Relationships

5 Ways to Get Involved

Kendra Smoot lighthouse

First of all, congratulations are in order, for everyone. It’s one week post-election and we made it. All of us, no matter who we voted for. Since last Tuesday, we’ve talked about coming together as a country and boosting optimism. Many readers have asked for specific ideas about what they can do to volunteer, participate and become more informed. We’ve loved seeing those requests (we feel the same way) because it’s an important time to get involved. Here are a few suggestions, and we’re looking forward to hearing more ideas.

Know what’s at stake. There are limits on what the next president can and can’t change, and understanding the facts can help focus your efforts. Here are 10 questions and answers explaining how key issues could play out over the next four years.

Switch to renewable energy. The incoming administration may not prioritize the environment, but we can. One of the easiest things you can do to help (easier than recycling!) is reduce your own home’s role in fossil fuel emissions — a main cause of pollution. If you live in a state that allows it, you can switch your power to wind or solar with a click of a button. Check out Green Mountain Energy or Inspire.

Donate. Cup of Jo recently gave money to the ACLU, Emily’s List and Planned Parenthood, three organizations we strongly support. This list by Jezebel and this one by TogetherList highlight hardworking groups that need support, if you’d like to donate to a cause you believe in. (We know someone who is making a chili dinner for friends this weekend, and everyone who goes will donate $50 to an organization they’ll choose.)

Volunteer, make calls, do stuff. If you’re eager to give your time by volunteering your expertise or elbow grease, the options are almost infinite. Three avenues for picking a cause: a list by Mikki Halpin with 38 things you can do, specific ideas for writers and teachers, and the weekly Deeds Digest newsletter that suggests smart actions.

Get out of your bubble. Group texts and Facebook have been everything over the past week, but it’s good to get out of your comfort zone. We liked this simple yet powerful idea: Read a non-fiction book about people who are different from you and expand your point of view (here are a few to try). Books can be great connectors, as Lisa Lucas, head of the National Book Foundation, told NPR: “Don’t just read the thing that you think is for you… read the thing that’s not.” Or consider widening your perspective in person. You can search here for local meet-ups that talk about politics, put on documentary screenings, harness tech for good and organize group volunteer missions.

Thoughts? Any other ideas for large or small ways to get involved?

P.S. How to follow the news and how to raise race-conscious kids.

(Photo by Kendra Smoot/Instagram.)

  1. Holly says...

    Thank you for being so positive during all of this! Here in the U.K. I’m still struggling with Brexit, but reading this has helped me realise that there are things we can do to help during these difficult times! Xx

  2. Lauren C says...

    I really appreciate this post, and I wonder why the general idea, that it is important to be an active participant in social and political issues, is offensive to anyone. I love that a lifestyle blog is addressing topics that have real impact on our lives. There are thousands of blogs out there that have continued to showcase nothing but tiny homes, white sheets and the perfect lip stain; I’m so grateful that there are a few (like cupofjo) that have stepped outside of these bounds to address something REAL. That resonates with me–and I want to thank you for that.

    Also, as a suggestion, I love that you brought up renewable energy here, but the opportunities you have listed are very limited unless you live in Texas or Vermont. There are actually TONS of opportunities to “invest” in renewable energy. Community solar is a big one that many utilities across the country are looking into. If customers express interest and help to ensure the success of these programs (which usually cost them nothing, or actually end up decreasing their bills), utilities will continue to invest in them.

    I would LOVE to see a post (or ten) on ways in which we can meaningfully address issues surrounding clean energy and environmental sustainability–two areas under major stress with the new admin.

    • Jamie says...

      Agree with your first sentence, reminds me of this quote “I look at something from right and wrong as opposed to right and left.” -Our newly elected state representative (Jay Edwards, R-OH)

  3. Kate says...

    Such a relief to find that Cup of Jo, a blog I have followed for almost a decade, has decided to have a frank conversation about the election and is not engaging in the process of automatic normalization of this result. Sometimes you have to stand up and be counted, and it’s terrific to see you doing this. Thank you.

    I’m not an American, but I have watched what has been happening with horror. The USA is such a great country. I believe this is one of the most dangerous moments in its history.

    I also wanted to say what I’ve always thought – this blog in particular attracts such an amazing, thoughful and intelligent bunch of women folowers/commenters. Reading BTL is an eye-opener in itself.

  4. Lindsay says...

    My family has decided to make Christmas donations instead of exchanging gifts. It seems like the socially-responsible, right thing to do this year. I sent my family the link to the TogetherList. Thank you for the great ideas! Personally, I am more exited to donate to an organization that is doing such amazing work than braving the Christmas retail frenzy!

    • Adrianna says...

      Yay I’m not the only one!!

    • Tanith says...

      This is what we decided to do as well! If family members feel they don’t want to donate and instead send gifts anyways (despite our requests) we are donating or returning those gifts.

  5. Steph says...

    I work in science research (behavioral) at an Ivy league university. One of the many reasons I love my dept (around 40 people) is how much community there is here. The day after Election day, our director held an impromptu pizza party where all of us (doctors, clinical researchers, admin staff) could discuss our feelings about the outcome, but then decide what we were going to do moving forward to create change. We now have a few community initiatives to give back to our surrounding community (food drive, distribution of toiletries to patients in the ER etc) and I couldn’t be more proud of my workplace!

  6. Sally says...

    Another suggestion: support (i.e. pay for) journalism. Take out that subscription to the NYT and/or the Washington Post and/or your local paper. A strong and independent media has never been so important.

  7. Amelia says...

    Yes! Thank you for posting! I will continue to read Cup of Jo, but I will continue to love Cup of Jo if posts get us out of our bubble and into a world where activism for progressive, inclusive issues becomes part of the daily norm and push our thinking and grows our hearts.

  8. Please keep these posts coming! As John Oliver said, we must never think this is normal. We can be optimistic and cherish every little positive thing, but we must never think that Drumpf isn’t dangerous after all the hateful things he has encouraged.

    So far I have donated to the UNHCR, Planned Parenthood (including in Mike Pence’s name), the ACLU, and left a voicemail for Jared Kushner. My donations amounts are nothing to brag about, but I hope they help in some small way. There’s still a lot more to do.

    It’s overwhelming. I guess it just shows how many different types of people Drumpf has put in danger. So many. Too many.

  9. Brittany says...

    Thank you for this post and all of your political messages. I love your blog, and I am even more devoted now that you haven’t cowered from taking a stand. Thank you.

  10. This election has galvanized me. I am almost 40, and until my last breath, I plan on being ENGAGED. I’ve always voted, and I did do a couple GOTV activities in NH recently, but it’s different now. People that work at Paul Ryan’s office (and whoever else will be the future Speaker of the House) is going to get sick of my voice on their answering machine.

    For people who think Joanna should not discuss politics, please listen very carefully: people right now
    are terrified. This is not a normal candidate or a normal election. Minorities in particular are very afraid. And no wonder. A white supremacist is going to be Trump’s top advisor. White supremacy will be in the WH this coming January.

  11. Brooke says...

    I am so tired of individuals acting like Trump and Republicans are the devils of the world and Democrats are the angels. I’m a college-educated 22 year old (going to graduate school for biomedical engineering) and feel so lost and hurt by a majority of Americans right now. I proudly voted for Trump and I am NOT a racist, sexist, uneducated, awful person like this blog is making Trump- supporters out to be. It’s so disappointing to me because I have always come to this blog to relax and to indulge in things/topics I truly love to read about- but now with the new tone I can’t.

    • Rachel says...

      You may not be a racist- but you voted for one. People are afraid right now- and rightfully so. Your candidate has literally promised to deport them and has bragged about sexually intimidating them among many other things. I think you may realize one day how far you missed the mark by voting for this man. How do you justify the things he has said and promised to do? Please let us grieve- this IS a tragedy.

    • Gabrielle says...

      Too bad. Racism, sexism, misogyny, homophobia, and ableism weren’t a deal breaker for you? Get your lifestyle blog fix elsewhere if you don’t like the message of resistance to the normalization of hatred.

      Have been a COJ reader for six years and will always be because of her ability to speak her mind without alienating people ??? This “liberal cry baby” has no tears for privilieged people who wont be affected by oppression.

    • Alisha says...

      I would like to hear your reasoning behind voting this way; and I mean that sincerely. I was shocked by the election results, and don’t understand how someone could proudly vote for Trump. Hearing your viewpoint would help further understanding.

    • Rose says...

      I am not going to dismiss your angst just because I don’t agree with your viewpoint. Instead, I will leave this here and hope that you will read it and it will resonate. I am not religious by any stretch of the imagination but this is one of the most personally powerful pieces I’ve read on why people are feeling so personally hurt by Trump’s election. As a young college grad, I hope you’ll be able to keep an open mind as you read it and understand where so many of us are coming from. http://www.shannondingle.com/blog//i-want-to-help-you-understand-my-lament

    • Tilly says...

      I am not a US citizen and I don’t live in the US, but I’m finding this election fascinating. I would love to know why you voted for Trump. You are obviously not alone and it would be so interesting to hear your opinion.

      If I lived in the States Sanders would have been my first choice, followed then by Clinton. I’m happy that Cup of Jo has opened up room for political debate on the blog. I think that’s a great thing. And I think it could be very useful for the views of Trump voters like Brooke to be heard too.

      I vote for a blog post with interviews from a wide variety of women voters from around the States about why they voted how they voted. That should be easy enough, right?

      As Olivia Newton John said “Let’s get political, political. I wanna get political, etc.”

    • C says...

      While I am truly sorry you feel hurt and lost I would ask you for a moment to step into the shoes of those that will stand to lose the most by the policies he has promised to put in place. He is an unapologetic bully, racist, misogynist, xenophobic and on and on and you decided, with your vote, all those things were not deal breakers. To many that is the end of the story and the beginning of intense and sustained positive action standing up for the most underrepresented and unseen among us. And if you feel how you voted is not who you are then use the power you have to create positive change that will lead to greater understanding and respect among all people.

    • Brooke says...

      Alisha, thank so much for your request to hear why I feel the way I do and not just shutting me down like the others did. I voted for Trump for several reasons but here are some of the main ones: 1) I hate the way the country has been operating the last eight years. I care about fighting terrorism, the health of the economy, creating jobs, trade, immigration, taxes, and creating/ strengthening strong allies (I have been to 4 foreign embassies in the last year who ALL say they feel less connected to the U.S. than ever before because of President Obama). 2) Trump has not been bought by lobbyist and special interest groups. I love that he is a businessman and not a politician. 3) Donald Trump gave me my first job when I moved to NYC at 16 years old and he is not the same person in real life that you see on TV. He is soft-spoken, kind, and loyal. He treats his family and his employees with respect. I will be the first person to admit that he has said and done some really stupid things but at the end of the day I feel 100% confident that he will do a great job as President of the United States. Many Hillary-supporters have come out saying they will give Trump a chance so why can’t we all just try to unite and be hopeful and positive for the future?

    • Em says...

      Brooke – thanks for your perspective. I agree it is important to be open and to listen. My respectful and optimistic suggestion to the Trump supporters who are frustrated with being called racists and bigots is to prove us all wrong. You obviously have some legitimate reasons to support Trump, at the same time, I hope you are hearing the voices of marginalized and frightened communities. He has opened a pandora’s box of frightening and hateful rhetoric and empowered some of the ugliest factions of our society. Your guy won – and you have a tremendous power (and I would argue, a responsibility) to use your voice as a Trump supporter who rejects that rhetoric to (1) acknowledge that the rhetoric is out there, and that Trump played a part in unleashing it, (2) accept that people are rightfully frightened by it, and (3) denounce it, loudly and often. You can be optimistic about his presidency and excited by some of the things he promised AND STILL stand up for the marginalized people in our community. THIS is how we can come together.

    • Nancy says...

      Brooke, thanks for being willing to share your perspective. Even if you’re supportive of Trump, I’d suggest that two specific items are cause for alarm, and I’m suggest you contact your legislators to speak about these. Specifically, Trump’s named Steve Bannon, the former head of Breitbart, a racist, anti-semitic, misogynist website, as a strategist, meaning that the voice of hatred is now steps from the Oval Office. Second, he’s resisting calls to put his business into a blind trust, meaning that neither he nor his family would have control over his businesses while he’s president. While he’s not legally obligated to do this, it’s a longstanding tradition, and it’s a serious cause for concern if his children – who are also part of his transition team – are at the head of his businesses as they negotiate with foreign businesses and banks. If you value that he can’t be bought by special interests, I’d imagine you would also value his companies not being enmeshed with foreign countries, business, and banks.

    • Jean says...

      Thank you for shedding more light on why you voted for Trump. I am a lifelong republican and was around in the days of Ross Perot v Bush Sr v Clinton. The idea of an outsider non-politician who stemmed to blast through the usualsually norms of politics was intriguing. This time around I was so fundamentally and morally opposed to Trump from the day he announced his candidacy and then even more so ever time he opened his mouth or prowled during the campaign and could not stand behind the party this go. Not that I still doesn’t hold onto my fiscally conservative and more minimal government beliefs. Also, many times in life I have felt like I’ve told a dog person I love cats when I bring up moderate right thoughts to the left: like they are disgusted and can’t even fathom the idea of why one would even like a cat without hearing why I might, while the expect me to dote affections on their unleashed dog as it jumps on me and licks my face, and I am thinking “aren’t they all animals that deserve kindness”. Anyhoo, David Brooks of the NYTimes wrote an interesting opinion “The Conservative Intillectual Crisis”. As a young conservative, you may find it interesting, too.

    • K says...

      I so appreciate your comment. I am 29 and hold 2 masters degrees. I, like you, proudly voted for Trump and am not a racist, sexist, homophobic, etc etc. In fact, I work with immigrants who are here with and without papers. I love all of them, appreciate all of their stories, and put everything into helping them in every way that I can. However, I feel very strongly that our country needs major changes. There are too many handouts and the result of that is never good. I am seeing it first hand with the high school students I work with, with the immigrants I work with, and with my peers who have been “stuck in a rut” since graduating high school. I am so disappointed and disgusted by the way our generation is handling the outcome of this election, this blog being part of it. I used to come here for enjoyable content as well, but like you, I feel the same way about this new tone. When I read this post my first reaction was, “wow, maybe you should take your own advice on that last suggestion.” While I appreciate standing up for what one believes in, there is an awful lot of judgement coming from people who pride themselves in equality for everyone.

    • Adrianna says...

      I do pride myself in equality for everyone. Mr. Trump does not. He is very clearly telling us that he does not believe in equality for women, people of certain ethnicities/religions or for people with disabilities. It’s unmistakable. To top it off he has just signed Mr Bannon on to his team. He has sparked fear in millions and it’s not just in the US. I appreciate that people have their reasons to vote for whomever and I don’t believe that all those who vote for Trump are racist (though some are, that doesn’t mean people who put their votes elsewhere don’t have their own issues). I haven’t seen personal attacks for those who did vote for Trump, I see a blog that is here to support those millions who ARE devastated by the results of this election.

