Relationships

Coming Together

Statue of Liberty

How are you doing this morning? First of all, I want to take a moment to send a hug to everyone out there, no matter what your political beliefs are. It has been a long and hard election.

This past month, we’ve been excitedly working on a big post to celebrate Hillary’s victory — we asked 10 of our favorite illustrators to draw how they would feel today, and the illustrations were ecstatic: from Hillary and Obama jumping into the air; to a little girl at a museum staring at a painting of Hillary among other great women in history; to faces of women of all races, ages and ethnicities smiling above the White House.

Of course, we won’t run that post today. I feel a huge mix of emotions: shock, sadness, disbelief, grief for what could have been. I keep thinking maybe I’ll suddenly wake up to Anton and Toby asking for milk and realize it was just a dream. I’m sure many people feel the same.

But.

Tomorrow I’m going to dust myself off. Because I also feel love. And fervor. And a commitment to my children, friends, neighbors and people in our country, especially marginalized people who may fear for their future.

“The worst thing that can happen in a democracy — as well as in an individual’s life,” says Hillary Clinton, “is to become cynical about the future and lose hope.”

So we will not do that, I’ll explain to my children. We will respect the democratic process and honor the outcome of the election and hope the country heads down a better path. “The Republican Party and Donald Trump will have control of all the levers of government,” writes Thomas J. Friedman in the New York Times. “That is an awesome responsibility, and it is all going to be on them. Do they understand that? Personally, I will not wish them ill. Too much is at stake for my country and my children. Unlike the Republican Party for the last eight years, I am not going to try to make my president fail. If he fails, we all fail. So yes, I will hope that a better man emerges than we saw in this campaign.”

We watched the results last night with a group of friends, including one who is Arab-American. When Trump was announced the winner, he said, “I didn’t realize how much my country hated me.” But I hope that’s not true. This morning I read a post by Ali Michael, an educator, about what to tell our children today, and she made this great point: “Remind them ― to ease their minds ― that not everyone who voted for Donald Trump did so because they believe the bigoted things that he has said this year. Many of them voted for him because they feel frustrated with the economy, they feel socially left behind, and they are exercising the one power they have.”

There are so many good people in this country — so many — and we can come together and make change. And look at how the young people voted! That definitely gives me hope.

We’ll make big changes on a larger scale, but also here are ways to help on an individual level, as Rachel Howe pointed out: Ask everyone if they are okay and if they’re not see what you can do. Say hi to strangers. Volunteer, anywhere. Shop locally. Host people in your home. Cook for yourself and others. Speak up when you see racism and sexism in action. Protest. Donate time and money. Talk to older people more. Talk to kids more. Teach empathy. If you feel your future is in danger, start now to build a secure foundation for yourself. If you’re in less danger, reach out to those who are and offer your time and money and care to them.

inclusiveamerica_penelopedullaghan

This flag gif by Penelope Dullaghan was one of the 10 illustrations we commissioned. It celebrates Hillary’s message of unity.

WE CAN STILL BE THIS COUNTRY.

  1. J Rooney says...

    I am full of anxiety and defeat. I feel that all the progress Obama has achieved (or tried to achieve…I’m looking at you, Congress) will be unfurled and the U.S. will be sent back another decade.

    I’m all for change and turning the government on it’s head- but that’s not what Trump represents. He represents hatred and xenophobia(hello border wall), he represents the NRA (‘A’ rating, folks…I don’t think the mass shootings will stop anytime soon), he represents a lack of knowledge about the environment(he wants to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement within his first 100 days) and he represents a pure and unequivocal lack of intelligence about women’s health(having a child at 39 weeks is typical called giving birth, Donald- not abortion).

    It’s sad to me that those that did vote for Donald could not find any other way to voice their issues. But I am hoping that if Trump and his corrupt team of hooligans(Christie/Giuliani/Gingrich) do try to pull anything insane- then we all organize, voice our concerns and get the U.S. back on the right track.

    • Nicole says...

      Agree 100%

    • Liz says...

      Thanks for expressing my views ..agree with everything you stated.

    • Hear hear!

  2. Sonja says...

    Loved this post. I’ve come back to it a couple of times as tears welled up again and again.

