says...

    I will be marching in Portland!

    • WJ says...

      Me too! Two generations in tow ;)

  63. Ali says...

    Is there a march in the Tampa area?

  64. Jennifer Vercelli says...

    I’ll be there from CA with Baltimore contingent! The minute I heard about it I signed up and set up a local page to help get info out about the march #strongertogether

  65. I will be going and I’m so excited to stand with like minded Americans. I’m lucky because my brother lives in DC so I can just crash with him and I reserved a parking space a month ago. So, I’m all set to go!

  66. This post pretty much seals the deal on a blog that I friggin’ LOVE TO DEATH already. Thank you for writing this, as it’s been top of mind… I’m on pregnancy bed rest for what could be months, and so I was trying to find a way to participate and support my sisters without being there. You’ve done the homework for me. To all the marchers in D.C. and all the participating cities: stay safe, stay strong, fight on. With you all in spirit (along with the future feminist in my belly).

  67. CindyA says...

    So excited to live in the District and am opening up my home for a bunch of friends who are flying in from all over the country.

  68. I’m taking a bus with my mom and sisters from Connecticut–there and back the same day. Super excited! I bought a t-shirt, and I’m ready!! I’ve never marched before unless you count a tiny little support rally for Planned Parenthood in downtown Albany, when I was in elementary school. :)

  69. sandy says...

    My friend and I will be there representing our little village of 357 in the “pinky” of Michigan! Empire/Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore! Looking forward to peacefully marching in large numbers on our nation’s capitol!

  70. Carol says...

    My husband and I will be marching in Austin!

  71. Tania says...

    I’ll be marching in solidarity in Toronto!

    • MissEm says...

      Me too!

    • Charlotte says...

      Me too!

  72. Rachel says...

    I’m going – heading up from Atlanta with a friend. My toddler daughter and longtime partner will be marching in Atlanta.

  73. Christina says...

    Thank you for this information! I’m going with my teenage daughter and my step-mom. We’re flying to DC from Los Angeles. It’s such an important gathering.

  74. One Love says...

    What exactly is the point of this? As an American I just cannot get on board with modern American feminism. We’ve come so far in the western world but yet there are still complaining about banal issues compared to to the troubles of what many of women around the world face.

    I get the reason women in the 70s and before marched and protested, but today’s protesters just seem like a bunch of narcissists. This isn’t about equality, its more like feminists trying to prove to the world that they’re better. Something proactive for your social media feeds. No thanks!

    • Samantha says...

      While I can understand where you are coming from, this is absolutely about equality. Not just for women, but for ALL people.

      https://www.womensmarch.com/mission/
      “The rhetoric of the past election cycle has insulted, demonized, and threatened many of us – immigrants of all statuses, Muslims and those of diverse religious faiths, people who identify as LGBTQIA, Native people, Black and Brown people, people with disabilities, survivors of sexual assault – and our communities are hurting and scared.”

      We as Americans need to fight for these rights to inspire those in other parts of the world who may not have a voice yet. Perhaps this will inspire another Malala.

      Also, I don’t feel that fighting for a women’s right to make her own health care decisions is a ‘banal issue.’

    • Elizabeth says...

      I think the idea that the work of the feminist movement is over is naive. A few examples:

      1. The nation has just elected as president a man who has openly stated he believes he can sexually assault women with impunity. The fact that this did not immediately disqualify him in the minds of voters is a sign the work of feminism is not over.

      2. The next congress is already planning legislation to enact a so-called first amendment defense that would allow businesses to refuse to serve individuals based on their sexual orientation or marital status. A clear sign that the work of feminism isn’t over.

      3. It’s not all about the West. The Trump transition team recently circulated a questionnaire amongst employees at the State department asking about policies, programs and funding first instituted under Secretary Clinton that sought to support women’s rights around the world. The move has raised questions about the new administration’s intentions to defund such initiatives. Again, I say the work of feminism isn’t over.

      This march is about a lot of things, as is the feminist movement. Feminism works to challenge sites of entrenched power and exclusion in the world. Finding community and solidarity is an essential part of developing that challenge and, I think, more than enough justification for attending this march.

    • What privilege it must be to feel as though the state of things in America are so good for women. that they do not warrant or necessitate change.

      Feminism is about believing in EQUITY for EVERYONE.