      Brooke, I am happy Mr. Trump has treated you well. I hope he finds it in him to settle our fears and treat the rest of the people in the country with the same respect as he gave you.

    • Aneta says...

      It’s sad how much barely concealed aggression there is in people’s response to Brooke’s comment and choice to vote for someone for whom many millions of Americans voted. Why not truly listen and not judge but try to look outside one’s own bubble? Do we really need more alienation and division in the US? I live in NY where so many people live in microcosms with opportunities that simply do not exist for millions of people in other parts of the country. Just because a system works for one person, does not mean that that system works for another. Aggression is certainly not going to bridge this divide but listening and really trying to understand just might. Fundamentally the people have spoken and it’s time we accepted the result and started a greater, more inclusive discussion of how we got to this point and what the problems are for millions of Americans who voted decisively for such radical change. Only then can perhaps positive change start to happen. You can’t fix it if you don’t understand it.

    • DR says...

      Brooke, I don’t believe for a second that you or a lot of people who voted for Trump are racists. I don’t even think Trump himself is aware of the damage his rhetoric as well as some of his policy choices – while well intended – are. It was wrong for HRC to call those who voted for him “deplorable”, there’s been some pretty deplorable things happening on both sides of the fence. I’m glad you were able to voice how things feel for you. You’re not the enemy, the concern that lots of us have is who Trump is placing into some major areas of power. Steve Brannon is a well-known White Nationalist and Carl Paladino has actually made the claim that Obama is a practicing Muslim with ties to a terrorist organization. They are the wolves we’ve allowed into the door and we need your help now more than ever to help us stop them. You voted because you believed in what was best. They are going to hurt us, and hurt us badly, I know you don’t want that. Thanks for listening.

    • SallyK says...

      Rose, thank you so much for the link to that blog post. Though my circumstances are very different, she describes exactly how I feel.

    • Courtnay says...

      Brooke – Agreed! There are terrible and wonderful Democrats and terrible and wonderful Republicans. Is Trump perfect? Was he our ideal candidate? Absolutely not! But just as many people on this blog think that Trump is dangerous, so do Trump voters think that Hillary is dangerous – and probably more so. Since homophobia and sexism have been brought up so much… what about her? She received millions and millions of dollars from countries who imprison and/or execute gays and women (Saudi Arabia I think being the largest donor with seemingly the harshest “punishments”) yet claims to be progressive for gays and women. A very real question: Do Hillary supporters 1. not know about that, 2. not believe it, or 3. ignore it? It seems more and more people are blind to the scandals surrounding her just for the chance to have a woman president. But please don’t forget that she abandoned OUR people in Benghazi. She has lied countless times over the years and continues to do so (do any of you younger people know about Whitewater, Travelgate, the Tuzla Dash to name a few? Look them up.). And people seem to be ignoring the fact that she lied to the FBI (something Martha Stewart went to prison for) and ignoring her private email server, which – yes – was likely compromised by foreign agencies. Does anyone know about her connection to George Soros? Look into him too; he is the real and evil racist and a huge financial backer of Hillary’s. And one final note… as a mother, I will NEVER be ok with someone who supports late-term abortion. You may not believe it’s a baby in the first trimester, but you KNOW it’s a baby in the last trimester. And that is unequivocally murder. All of that said, I do understand that many people are hurt and scared and think that America is now going to hell in a handbasket, but please look into the facts – not just what CNN tells you. All Hillary-lovers should really see “Hillary’s America” and if it doesn’t at least make you THINK, then you really are blind. Some people voted for Trump as their only way to effectively vote against Hillary. Because that scared us more.

    • K says...

      @Courtnay, BRAVA! I wonder the same things myself.

    • T says...

      Brooke,

      Thank you for taking the time to explain why you voted for Trump… I think these conversations, thought difficult, are important to helping people on both sides of the divide understand each other better. This election has shown that the country is so polarized, we rarely have the chance to venture beyond our own bubble world of like-minded people.

      You feel “lost and hurt” as a result of being perceived and judged as something you’re not (racist, misogynistic, etc). I sympathize with that. But there are many Americans who feel lost and hurt too — AND who now also legitimately fear for their physical and psychological safety and for the erosion of their rights. Since last Tuesday, perhaps your own day-to-day life hasn’t been too affected and you still have the luxury to escape reality and “relax and indulge” by visiting this blog (as do I). But this is not the case for many others who belong to minority or marginalized groups that Trump deliberately targeted during his campaign.

      All the reasons you listed for supporting Trump I would find more compelling if Trump could actually discuss those issues and policies (terrorism, the economy, immigration, etc) with any sort of depth, thoughtfulness and principled, intellectual rigor. But he mainly repeated grandiose slogans that had very little substance behind them and gave little indication that he grasped the complexities and nuances of those issues. HOW is he going to enact policies and keep the promises he made when he couldn’t even study up enough to prepare for a debate? Just read the transcript of any of his debates against Hillary and you will find that he couldn’t speak to any of his talking points with any level of detail, nuance or deep understanding. This lack of detail allowed potential voters to project onto his stances whatever they wanted to hear. (In fact, the WaPo reported his DC policy shop that was tasked with fleshing out his campaign platform and preparing him for the debates essentially closed because they found he was not receptive to it, that he didn’t need it to appeal to voters, and because he didn’t pay them. No really. Turns out it’s not just contractors that he will stiff.)

      It’s interesting that you say you cannot accept the “new tone” on CoJ, yet you can somehow abide Trump’s. The thing is, whatever your own beliefs, you still proudly voted for a man who called Mexicans “rapists” in his very first speech announcing his candidacy and continued from there to willfully stoke racial and social tensions throughout his entire campaign. He set the tone from the beginning. History has shown time and again that any time a populist leader harnesses these emotions, fueling and feeding off an atmosphere of fear, mistrust and hatred, in order to galvanize the masses and gain power, it never ends well for the country. You may personally not be a racist, but you can’t deny that racists across the country responded to Trump with fervor. And his victory further emboldened them, leading to an actual rise in hate crimes. Trump’s rhetoric is not just harmless words — it has unleashed dark forces.

      You implore us who supported Hillary to give Trump a chance. I would like nothing more to be proven wrong about him. Yet one of the first very steps he’s taken as president-elect is to appoint Stephen Bannon, an avowed anti-Semite, racist and misogynist (who spread and encouraged those views through Breitbart News — that was literally his job) as his chief strategist, an official role in his White House on a par with chief of staff. If you say you are not a racist, sexist etc, then this should dismay you. And you should stand up against it.

    • Meg says...

      Hi Courtnay – as a Hillary Clinton supporter who voted FOR her (and not just against Trump), and voted for her because she was (for me) far and away the more experienced, qualified candidate (and NOT simply because she is a woman), I wanted to respond to your questions about how I view her record. Hillary Clinton did not take any money from Saudi Arabia (it would have been illegal to do so). I believe you are referring to money Saudi Arabia donated to the Clinton Foundation. I’m not concerned about the Foundation taking money from Saudi Arabia, despite its human rights issues, to perform life-saving work around the world, including for marginalized people. There is no evidence what so ever that any of the donations influenced Ms. Clinton’s work with respect to Saudi Arabia. I’ve looked into the scandals you’ve referenced, but when I’ve looked at a variety of sources, and tried to find the primary sources rather than reporting by newspapers/networks, I’ve gotten comfortable with her trustworthiness. I have to respectively ask about the sources you’ve gotten your information from – if you primarily consume news from Fox/Limbaugh/Facebook, it is likely that your sources are as suspect for many of us as CNN is for you. For example, the FBI actually said that Ms. Clinton did NOT lie to them (although there is room for doubt about how fully and immediately truthful some of her public statements have been). I can definitely concede that she is an imperfect person and candidate, and I think a lot of Clinton supporters were frustrated that she wasn’t more forthcoming and aggressive in responding to her scandals precisely because her perceived dishonesty was almost always much more troubling than the “scandals” dredged up against her. I hope this perspective helps you understand the other side.

    • Rose says...

      Sallyk, you’re welcome! I thought it articulated how I felt . Unlike many others here, I do believe that everyone who voted for Trump in spite of his hateful rhetoric is complicit is complicit in, at the very least, upholding institutionalized racism, ableism and sexism. And for me, that’s personal.

      Courtnay, I don’t really know what to say and maybe I shouldn’t say anything, because really, how often do people actually try and listen to one another, but you’re ‘facts’ are not at all true. 1. Political candidates cannot take money from foreign powers, so no, Hilary did use money from Saudia Arabia for her campaign. 2) Martha Stewart did not got to jail for lying to the FBI, she went to jail for insider training. They are very different. 3) Late-term abortion accounts for less than 1% of all abortions in the US and are classified as abortions that occur after 20 weeks. The youngest preemie was born at 21 weeks and 6 days. So no, I do not KNOW that it’s a baby. And if you’re so concerned with late-term abortions, how about helping women get access to contraceptives or, shock, abortion within the first 8 weeks instead of trying to restrict them further. 4) George Soros is a flawed billionaire but is not, in fact evil. His main flaw was capitalizing on the British Pounds sharp depreciation. Please send me any credible evidence of his racism, since I have only ever seen him fight against racial injustice. 5) Hilary’s America is propoganda, not a credible documentary. I am a liberal but can concede that Michael Moore are in the same boat. The director, Dinesh D’Souza, has, among many other things, said that the problem with Africa is not that it was colonized, but that it was not colonized for long enough. He is, among other things, a racist, a homophobe, a Christian apologist and a sexist. I do not get any of my facts from CNN. I read critically and understand how to dissect both my personal bias and the author’s. However, I do believes facts still exist and hope the above help.

      As for the ‘scandals,’ Bhengazi and the email server, Hilary was cleared of all charges. She did not cause Bhengazi, she followed precedent from both Colin Powell and Condoleeza Rice when she set up her server and I do not hold a woman responsible for the sins of her husband. I do however, hold a person to his own word. As Maya Angelou said “when someone shows you who they are believe them; the first time.” Trump has shown us who he is over and over, and I for one, believe him.

  12. Z. says...

    I’m having difficulty understanding some people’s divide between “girly” things and the political. If we are citizens of any country, any decisions and choices we make in daily life are political. That is kind of at the root of the word, right? Getting that bar of chocolate is a political decision (fair trade or not), post partum depression is a political issue (health and social related, so political), taking the kids to the park is political, because someone at some point fought for the existence of parks or riding your bike vs driving or fashion is political (not enough people are concerned about the consequences of fast fashion or where their cute top from H&M or wherever is made or the employee rights of the people who make that top) or the very dietary choices you make. Each and every choice we make has a political dimension. Maybe some people choose to ignore that aspect of their decisions, but even that is a political choice, because then you give up on your chance to have a say, and someone else does (and will) make that choice for you.

    Also, I salute Cup of Jo team for having the “ovaries” to stand up for what they believe and what they see right (which seems to me to be just that, standing up for what you believe no matter what that may be).

    • wendy says...

      completely agree with this. thank you joanna and team for taking a stance.

    • You brought up another point! We must vote with our dollars as well. I’m trying my best not to support businesses that support Drumpf.

    • Thank you @courtnay! I totally agree with you. :-) For the record, I can’t stand Donald Trump. However, his policies are more in line with my thoughts than Hillary’s are. I am in favor of small government, more free trade, religious freedom, personal freedom (including being able to defend myself with a gun), state’s rights, and protecting our borders. I am in favor of-getting rid of political correctness. And I’m pro-life.

      I would love for a female to be president, and soon. But Hillary is not the kind of lady we need young girls to be looking up to. She is so corrupt and America was sick of a shady career politician. Donald Trump may be a very flawed man, but hopefully he will surround himself with people that will give this country the change it needs, and a better economy.

  13. Casey says...

    Strongly recommend the new documentary, Before the Flood, about climate change. It was eye opening. And added bonus, stars Leonardo DeCaprio. I only wish he would fund it for prime time viewing so it would reach a broader audience.

  14. Karen says...

    Thank for you highlighting such a wealth of resources and inspiration!

    I would like to add another cause worthy of our attention, and one which could certainly use additional support during the next four years. With Trump’s win, sensible legislation pertaining to gun safety faces an uphill battle. (On the campaign trail, he even spoke of ending gun-free zones around schools.)

    In looking for organizations that might support this worthy cause, I found everytown.org. I am planning to make a donation here. If anyone knows of similar organizations, please share.

    Thanks again, Cup of Jo, for providing such great round-ups of post-election info!

    • Em says...

      Check out the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence: http://smartgunlaws.org/. They are a truly fantastic group. The center was formed by lawyers in California after a mass shooting at a law firm in San Francisco.

  15. Arielle says...

    I love this post, thank you!

    As a longtime (5… 6years…?) reader of your blog I can’t tell you how comforting these posts have been. As a socialworker, activist, woman, reading your work around the election has been reaffirming and grounding. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

    With care and appreciation,
    Arielle

  16. Genevieve says...

    Love this post! I’m a long time reader, first time commenter. This election has shaken me, and I just feel compelled to do anything I can to feel useful. The past week has been filled with many conversation with girlfriends asking “What do we do now?”

    A couple things I have been doing (that aren’t already on your list):

    1. Subscribe to a newspaper. More now then ever we need to help fund and support credible news sources. I just bought my family members an online subscriptions to the NY Times as an early holiday gift.

    2. Have tough conversations with our kiddos. I’m a middle school educator, and taught the elector college and how polling works to my students. We avoided talking about the candidates, and focused on the mechanics of an election. Post election, I gave my students 10 minutes to ask me whatever question they wanted (beside who I voted for). The conversations were tough and my voice cracked, but we need to provide kids with an opportunity to ask questions and find out valid information in a safe space. We also discussed how much misinformation was floating around and how much fake news was out there- I’m making it my mission this year to build into my curriculum checking the credibility of what we’re reading. The next day I showed this video as a follow up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ghk-nDJB3Tk. Then, before Thanksgiving I’m having my kiddos complete the sentence “One thing I can do today to be kind is…” which we’ll display in our classroom for the rest of the year.

    Here’s to finding ways to channel our fire.

    • Genevieve – you brought up an incredibly important point, especially with children: how much misinformation floats around now and how people so very easily get swept up in lies. When I was a freshman in high school, I had a Social Studies teacher who spent the entire year, from September to June, teaching us about credible sources: the value of where we get our information and how to discern fact from fiction. It was a lesson that changed my life. I’m glad to hear you starting to talk to your students about it. Math and science will always be important, but Critical Thinking is the most valuable of all.