    In college I attended a talk by Tim Wise, author of “White Like Me: Reflections from a Privileged Son” and something he said nestled deep in my mind and provides both comfort and urgency. He said (or close to this as it was some time ago): It’s worth the fight. When you encounter racism, especially in your family or community, it’s worth the fight. Love them enough to fight with them.

    I think this is so true. Let your convictions pour out of you. Take a stand, especially when it’s not easy as that’s when it matters the most.

  3. Rachel says...

    Beautiful, classy post. This election season has been hard and exhausting. The country is divided in half and somehow we have to unite and really listen to each other. After reading many of the comments, the generalization that almost 60 million Americans voted for Trump from a place of racism and hate is hurtful, insulting, and inaccurate. America is better than that. My friends, family, and community (made up of many races) are loving and inclusive but could not vote for Hillary Clinton. The corruption, treatment of her husband’s victims, foundation scandals, and her bold stance on late term abortion were deal breakers for us. Therefore, we voted our party. Thank you for letting people openly share their individual views here. I am choosing to be hopeful for our nation and my own actions will continue to be rooted in love.

  4. Nicole says...

    Joanna- I applaud you on this post, unity and mutual respect are what we need right now. Compassion towards one another, understanding, talking, engaging, learning, we HAVE to stay positive and united and also hopeful. We must not lose hope, ever. I think for us young people, this election provoked the inspiration to get involved, even if just local to our communities. Both sides of the equation felt a palpable sense of uncertainty yesterday- but I personally am choosing to let that uncertainty be my motivator. I thought a lot yesterday about this quote from Anne Frank- ‘We all live with the objective of being happy, our lives are all different, and yet the same.’

    To me, that quote reminds us that at the end of the day, we all live for the same simple ideals- to be happy, to be healthy, to have opportunity and to be loved. I am inspired that perhaps our generation can work together to understand each other better, and find more common ground, and most of all, set a great example for our children. We can do great work together.

  5. Sandra says...

    Only 1453 days until election day 2020. I pray Trump can hold it together that long, and it is plenty of time for those of us who abhor him to put up the good fight in helping to present a candidate that will not allow him a second term.

    My sister lives in Arizona and prior to the election a 2nd grader at her children’s school told a classmate that if “Trump wins you will have to go back to Africa.” (The child’s who was told this is Indian, BTW.) It breaks my heart, because you know this is passed down from the parents. Those of in major cities and along the east and west coasts live in a bubble. There is a lot of racism in between.

  6. Bridget says...

    Thank you so much for this post.

  7. Joanna,

    As always, thank you for the empathetic, articulate and personal way you have written about this. You are a place of warm hope on a dark day.

    Please post those illustrations! Even though it didn’t go the way we do fervently hoped, one day it will. I’m sure you saw Seth Myers monologue on the election. Somewhere out here is the woman who will become our first female President. She and I and all of us need all the hope and encouragement we can get! Please share, so that we can all have clear images to carry with us, to never forget what we are working for.

  8. I feel like it’s a dream too and feel so sad for the lost opportunities that would have come with a Hillary victory.
    But yes, we mustn’t lose hope. Hugs from England x

  9. Lynda says...

    I would still love to see the commissioned works … the artists and messages still deserve to be seen and heard, no matter the outcome of this election. Thank you for your essay.

  10. Carla says...

    God bless you for your remarkable words! Thank you and God Speed to our country!

  11. Sarah says...

    Thank you, Jo. This was really comforting. And I appreciate you addressing it.

  12. Robin says...

    I can’t stop crying.

  13. Summer says...

    Great message, Joanna, and thanks as always to being so open in your blog. You see how much it means to so many of us.

    I, personally, am having a hard time coming together. I truly don’t want any president to fail, but I’m TIRED of being the bigger person.

    • Liz says...

      Me too

  14. Elena says...

    Proud of you and so much respect for using your voice for connection and compassion. You could easily have chosen to “stay out of it” or “not get political.” Thank you for making a different choice- there is too much at risk to stay quiet.

  15. Haylee says...

    This is beautiful and exactly what I needed to hear. Thank you!