      When a black mother has to worry INCESSANTLY whether her son is going to die at the hands of a police officer, that is NOT progress, and it has EVERYTHING to do with feminism.

      When a Native woman has to give birth in the freezing cold, while fighting for clean water, that is not progress and it, too, has EVERYTHING to do with feminsm.

      When a farm worker is doused in pesticides while harvesting the crops that you will eat, then later suffers from infertility, that is not progress and it, too, has EVERYTHING to do with feminism.

      I could go on – about how those of us in rural communities have to drive dozens of miles to our nearest Planned Parenthood to receive life-saving services, or about how there is talk of national registry for Muslim citizens and yes that means our daughters and sons may never feel safe in their own neighborhoods again – but I won’t.

      There is nothing “banal” about protesting, about being angry, about wanting to walk alongside equally passionate, intelligent people who feel and live and breathe these injustices every day, and who are SICK of them.

      There is still a LOT of work to do.

    • Julia E says...

      Ditto!!

    • One Love says...

      At Elizabeth, I understand the NEED for feminism in some cases, American women aren’t suffering as much, I’m sorry to say, as much as a women from a country where female genital mutilation is still a norm or where underage marriage is ok. As for Planned Parenthood, that idea was formed from a racists and was not for black women. It was to kill black babies, so that’s pretty much a moot point.

    • Sara says...

      I’m with you, sister (@One Love). The time and energy devoted to this march, not to mention the money, could be far better served being used to help women and children who are truly suffering throughout the world. This anti-Trump hysteria irritates me. What are you afraid of, exactly?

    • Alex McKellar says...

      We have absolutely come along way, but we’re still NOT equal. That’s the point of modern feminism. Anything less makes us still inferior to men and that’s just not good enough. Many western women experience this reality on a regular basis with serious real-life consequences – how lucky you are if you feel this isn’t the case for you! I agree that women in the developing world have it worse, but every time we fight for the rights of women anywhere, we are improving the lives of women everywhere!

    • Laura says...

      Feminism includes women around the world too. I want equality for all women, everywhere, not just America.

    • Laura says...

      And also, if women around the world face troubles, that proves that the work of feminism is not done.

    • Allison says...

      sexual harassment in the workplace, sexual assault (especially on college campuses) and domestic violence – not banal issues, and very much an issue today. Reproductive health and choice, access to medical care, getting fired for wanting to take maternity leave or taking too many days off during pregnancy – still issues, and extremely important to not just women but to all families and the growth and health of our nation. Yes, women in the US in general may have more safety, security and options – but that doesn’t mean these issues are not worth fighting for. It allows us to be even stronger advocates for women here and around the world.

    • I’m with OneLove and Sarah on this. The march is a nice idea, but ultimately nothing will change unless you get men to rethink their world view too.

    • Jean says...

      One Love, perhaps you regard the challenges faced by American women because of sex discrimination to be ‘banal’, but rest assured that these challenges are deeply problematic to women across the country, in particular women of color who are doubly discriminated against because of their race as well as their sex. It’s your right to respond passively to the current threats to American women but what’s the point of belittling those of us who are choosing to take action for ourselves and our sisters?

    • LAW says...

      I’m not sure what you mean by banal issues, but I can assure you that the feminists I know are fighting for rights that are anything but banal. Take a look at the United Nations experts’ assessment of women’s status in the U.S.
      http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=52797#.WGa9BLWbdaU

    • Katie says...

      One Love,

      I read your comment about a week ago and haven’t stopped thinking about it! Please watch the video at the following link:

      http://everydayfeminism.com/2016/01/wtf-is-intersectional-feminism/

      You may find it useful to think about today’s issues through a lens different than you own.

  75. Diane says...

    My husband and I are going via bus from Boston. I’m 63 years old, and I want my voice heard. Will it make a difference? I have no idea. Will it make a difference to me? Hell, yes.

    • Frédérique Poirier says...

      I really love the way you see this movement, Diane! I’m 26 years old and I find this so inspiring! Love from Montreal.

  76. Meg says...

    I’ll be marching in Seattle!

    • I’ll be marching in Seattle, too!

    • Greta says...

      My sister and I will be marching in Seattle as well!

    • Lydia says...