  17. Kerri says...

    If the Cup of Jo team does decide to proceed with some sort of discussion about women’s stories of / experiences of abortion, it seems it would be really important to include links to resources where women (and men involved) can seek healing after the often traumatic experience of abortion, if they so choose. Many women feel depressed and even suicidal after an abortion – sometimes even years afterwards. There is help. http://www.silentnomoreawareness.org/search/index.aspx. I personally know women who have found a lot of peace through programs like Rachael’s Vineyard.

    (The same is true for people who have worked / are working in the abortion industry and wish they didn’t have to. There is help available. https://abortionworker.com/)

    • Nancy says...

      Let’s also say here, though, that many women do not feel traumatized by their abortions. For many women it’s a difficult but necessary choice – and painting women as victims when they’ve made a legal choice about their own bodies and their futures doesn’t help anything.

    • Ashley says...

      Nancy, I’d almost go to say that most women do not feel traumatized by their abortion (particularly early term). I work in mental illness and this topic has been broached many times. More women actually express relief or optimism for the future. But that’s my brief experience with women.

  18. Julia says...

    To all the commenters saying that they are disappointed in Cup of Jo’s stance on the recent election, I have been a reader since 2009 and its been pretty clear to me through the posts throughout the past 6 years where she stands socially and politically. She has never pushed that on anyone but has been clear about where she stands. SO thank you Cup of Jo for posting this post especially right now, it is important to speak out and educate more than ever. I have been completely aghast at the amount of bloggers that have chosen to go about their every day posts and not comment about what is going on. Taking a blind eye in fear of losing followers in my eyes is saddening and not so admirable. Thank you Cup of Jo for the insightful, important, and lastly inspiring posts regarding our world today and what we can do to take action and make it a better place for the future generations.

    • Lorelai says...

      amen

    • Jillian says...

      Agreed, agreed, agreed. Speak up people! I’m a big girl, I can take it.

      Also, I’m Canadian. This election has rocked the world. I’ve been unable to think of anything else all week. On election day, when my whole body hurt from the stress, I read this : “Being Canadian today feels like I’m overhearing my downstairs neighbours arguing about whether to set the building on fire.” It was so accurate to my feelings of helplessness that day. Thank you Cup of Jo for the suggestions for actions to take – many of these can be applied in similar ways around the globe.

  19. kim says...

    This is all good and progress. Thank you.

  20. Thank you for this post, Lexi! I work at MM.LaFleur, an NYC-based fashion start-up that creates clothing for professional women. Following the election, our CEO sent a letter to our customers, calling for a conversation among women. In 24 hours, we received over 1,100 responses. We published a handful of them on our digital magazine, and the article was picked up by Fortune. Cheers to continuing an open, respectful dialogue through communities like Cup of Jo.
    http://fortune.com/2016/11/15/women-election-mmlefleur/

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      I saw that and I salute you guys! xo

  21. K. says...

    One more action to take: Foster Campbell is a Democratic candidate in a runoff for a Louisiana senate seat. It is a chance to flip a senate seat and add a voice and a vote of reason and compassion to the senate. I am neither from Louisiana nor have a lot of money to spare but I am donating anyways given the importance. Please look him up and find the donation page on his website if you can.

    thanks.

  22. Over the summer, I listened to a fabulous broadcast on NPR that challenged listeners to start following legitimate news sources that were more geared towards the party they didn’t identify with. It also suggested to open one’s friend circle with those on the opposite side. The thought process was that by broadening your knowledge and not just cloistering yourself with like-minded folks, you were more apt to really make the best informed decisions. I found that to be a very thoughtful concept (like the two books you suggest above).

  23. Thank you for continuing to keep this as part of your platform. I keep seeing things like “Can we just stop talking about politics?” and the answer is “No, we cannot, because there are some scary people in power right now and we all have to do what we can to ensure the worst doesn’t happen.” It’s easier to stick your head in the sand but that’s part of what got us into this mess in the first place. Easy doesn’t always equal right.

    Love the list. In terms of books, I highly recommend to everyone who lives in a blue bubble, as we seem to here in the city, JD Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy. Really opened my eyes about Trump voters (though it didn’t necessarily make me feel better). Book review coming on my blog very soon!

  24. PS Also worth mentioning is that in New York City, you can join New York Cares, which is kind of a booking service for dozens of charities all around the city. You go to one orientation (a pretty simple hour), and then you can search for the right volunteer opportunities in your area. i.e., working with kids in a shelter, Thursdays, in Queens (or feeding the homeless, or Arab-American women and children, or playing board games with people in long-term care, etc etc…). My husband and I have been volunteering with New York Cares for three years and it’s one of the best things I’ve ever done. Usually we volunteer apart – I mostly work with kids and he mostly works with the homeless – but sometimes we volunteer together – which might sound kind of strange, but it’s actually far more emotionally beneficial as a date experience than going out for dinner.
    Sign up here: https://www.newyorkcares.org

    Since the election I’ve also signed up with the Young Center which protects immigrant childrens rights, so I can be a Child Advocate to an unaccompanied child during their immigration process.
    http://theyoungcenter.org
    “Unaccompanied and separated immigrant children—also called children on the move—are children who travel to the United States without their parents from all corners of the world: Central America, Mexico, China, India, Romania, and Sierra Leone, just to name a few. They travel alone, via smugglers (coyotes), or under the control of traffickers. The children come for many reasons—they are fleeing political upheaval, extreme poverty, child labor, and abusive homes. Some children are sent to the United States by their families. Some children come hoping and expecting to reunite with family members here. Most are teenagers, but some children are much younger—11 years old, 9 years old, 5 years old or 18 months. Children apprehended at the border or at ports of entry are in almost every case placed in removal proceedings: formal court proceedings in which an immigration judge will decide whether or not the children (who carry the burden of proof) can prove they have the right to remain in the United States. If they can’t prove their eligibility to remain in the US, they will be repatriated to their country of origin. In most cases, these children must navigate the immigration system alone, without an attorney, Child Advocate, or any other adult to help them. A Child Advocate is an adult who volunteers to spend time with and advocate on behalf of an individual unaccompanied immigrant child while he or she is subject to immigration proceedings. We welcome volunteers from all cultures, professions, races, ethnicities and social backgrounds. Advocates must be at least 21 years old. We have a particular need for bilingual volunteers who speak Spanish, Mandarin, Indian languages (Hindi, Punjabi, Gujarati), Bengali.”
    What do Child Advocates commit to do?
    ■ Visit with the child each week.
    ■ Help the child think through options and decisions.
    ■ Accompany the child to court hearings and other important meetings and interviews.
    ■ Conduct research on the child’s situation in his or her home country.
    ■ Draft a written report regarding best interest recommendations.
    ■ Maintain communication with the Young Center staff, the child’s Case Manager at the shelter and the child’s attorney.
    ■ Advocate for the best interest of the child.
    If you are interested in volunteering to be a Child Advocate in any of our office sites, please contact the volunteer coordinator at the site you are interested in serving:
    Chicago, IL Geoff Wood gwood@theyoungcenter.org
    New York, NY Rubi Rodriguez rrodriguez@theyoungcenter.org
    Harlingen, TX Thomas D’Adamo tadamo@theyoungcenter.org
    Houston, TX Rachel Wootten rwooten@theyoungcenter.org
    San Antonio, TX Geoff Wood gwood@theyoungcenter.org
    Los Angeles, CA Geoff Wood gwood@theyoungcenter.org
    Phoenix, AZ Kate Morgan-Olsen katemo@theyoungcenter.org
    Washington D.C. Emily Verburg everburg@theyoungcenter.org

    • Alexandra says...

      This is so awesome. Thank you for sharing. If anyone happens to be a lawyer or speak Spanish, my organization, Safe Passage Project, represents unaccompanied kids in their legal proceedings in New York. We need volunteers lawyers and interpreters! (and donations never hurt). http://www.safepassageproject.org

  25. Erica H. says...

    AWESOME! Thank you! XO

  26. Love this and you xxx

  27. This past week has really exacerbated the polarization in the country and I feel like I have seen the very best in people (as well as read a lot about the worst). The surge in interest people have for giving their time, voice, and money to causes they believe in has brought a lot of much-needed hope to this post-election reality. This is a great list!

    A list of informative podcasts that cover current events might be another good way for people looking to become more involved to stay informed. I always enjoy the round up of podcasts that you feature on Cup of Jo and a more news-focused list might be of interest to other readers!

    A few of my (arguably very left-leaning) favourites: NPR Politics, The Weeds, Keepin’ it 1600, Slate’s Political Gabfest, Planet Money, the audio version of The Rachel Maddow Show, and for a couple for views outside of America, CBC’s Power and Politics and The New Statesman podcast. I’d love to hear what other readers listen to to stay informed!

    The Ezra Klein Show is also one of my favourite interview podcasts and features a lot of political-focused discussions. He had a great episode talking with Arlie Hochschild about the experience of researching and writing her book that was featured in the NPR article about reading opposing view points.

    Thanks again for all that you do at Cup of Jo and for creating a space where women feel safe and empowered to have discussions like this!

    • Kaitlin says...

      I LOVE The Ezra Klein Show, too. The Deborah Tannen interview was unbelievably amazing. And I loved the one where he interviewed the Baltimore health commissioner. So interesting.

  28. Laura says...

    Wonderful post, thank you.

  29. Kelly says...

    Great post and great comments! What an incredible community we have. I find hope in the people who have really shown up and come together over the last week – so thank you all for that<3 Let us not lose this momentum.

    Just wanted to chime in that it's also important to support real journalism right now. If you can, pay for subscriptions to the New York Times, the Washington Post and other great, verified newspapers and magazines (print or digital!). Not only is there so much misinformation and biased content circulating, but Trump has has made threatening statements about libel laws (although there are limits to this) and blocking a presidential press corp.

    We know that his big ego, thin skin and aggressively litigious record does not bode well for freedom of press or speech in the next few years. This is a vital check and balance on his power and accountability and the very foundation of our republic. We need to keep ourselves informed and support those who work so hard to bring us this information. Knowledge is real power.

    • Kelly says...

      Also – ProPublica is another great and worthy non-profit news outlet with some of the best investigative journalism for the public interest!

  30. Jean says...

    Thank you. Also most appreciate the last “get out of your bubble”. Grew up in very rural area and everyone I still know there voted for Trump (I did not). To many it may seem not worth hearing their voice since what happened is deemed so absolutely unacceptable, but there is more to their story that truly listening to and respecting and empathisizing is worth doing and is a path to reconciliation. My caveat is those for Trump that are not fueled and steeped in the belief of racism, sexism, bigotry, hatred, etc. … which I truly believe are not the majority.

    • t says...

      Yes Jean! It is so important to understand both sides.

    • Ali says...

      I absolutely agree that it’s so important to try to understand those who don’t live near you/don’t think like you, but I do feel like I’m only seeing that encouraged by the people on the left as regarding the people on the right. I have seen much less of a call for people in rural or red areas to try to understand what might make people in blue areas vote that way, and I find that so frustrating.

    • Jean says...

      Ali, I hear you. I guess first, if one wants something done, they should be the person to make the first move. And right now I want something to be done. Reaching out can enlighten, hopefully both sides. Second, I think rural right is open to reaching out to the left but often feel their voice doesn’t have a place to be heard in that realm or is just quickly dismissed (I.e., what you believe is wrong, how can you even think that, etc.). There are plenty of rural now city that have a better perspective on both side, but how often do city move and live REAL rural lives? Coming from rural I have put up with plenty of “city” comments, from the teasing of city cousins growing up on if we have to fetch our own water or does school not start until harvest is done, to how being rural must mean I never appreciated the arts available in the city, to just a couple months ago my very own husband was laughing how he use to go to country fairs in college to watch the odd country folk and now he works with many in corporate agriculture and isn’t that ironic (it is? And uhm, you are married to one, by the way). It’s subtlety degarading.

  31. Yes, yes, yes! Called my local reps during lunch today, it only takes a few minutes. When I heard “Your voice is being heard” on the other end, I began to cry. I’ve also deleted Two Dots from my phone and am reading fiction instead. Amazon Prime Members – you can get books on your kindle/kindle app for free! In two days worth of commutes I’m almost finished with a book (which also makes me realize just how much time I was wasting).
    Also, I cannot love this post more. GO CUP OF JO, GO!!

  32. Leslie says...

    Love your political bent so much! Good for you for speaking your mind and encouraging love.

  33. Lindsay says...

    Thank you for this post! The election and it’s aftermath has made me so motivated to get involved! I’ve donated to several organizations, made calls to my congressmen and I’m planning on attending the January march in DC. Please keep up your efforts! We need to work hard to fight the normalizion of the hate and bigotry that Trump is bringing to the White House.

  34. Kate says...

    Thank you, thank you, thank you. These posts are absolutely essential right now, and I feel that I can no longer follow blogs that are not addressing the current political climate. Thank you for using your voice, and for making it easy for me to continue supporting Cup of Jo!

  35. These are great, particularly “get out of your bubble”.

  36. Jane Neal says...

    This is the first time I have commented on your blog which I read every lunch time. I have come up with a very similar plan and was looking for additional ideas. The fact that some of the elements were already in place due to actions I have taken in the past year a small comfort this past week.

    We signed up for green energy in September
    I volunteer teaching ESL to immigrants
    The coalition I volunteer with settled our first Syrian refugee family just yesterday.
    I renewed my subscription to Planned Parenthood
    I signed up for Moms Rising
    I will add the books you recommend to my reading list
    I will start to host talking parties and invite new people, not just the same people.
    I will CALL all my political representatives on all the issues I care about because I have read that letter writing does not work… but phone calls do!

    I am an English woman who has brought up my four kids in the US – I love the way your blog has a taste of England in it!

    Finally The Crown really was the perfect thing to watch this week… loved it.
    Thanks for the recommendation.

  37. My first step is avoiding Facebook. By it’s very nature, it attracts viral videos and articles. By THEIR very nature, viral videos and articles share a limited, and extreme viewpoint. They feed into what you already believe, or fear. I think the news in general has become more and more this way because media organizations are understanding now that people get their information from social media. To a great degree, I believe, it’s all driving both sides farther apart. The government worker that referred to Michelle Obama as an “ape in heels”? I’m sure many of us have heard that repugnant story. But I’m afraid social media is misleading us into thinking that it represents a lot of people. Does it? I don’t think so.

    • I haven’t looked at Facebook since August. Between it causing me to often feel inadequate, I knew that this upcoming election would make my blood boil since some of the stuff I see on BOTH opposite and “my” side is flat out insulting and ridiculous. Social media is such a bane to our society. Ugh. Isn’t it refreshing to be free of it?

  38. Milou says...

    I just want to echo what so many have written: Thank you.

  39. Christine says...

    Thank you so much, Jo. These posts have been a source of light and truth for me in this post-election time. Your writing strikes the perfect balance between acknowledging the issues and inspiring hope.