  16. Sarah says...

    I am Canadian, living in Vancouver, and I have cried over these results. Then I read this post – thoughtful and humane – and the illuminating comments After reading them, I still feel afraid for Muslim Americans, and people of colour, and women seeking legal abortions, and girls growing up in a sexualized and devaluing America. I also feel afraid for my sons, still small in a world where a climate change denier could be elected US President. Trump is actually a global problem now. The silver lining I feel today is I am galvanized to fight harder what matters – social equality and our global climate.

  17. adriane says...

    Thank you! Hugs to everyone. We need it now more than ever.

  18. Thank you for this, I’m feeling so scared and devastated, these really lovely words from you do help.

  19. kelley says...

    Very beautifully written. I did not vote for Hillary, not because she was a woman but because she was not the right woman for me. I refused to vote for someone I do not believe in just because she was a woman. I am still trying to come to terms with this election and my choice, but at the end of the day I know that we must come together, we are all in this together. I loved this post.

  20. plch says...

    For people who voted Trump: have you thought about the enviroment? Because Trump’s program is terrible for everyone’s safety:
    1. Withdrawal from the Paris accords and all other American involvement in actions on global warming, which means the total collapse of international cooperation on the matter. This is a virtual certainty.

    2. The end of all new EPA regulations on air and water pollution, including carbon limits and efforts to prevent the dumping of coal ash and other toxic pollutants into our waterways. This is also a virtual certainty, as Trump can order that without even asking Congress.

    3. Greater use of coal and the end of all federal tax breaks, subsidies or research on renewable energy sources. Again, a virtual certainly. Trump promised to do that only a week or so ago.

    4. The end of restrictions on fracking.

    5. Possibly even the elimination of the EPA completely. The far right has salivated over this for a long time and they may well have the votes to pull it off, at least in the House. The Senate seems less likely.

    6. The end of all drilling restrictions for oil, from the arctic to our seaboards.

    From here: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/dispatches/2016/11/10/trump-effects-the-environment/?ref_widget=trending&ref_blog=lovejoyfeminism&ref_post=tomorrow-we-fight

    • Me says...

      Because killing babies and being a complete liar is a better goal for the presidency. ??

  21. Erin says...

    I found it comforting to know that I wasn’t the only one who was experiencing intense shocks of grief, sadness, and pain. It feels like my heart has been ripped out and I don’t know how to pick up the pieces. I thank you so much for being honest and candid about politics on here. It is refreshing to see someone who is isn’t afraid to post how they feel, in part knowing they may lose readers. But, we will rise up. We will show our sons and daughters that there is good. This will be a historic moment in time, and I’m eager to see the light that comes out of the darkness <3 Thank you, Joanna.

  22. Corinne says...

    I just wanted to thank you for this post. I know how important it is for you to present positive views that seek to make everyone feel loved and included, so sending out the message that you are struggling with Tuesday night’s decision means a lot. I’m struggling with it, too. I’m struggling with finding a glimmer of hope in all this. I’m struggling with coming to terms with the idea that so many of my fellow countrymen are either okay with or are willing to turn a blind eye to so much racism, sexism, and hate. I’m struggling with the fear of the very real possibility that I will not have health care next year. I feel for my children’s future. And so, so much more. After all this time, after so many ups and downs and challenges and obstacles in my life, after truly believing in myself and knowing that whatever happens, “I got this” — I am suddenly rocked to my core. I’m not so sure I can muster an “I got this” this time. So I just wanted you to know that lifelines like this are important to me and many others right now. Just finding a quiet place of sanity means everything to me right now.

  23. Thanks for sharing that, Joanna. I am from Germany and I feel very bad, sad and anxious for the world; I cannot even imagine how hard it must be for you guys. My heart goes out to all of you US people who never wanted this desaster to happen.

  24. Kristina says...

    I voted for Trump because I believe that we will all hold him accountable and responsible for the decisions he chooses to make. His words will matter and his actions even more so. Both sides of the aisle will uphold a standard that he will have to meet. Republicans have been hard on Trump and will continue to be in order to ensure transparency and adherence to the Constitution. I could not say the same about Hillary. She has colluded, conspired, lied and evaded within her own party and beyond on so many controversies over the years that I could not allow my country to be led by someone so dishonest. It really just comes down to that.

    I feel for the loss that Democrats are struggling with, but hope that they can ultimately see that it is possible that the other side is comprised of informed and intelligent voters that didn’t vote based on race/gender, but on transparency. Love does trump hate, but it’s unfair and irresponsible to assume that those who don’t want to support a corrupt and deeply flawed candidate as part of the hate.