      Marching in Seattle with my parents, husband, and friends! My mom took me to a HUGE pro-choice march in Washington, DC when I was in 7th grade, it inspired me to stand up for equality for the rest of my life. We are so strong together!

    • Katie says...

      Three generations planning to march together in Seattle :)

  77. Myrt says...

    Those of us who voted for Trump did so because he represented this country’s best chance of maintaining our role in the world. When Barack Obama was elected we did not march because we didn’t share his values; and we certainly did not approve of his appointees to various positions. We accepted the fact he was our president and deserved our support. It seems to me this march should be concentrating on bringing America together, not further divisions in our own people. In four years you can vote your beliefs; in the meantime please do your best to reunite, not destroy this country.

    • shannon says...

      I’m genuinely curious why you consider a march with the stated goal of “…. supporting equality for all, including immigrants, religious groups, those who identify as LGBTQIA, people with disabilities and anyone whose rights might be threatened” as something that could “destroy the country.”

      While I most definitely do not share the values of the president-elect –particularly his much publicized attitude toward women – I personally will be marching in support of the groups above. AND as a statement of defiance against hate. Yes, in four years, we’ll all vote again; in the meantime, we’ll bring our voices together to support the vulnerable.

    • CindyA says...

      I hope you’re sending this same wisdom to the president elect, who has done nothing to unite the country following his hate-filled campaign.

    • Alice says...

      Does “reuniting” the country mean ignoring threats to the rights of non-Christians, the LGBTQ community, women, the elderly, disabled people, the poor. etc.? I disagree with your logic that peaceful marches such as this one will help “destroy this country”. Ideally they start a discourse, something that is truly lacking in this country. Instead we are encouraged to blind allegiance.

      Protecting the vulnerable is the right thing to do. We are practicing our first amendment right to free speech.

    • Theresa says...

      I certainly don’t think marching and raising your voice is destroying our country. This march is about unification and standing up for others. Please remind me, did President Obama wreck our role in the world and President-Elect Trump is the person to restore it? I also don’t remember President Obama insulting various groups of people continuously and inciting such actions amongst supporters. I certainly don’t understand how anyone can excuse such oppression of others.

    • Diane says...

      It’s so strange and bewildering to see those of you try to manipulate those of us who are exercising our right to assemble as something that is divisive. This country is more and more like the pre-Hitler as a result of rhetoric like that.

      Obama was NOT accepted as our President, given Congress fought his every move and conservatives attacked his citizenship, his family and his beliefs as a Christian. So you’re wrong on a number of levels.

      And I’ll be marching here in Oakland.

    • Stacy says...

      For me, this is not about politics or differing ideologies. I accepted Bush and moved on. Could accept a republican president and move on. This man is an embarrassment and a disgrace in my opinion. He is everything I’ve spent the past 13 years teaching my daughter NOT to be. It breaks my heart to hear her talk with her friends, asking how someone like that can become president and I feel the best thing I can teach her is she has a voice. She can speak out against intolerance and hate and be heard. So, we will be headed to D.C from Boston to do just that. Three years ago she looked out of the hotel window and said “I can’t believe I’m in the same city as Michelle Obama”. Two weeks ago, referring to next year’s class trip, she said “I can’t believe I have to visit Trump’s White House”. That is not ok in my world.

    • LAW says...

      We are trying to save this country and its best values and ideals at a time when a minority in this country elected a man who represents the nation’s worst qualities.

    • Cecily says...

      I can’t even. God help us!

  78. Nicole FR says...

    I will be marching at another march in Austin, TX with many of my long, close lady friends + allies who identify as men. So excited!

  79. Cindy says...

    Not!
    I will be spending my positive energy towards making and helping my beautiful country, America to be a better and stronger country for All…. Not just some …. Prayerfully and with positive human interaction. Go in Peace.

    • Sara says...

      Dear Cindy, it seems from your comment that something about this initiative makes you angry, specifically, that it is not inclusive. Is that the case? From the information above it does seem to be an event focused on making the country better and stronger for all, and not just some. Or am I missing something? I’d love to hear more from you and understand your position.

    • Alice says...

      Ironically marchers will be using their positive energy toward making and helping our beautiful country, America to be a better and stronger country for ALL. All Americans deserve to live in peace and be free. Standing up for the rights of the disenfranchised amongst us is the right thing to do. I’m sorry you feel differently.

    • bisbee says...