  40. Gianna Nicolay says...

    Hi! In addition to all this awesomeness there is something immediate Cup of Jo readers can do. There is a runoff in Louisiana for a senate seat happening on December 10th. Foster Campbell is the Dem candidate and if he were to win the Senate would be split 51-49. Donate if you can here:

    https://secure.actblue.com/…/p…/fostercampellforsenatedonate

    or sign up to phone bank/volunteer here:

    http://www.fostercampbell2016.com/volunteer/

    Would be awesome if you amend the post or include it in the weekly round up!

    Gianna

    • Madie says...

      I donated! Thanks for the heads up – I hadn’t heard about this run-off election with potentially huge implications! Go Foster Campbell and Come On Louisiana!!

    • Rosie says...

      Thank you for spreading the word about this Alyssa! I’ve just donated and shared it with my friends and family, one of whom also already donated. While we can’t flip the senate, I’ll certainly take one more seat!

    • Alyssa says...

      Rosie,

      Thank you so much for catching my error there! “a Senate seat” is what I should have written.

      And yes, Gem! Go Louisiana!

  41. Erin says...

    Thanks so much for this post–I think it’s so important to tap into all the energy and desire for action that many of us feel right now. In addition to your great list, a few additional ideas:
    –Hillary may have lost, but for those of us who championed her candidacy, I think it’s important to reflect on what she meant to us and why her legacy matters. I wrote a public letter on Medium and would encourage others to do the same (bonus: it felt pretty cathartic to write it down!)
    https://medium.com/@Global_ErinH/thank-you-hillary-4ddb468177e5#.8kndtkpvg

    –If we want to boost our country’s pipeline of strong, female candidates (across all parties!), we have to start in our own communities with work to make young girls feel valued and empowered. I LOVE volunteering with Girls on the Run, which has chapters all across the country. I’d highly recommend checking them out, either in a volunteer capacity or by considering a donation of any size.
    https://www.girlsontherun.org/

  42. Fiona says...

    I love this list and am really grateful that you and the team are offering this respite of concrete suggestions in a sea of uncertainty. Three of the things that I’m concentrating on right now are 1) making sure I buy all holiday food, presents, wrappings etc. from local stores, larger stores that support my beliefs, stores run by migrants, POC, women, telling local stores what I need so they can stock it in advance, and making sure all presents are made in the US wherever possible. I’m also asking my family and friends interested in getting me presents to do the same, or make a donation in my name.

    A second thing I’m doing is that I travel a lot for work, and am offering to be my friend’s personal shopper, charging them local prices (from small local stores or artisans themselves), plus a 25% up-charge that goes to their pick of a list of charities I love. (My friend at work wants Mexican wrestling masks for her son, they cost $15 here and are made in China, they cost $4 there and are made in Mexico, so I charge her $5 and the extra $1 goes to my local animal shelter).

    My third thing is reaching out to larger stores that could be a good fit for the larger empty storefronts in my neighborhood that smaller stores can’t afford. This brings local employment, tax income into my local area (which supports transport, education etc.), and increases foot traffic which also helps smaller local stores.

    Just some additional thoughts if anyone else is brainstorming!

  43. A friend sent me this: https://www.hifromtheotherside.com/ — a website that connects you to people who voted differently than you. To be completely honest, I’m not *quite* there yet (and I think I’ll have plenty of it at Thanksgiving), but it’s a great idea once emotions have settled a bit.

    Next week I’m hosting dinner for a dozen or so girlfriends (the group actually keeps growing, which is exciting!) and I’m cooking chili and getting wine and asking them to make a donation, for what they would have paid for dinner out with girlfriends, to their charity of choice. Over dinner, we’ll discuss our causes and how to get further involved. While I was devastated by the outcome, it has been incredible to watch my friends mobilize, organize, and speak out in ways I haven’t seen before.

    • Meg says...

      What a cool website! I’m intrigued.

  44. Sarah says...

    You are awesome Cup of Jo peeps! Love from a Brit X

  45. Danielle says...

    Thank you for the link to the LA times article, it significantly reduced my anxiety. I spend a lot of time worrying about climate change so Trumps win devastated me. I’m Canadian but have donated to American environmental groups this week as they may need it more than we do right now. For the Canadians that don’t think the result of this election effect them, WRONG, as Donald would say.

  46. Corinne says...

    Thank you so much for this post. I’m looking for ways to make sense of last week and I know that active participation and positivity is the way to go. Your post has given me several concrete tasks for my new to-do list.

    I would also like to thank you for not shying away from this topic in general. There are going to be some who disagree with your point of view and, ultimately, you may lose a reader or two. In the long run, however, it is far more important that you speak your truth and follow your heart. You have somehow managed to do that in a fair, evenhanded, and inclusive way and I applaud you for that. It’s wonderful to see you navigating these difficult decisions with such grace. Please keep it up.

    • Madie says...

      Hear, hear! I second this, wholeheartedly. COJ we love you.

  47. Carolyn says...

    RE: (We know someone who is making a chili dinner for friends this weekend, and everyone who goes will donate $50 to an organization they’ll choose.)

    I’ve been thinking about this for a few days—does anybody have any suggestions for how to phrase an invitation like that? “Please come over for dinner but only if you can donate money” makes me a little nervous.

    Thanks!

    • Corinne says...

      Perhaps frame it as an opportunity rather than a simple dinner invitation? For example, “Looking for some motivation to get off your duff and take a positive step? Great, I’m your girl! Simply donate $10 to your favorite charity in the next two weeks and I’ll reward you with an evening of yummy chili and a roomful of inspiring, likeminded friends!”

    • Lindsey says...

      Have you heard of Go Jane Give? They are perfect for this sort of thing. https://gojanegive.org

  48. Amy Madeline says...

    I read this when you posted, but visiting the blog today had to come back and thank you for using the blog to help us respond in helpful ways to support our concerns in the days to come. Keep it coming! I feel that your well-rounded posts, from small ideas to large ones, reflect my life and interests and bring me real content that is meaningful and useful.

  49. Sarah says...

    Love this post, and I have a suggestion to add:

    Reach out to a Syrian Refugee family in your area. It’s a community of wonderful people who likely feel unwelcome right now. If you google the name of your city and “syrian refugee resettlement,” you’ll likely find a way to get connected. I’ve been “mentoring” a young Syrian mother for a few months now (her kids are about the same age as mine), and her family is joining my family for their first Thanksgiving next week! How cool is that? It has seriously made me feel so good; I highly recommend it.

    • That’s so wonderful, Sarah! Go you!

    • Danielle says...

      Sarah, I just want to tell you you’re amazing!

    • Sarah says...

      What a wonderful thing to do, must be the name :)

    • Belle says...

      Love this idea! If anyone is interested in donating to a refugee organization in particular, I’d highly recommend the International Refugee Assistance Project. They do really wonderful, truly impactful work.

    • Laura C. says...

      Sarah, you are great! Thanks for sharing!

  50. Kim says...

    Thank you for sharing the green energy companies! I had never heard of Inspire, but just signed up for it. The fact that my home will be run on 100% solar energy is incredible. Thank you!

  51. Maria says...

    Dear Joanna,
    as shocked as I still am about the outcome of the election and its implications for all of us, I have hope that people will get together to make a difference and change things. And I wanted to thank you very much for speaking up for your believes in feminism, equality, LGTB rigths and much more! I really think it´s also a brave step to voice your believes here.

  52. I love that last suggestion!

    • Victoria D. says...

      Thank you guys for giving great ideas about how we can help organizations that help others. I think we’re all looking for ways to make a positive difference and be agents of change. I do want to emphasize that the majority of what PP does involves preventative health screenings. Birth control and contraception is a big part of what they do and that’s the first step in preventing the other thing. As a poor college student, I had no health insurance and required a cervical cancer screening and PP provided that. Coming together requires stopping vilification and bridging the gaps. Getting educated and understanding. Stepping out of our comfort zone as many have said. I’m ready! I respect cupofjo more than ever for their posts on the matter.

      Here’s a TED talk I found insightful:

      https://www.ted.com/talks/jonathan_haidt_can_a_divided_america_heal

    • Andrea says...

      In terms of Victoria’s comment below, PP does about 30% of all abortions in the US. If there are roughly a million a year, PP does more than 300,000. http://www.politifact.com/punditfact/statements/2015/aug/04/sandra-smith/fox-business-reporter-95-planned-parenthoods-pregn/

      Plus, government revenue accounts for half of PP funding: http://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpolitics/2015/08/05/429641062/fact-check-how-does-planned-parenthood-spend-that-government-money

      So, for people who have an issue with abortion, giving money to this organization is problematic. They are a leading provider of abortion in America.

    • Laura says...

      Wow, Andrea, Planned Parenthood has prevented over 300,000 unwanted or severely medically impaired fetuses from growing into 300,000 unwanted or severely medically impaired children? What a wonderful and invaluable organization to women and the world- I’m doubling my donation.

    • Dewey says...

      Andrea, that’s a bit misleading. There are no federal funds for abortion. Yes, there are federal funds that go to PP (for now), and yes, PP provides abortions, but none of the government funds are permitted (by law) to go to providing abortion. We also know that the #1 way to reduce abortions is to put women in control of their reproduction, namely by providing contraception. That’s a really big part of what PP does. So are they providing abortions? Yes, as a part of comprehensive women’s health. Sometimes it comes down to termination. But in a broader way, they’re reducing the demand. This is all to say: if you’re against abortion, PP is actually an EXCELLENT place to donate funds!

  53. Thanks, Cup of Jo team. I’ve also been listening to the Civil Conversations Project to learn about others, YouTube’s School of Life channel to learn about myself and others, and always love YouTube’s Stuff Mom Never Told You to keep learning more about feminism. Love out to everyone.

  54. Hanna says...

    This election cycle has been an intense one for me, because my life straddles the divide between the blue tribe/liberal elite and red tribe/rural America. I grew up in rural West Virginia; later I traveled a lot, accumulated a stack of diplomas, and postdoc-ed at NASA, and lived in a much bigger world. Since life is always full of surprises, I’m now raising my kids in the community where I grew up and still working on space missions missions. Two things that I never thought would fit together, but somehow they do. Roughly.

    This election has highlighted the tensions between my professional world and my home. I (like so many people in my “blue” world) am appalled by Trump. Meanwhile, so many of my neighbors and friends in West Virginia view him as a champion of the working people. I find myself struggling to explain to neighbors why Trump is not really the savior they’re looking for, struggling to explain to other friends and colleagues just how bad things are in rural America and why people here are willing to risk disaster for change — and then in another breath, damning people in my community with the same criticisms I tried to defend them against.

    One of the things that has helped me navigate my thoughts and emotions this year is the Common Sense podcast by Dan Carlin. The most recent episode should be required listening no matter who you voted for in the presidential election, and no matter or how confident or conflicted you felt about your choice. Somehow we’ve got to find a way to move forward together as Americans. Dan offers a rationalist’s view that makes working together across political divides seem both essential and possible.

    • Hanna says...

      I think what I’m trying to say is that one of the most important things we can all do is try to understand the other side.

    • I also live in rural America, and though I am a Hillary Clinton supporter, was hardly shocked by the outcome of the election. I kind of think I have an advantage, as I am not stuck in a “bubble.”

    • t says...

      Well said Hanna!

    • Emily says...

      As a fellow West Virginia (turned New Yorker) I feel this strongly. <3

  55. Laura says...

    Please , do not forget that what happened did not only hit US.
    As already wrote last week I’m Italian and deeply concerned about the result of the election. What happens to you, effects us and viceversa.
    Please resist and show us that we all can survive and also get something good from such a difficult moment.
    I and we need you to stay positive and resist .
    Thanks
    Laura

  56. Kerri says...

    Yes! I love this space! I have been feeling so frustrated lately and not sure what to do or how to get involved to make a REAL difference. This is exactly what I needed. Thank you, thank you.

  57. Amy says...

    Thank you for this post!

  58. Katrina L says...

    I like all of these ideas. In addition to some of these, I chose to write Hillary a thank you card. She’s done a lot of great work, and if I’m having this tough of a time, she must be struggling.

    • Jenny says...

      Would you mind sharing the address to which you sent the card. I would love to send her something as would my little girl.
      Thanks!

    • Lynne says...

      Yes, me too!

    • Kaitlin says...

      I sent one too!
      Hillary Clinton
      Post Office Box 5256
      New York, NY 10185-5256

  59. admittedly, the first week left me feeling both energized and lethargic. i’ve reached out to a local immigration organization and am going through the interview process.
    knowing me, i needed to find a cause that speaks to me and as an immigrant who came to this country after escaping on boat from vietnam, i know that this work is needed. my role would be small, but it would be towards a greater good and towards a great country overall.

  60. Sian says...

    Interresting article here about liberals and conservatives swapping Facebook feeds for the day and seeing totally different kind of news:

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/nov/16/facebook-bias-bubble-
    us-election-conservative-liberal-news-feed

    Helps a bit with understanding the ‘other side’, we are literally hearing different things to each other these days no wonder we think so differently to each other.

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      Hi Sian, totally. Especially when half of the country says Facebook is their main news source — so important to get a sense of what that looks like outside your own bubble.

    • I grew up in a VERY conservative, evangelical bubble and then moved to a liberal city, went to a liberal college, and made liberal friends. Now I work in the Oil and Gas industry in Houston where my friends are liberal but my coworkers are extremely conservative. All this lead to a very diverse newsfeed. It’s so tempting to unfriend or hide the people who feel differently from me, but I won’t do it because I get insight that I would never have otherwise. Sometimes my blood pressure rises a little bit, but I think it’s worth it to have all the information.

  61. Brittani says...

    For number 2, switching to renewable energy is something only a limited number of people can do. Recently, I’ve been reading and following on social media, a few “zero waste” accounts, inspiring me to make small changes in my daily life that cut down on plastic consumption (therefore production) which is one of the harshest realities for our environment.
    Someone you guys might be interested in doing a spotlight on is Stevie Van Horn, located in NYC. She has great style, lives waste free, and runs the blog Trading Waste For Abundance. Truly, limiting our individual plastic consumption (for example, simply refusing a straw at a restaurant) will make a HUGE impact on or environment, and for some, all it takes is awareness of that fact.

  62. Rachel says...

    Huge high-five to everyone at Cup of Jo for including election-related content. It is really disappointing that readers who are probably attracted to your lifestyle blog because of how much it doesn’t shy away from ALL aspects of life then say they will stop reading once one suggestion in a post goes against their own beliefs. I have been saddened to see blogs I love reading completely ignore the election (which I get is probably for business reasons in a tough market for many of them), but it has been inspiring to see the team at Cup of Jo is passionate enough to put themselves out there.