  25. Sofia says...

    I’m european and spent the entire day yesterday nauseated with the outcome. My boyfriend woke me up at 5 a.m with the news and I couldn’t believe it. I was in denial that it could actually happen based on the pre-election polls. It’s just appalling. Not to say that Hillary was a flawless candidate in my eyes but against that sad excuse of a man?!! There’s no possible comparison. How could so many people see him as an acceptable candidate even? It blows my mind. I just hope that somehow this doesn’t mean what we most fear for your country and the rest of the world really.
    But yeah, what can you do? Life goes on, and you make the best of your reality day by day. Also Ali Michael’s view was a really good call. Great points, as always, Joanna. Stay strong people.

  26. Julie says...

    Thank you Joanna, a truly inspiring post. The silent and discontent minority has become the loud majority, just like here in the UK when Brexit occurred. Inequality and globalisation are to blame, a sense of powerlessness, of loss and fear for the future. In a way, although shocking, the outcome is understandable. People who feel left behind have spoken, and as Joanna writes, we all need to listen.
    In a way, it is a shame that Hillary was the democrats’ candidate. Although her message was about unifying America and giving everyone fair opportunities, she represented the wrong side of the fence, the establishment, the status quo, the top 1%, with all the connotation of bribery and unlawful wielding of power that it entails. So I do understand the ‘protest’ vote. But I do not understand the need to vote for Trump. As alternatives go, he is a loose canon with a very dubious character and no real political plan.
    There ought to be a third option. An option that says that nobody out there represents you, and that option should count. Between a rock and a hard place, we all should be able to say when our political class is failing to represent us. Otherwise, we end up with Brexit and Trump. We need a better political system, one that lets good people through, people who do not need to be from political royalty or who have billions at their disposal.

  27. This was such a beautiful, gracious and hopeful response – a posture much needed today and all days. Thank you. <3

  28. Danielle says...

    Thank you so much for this x

  29. I’m from Belgium but I would like to leave a comment as American politics influence European politics a great deal…

    I have so much to say but it’s already been covered in the majority of the previous comments. I would like to stress 2 things however that I don’t see popping up a lot:

    1) As a historian, I cannot understand that people don’t learn from thousands of years of mistakes, and worse: keep on repeating them. The last time people who found themselves in crisis supported a political figure who spoke understandable (populist) but dangerous views, was in in Germany in the late 1930’s. We ALL know what happened because of that: the whole world was at war and millions died because of a power-driven psychopath. My grandparents still have nightmares about it… Not even 80 years later, we find ourselves in the 1930’s again, and this time the US finds itself in Germany’s position…

    2) I find it absolutely shocking that someone who denies climate change will be in charge of the US. Climate change is the most urgent and life-threatening thing happening globally. It should be stopped at once. Politicians have the power to stop it by making some very simple choices. Alas they are owned by the fossil fueled, corporate world. This election of Trump who denies climate change, magnifies those facts 100 times.

    Since I woke up yesterday, I am seriously reconsidering my wish to have children. My boyfriend the same.

    On a more positive note, I love it that you call your readers to do their own “homework” Joanna. If we want change in the world, we will have to make it ourselves instead of waiting for our “leaders” who don’t seem to give a crap about it because they represent corporations instead of the people who elected them. I already saw some personal action plans listed up in the comments. Bravo to all of you! For inspiration, here a the actions I’m already taking myself: (1) for food I shop very conscious and local, (2) for material stuff (cloths, electronics, furniture, car…) I don’t go shopping unless I really need something (I still don’t have a smartphone because my old Nokia still functions perfectly…), (3) I’m friendly to strangers, (4) I donate to a few causes I strongly believe in, (5) I donate blood, (6) I sign petitions, (7) I’m critical towards regular media, (7) I transfered my bank accounts to a social and climate conscious bank

    If you want to start somewhere, please consider learning more about the Dakota access pipeline threatening Standing Rock: it’s kept out of media worldwide although hundreds of thousands of people world wide support the protest and Norway is even pulling out of investing in the pipeline.
    http://standwithstandingrock.net/ #nodapl #standingrock

    A good read about our power as consumers by our Caroline Donofrio: http://www.refinery29.com/2016/11/128301/purchasing-power-tracking-spending-habits

    Be the change you wish to see in the world! We have the power!