      Cindy, your comment puzzles me. What on earth does a march about equality for all NOT say that we want America to be a better and stronger country for all? I think you are confused…

  80. Kate Murphy says...

    I am traveling with three busloads of women from our tiny upstate NY town of Canton (population 4,000). We are PSYCHED.

    • Olivia says...

      I freaking love Canton, and I love that in a town of 4,000 you somehow got three busloads of women! How amazing!

  81. Sarah says...

    I will be there as a proud DC resident! Hosting a breakfast for friends beforehand. Welcome all to our beautiful city that remains hopeful and active!

  82. Kristi says...

    Thank you very much for covering this! Reading that the focus of the March is not Trump, but women’s and human rights helped me clarify my thoughts about what the day will mean for me and what kind of sign I will carry. I’ll be marching in Tucson, Arizona.

  83. delaney stuart says...

    any info on how to get sponsored or get one started? i’m a college girl in SC, one of the only states without a sister march :( and would love to be able to participate in DC but don’t know if I have the funds on a college student budget or any friends interested in going and splitting travel

  84. Elaine Lynch says...

    I marched in Washington with the Jeanette Rankin Brigade, January 15, 1968 Jeanette at 87 years led the march. It was peaceful and powerful with only 5,000 women – let us hope for millions this year.

  85. Carrie says...

    I’m not going, but am knitting some hats to contribute to the Pussy Hat Project. Check it out!

    http://www.pussyhatproject.com

    • Be The Heroic You says...

      Hello Carrie,

      I read about that only yesterday. All of us have some yarns to tell but some of us like you are fabricating more practical (and more physically) memorable contributions to our posterity.

  86. melissa w says...

    Thank you for posting this! I will be marching at a sister march in Maine.
    I went to a march in DC in the late 80’s and it was an amazing experience.

  87. Alex says...

    Was planning on going to DC without my 15 month old daughter, then changed my mind and decided to take her with me to the NYC march (we live here). But now I’m undecided. Which one should I do????

    • Melkorka says...

      I am in the same situation, I have a 20-month-old and I want to bring her – so I am going to go to the March here in NYC. It feels like an appropriate way to involve my daughter (I worry about having her out all day in the cold in D.C) and show solidarity for the march itself.

    • nora says...

      Marching in NYC with three generations of family – including our toddler. The travel is just too much with a little one, and we want the whole family to be part of history. Hoping to see lots of kids!

  88. jamie says...

    Travelling from NYC with friends to march in DC alongside my mom!

    • Alix says...

      I’m also travelling to DC from NYC with my mom–and my husband!

  89. Kadija says...

    I really appreciate this post for its helpful tips on practical things like food and lodging for those that want to be a part of it. I’m still figuring out logistics to see if I can swing it, and this info helps tremendously! In the meantime, I’m knitting p_ssyhats for myself, family and friends, as well as sending several for those who will be marching in the chilly weather. I. AM. SO. EXCITED!!!!

  90. Thanks for covering this! Lots of us are coming from Portland. xx

    • Carrie says...

      Portland tried the peaceful march thing and wound up with a crowd that caused over $1 million in damages. I hope this march will stay peaceful. We live in a really violent society anymore, and a very politically charged one too at the moment. I’ll be following the coverage from my desk at work.

  91. Thank you for posting this. We must do all we can to be the change we wish to see.

  92. Charlotte K says...

    I am going as are most of my middle-aged friends (from New England). I want the new administration to see the number of people who do not agree with their stated agenda. I am going to show that I love my country and I don’t want it to turn back to 50 years ago. I will be marching for liberty & justice for all. The fact that it is vaguely organized appeals to me. I don’t want to march for an organization, I want to march to show that we won’t go along with rejecting true American values, like our strength that comes from immigrants. I have arthritis and I expect to be in pain that day and for days after, but I don’t want to have to tell some child I care about 10 or 15 years from now that I did nothing. I’ll march whenever and wherever I can. I want them to see the NUMBERS of people who will march. If 250,000 people are there, it will be stupendous. If the 500,000 people who have RSVP’d all show I’ll be thrilled. If it’s more, then I’ll have some hope!

  93. Katelyn says...

    Taking a rally bus from Ann Arbor, MI with my mom and sister! This is our moment and we couldn’t miss it!