  63. Jehanara says...

    This is such a timely and helpful article. It is so important now for all of us and for the future of this country to really snap out of our bubbles and get to know unfamiliar things and people. As a Muslim immigrant raising my American born son here, this election has literally broken my heart but there is a reason for everything, a purpose so to speak. Perhaps this turn of events was needed in order to nudge us into looking at issues differently and also looking at the other side of issues. Resentment and rage will do nothing, we all need to feel personally responsible for how our country progresses. Baby steps, each and every small change will help. Using less plastic, living with less waste, teaching our children about tolerance, understanding and that excess of anything is toxic. Opening doors, doing small kind deeds and just being a reasonable kind human is a good enough start. And yes, charity giving away a part of ourselves not just by writing a check but actually seeing and feeling someone else’s cruel gut wrenching reality and then helping them with our hand, our hearts and our minds. Our children are our greatest asset and responsibility, teach them how the “other” lives and how much they have to be grateful of and to never take anything for granted.

  64. Don’t forget about Standing Rock too. The media exposure they were getting was increasing until the election results. Keep an eye on this important issue, don’t let it get swept under the rug!

  65. Virginia says...

    Thank you for this.

  66. sam says...

    This is a really lovely list, but I think it’s missing something. When you write ‘get out of your bubble’ and then focus only on media, I think you miss something far more important.

    We need to get out of our real life bubbles. Have empathetic conversations and share cups of coffee with the people who make us uncomfortable. The neighbour whose house smells funny, or chain smokes, or simply doesn’t fit into the category of person that we normally hang with.

    We need to do this for two (main) reasons. Exposure, in the form of positive, empathetic conversation with minorities reduces bigotry. And, many ‘conservative’ white working class people feel looked down upon and ignored by the ‘liberal elite’ so listening to them with empathy and kindness can help change their perception.

    I’m not saying that these perceptions are correct, an excuse for bigotry, or even okay. Just that, if we actually want change, then we may have to force ourselves to cultivate empathy for people who hold beliefs that we absolutely despise. It’s frightening, it’s hard, it’s uncomfortable, But so is the outpouring of hate and violence that we’re seeing all around us.

    This article does a better job than I can: http://www.vox.com/identities/2016/11/15/13595508/racism-trump-research-study

    • Sam, thank you for posting this article. I love this:
      “Telling people they’re racist, sexist, and xenophobic is going to get you exactly nowhere.”

      I can’t help but chime in in response to the comments saying “we can never find common ground with THOSE (Trump-supporting) PEOPLE.” This attitude is precisely what drove so many people to vote for Trump in the first place. It is extremely alienating and belittling. If we continue to pursue actions drive by that mindset, we will get exactly nowhere. It is extremely uncomfortable to engage people different from us (yes, even “racist, sexist, xenophobic” people), but if we don’t do it, we aren’t going to move forward.

    • Aneta says...

      Bravo! That’s exactly what I have been thinking and could not articulate quite as well.

  67. Martha says...

    You guys rock!

  68. Meg says...

    I just wanted to lend my voice in support of this and other recent CoJ posts on our current political situation. I think you’ve been very respectful in how you’ve approached the topic and although a handful of readers seem put off, I think it’s important for us now, more than ever, to refrain from ignoring what’s happening. We should ALWAYS be paying attention to politics. I think this last election has just made so many of us more motivated to do so. And for those who don’t like these posts, well, they can just choose not to read them. Not every CoJ article applies to me, and if I’m not interested I skip that one and look forward to the next post. CoJ remains one of my very favorite blogs to read. Thanks for creating a thoughtful and interesting space!

    • I agree with this so much, Meg. Now more than ever we need to not just ignore what’s going on! I so appreciate that Joanna is willing to talk about this.

    • Elizabeth says...

      I agree as well. Thanks CoJ team!

  69. KTMB says...

    I just want to remind us of the consequences of anger. There’s been more rage on this site that I’ve ever experienced on a blog. We all experience emotions and we have a choice to nurture the anger or forgive. To spread words of love and acceptance or share opinions of hate that ultimately sour our own hearts. Most belief systems encourage forgiveness because resentment can ruin our health and our relationships. Anger is destructive. Just look in the mirror when you think or write an angry thought. Whether it’s in the name of unity or getting involved, it’s still damaging, discouraging and ugly. A smile is more beautiful, a “good for you!” more encouraging than a lack of self-control regardless of the cause.

    • Nancy says...

      I’m really surprised that you feel like Cup of Jo and the commenters here are expressing rage. What I’ve experienced has been sadness and fear – which seems very different from rage. I’d ask you to take seriously the women, people of color, migrants, immigrants, and others who feel seriously threatened by the words of our president elect and his supporters.

    • Elizabeth says...

      I agree with Nancy that I’m not seeing rage on this site, but more anxiety and sadness.

      I’ll argue though that anger isn’t always a bad thing, though. It can spur people to action to right wrongs. Shoot, the U.S. was founded by people who were angry about their treatment by England, and according to the Bible, even Jesus got angry at the moneylenders working in the temple.

  70. Helena says...

    Thank you so much for this. Thank you for not taking the easy road. It’s so important to keep striving – in as many ways as we can – against hatred, bigotry, and the exaltation of ignorance. Thank you talking about, and acting on, what matters, and for encouraging – courteously and respectfully – us all to do the same.

  71. Jill says...

    Thank you so very much for posting the link to the LA times article. It reduced my anxiety significantly. (Or at least until my next panic attack!)

    I left the day after the election to do research in service delivery of family planning methods in Burkina Faso (funded by USAID), one of the poorest countries on earth, and am writing this from my hotel here. Being here has blown my mind and heart wide open and reinforced a thousand times that we are dependant on each other and that we are better for the influences of a diverse life.

    I love these kinds of posts these days…it keeps me from frantically scheduling therapy sessions!

    • Elizabeth says...

      Thank you for the work you do! One of the lovely things about this thread is learning about all of the CoJ readers who do work for the world’s most vulnerable people. I admire you guys so much.

  72. Jennifer says...

    Thank you for this

  73. Meredith says...

    Yes! Love this list! In my family, we are picking 24 organizations (a lot of them from that Jezebel list) that support women, immigrants, the LGBT community and the environment to donate to during the advent season. We will talk about each organization with our kids and why they are so important to us. It can’t just be business as usual and “everyone has their own opinions” with this election. Racism, sexism, homophobia, Islamaphobia, etc etc are not okay and we have to teach our kids that. While I get the sentiment that we need to “come together”, if that means that I have to bend to the alt-right, then absolutely no thank you!!

    • Brenna says...

      I love your idea as daily donations during Advent sparking conversations with your kids. I’ve been trying to think about how to share some of these ideas with our children. Stealing this! Thanks!

    • Olma says...

      What a great idea!

  74. Anne Sophie says...

    Brilliant post. Thank you ever so much. Pretty invigorating! Just sent the link to the Los Angeles Times article to my students (English teacher in France) to give them some insight on the new situation. Thanksss

  75. Great post. And you kept all the comments up so they could be seen. I may not agree with some of the views but shutting women up is not the way forward. Now more than ever we should speak out. This is what blogs are for. And lifestyle means more than cosy chats about cushions and lip balm. Onward!

  76. Tanith says...

    Thank you for sharing this post! Never before have I felt so deeply disturbed by the actions of my countryfolk and yet at the same time so intensely connected to them. Seeing how everyone else has found ways to help and encourage others to do so as well makes me hopeful that we can fight back in positive and realistic ways!

    I’ll be honest; I couldn’t read the normal posts this last week. None of us thought we would be where we are today, yet here we are just the same. As long as Cup of Jo keeps these kind of posts up, I think we will continue to feel the unity that we need, and to not just give up and go back “to normal”. It really feels like a sanctuary and safe place for everyone who feels threatened by Trump and the dangerous cronies he is placing in his staff.

    I want to add on a positive note, that if anyone is feeling so-inclined, they can write a snail-mail letter to Hillary, thanking her for fighting for us and also congratulate her for winning the popular vote!

    Hillary Rodham Clinton
    PO BOX 5256
    New York, NY 10185-5256

    Thank you again!!

  77. Laurie says...

    Great ideas! I’m going to voice an opinion that seems to be unpopular, but still mine to have: no surrender. I realize unity and respect are important, but I cannot and will not heal with people who can vote for a sexual predator AND strive to make abortion for victims of rape impossible. I will not find common ground with people who want to register my Muslim neighbors. It is our duty to care about politics and not apologize for our principles. Thanks for taking a stand and using your voice.

    • Marina says...

      This. I absolutely agree with you. Thank you. Never surrender.

    • Carolina says...

      This! My problem with the result of this election has nothing to do with a difference in political opinion. I was disappointed when G.W. Bush was re-elected but I made an effort to understand his supporters. I will never understand how voters in this election made a choice to overlook that candidate’s disgusting, disturbing and offensive viewpoints. There IS a line for me and that line was crossed in this election. I may lose a few friends and family members in the process but I will always stand on the right side of history. To do any less would feel like I were complicit in a terrible injustice. Never surrender.

    • Corinne says...

      Agreed.

    • Stephanie says...

      Right, exactly. I’m sick of being told that I need to try harder to understand why people voted for Trump, and that I’m being mean when I say they’re racist. If you just generally think there are too many Mexicans in Los Angeles, regardless of immigration status, you’re a racist. If you think all Muslims are plotting to kill you, and that they should be registered, you’re racist. If just the phrase Black Lives Matter sets your teeth on edge, you’re either racist or just willfully ignorant. Even if you don’t think those things and you just, you know, really wanted change and something about the economy, electing a know-nothing narcissist con man isn’t going to help you. Coal isn’t coming back. Automation won’t be reversed. The US can’t be simultaneously isolationist and super bad ass militarily. Staffing up the federal government with cronies and Trump offspring isn’t draining any swamp. You’ve been had, and I don’t really want to have dinner with you.

    • Jillian says...

      Amen. And Amen to Stephanie too – you nailed it.

  78. Jen says...

    I am loving this discussion!

    I think that if the post sounds partisan to you it is because “Trump” is synonymous with “racist, sexist, islamophobic” right now. I know that many people disagree or feel that this attitude is divisive, but that is the current perception among lots of people (most importantly among people negatively affected by those things), and not just Hillary voters either.

    The one statement that I have heard repeatedly over the course of the last week is “I voted for Trump but I AM NOT racist, sexist, or islamophobic. I will fight against those things.” Ok. Fine. Here are some ways to do it: COME TOGETHER with the ACLU and The Southern Poverty Law Center to fight racism and islamophobia. COME TOGETHER with Emily’s List to fight sexism. COME TOGETHER with Public Lands and Inspire to prevent further damage to our earth. On Sunday I had a few moments of “Ok fine, I’ll wait and see” and then he got on board with Bannon (a man who is terrible enough to be called out by The National Review, how’s that for partisan?) and put my fighting pants right back on.

    High five to CoJ for recognizing that when you see something wrong you need to COME TOGETHER and work to stop it, even and especially through social media platforms like blogs. The personal is political and to me CoJ is a personal lifestyle site where we learn about pattern mixing AND how politics affects our lives. If you only wanted pattern mixing, there are plenty of other places to find it.

    • t says...

      My vote came down to: should I vote for a bigot who I think can enhance the financial well being of our country or do I vote for a social advocate who I think can tank the financial well being of our country?

      That opinion may be wrong but based on their proposed stimulus packages and spending plans that was what I boiled it down to.

      It is a tough decision! I am a white woman married to a latina women and am the sole breadwinner of our family of four (two kids – my wife is a stay at home mom and we are hanging on to that with a shoestring budget). Obviously LBGTQ+ rights are important to my family but in all honesty I feel pretty secure in those rights as I didn’t get the sense that Trump cares all that much about reversing our rights. Gender equality is important to me as I am in a male dominated industry and support our family. I have health insurance through obamacare that is WIPING ME OUT FINANCIALLY! The insurance is extremely cost prohibitive and our copays and out of pocket expenses are absurd! So I want obamacare completely overhauled or removed. I want (need) our schools improved and I don’t at all think that more taxes and throwing more money at schools is the way to make improvements.

      So as you can see it wasn’t an easy decision. Ultimately I didn’t vote for either because as a Californian I have a little more flexibility (the democrat nominee will always win).

      I guess my point is that it isn’t always as black and white as it may seem.

    • t says...

      Ha, I got sidetracked! I forgot to say YES Jen! Anyone who claims to support the Trump agenda but hates the bigotry should ABSOLUTELY advocate against the bigotry. I 100% agree!

  79. I really REALLY appreciate these positive posts. The election left me in shut down mode. Now, the protests and violence have me down. It bothers me that the people opposing Trump are kind of acting just like him. The anger and negative indignation on Facebook are killing me. “When they go low, we go high,” right? Thanks for sharing some ways to go high. xo

  80. On the idea of getting out of your bubble I created a way to connect individuals from different parts of the country as pen pals. Super low key one woman operation but I’d love to have you join in. Check it out and feel free to participate if you live in the United States. Americanpenpals.com

  81. Love this!!! Thanks for the great round-up. Although I’ve been disappointed reading comments that it seems like your pro-life readership feels excluded because of the mention of PP…between your list and Jezebel’s even though there are several organizations with pro-choice missions, there were a number it feels like people on both sides should be able to support. Boys and Girls Club, Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund, National Coalition Against Domestic Violence were such great and under-represented suggestions! Also love that She Should Run has a way you can anonymously ask a woman you know to run for office.

  82. Fabienne says...

    Just wanted to thank the writing staff for not shying away from political posts recently. It is important to recognize that Donald Trump is not just another public figure or politician. He represents a very real threat to many of our fellow Americans and to ignore this is counterproductive, it normalizes him and his actions. It is important to take action now more than ever. I thank you guys for not taking the events of the past few days lightly, the fact that you’re disseminating helpful information comforts me. It is comforting to know that the struggle may be shared not just by those directly in danger but by everyone willing to share in that.

    As for those complaining about the political posts, this shouldn’t even be a matter of partisanship. Any decent person should oppose Trump’s actions regardless of political orientation. The campaign tactics he used are disgusting and offensive. Basic human dignity and respect should tell us that.

    • A.D. says...

      I agree! I’ve stopped following blogs that are acting like nothing major just happened. Racism, sexism, Islamophobia, and xenophobia need to be human rights issues, not partisan issues, and I’m grateful when influential blogs acknowledge it. Thanks Cupofjo for this list!

  83. coco says...

    Thanks for the suggestions! I’m hoping to volunteer and donate more (last week I donated to Planned Parenthood (in Hillary’s name) and the Environmental Defense Fund.

  84. Cara says...

    Thank you for this. I admire your team for continuing to push important issues to the forefront.

  85. Sarah M. says...

    I have appreciated your posts and have especially loved the beauty uniform posts, but, I have to echo many other readers. If I want to tune in on political points of view & content (and I regularly do), I already know where to find them on the web… I came here for the “fun and girly stuff.”
    For me, it is the equivalent of going to a concert and having them talk about political content when all I really wanted was to hear the musician play…

    So I guess I’m just going to take a break. Best of luck.