    Love from Belgium

    • plch says...

      thank you!

    • Me says...

      Grow up and deal. He isn’t Hitler, this isn’t the 1930s and you sound like a moron.

  30. shopgirl says...

    Wow, 560 comments already!
    I think that the media and survey agencies were very damaging to her! The question is whether deliberately or not. Trump’s intense presence in the media (good or bad – we all know it doesn’t matter) was unbeatable. And that completely wrong assessment of ratings, because of which she did not have a chance to correct the tactics and campaign. Very very disturbing. And therefore also a big shock after the election. They just couldn’t see it coming. I’m from Europe and I am very sad how the world is turning right now …. we all must be tolerant and strong.

  31. This made interesting reading. One of the commenters said: I used to be a progressive.
    I wonder how you stop that. Either you believe in progress and looking forward or you don’t. Mind you, we have the same comments over here in the UK from people who once voted Labour and suddenly became Ukip supporters. In the words of one woman I know who, after being a life-long Labour voter suddenly turned Conservative: I’m looking out for number 1 now. Said in the comfort of her own home, lavish pension behind her, family and friends and pretty good health for someone in her 80s. But still feeling that the world has let her down.
    Meanwhile, think on this: Trump has vacillated between saying that women who seek abortion should be punished to doctors who perform abortions should be punished. Not a single word about men who are part of the conception process. Forcing women to carry to term fetuses that they do not want, they may be damaged beyond hope, who may be the result of rape or incest or whatever…if you are a woman who voted Trump on those grounds, shame.on.you.

  32. Simone says...

    Thank you for this post! In Europe, we are shocked and devastated with you. But I have been thinking in the same terms as you – let’s try to make an difference all the same and teach our children how to be good, tolerant persons.
    My thoughts are with you. Xoxo Simone

  33. Eva says...

    Hi Johanna,

    I am Portuguese and felt exactly like you. America is a world lider, and your values affect, I would say, all the world. And I felt depressed with this choice. How could be possible? As you said, its the disbelief that made americans vote this way.

    As european I can only ask you to do what Hillary said “This loss hurts, but please never stop believing that fighting for what’s right is worth it. It is, it is worth it. And so we need — we need you to keep up these fights now and for the rest of your lives”.

    We need you to do this, for the whole world.

  34. Trudy says...

    Very well written! Thank you. Wishing America wishdom, strength and grace from Amsterdam!

  35. YK says...

    Hillary’s encouragement to little girls in her speech was beautiful and heartbreaking.

    It made me think of this spoken word by Sarah Kay “B (If I should have a daughter)

    “if i should have a daughter…she’s gonna learn that this life will hit you, hard, in the face, wait for you to get back up so it can kick you in the stomach. but getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to remind your lungs how much they like the taste of air. there is hurt, here, that cannot be fixed by band-aids or poetry, so the first time she realizes that wonder-woman isn’t coming, i’ll make sure she knows she doesn’t have to wear the cape all by herself. because no matter how wide you stretch your fingers, your hands will always be too small to catch all the pain you want to heal.

    i’ll tell her there will be days like this when your boots will fill with rain and you’ll be up to your knees in disappointment and those are the very days you have all the more reason to say “thank you,” ‘cause there is nothing more beautiful than the way the ocean refuses to stop kissing the shoreline no matter how many times it’s sent away.”

    • Yaindy Lara says...

      Beautiful !

  36. LB says...

    The United States missed an opportunity to elect an intelligent public servant who understands public policy and international issues and is genuinely dedicated to making all Americans’ lives better. Instead, we’ve elected Donald Trump, a misogynistic, racist con man who only cares about . . . Donald Trump! It’s heartbreaking. He has bragged about assaulting women and he has mocked disabled people. I am a fan of Cup of Jo and appreciate this Cup of Jo post, but it doesn’t change the reality of the next four years. For me, I will turn off the TV and take comfort in friends, family, good literature, and music—no president can change those things.