  94. Jennifer says...

    I’ll be there with two friends and my 70 year old next door neighbor. Plane and hotel booked the day the march was announced.

  95. Miss Sarah says...

    I’ll be marching with my mother, coming from PA. We also marched together during the March for Women’s Lives in 2004. It was an amazing experience to share with the strong woman who raised this strong woman. Can’t wait!

  96. Meggles says...

    I’all be going to the Boston one. :)

    • Grace says...

      Me too!

    • Claudia says...

      Yes! I will. :)

  97. Kate says...

    I’ll be marching in solidarity from Denver (and happy to host if anyone driving in needs a spot to stay!).

    • Olivia says...

      I’m moving to Denver on the 28th of December and so excited to be marching there! xx Glad to see someone else.

  98. Meredith says...

    Can’t make it to DC that weekend, but I’ll be at the NYC march!

  99. Kellie P. says...

    Going to the one in St. Paul, Minnesota with my two girls and husband!!!

  100. Madie says...

    I’ll be marching (waddling, more like, 9+ months pregnant) at our Sister March in Oakland, CA!

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      How cool, good luck with everything!

  101. Ryan says...

    Yes! I’m coming in with a group of teachers from Chicago. I’ve seen one of the national co-chairs speak and I’m thrilled with who is taking the lead for the march. Tip: We’re staying in Baltimore and taking a bus in since airbnb/hotel prices are *much* more affordable than D.C.

  102. Denise says...

    I’ll be marching in Portland Oregon.

  103. Allison says...

    I’m going, flying in from CA with some girlfriends!

  104. susan spaulding says...

    I live here. I work here. I am going and I have a crazy bedroom which I offer to someone who can’t afford to pay for a room.

  105. I WISH I could go, but with two little kiddos it’s just not going to work for our family. My mother in law, who is in her 60’s is going! I love it! She said she feels compelled and it reminds her of the old days when protest culture was filled with passionate women who wanted to make a change. I love having her as an example for my little girls! Sending power and positive vibes to everyone going!!

    Xoxo http://www.touchofcurl.com

  106. Hilty St. Denis says...

    I’ll be there from Alabama with several friends!

  107. nicole says...

    I’ll be there with about 10 other friends, men and women, as well as my mom and sister. We need to make our voices heard. Please join us and stand up for human rights, if you can. I marched in NYC the weekend after the election results. It was also peaceful. Many small children were there with us, carrying their own banners and signs. I found it moving and encouraging to be surrounded by people who cared about issues also important to me, even though it seemed as though the USA as a whole was turning against progressive ideals.

  108. Alison says...

    Flying in from California with my lady crew. Can’t wait to be part of this.

  109. Lizzie says...

    I’m going and truly excited! Just reading this post has me inspired thinking about so many people coming together in the name of human and civil rights. Looking forward to sharing in the momentous day.

  110. ks says...

    i apologize for my ignorance in this but while I support women & minorities right (and applaud COJ for continuing to highlight and bring to our attention these issues) – what are the goals of the march – not just for the day, but the long term? is there a united message or is it all our messages? are there actions that will continue after this that we can support so the message does not stop after that day? i think that has been my question with this march and npr’s article yesterday helped sum up some of my confusion better than i am writing it here: http://www.npr.org/2016/12/21/506299560/womens-march-on-washington-aims-to-be-more-than-protest-but-will-it .

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      Great questions, and maybe Breanne, who I interviewed, will be able to jump into the comments and say more, but I think this march is very much defining itself day by day in the run-up. It was created by a group of women who never dreamed it would turn into such a big movement and I think they are figuring out how to define it in real time. That said, I know they feel strongly that it’s about a lot of different issues and everyone is welcome to interpret it in whatever way has the most meaning for them.

    • Julie says...

      If it’s helpful, the vision and mission statement is posted on the women’s march website here: https://www.womensmarch.com/mission/. As far as I know, the group is also working with established non-profits (Amnesty International has launched its support). I definitely can’t answer your question as well as Breanne. But that’s a good place to start. As an attendee, I am also enjoying the dialog on instagram, which is helpful. Today the march posted about people who are bringing their kids in order to inspire them. Thinking of the future leaders who may be inspired to run for office or become a lawyer or lead a non-profit fighting injustice, those ripple effects can’t be tracked by data, but I have faith that they matter and will matter. Hope this helps!