    • Rupa says...

      It seems a shame that readers equate this blog with “fun and girly” when it has consistently posted challenging and important posts on a range of topics. With a huge readership, posts like these reach those who are looking for ways to help make changes and improve the lives of those who are marganislied. I salute this blog.

    • Although this blog does post some “fun and girly” content, I view it quite differently. Joanna and team have posted many, many posts on serious, sometimes even uncomfortable topics. That’s why I love this blog, because I feel like I am constantly learning things on this site, and Joanna doesn’t shy away from serious issues. That she throws some fun girly content in is just icing on the cake.

    • Disagree 100% with this commenter. Staying silent on important issues is no longer an option. Keep posts like this coming, please!

    • Jillian says...

      I’ve never thought of this blog as fun and girly. I’ve learned so much here, and not about lipstick. It’s heavy on intelligence, and is often wise and thought provoking. I often skim much of the lighter stuff, like house tours.

      And I love it when musicians get political. If I just wanted to hear the album, I could stay home and listen to it. Rock the forum you’ve been given, I say.

  86. Ado says...

    So sad to read this post…the suggestions are the opposite of coming together. Will no longer read this blog that I enjoyed for so long:(

    • A.D. says...

      May I ask how these suggestions are the opposite of coming together? Cupojo has always inspired me to appreciate the diversity and beauty of the world around me (especially in the motherhood around the world series), and this post continues to encourage me to actively care about my community. I’d be interested in hearing your views!

    • Tay says...

      I would be curious to hear what coming together looks like to you, Ado.

    • MA says...

      Was going to post the same link! Super helpful information on the best way to reach your local, state and federal reps. I earmarked this info to prepare for the coming major potential changes to environmental protection and reproductive rights.

  87. Lee says...

    My local elementary school in California is setting up pen pals with students in red states as a way to try and understand issues and opinions that are different to ours. I thought it was such a helpful and constructive idea for our future generation.

    • Sarah says...

      Beautiful idea!

  88. Kate says...

    This is great, Lexi and crew! Lots of concrete ways to get involved. I’m hoping that we don’t lose this energy as time goes on over the next four years. These things should always be a part of our ongoing conversation!

  89. Paula says...

    Donate food to your local Food Bank — Thanksgiving is just around the corner!!

  90. Mary says...

    I have to agree with some comments. The suggestions seem more devisive than unifying. This opinion doesn’t continue the stream of thought from last week. I really thought there might be room for all in this space but I have lost hope after the suggestion to support Planned Parenthood.

    • Shannon says...

      You could easily take this as a suggestion to support orgs that YOU believe in. If the author of this post happens to support PP, it doesn’t mean that those who don’t are not welcome. But if you can only happily occupy a digital space where every voice supports your view than perhaps there *is* no room for you here. It’s a shame that you have not noticed the civilized and honest questions to and between readers of different opinion within the comment stream this week. These ladies are champions, in my opinion, and I deeply admire their desire to understand difference. We can all learn from this exercise in openness.

    • Kate says...

      Interesting comment. I actually found the post from last week AND its comments to be more divisive- very Us (Progressives, what are we going to do) vs. Them (about what those Ignoramuses have done), and it really irritated me.
      It would be really lovely to hear a point of view that is more neutral, like that would be the ideal right now, wouldn’t it? Especially after how separate these two perspectives have proven themselves to be. But unfortunately we seem to keep heading in this Us vs. Them direction as a country. Until we realize that we need to really see and better understand each others’ perspectives in order to come to some middle ground, I don’t see any of the whole making much progress. :(

    • Sian says...

      That suggestion actually suggested for you to donate to an organisation of YOUR choosing, and tells readers who A Cup of Jo supported. Can’t you use your imagination and think of donating to an organisation that better suits your beliefs? I assume there’s a pro-life equivalent since you feel strongly on this point.

    • Olma says...

      The suggestion was not to support Planned Parenthood. The suggestion was to support some group that you believed in. It then gave two links to lists of groups that could do with your help.
      Personally I appreciate the honestly of Cup of Jo in revealing who they as a company support. Often I don’t agree with their viewpoint but they have every right to have it and express it as do you and I.

    • Jen says...

      “Room for all” would include “Room for people who want to keep abortion safe and legal”.

    • Lindsey says...

      We just elected a xenophobic, misogynistic, fear-mongering jerk to lead the country, and you’re offended that a suggestion to donate to Planned Parenthood is divisive content? Keep in mind that Planned Parenthood isn’t just abortion (or even “mostly” abortion– it accounts for 3% of services). Our pres-elect wants to repeal ACA and the coverage it offers, so more women will need solutions for basic care. It is more important than ever for the CoJ team to stand up for what they believe in, given their readership, and I’m glad they did.

    • Tanith says...

      Sadly, I think you are missing the point. Supporting Planned Parenthood is supporting the health of women from all walks of life, for many different health issues. You should take the suggestion to read and learn more about things that you might not have experienced to help you gain an understanding of people outside of your identity bubble.

    • Escondista says...

      Planned parenthood was the only way that I was able to afford my breast and pap exams as a young woman. That organization could have saved my and many other women’s lives. I stand with pp.

    • Ann says...

      I’m wondering why so many people are polarized by Planned Parenthood? Is it because they offer abortion services? That is only 3% of what they do. When I was uninsured I relied on Planned Parenthood to receive Pap tests and breast exams because that was the only affordable option. I’m now lucky enough to have health insurance but I will always appreciate and support PP for the services they provide to people.

    • Ali says...

      Ann – yes, if you look at page 29 of PP’s annual report, it will show that only 3% of services are for abortion. That number is calculated pretty creatively based on the definition of “service.”

      The next page shows that 3% represents 323,999 abortions – that’s more than the Pap tests they provided (271,539) and almost as many breast exams (363,803). The report also states that PP served about 2.5 million patients in that year, which means that about 13% of the people they provided care to obtained an abortion. That’s a bit higher than 3%.

      In the interest of conversing outside of our bubbles, I’ll add this, if I may. For women who are anti-abortion, the mix of PPs services is irrelevant. The portion of services that are abortions could be 3%, it could be 1% – heck, it could be 1 abortion – and I (and many others) would still not support the organization because of our belief that abortion takes a human life. It’s not opposition to healthcare, it’s not desiring to control women’s bodies – it’s a moral framework that says that is a human and abortion ends its life. With that in mind, appeals of “only 3%” are the equivalent of saying “only 3% of the time, Planned Parenthood is killing a human.” Hardly a compelling pitch for those who are anti-abortion.

    • Liz says...

      Ali-I’ve seen a few of your comments on this post and I want to commend you for being willing to speak up, I know it is hard to be vulnerable and uphold an opinion that is not popular with many others. I also think it is imperative that we hear opinions different than our own.

      I would love to see a more nuanced discussion of abortion (cup of jo team?). I was raised in a home that voted based entirely on who ran a pro-life platform-as an adult, this is bothersome to me simply because abortion does not exist in a vacuum, so many factors go into why women choose abortion-or don’t. I would love to hear stories from women who chose abortion and why and from women who chose to give birth ultimately and why.

      I was talking with a friend last week who told me she had an abortion when she was young-for many reasons. She said that it was an incredibly hard and sad decision to make and that she felt terribly hurt by the portrayal of pro-choice women as women who celebrate abortion and rejoice at ending a life.

      I think there is a lot of hurt on both sides of this issue. I, for one, would like to hear more about the people behind the issue, not the issue as a hypothetical.

    • MA says...

      Well said, Liz. Abortion as an issue does not exist in a vacuum. As a biologist, I find the issue massively frustrating. Determining when “life” begins is a question that is as complex as it gets in my opinion, e.g., when does the clock start? Why this time versus that time? My family is pro-life to the extent that we can’t even discuss the complexities of the issue. Abortion is just wrong, the end. I hate that me and my family can’t talk about it. It is the saddest reminder of how far apart we are on some issues.

    • Katherine says...

      Liz – I love that idea. Abortion is a reality for so, so many women and the lack of dialogue/storytelling surrounding abortions can leave those women feeling isolated and alone. COJ Team? (I understand this is a controversial topic so will not be surprised if it doesn’t get covered – but it’s important, especially now).

    • Mary says...

      Thank you Ali for better articulating my thoughts. Thank you all also for not jumping on my ignorance in misspelling “divisive.” I do give my time and efforts to organizations, of which there are many, providing medical services to all people, without providing abortions.

    • Meg says...

      Thanks for this rational engagement on a tough issue. Mary, would you mind sharing some of the organizations you referred to, perhaps the team could add those to their list next time.

  91. Love love love all of this! Thank you for the tips! :)

  92. JC says...

    Love all of these suggestions. Would also add that it is important to do the day to day unglamorous work of building community. Extending friendship to members of vulnerable communities through eye contact and smiles; also by sitting or standing near people in public places. Stopping harassment in action can be daunting, but recording and reporting is as crucial. Also, after harassment occurs, check on the person. Asking what you can do or even saying that what happened is terrible goes a long way. Being harassed is humiliating and awful, but when people around are silent or avoid me after, I feel isolated and alone.

    • Shannon says...

      Never underestimate the power of eye contact and a smile in passing. Thank you for the reminder!

  93. This is so very helpful, thank you for sharing. Along the lines of a chili dinner with donations, I was thinking about organizing a bake sale with other families to donate to one of those causes. I also hope that yours and other big lifestyle/design blogs, who have a big impact by the nature of your audience, channel that thinking to your gift guides this year. This is the year to focus on supporting small businesses run by women/minorities — I for one want to focus on making sure every dollar I spend can help in some small way.

  94. Melanie says...

    A sincere and deep bow of gratitude for this list. Amazing and so helpful. You are such an important corner of the internet. Keep on doing what you do! Thank you!

  95. Audrey says...

    YES! Just yes, Jo! This is so awesome ~ keep it coming!

  96. Auste says...

    Your posts all week have been precisely what I’ve been needing. You have a such a strong connection to your readers and their emotional stages and needs, and you simply nailed it. Thank you.

    Renewable energy really is more accessible than ever. Small business owners can benefit too! On the west coast, check out Shift Solar. My husband has a small business providing solar energy to other small businesses (coffee shops, craft breweries, etc)… It really is a simple way to make a positive impact on our planet:)

    https://www.shiftsolar.com

  97. Ariane says...

    Thank you for continuing to write thoughtful posts like this one. The election results are heavy on my mind, and I appreciate that this blog is providing helpful information in a time when many of us feel powerless.

  98. We are so lucky to have you! SO helpful. Thank you for always always always being a voice of sensibility, compassion, and authenticity.

  99. Alice says...

    Thank you so much- this was a great piece and felt empowering. We cannot pretend that this presidency is politics as usual, especially with the Bannon appointment, and I applaud you and your team for acknowledging the struggle many have been going through.

    I see some commenters saying this is out of bounds for a lifestyle blog and I could not disagree more- civic engagement and advocacy are a very important part of any lifestyle. This election has been a wake up call that I can’t rely on a good president (and Senators- I’m lucky enough to be repped by Warren) to make this the country that I love. If one good thing comes out of this, it will be that many more of us will find our voices and new ways to use our talents to help each other. Please keep being a bright light and using your platform to talk about all the issues that are important to us as women and citizens.

    Finally, from a purely content perspective, I love it when you guys tackle the deep stuff. I mean, I love the fashion posts too, but I think this is a community of brilliant women and I’m thrilled to see posts like this happening more often.

    • Lauren s says...

      Yes! All of this!

    • Well said and completely agree!

    • Ara says...

      Yes, yes, YES!

  100. K. says...

    thank you for speaking up. Early and often is the only way to combat racist and anti-semitic rhetoric. We need people like you guys to help us all understand that we are not alone and to underscore that some things are respect and civil liberties should be non-negotiable. I am so glad to see you and a few other typically non political websites sounding the call for activism and compassion. It would be frightening to normalize Steve Bannon et al. It is too important this time. SO thank you for your bravery, boldness and compassion.

  101. Bobby says...

    I can’t thank you enough for this resource site! I just signed up with NYCares (one of the organizations that needs writers) and am having my first training session next week. I already feel better. Also, I don’t know if it was on one of your lists, but the Southern Poverty Law Center is also an EXCELLENT place to donate right now. Again, thank you for making it easy to get involved.

  102. Heidi says...

    This is great – yet another reason to love you guys!

  103. Anna says...

    Wonderful! Thank you.

    On the energy idea (agreed that one of the major threats posed by the incoming administration is on climate change), please learn more about how our dietary choices impact the planet. The documentary Cowspiracy is a real eye opener – you can get it on Netflix. Learn more here: http://www.cowspiracy.com/

    (I’m not affiliated with the film, just a mother who cares deeply about the future of this planet for my children!)

  104. Kris says...

    Love this list and that you are speaking up. Thank you to all of you for being a part of the solution! XO

  105. Joanna, some friends and I recently started a blog (http://www.project1460.org) and Facebook group (Facebook.com/project1460) that will post one concrete, daily action every day of Donald Trump’s presidency that people can take to make Trump a one-term president and return Congress to Democratic control.

    We’re already starting up because there’s so much momentum right now and would love to have you and your readers join us.

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      Thanks so much for sharing. What a cool action-oriented project. I encourage you to write more on your “about” page about who started and is running the site. I think transparency makes a project like this so much more compelling.

    • Agreed and it’s in the works. I started the site on Friday and it’s totally blown up in just a few days. Working on pulling together a team and getting the site beyond “oh shit let’s do something asap” stage this week.

    • cz says...

      Just signed up for your emails – thank you for your hard work. It is inspiring. We really are stronger together when we are informed!

      Thank you Cup of Jo for this post. Can we continue to voice our mobilization efforts to transform this nation from a place of moral compassion and understanding. Not the presumptive president elect’s corrupt values.

      Keep up the great work – it is important !

    • Leah says...

      Liza, I was going to comment on behalf of your org here, but you beat me to the punch. It’s great work and I’m happy to be involved! xoxo

    • Thank you so much for posting this! I just signed up!

  106. Patty says...

    Thank you for this list….when Trump was elected, i was thinking how to survive four years of him and that’s when i came to the conclusion to donate to organizations that can better thwart him than just me…..sure beats just waiting for his term to be done or burying my head in sand!!

  107. Alix says...

    My mom and I are attending the Women’s March on Washington on January 21st (the day after the Inauguration). Here can find out more info here: http://bit.ly/2eKDgj2 and also check the page for state-specific chapters. This is a grassroots event, so each state is organizing locally to get everything sorted. Hotels, flights, and trains are already booking quickly, so they’re also organizing charter buses and other places to stay in DC.