  37. Ceridwen says...

    What a powerful post. In Australia, many feel what you have articulated with such compassion and resilience here. Other countries feel the weight of the decision/s made…we feel that uncertainty and fear, the shock of the outcome and dismay. Our government in Australia is not showing a lot of compassion now in policy making. What you have said about everyday acts of goodwill, kindness and compassion is so important to all of us. as Ghandi said “Be the change you want to see in the world.” Love to you x

  38. Sheri says...

    A Canadian reader. Enjoy your blog and have for years. I watch American politics closely and was so nervous watching the results come in last night, I had to stop watching. I had a hard time explaining his win to my kids…they truly do not understand.

    Friends across the border.

  39. Maya says...

    Dear Joanna,

    I’ve been reading your blog for years now, however I’ve never posted a comment. But today for the first time in my life I feel actually terrified and maybe sharing it would ease this feeling. I live in Lithuania, a small Baltic state in Europe, bordering Russia. Trump’s victory will not only shape everyday life in the US but also around the world. Abolishing NATO, friendly approach towards president Putin – these messages from Trump may change the global playing field dramatically. And today me and many people around me fear, that the independence of our country and well being of our families is in real danger. And if the strongest country in the world is led by a man who does not stand by it’s commitments and principles, we might see some tragic outcomes. I really hope I’m exaggerating and it’s just the after-shock speaking. But remembering recent events in Ukraine and Russia’s occupation of Crimea, it does not seem to be such an unlikely scenario..
    Just wanted to tell you how deeply concerned people all around the world are .

    Tons of hugs from Lithuania! Your blog has become such an important part of my life :)

  40. Thank you for being vocal in your support for Hillary. I am heartbroken for what would have been – for women and minority rights, human rights across the globe, the economy, the planet…..watching women run to get IUDs because the new Congress and Trump Administration could eliminate birth control rights under the Affordable Care Act (or whatever will become of it) is not something I can fathom happening in 2016. We can be sad today but tomorrow we need to channel Hillary’s strength, determination and grace to fight on.

  41. cilla says...

    I am Slovenian (yes, from the country of the first lady – I cannot understand that some people celebrated the results yesterday in her hometown??), so wasn`t personally involved in the elections or the last 18 months and didn`t need your words to calm me down. yesterday i was shocked, horrified, afraid, and today i am happy i live so far away and don`t need to deal with it on daily basis.
    I would just like to say i was happy that the your blog didn`t ignore this topic and did express clear opinions of the candidates. Some blogers try to stay so neutral virtually and the blog just doesn`t feel real, because it`s not the topic that anyone would stay neutral about in the real life. therefore thank you for writing about politics.

  42. Paige says...

    The optimism of this post was much needed today. Peace and love <3

  43. Meghan says...

    Can you please post the Hillary victory post so we can all pretend it was true? I would love to escape reality right now.

  44. Meghan says...

    Can you please post the Hilary victory post so we can all pretend it was true? I would love to escape reality right now.

  45. Jenny says...

    As a somebody who originally supported Bernie, and then went on to support Hillary (first cautiously and then fervently), I understand where some of the Trump voters are coming from. You had reservations about Clinton, which is something I believe we should feel toward all politicians at first. But considering the fact that Clinton has had one of the most transparent (albeit, not necessarily by choice) campaigns in U.S. History, and as somebody who read through many of the leaked emails, I truly feel like Hillary had our country’s best interests at heart. I voted for Hillary not only for myself, but for my LGBTQ friends, my Muslim friends, my African-American friends, and all of those who are marginalized in this country and who will be marginalized further during the Trump presidency. You may say that you are not racist or bigoted, and you likely aren’t; you may have voted for him for legitimate reasons, but that does not make you any less complicit in any harm that results from a Trump presidency. The moment that you cast your ballot, you agreed to support somebody who has made threats against our fellow Americans. You don’t get to escape the weight of that responsibility.

    • Lindsey says...

      Completely agree.

    • plch says...

      *applause*

  46. Stacy says...

    I feel it’s incredibly important to point out that roughly 50% of people who voted, voted for one or the other candidate. This means it is quite likely that someone you love likely voted for the candidate you loathe. Tread lightly through these judgemental waters. I’m so very sad about some of these comments that are coming from a place of hurt or anger on here and I didn’t vote for either of these two. We can only change ourselves. Perhaps an open, thoughtful, and less critical dialogue may be more appropriate? Tearing people apart and defaming their character is not ok. I won’t be back for a bit, as reading some of this was more upsetting than all of the negativity of this whole election for me. Be kind and be thoughtful. No matter what, because that’s a reflection of YOU. Peace like a river.