  111. Annie says...

    I’m from L.A. but am going to the one in Chicago with my best friend who lives there. This Californian is ready to freeze her butt off to march in solidarity with some rad women from Illinois!

    • Ursula says...

      Annie! You can do it. Just bring lots of layers. :)

      I will be at the Chicago march too!

  112. bookishgrrl says...

    I went to the protest for Bush 43’s inauguration and then happily went to the Mall for Obama’s inauguration. With both of those instances at the front of my mind, it is really important to emphasize two points made above — it is likely to be *very* cold and you will do a LOT of walking. Be sure to wear comfy cozy boots with warm socks. And it’s also great fun, even when you feel like democracy itself is at risk.

  113. Erin says...

    My husband and I are flying in from Boston with our daughter, who was born right before the election and went with us to vote when she was 1 week old. Excited to make this memory with our new family, and teach our daughter to stand up for what she believes in…

  114. I’ll be attending the one in NYC!

  115. Kate says...

    I WISH! It’s just going to be too hard to get out there next month.

  116. Barbara says...

    I will be marching in Portland, Oregon. If you are in the area, please join us.

    • Babs says...

      I’ll be marching in the PDX march as well!

    • Sarah says...

      Me three!!

    • Lauren says...

      I’ll be at the Portland March too!

  117. I’m going. I need to go. I have to go.

    I’m 60 years old and I’ve seen a terrible erosion in the word “feminism” since I was in college. I want to proudly reclaim the word and stand together with a widely diverse group of people who will reclaim the respect and dignity of being female.

    Thanks for the post. And thanks to my dear friend Dee in NJ who asked me to go. And “hey” to Stella from Springfield!

  118. Anne says...

    Yes! Thanks for these great links. I’ll be including the pamphlet in the pre-rally rally house party I’m hosting for friends in my area that can/can’t make the march. I am so so glad to see that you are continuing the conversation around important women’s issues here and not shying away from politics. Of course, the tone is spot on, as usual cupofjo team!

  119. Kat says...

    My husband and I are going!

  120. Katie says...

    I have been planning to go since the moment I heard about it on facebook. My five-year-old will miss his mama but has told me he is proud of me!

  121. Lauren says...

    I’m glad you guys wrote about the march!

    I would caution Lexi to rephrase a bit to say it’s not *necessarily* about the new president. Because for many of us, the emotions conjured up by his election, and the associated events and revelations surrounding it, *are* very much among our primary reasons for attending.

    • Courtney says...

      I agree. Or perhaps, it is not “just” about the new president. While human rights are obviously much bigger than one election, there is no question that for many women, this march is absolutely an act of resistance against the president-elect, his horrifying incoming cabinet, and the misogyny and racism they represent.

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      Sure, but I think with the recognition that these issues did not start and won’t end with the incoming president. It’s much bigger than him.

    • LAW says...

      I agree!

  122. cooper says...

    I’ll be marching in solidarity in St. Paul, MN!

  123. Maggie says...

    I will be marching in San Diego!

  124. Emily B says...

    I prefer to channel my energy into something more specific. This sounds vague.

    • Lauren E. says...

      I’m with you. I’m still not sure what my going to DC will accomplish in the grand scheme of things. If we all put our money into local causes instead of transportation and lodging in DC it might make a much bigger impact. I’m a little bit on the fence about it.

    • Katharine says...

      I urge you to look at history to see the importance of a large group of people gathering in one place and how much change (both good and bad!) such gatherings can change. There is nothing vague about 500,000 people marching in support of human rights. It is in fact a tangible, specific way to broadcast a big message.

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      From everything I learned in working on this post, I agree, Katharine. I’m the first one to be skeptical but there’s a lot of precedent to support the potential impact.

    • Julie says...

      I think it’s helpful to read the mission statement: https://www.womensmarch.com/mission/ as well as reading the stories they continue to feature on their IG page. Gathering in a large group, as Katharine says, historically, large gatherings can have a big impact. Going and having our voices heard and then continuing to push for what you believe at home is very powerful!

    • Erin W says...

      It is a little vague I think, but marches and protests definitely have accomplished a lot throughout history, just look at what happened at Standing Rock recently!

  125. Sally says...

    Love that you are posting about this! I hope to be there.