  108. Thank you, Jo. As a blogger myself, I applaud your honesty and sincerity in such difficult times. The world changed last Tuesday night and as women, as American citizens, we no longer have the luxury of silence. I called both my Republican senators today to express my horror at the appointment of white nationalist, Steve Bannon, as advisor to the new President of the United States and I hope others will do the same. And as a side note, the photos of your boys on IG always make me smile and smiles are vital these days. Much love your way. Pamela Terry

  109. Gem says...

    Great ideas! This week I’ve come face to face with the realization that I totally live in bubble. I have lived in large, left-leaning cities for the past decade and most of my friends are like-minded professionals. I don’t think I truly understood how separated I am from different political views until this week and it’s been a huge wake-up call! There is always nuance, always another way to see an issue. I love the idea about reading books that aren’t “for you.” I’ve already reserved two at the library.

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      Van, I just finished reading that after Joanna sent it to me! I totally agree. It was great.

    • Meg says...

      Yes! Thank you for sharing that article! That was the single best thing I’ve read since the election and it’s really opened my eyes. I’ve been sending it to everyone.

    • Roxana says...

      Thank you for sharing! Very astute!

    • Julia says...

      I felt that the union bashing in that article hampered the argument the author was trying to make. Unions make the labor force strong–and help the working class. you

    • My favorite article post-election, too. As someone who grew up in a depressed steel town 25 miles NW of Pittsburgh, I felt like she was describing people in my hometown.

      I grew up, moved to a liberal city, and tried to forget about it. But when I went home for a wedding and saw a million Trump signs, after the disgusted shock faded, I tried to understand. When the Steel mill closed in my town in 1984, 8,000 people were laid off in a single day. The area has never recovered. (Link to recent pics.)

      I, personally, do NOT think this is an excuse to vote for someone who is hateful toward so many minority populations, but do think this is the election where we realize the rust belt is a real, hurting part of our country.

    • Thanks for posting. Many points in the article seem very accurate. Especially when she described why Hillary Clinton didn’t really appeal to some.

  110. Mariela says...

    Great!! Please keep this up, it is so so appreciated. Though most of us made it through a week, it has been a HELLISH one for many – many experiencing things they never imagined they would have to experience in America. We need to fight against the growing hate, and for it to get better, the media (including you!) needs to not tire of talking about it.

    Thanks again!!

  111. One note from pantsuit nation came from someone who bought Hillary’s book “Hard Choices” so they could “hate read” it and they ended up falling in love with her instead. I loved that story. Maybe I’ll try a book out of my comfort zone bubble – that is, after I “love read” Hillary’s :)

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      That is really awesome, and totally the mindset that we need right now.

  112. Ali says...

    *Sigh* Wish I hadn’t read this. I don’t support Trump – but I also find it hard to support websites with my clicks once I know they are actively supporting organizations that I cannot, ever, in good conscience support….

    • Laura says...

      Me too, Ali. Have read you for years but the PP endorsement stopped me in my tracks.

    • karen says...

      Yeah, Planned Parenthood is the worst–you know, providing healthcare to poor women and young girls who don’t have any other options–yeah, they are just monsters.

      Thank you, Joanna and Team.

    • Monica says...

      I agree! I read this blog because it has long been non-partisan. I read it to ESCAPE the craziness of the political world. Jo and team, I am saddened to see the recent posts.

    • May I ask why you cannot support organizations that offer free/affordable cancer screenings to women and who promise to protect the bill of rights? (PP and the ACLU). I truly ask this in the spirit of wanting to understand. I am not being sarcastic in any way.

    • Roxana says...

      Ali, thank you for being brave enough to say something. I wish I would’ve been earlier.

      I agree about Planned Parenthood (and Trump). Very disappointed to hear that Cup of Jo openly support them and is encouraging others to do the same. Additionally, the list of organizations on Jezebel made my stomach turn. It seems like willful ignorance. There is so much more that could be said, but given the general audience on Cup of Jo, and Joanna and the editorial teams stance. it feels pointless for me to even try.

      I like what you otherwise do at Cup of Jo, but the partisanship is starting to get very tiring, and sadly, it’s forcing me to turn away. Even though I already knew I didn’t agree with your political positions, I was encouraged when you talked about “coming together” and by the manner in which you did it. However, it’s become clear in several subsequent posts that you keep subtly and not-so-subtly pushing partisanship. Don’t think you really care to “come together,” after all.

      Sad to have to go.

    • Caroline says...

      I was also disappointed to see the list of organizations that Cup of Jo has chosen to donate to since the election results. I voted for Hillary, as I fundamentally agreed with her on the vast majority of issues, yet I still hold to a pro-life moral framework. It has saddened me to see that this belief system has categorically been portrayed as anti-woman. I am a women’s healthcare provider, and I have dedicated my life’s work to supporting women throughout the reproductive life span. I hope for a future where this important issue can be addressed and debated with the knowledge that there are individuals on both sides of the coin who truly want the absolute best for women and their families.

    • Agreed. I know many more businesses and website support causes I disagree with, so I don’t know that it changes my coming here, but most of the suggested donation list made me feel sick. However, I knew what Cup of Jo’s political views are and I come here for the different perspective, just like this post talks about. So I can hardly say I’m surprised.

      Bobby, I believe those of us who feel this way about PP are strictly anti-abortion, so whatever else they offer (screenings are far from at all clinics to begin with), that overrides any desire to support them. I would personally like to see the pro-life movement expand WIDELY to recognize the need for support of women through and after pregnancy, and advocate for education, childcare, maternity leave, and much more, being the only way to truly be pro-life and pro-woman.

    • Ali says...

      Karen and Bobby – many (myself included) don’t consider all of PP’s services to be morally neutral healthcare. Unfortunately, in that context, the moral gravity of abortion means I can’t support the organization in the rest of its work. I’m struggling to think of a perfect analogy, since I can’t equate much to abortion other than “taking an innocent life.” But perhaps similarly (again, far from a perfect analogy), I wouldn’t support an organization that provides free meals for the needy if they simultaneously relied on slave labor to provide that food. The immorality of that one aspect of their service invalidates the rest of the work it does – particularly when there are other organizations that help provide those services.

    • Keeley says...

      The best way to prevent abortions is birth control and women’s health education and sense of physical safety – both things Planned Parenthood provides. As a young woman, Planned Parenthood represents my independence and sense of worth. I depend on it for my healthcare and know many others do as well. Thanks Joanna + Team for being a support network for women (and men) across our country.

    • Melanie says...

      Thank you. The post and links are helpful in channeling that energy into a more positive/constructive path. And I agree in breaking out of your bubble — to truly discover empathy is to be able to understand what it is like to walk in someone else’s shoes.
      Speaking of respecting and empathizing with another perspective…
      Planned Parenthood provides so many beneficial services to women, and often to those who are not privileged enough to find other providers. It has been aggressively targeted by the right and demonized because of the 3% of the services which support abortion. I understand that realistically, there will never be a bridge between the prochoice and antiabortion camps and for some, any support of abortion is a dealbreaker. But as a physician who has seen some medically threatening and heartbreaking situations , I strongly feel that this is often such a harrowing and personal decision that should be made by a woman, not her government.
      Also, I must say that while I want to channel as much energy into these positive actions, I feel so so unsettled right now (understatement). With the recent appointment of Steve Bannon, I ask at what point is it too much??? His record and endorsements by white supremacists is horrifying. What will it take for people to be more concerned?? I think back to when Trump taunted us and said he could shoot someone and not lose support. Is this truly reality? Shouldn’t we be fighting this? If there was anything to fight against, surely this hate would be it, right?
      I started to wonder, what was Germany like before someone like Hitler came to power? Not that Trump is Hitler, but sometimes it’s easier to pick the most extreme example because you can see how racism and hate is being normalized in this climate.

    • Laura C. says...

      Completely agree with Ali. Last time I donated was for LBBC, Living Beyond Breast Cancer. I donate for life.
      Reading about that list (abortion fund) made me sick. Plus, if you support PP, it makes me sad but it’s your choice, not mine.
      I would suggest not to politize this wonderful blog so much. It’s been nice to see you support but now I think it’s getting different…
      Thank you.

    • Katherine says...

      To all of you who are anti-abortion – are your views on when life begins are deeply affected by your religious beliefs? If so, it’s imperative to remember that we have freedom to, AND FROM, religion in this country. There is no scientific basis that aborting a fetus is equivalent to killing a baby. That may be your belief, and that may prevent you from ever seeking an abortion, but to want your belief to apply to all women is unfair and unconstitutional.

      Not to mention, PP provides family-planning, sex education and contraception to underprivileged women, thus REDUCING the overall incidence of abortion. There are no women choosing abortion for fun. It’s a deeply personal and often sad decision, and I don’t believe that someone’s religious beliefs should ever trump someone else’s ability to choose.

    • Caroline says...

      Katherine- actually my pro-life view is not remotely based on religion. Rather, it is based on biological principles regarding the origin of life, as well as a moral conviction that human life has intrinsic worth and value in every stage of life. The constitution gives us all the right to life. Because I believe that life begins at conception, I also believe my pro-life views are constitutional. In my career as a women’s healthcare provider, I too provide family planning services/contraception and sex education. In fact, it is one of my favorite parts of my job! I do acknowledge that these services are often not supported by more conservative, right-wing, pro-life individuals, and I do sincerely hope for change in this regard so we can reduce rates of unintended pregnancy.

    • Margaret Sanger says...

      Abortion has been around for thousands of years all around the world, in all cultures. It’s not a recent invention. Planned Parenthood simply works to make it safe and minimize unwanted pregnancy in the first place by providing contraception. Taking PP away would put women back on the dirty kitchen tables of unqualified midwives. Women will die without Planned Parenthood.

      It is pretty simple. You can’t make abortion go away. You can only make it safe. That’s why educated empathetic women support it.

      The ONLY way to prevent unwanted pregnancy is education and birth control. Thinking otherwise is naive at best.

    • Ali says...

      Katherine –

      I won’t shy away from the fact that religion informs my fundamental belief that all human life has intrinsic value. One can probably hold that belief in the absence of religious adherence – but in my case, my belief in God (and that we are created in his image) informs that view.

      However, I don’t think religion informs my view on when life begins – I’d consider them more based in science and logic.

      I’m no scientist – but everything I’ve learned about biology/reproduction/cells/DNA suggests life begins at conception. At that point, two previously separate entities have become one, in something that is unique and separate from anything that came before it. It’s amazing. Then it divides, and grows, and develops – processes that are consistent with/indicative of life. It’s human life because it simply CAN’T be anything other than human, given its origins.

      With that said – while I see no reason to dispute when life begins, I recognize that the debate still exists for many. Debate is key, there. With no consensus on when life begins, I’d still argue that we should err on the side of life. If we don’t ABSOLUTELY KNOW that life doesn’t begin at conception, shouldn’t we support policies and organizations that don’t take a chance on killing what may be human life? If one day it is settled science that life begins at conception – how much have we lost by ignoring that potential reality and supporting organizations that are comfortable operating in that grey area?

      None of this is to say policies geared in this direction are simple. Just wanted to provide some context for why someone might be vehemently anti-abortion, even without a religious framework.

    • Laura C. says...

      To Katherine: you are right, it must be a very sad choice for a woman.
      Just for your interest, I have a girl friend who is an atheist and pro-life. I am a Christian and I am pro-life. My sister is a Christian and she is pro-abortion. As you can see, there are different points of view. I am not trying to impose a religious belief; I’m just telling my opinion.
      If a pregnant woman has a miscarriage after 9 weeks of pregnancy, ask her if she just lost a fetus or lost her baby.
      I think I would be pro abortion if a woman gets pregnant after a rape. It would be very sad, of course, but I I think in that case abortion could be justified. In my opinion.

      Said that, if I was American, my vote was NOT going to be for Trump. He scares me.
      Thank you Katherine for sharing. :)
      I will continue to read CoJ. We are not the same, but I do like the CoJ community. :)

    • Ali says...

      Can I ask you, Ali, and all the others that oppose PP, if you are willing to pay the necessary taxes that would be required to support unplanned children? Support and promote Medicaid services? Are Catholics willing to retrofit Catholic schools to fit ADA recommendations, and provide accommodations for children with learning disabilities? Because, in my experiences as a woman raised in a very Catholic environment and now living in a very Evangelical state, the answer to all of these questions is no. For you and all those who are “pro-life”, let’s all agree that there is a lifetime between conception and death. And, quite honestly, our country does a lousy job at being “pro-life” throughout life. This new administration, with its threats to repeal the ACA, deport immigrants, and create an “America First” mentality is about as “anti-life” as you can get. PP is a very small piece of a very complicated puzzle, and discounting it entirely in a society that will soon lose affordable healthcare, is the real sin.

    • Caroline says...

      Ali- I couldn’t agree more. I absolutely think that Trump’s vision for America is one that is anti-life in many respects. It deeply troubles me to see many Republicans who are not willing to create a culture that values life at every stage and seeks to support the most vulnerable among us. It is primarily for this reason that I chose to vote for Hillary, despite my strongly held pro-life stance. I simply could not support a man who demeans women and fails to seek solutions for many of the most pressing issues within our nation (healthcare, racial inequality, education gaps, imprisonment…).

      All of this to say, not every pro-life individual is anti-woman and anti- social progress.

    • Dewey says...

      I’m super-duper pro-choice, but I think you guys make some good points about not being able to support an organization that provides abortions, no matter the number (if it’s murder to you, even one is too many).

      The problem I see, though, (and please correct me if I’m wrong!) is that there is no equivalent to planned parenthood that DOESN’T provide abortions. So if you support the other things PP does–free and reduced cost cancer screenings, Pap smears, std screening–but want PP closed down because of the abortions, where are poor women supposed to go for those other services? I know so, so, so many women who couldn’t afford vital health care other places and were able to get it at PP.

    • Ali (original poster) says...

      Ali – there’s a lot to potentially respond to in your post, but I’ll try to stick to this aspect. This is an argument that is often tossed out in abortion discussions – but it’s a false dichotomy. As I noted in another comment, the basis of an anti-abortion person’s view is usually fairly straightforward and along the lines of:

      1) It is wrong to end innocent human life
      2) A fetus is human life
      3) Abortion ends an innocent human life
      4) Abortion is wrong.

      For someone whose perspective is based on those arguments, your argument merely says “you have to be willing to pay taxes to support children when their parents can’t, or you can’t be against them being killed.” Outside the context of abortion, I imagine very few people would agree that is a fair argument.

      Now – while I think the logic of that argument is flawed, it does appeal to me on a practical and an emotional level. Yes – more needs to be done to establish a culture that supports women, and children, and families – particularly those in difficult pregnancy situations. I support organizations that do just that – and particularly those that aim to put women and families in a position to be self-sufficient. But not being actively engaged in such efforts should not preclude someone from identifying and decrying a grave moral wrong.