    • Allison Dyer says...

      Wow, so perfectly put. Thank you. I too will not be back to this blog for a while, despite my being a long-time reader, because of the sadly judgemental comments coming on so strongly from those who claim acceptance for all.

  47. Courtney Lennberg says...

    Thank you, Joanna and Cup of Jo team.

    I am hurting and hurting for all my marginalized brothers and sisters.

    But, we rise. Together, we rise.

  48. Thank you for such a positive post. What I needed today <3

  49. Sara says...

    Thank you for this! I, too, have been in shock all day and wondering how to move forward!

  50. Sarah says...

    This was the first election (of the three I’ve been eligible to vote in) that I truly made a point to stay informed – watching the debates, understanding (as best I can!) the policies, etc. As my main criteria for a candidate is equality (marriage, women’s rights), it has made me sad to realize that in my three elections, I’ve only truly been given the choice of one candidate.

    When will it be the case that we have a hard time choosing our candidate because there are too many good options??

    Anyways. I never expected to feel so emotional following an election. But today has been a mix of disbelief, shock, confusion….and real sadness. It has come in waves.

    I am happy to say that this last wave of tears is from a good place- I was so relieved to see that you wrote this post – the perfect post, if I may. And, to see the comments from all of the readers. This blog means so much to so many of us, Joanna. I hope you know that. xxo, Sarah

    • The reason that we don’t have tons of candidates on election night is because we weeded it down to two from the primaries. Running third party this late in the game, unfortunately, lends no strength to that position. Bernie Sanders was a third party candidate (Independent) running on the Democratic ticket. Even Donald Trump was not an actual Republican, but again, he ran as one. Ron Paul was another candidate, who is Libertarian, but served in Congress as a Republican, and also ran for president as a Republican.

      We narrow it down to the strongest candidates, but unfortunately, that leaves room for favoritism and apparently demagogues. I’m not saying this system is perfect (it isn’t), but if people really want to win the game, they have to play by the rules. The DNC didn’t play by the rules by rigging its voting against its strongest candidate, Bernie, but the RNC and Donald Trump played by the rules, and now we’re screwed.

  51. Nicole says...

    The Turmp voter refrain seems to be, “I’m not racist, sexist, prejudiced, etc.” Maybe. But none of you were sufficiently bothered by his rasicm, sexism, and prejudice to not vote for him. That speaks volumes.

    • Meg says...

      Agree. It’s telling that the things he said that shocked us were non issues for a lot of people.

    • Me says...

      And apparently you aren’t bothered by a lying, baby butcher who leaves Americans over in a foreign country to be killed. Or laughing about a rapist molesting a 12 year old. Works both ways hunny.

  52. Caroline says...

    Doing all we can today just to make it through. Are you planning to the share the art you had commissioned? I think something happy and exciting could do me a lot of good right now. I need to feel some sort of hope and possibility for the future.

  53. Annmarie says...

    Thank you so much for this post. Really needed it.

  54. Melanie Shevkenek says...

    I am a Canadian and was very disappointed in the result from our election last year. It is a relief for me that America did not elect Hilary Clinton, who shares many of the values of our Canadian Prime Minister. I’m not sure how, in advocating for late term abortions, Hilary Clinton can be respected.

    • Jane Doe says...

      at least spell her name right *Hillary

    • Erzsébet says...

      Fortunately your views do not represent the majority of Canadians.

    • plch says...

      nobody advocate for late term abortions, late term abortion are sometime a tragic necessity. Have you read the stories of the women that had one? they all very much wanted a child, even a child with disabilities. But a child with no brain? a child with his gut out of his body? a child with so many defects that would never be able to breath? a child with continous seizures? those are the cases I have read about.
      http://www.ourbodiesourselves.org/stories/my-late-term-abortion/
      http://jezebel.com/interview-with-a-woman-who-recently-had-an-abortion-at-1781972395
      BTW: I don’t think Trump cares one way or another about abortion

    • Sarah says...