  126. Betsie says...

    My husband and I are going! As are several friends from across the country, and their moms. We are staying with a friend, and the home of every friend I have in DC is going to be packed with others coming to the march.

    If you’re coming from a warmer climate, be sure to pack warm clothes!

  127. Amy G says...

    Thank you so much for posting this! I will be coming from Reno, and bringing my mom from Seattle. I have never marched before, but am very excited for this. if anything, our unfortunate political situation will inspire a generation of activists.

  128. kara says...

    what a great post! this is part of what makes this one of the best spaces on the internet.

  129. Anna says...

    I marched for planned parenthood in DC and it was lovely and empowering… Unfortunately I live in Europe so I can’t come but donating a bus ticket sounds like a great idea! I think I’ll give donated bus tickets to my mother and grandmother as an extra Christmas present!

  130. jen says...

    Most definitely will be going to our local one in Oakland.

  131. Shannon says...

    Really excited to march in solidarity at the Sister March in Madison, Wisconsin! There will be Sister Marches across the country (and even in a number of cities around the world!). If you’d like to participate visit the Sister Marches section of the Women’s March website at: https://www.womensmarch.com/sister-marches/

  132. Abbie says...

    Was thrilled to see there is a sister march local to me (st pete, FL). Totally doable for me, hubby, and our three young boys!

  133. Elizabeth says...

    I’m going with a big group of people from all walks of life! I know it will be so special and I’ll remember it forever. I can’t wait!

  134. caroline says...

    I support this March 100%. Don’t forget that many of us call D.C. home. We were drawn to this city to pursue careers in public service and we share your concerns and worry about the new administration. Long after the March is over we will go to work every day to do all we can to better this country, whether our work is at a federal agency, a nonprofit or advocacy group. So March proud and March strong and on behalf of my fellow Washingtonians..please don’t forget to respect our city and keep it clean!

  135. Kate says...

    Myself and 5 of my friends are driving down from Maine to attend! Thank you for posting this article – we’ll look for you all among the peaceful masses :).

  136. Tiffany says...

    another small way of getting involved if you can’t make it in person (or even if you can): join the #pussyhat project (pussyhatproject.com). They’re collecting handmade pink hats to distribute at the march for visual impact. Especially if you’re a crafter, it’s a very simple way to feel like you’ll be a part of the march!

  137. Mallory says...

    Many of us from San Francisco are going! My midwives, my daughter’s preschool teacher, a bunch of friends and myself. I’ve heard of so many people receiving financial help from friends and family to go, (myself included!) which makes me feel so bolstered that my community understands the importance of intersectional feminism and the need to show up!

  138. Liz says...

    See you there!

  139. I would love to go to DC, but it may be a stretch as I’m in Indiana. I am trying to go to the Indianapolis sister march though!

  140. so excited about this- a huge group of awesome women from minneapolis are going! i have a baby girl and kind of want to bring her with, but i’m undecided. either way, she and I are there in spirit!

    xo, brittany
    http://www.notablob.com

    • heather says...

      I’m torn about bringing my daughters, too. Part of my concern is safety, because even though I feel like I can count on other Marchers to be peaceful, there are going to be a lot of Trump supporters still in town (which sadly does include violent groups and White Supremacist groups), and I worry that some kind of scuffle will break out. The other part is just that they are still toddlers and may just be super needy and more work for me. On the other hand, I want to be able to tell them that they were there!

    • Lauren says...

      I’m also not able to go, as I’ll be 35 weeks pregnant, but there is a local march here in St. Paul- just in case you haven’t seen it yet. Same day at 10 AM! https://www.facebook.com/events/1798874673734173/

  141. H says...

    Nope, not planning on it! : )

  142. Marlena says...

    Yes! Coming from Madison, WI.

  143. Meredith says...

    I’ll be there with my mom! We’re roadtripping from Maine.

  144. bisbee says...

    I won’t be going, but I will be involved by donating to the cause. I participated in many marches in Washington during the Vietnam era…and also some marches for Women’s Rights in the early and mid ’70s. It’s a special thing to participate…and certainly NOT for women only!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that is awesome!

  145. Jessie says...

    Canadians will be supporting you from north of the border, in solidarity. :)

    • Ashley says...

      I am with you Jessie!

      -from NB with love

    • nadine says...

      me too from QC!