    • Ali F. says...

      I appreciate your response. I believe that the principle of double effect, which is my understanding of your argument, is also flawed. According to some of my Catholic friends, they supported Trump because, in the end, they hope that he will appoint a justice who will overturn Roe vs. Wade. They apply double effect for abortion (i.e., abortion to save a mother’s life is wrong; contraception is wrong but natural family planning is acceptable because it doesn’t put a barrier against pregnancy) but voted for a man on a single issue despite his repugnant, immoral stances. I just can’t get behind that. This kind of thinking is one of the main reasons I left the Church.

      I would feel much better about the pro-life position if it didn’t seem like a such a single-issue stance (abortion and in some cases, euthanasia). I would be more able to understand if pro-life advocates were more committed to assisting people of all races, gender, and ability across the lifespan. However, I don’t and can’t respect people like my mother-in-law, who is very “pro-life” but does not want to have disabled children in her Catholic school or support parents on “welfare.” I can’t stomach it. But I appreciate your measured response.

  113. elise says...

    Joanna,

    thank you so much for this. I follow many lifestyle blogs and yours is the only one that has made a statement regarding the results of the election. Thank you for letting us know where you stand – it means so much.

  114. Jessica says...

    I’ve noticed in the past that you’ve kept the blog relatively apolitical. I just want to say how happy it makes me to see Cup of Jo be a little more politicized recently, and especially in this post. It is so important to take a stand against bigotry of all forms. Thanks for keeping it real, ladies!

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      Thanks for saying that, Jessica.

    • Ali says...

      Absolutely agree. It’s socially responsible.

  115. jen says...

    Seriously THANK YOU. I was shocked how some bloggers are completely ignoring what’s going on in this country.

  116. Memberships! I applied to join by county’s Democratic Committee, but join whatever civic organization in your community that you align with or have interest in.

    And generally, be kind. We all need it right now.

  117. Emily S. says...

    Hi Cup of Jo team,

    Thank you for this! It has been hard to know exactly what to do and these are good places to start. It would also be great for your team to share methods of contacting our representatives in Senate and Congress to voice our opinions and ask for support and yes, representation, from our representatives. Sharing information about how to find and get in touch with our representatives and tips for how to do so most effectively (someone shared a phone script on twitter, for example) would be a really helpful thing for many.

    As a Jewish woman it is frankly terrifying to see people like Steve Bannon being appointed as Chief Strategist, and as an environmentally-conscious young person hoping to have a healthy planet for myself and my future children and their children– it is frankly not okay with me to have a climate change denier like Myron Ebell appointed to head the EPA. I understand those who voted differently than myself, but some things should never be normalized. I would love to see Trump voters taking action and asking for more from their President-Elect as well.

    Thanks for all you do! I see you are walking a fine line between inclusion and speaking to your positions.

    • Hong says...

      I was just about to post about contacting your representatives. This website provides an easy way to locate your representative: http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/

      Phone is the best way.

      As for things that shouldn’t be normalized, not hiring who many see as a white supremacist (Steve Bannon as chief strategist) is a good place to start. Ask if your representative has signed Cicilline’s (Sis-uh-LEEN-ee) letter demanding Trump to rescind Bannon’s appointment.

  118. Alaina says...

    So many great ideas in this post – thank you!
    I love IssueVoter.org as a way to track political issues I care about and connect with my representative before she votes on new bills. They send email alerts w/ summaries of bills being voted on and let you click “support” or “oppose” to send your opinion to your rep right from the email. It’s more important than ever to stay engaged between elections, and it makes me feel like I have a voice all year.

    • Gem says...

      So cool! I just checked out your Instagram and love the paintings!

    • Tanith says...

      That’s fantastic Elyce! Thank you for sharing, your paintings are so unique and full of energy =)

      An artist I admire from Disney and Dreamworks is doing similar with her prints here: https://www.instagram.com/grizandnorm/

    • Thanks Gem and Tanith!

      And Joanna, I just want to thank you for being vocal. It is not always easy, but it’s very important.

  119. Lee says...

    I was expecting a surge in hate crimes but have actually been surprised by the alarming frequency at which these incidents of vandalism and harassment are now occurring, and how widespread they are throughout the country. Safety pins are not enough, that has been made clear. Let’s take those intentions a step further. Let’s build or add our support to pre existing networks of support for reporting, monitoring and responding to incidents of hate. I feel that responding to this with coordinated efforts for clean up/ support/ solidarity for victims in our communities is a great way to immediately take action and be of use. We must drown out every act of hate with a wave of love.

    These are some resources I’ve started to gather:

    http://www.hrc.org/resources/what-to-do-if-youve-been-the-victim-of-a-hate-crime

    http://www.avp.org/about-avp/coalitions-a-collaborations/82-national-coalition-of-anti-violence-programs

    https://www.splcenter.org/

    http://www.icaad.ngo/how-icaad-works/

    https://www.splcenter.org/20100216/ten-ways-fight-hate-community-response-guide

    http://www.osce.org/odihr/39821?download=true

    I also found a local chapter of the ACLU to join and hope to begin volunteering and putting this into action. If these groups don’t exist yet in our neighborhoods we can begin by contacting our local police, our school boards and other community groups and start to build networks for reporting, monitoring and responding to these increasing incidents of hate.

    I’ve been thinking about how shocking many of these cases feel, despite knowing this hate persisted and that so many groups suffer these fears all the time, the mob mentality effect has clearly spread the behavior rapidly and a look at the difference in Facebook feeds as many articles have been illustrating is perhaps evidence of how to understand these different worlds we live in, the hate will continue to be fed and validated among many social networks, we must utilize our own networks to simultaneously spread and strengthen our own solidarity, knowledge, and love and energize eachother into action that outshines this hate.

    ❤️

  120. I found this so helpful! Love these ideas!

    I’ve also started a project highlighting women who were pioneers in their careers, the more diverse, the better! We’re @1460women on instagram and are hoping to post a profile for each of the 1460 days of the next administration. If you have anyone to nominate (yourself included!) or want to follow along, check us out! :)

  121. Just wanted to give my thanks for this. I’m sure you guys have been given a lot of flack for posting your opinion. It’s nice to know that there are others trying to figure out what is next.

    • Sian says...

      Me too!

  122. Liz says...

    What a great list! For helping kids learn how to make a difference, I love love love the idea behind Little Voices Are Loud. They have different boxes focused on peace, equality, and the environment!

  123. Love love love this thoughtful, empowering and informative list! Thank you, Cup of Jo team!

  124. Alex says...

    While it’s true that there are many things we can do to make our own homes more environmentally friendly please don’t fool yourself into thinking these individual efforts are going to combat climate change. We need major change internationally at the governmental level. We need to organize and put extreme pressure on the Trump administration to follow through on the Paris Accords. In the absence of environmental leadership at the federal level we need to turn to cities as our next best line of defense. Cities are major carbon polluters but many are also forward thinking when it comes to the environment. If all our major cities enact tough environmental laws (carbon taxes, congestion pricing, banning plastic bags, etc.) we might begin to get somewhere. If you live in a city start lobbying your local government to enact extremely tough environmental laws. One other powerful strategy individuals can take is to look at your portfolio and divest of any investments that are contributing negatively to climate change and put that money into renewable energy companies. Finally, get out there and protest. There are 2 big ones being planned around Inauguration Day.

    • Thank you for these tips!

    • Katherine says...

      Agreed.

      On an individual level, I highly recommend watching Cowspiracy on Netflix. It examines the relationship between the food we eat and the effect it has on our planet. A vegetarian/vegan diet cuts your carbon footprint in HALF and is the single most powerful step an individual can take towards fighting climate change. I made the switch after watching the documentary and am feeling an overwhelming sense of relief and peace during a time where we often feel powerless to make any meaningful change.

  125. laura says...

    Please don’t let Abby pressure you. I visit ” A Cup of Joe” everyday because it is kind, respectful and thoughtful to all. I go to other sites for my explicit feminist readings.

    • shanze says...

      Those of us who are targets of the alt right & trump’s hateful rhetoric would probably feel more comfortable if CoJ went ahead with what they are doing being explicitly supportive of the diverse, gender equal society that will serve all Americans and the whole world instead of normalizing whats happening in the White House and going back to the 1950’s when its wasn’t polite to talk about such matters- especially for women! I hope you’ll realize the ability to ignore it isn’t a privilege all Americans enjoy. This isn’t a normative time in our history- this is part 2 of the Civil Rights era.

  126. I appreciate this post so much Joanna! I have felt very conflicted, especially during this holiday season, knowing that I have so many relatively I hold close who supported Trump fully. I think it’s important to not only shy away from speaking to them on the subject, but to engage them and step outside of my liberal bubble. To effectively change I need to know what needs changing and to understand how this happened. I also appreciate the call to action you are sugguesting. It’s easy to be outraged, but do something! We’re donating to planned parenthood (a service I used for years in my early 20’s for BC) and volunteering at a crisis center for women, thank you for being an advocate for change and using your voice Jo!

    Xoxo http://www.touchofcurl.com

  127. Laura says...

    I donated to Emily’s List today. Thank you for the list of ideas.

  128. Rani says...

    I love this blog but was surprised to read the words in the first paragraph saying “it’s one week post election and we made it”. Yes, many people made it, but too many others were threatened or assaulted because of their skin color or religion during these first days. I am an immigrant and a woman of color and people who look just like me have been easy targets since last Tuesday. The suggestions you outlined were wonderful and I plan to use some of these tips, but let’s not pretend that this is going to be fine. A slight change in tone would go far in these discussions.

    • JMT says...

      I agree. And “whatever your politics” normalizes the incredibly fast and dangerous far right wing turn our federal government is about to take.

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      Thank you both for your comments. Even though we openly supported Hillary Clinton on Cup of Jo (and continue to support progressive organizations like the ones we mentioned in this post) we respect readers of all viewpoints and all identities as long as they are equally respectful of Cup of Jo and its community.

    • sunny says...

      I also have to agree that people have been verbally and at times physically assaulted for how they look or their opinions, and it’s very worrisome. I know most of us are okay and haven’t personally been attacked, but things don’t feel okay to read about minority and immigrant kids being chanted at by kids yelling ‘build a wall’ or ‘go home.’

    • Jess says...

      I was thinking the same thing. I felt stunned to read the self-congratulatory opening. I truly do support your goal of inclusiveness, but it feels disrespectful to people in my community who are already experiencing increased hate and discrimination. You can respect “all viewpoints” with greater sensitivity to the impacts on vulnerable populations, especially people of color, immigrants and LGBTQ+ .

    • Lee says...

      I agree, and am slightly alarmed at the “we respect all viewpoints” response because in this election, as we all know, it was not “politics as usual” and while I agree in the notion of accepting all viewpoints, in this case voting for trump means your viewpoint excuses if not supports racism, sexism, bigotry of all types, if there was any doubt I think the appointment of Steve bannon made things clear. I am grateful to messages like those of John Oliver who honor the fact that “this is not normal”. That message is essential. And I’ll repeat, Steve bannon.

    • I agree. I like the spirit of the post but I think it’s important to realise that *not* everyone made it unscathed. I also agree with trying to understand someone’s view, but at some point you have to draw a line. Racism, misogyny, homophobia and Islamophobia are not viewpoints which should be respected. My greatest fear is that the immediate resistance to Trump will die down as people start to accept/live with/normalise him and the views he’s enabled and helped actualised as the new normal, both in the States and across the world.

  129. Sara Wilson says...

    Thank you for this article! I just wanted to add that being mindful of what goes in landfill and trying to recycle and compost everything you can is a great way to help the environment as well. Here is one great company we have found very useful to help us with difficult to recycle items (all those baby food pouches!) : http://www.terracycle.com/en-US/

  130. Susanne says...

    Thank you.

  131. Anna says...

    I like using justserve.org to find service opportunities in my area. Just typed in my zip code and found almost 40 service opportunities within 5 miles of my home. So awesome.

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      Great idea!

  132. Erin says...

    Don’t forget our HeadStart programs! Many immigrant and single- parent families are supported. This program helps educate both children and their families. They need our support so please consider a tax- deductible donation!!

  133. Abby says...

    I’m interested in how you’ll continue to navigate the world between not wanting to normalize a Trump presidency & writing and working to fight some of the things he says and legislates, and the “no matter who you voted for” tone of trying to be a big, inclusive tent. I’m not sure how I’d do it, and I think I’ll probably be more likely to continue to read if you continue along the path of more articles and issues that are explicitly feminist, anti-racist, or otherwise direct. I’m appreciative of this space and the work you do here-thanks.

  134. Chelsea B says...

    Building off of the first item “know what’s at stake” – subscribe to quality journalism (like actually pay for it)!

    • Lexi Mainland says...

      Yes, absolutely, thank you for mentioning that. Personally, I think it’s especially important to support local media (local NPR stations and newspapers, for example). They are the ones reporting on the day-to-day, on-the-ground issues that often only rise to the national level of interest every four years. And they really need the support.

    • chelsea b says...

      Thanks Lexi, BTW loved the article!

    • Sara says...

      My husband & I just did this today. We’re excited about our new NYT subscription & about putting our money where our mouth is. Print journalism needs support or it will die. Print journalists hold our officials accountable and keep us all informed.

  135. Thank you for the suggestions! Indeed, we do have to broaden our minds. It’s tough, though, right? Thank you for encouraging open-mindedness!

  136. Amanda says...

    One way to help the environment is to go vegan or vegetarian. And it doesn’t have to be 100 percent of the time to have an impact. Plant-based diets have long been proven to be much better for the environment. And there are TONS of awesome cookbooks out there for all budgets and skill sets to get you started (highly recommend anything by Isa Chandra Moskowitz).

    • Yes! Watch Cowspiracy if you haven’t already. I am not full vegetarian, but it inspired me to eat more plant-based! Another way to help the earth: just buy less stuff. The documentary The True Cost (link to trailer) inspired me to cut WAY back on shopping.

    • Sam says...

      Yes to this!

    • Baily says...

      I was going to say this too!!

    • Katherine says...

      Yes! Cowspiracy was a life-changing documentary. When I get overwhelmed with the state of planet earth, the knowledge that I’m doing the best I can makes it feel a little less soul-crushing. Plus vegan food is healthy and delicious!

    • Vicky says...

      Thank you. I was going to suggest watching Cowspiracy also. You can make the biggest impact by limiting meat consumption or even better go vegetarian :) As an added bonus I’ve never felt better or had more energy!

  137. Alice says...

    Thank you Lexi! My friends have all been brainstorming and researching what to do to help. Will forward this around to everyone!

  138. Nikki B says...

    This is so great! EMILY’s List is an acronym (Early Money Is Like Yeast) – and so the name of the org is capitalized. Thank you for being so open and supporting of such great organizations.

  139. ALison D. says...

    Thank you for this.