      That was the very moment she earned my vote. She passionately defended a woman’s right to a heartbreaking choice. Advances in science allow us to learn, during pregnancy, of some tragic situations, and to then tell a mother she must carry a child, who will either never be able to live the life which she had dreamed for him/her, or will kill her in the process, is terribly cruel. It is simply not your, or anyone else’s decision to make. I would like to believe that if such a tragedy were to befall your sister, your daughter, or your friend, that you would have compassion and respect for her grief. This is a horrible choice to have to make, but having no choice at all is worse.

    • Jenny Rose says...

      I am Canadian and was very happy with the results from last years election. It is sad for me that Hilary Clinton, who shares many values as our Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, did not get elected. My fellow Canadian above needs to read further into Clintons position on abortion and not make half statements about whole thruths.
      I stand with you as a neighbour here in Canada. May your country find ways to come together through all of this.

    • Samantha says...

      I have no idea how your Prime Minister won either. People critices Trump for having no experience, but Trudeau was an actor just one year before being involved in politics.

    • Yaindy Lara says...

      An actor ! Wow. Well we have a crazy raper aka “Kaney West” who said he will be running in 2020. Sad very sad but what’s done is done. We can only hope for the best.

  55. This says it all.

    Unlike the Republican Party for the last eight years, I am not going to try to make my president fail. If he fails, we all fail. So yes, I will hope that a better man emerges than we saw in this campaign.

    Sending a hug to you too.

  56. Jovita says...

    This is a thoughtful, encouraging post. Thank you for your words, Joanna.

  57. Catherine says...

    Joanna,
    Thank you for posting this and for your vocal support of Hillary. I’ve been a long time supporter of her but haven’t been very vocal about it. I didn’t want to offend anyone who felt differently (and still don’t) but more so I doubted myself: was I informed enough to vehemently support someone? In hindsight, yes, of course I was. Now I wish I’d spoken up more. But your post at least represents the positive that’s come out of all this. Instead of anger or hate, I’ve seen so much optimism and hope from Hillary’s supporters and I hope our disappointment unites us and propels us out of apathy and toward action.

  58. Kari says...

    So wonderfully proud of you for sticking to your guns this election and posting what believe in spite of all the naysayers. I had to get this out today:

    To everyone who is happy today,
    I honestly hope you get what you wanted. Your capacity to accept racism, degradation of women, mockery of the disabled, unabashed tales of sexual assault, incitement of violence, and religious persecution is astounding, and I hope founded out of a deep desperation to help you and yours. In the meantime, please understand that the rest of us will be fighting to protect ourselves, our loved ones, our neighbors, friends, and above all, people we’ve never met, because your path to happiness will not be allowed to crush the rest of us along the way, and you have given us no indication that you care about the wellbeing of anyone else but you. I hope that someday you will find the same capacity for love and understanding that drove my vote yesterday.

    • Ellen says...

      You said it exactly how I feel! Thank you! I can’t understand why people voted the way they did and I’m certainly not ready to think Trump is changed in one day in a better person. He is not and will never because that’s not who he is. I’m scared and hope people will watch him closely.

    • Laura says...

      Very well put!

    • Emily says...

      Well said.

    • Laurie says...

      Yes. Nail head, you have been hit.

    • Corinne says...

      Exactly. <3.

    • Summer says...

      I could not agree more.

    • elizabeth says...

      Not all of us who are pleased with the election results are racist, sexist, etc. I’m a 31 year old college educated woman, and I struggled with both candidates. Trump is far from perfect, but please keep in mind that Hillary has many faults too, including silencing women who have been sexually assaulted. I haven’t put down my friends who were adamantly pro-Hillary, and as such, I don’t think its ok to put down those of us who aren’t entirely discouraged that Trump won over Hillary. Perhaps the best way to show a “capacity for love and understanding” is to love your fellows who voted for EITHER candidate. ❤️

    • CathyS says...

      Riots in major cities….vilifying people because of their beliefs does not sound very nice…on either side.

    • Yaindy Lara says...

      Amen!

  59. Emily says...

    Joanna, I admire you for your readiness to look ahead. Like you, I don’t want to do what the Republicans did to President Obama; it clearly did not serve our country well. That being said, it seems like we are in a deplorable position: how do we come together when if feels like it is giving tacit acceptance to his unconscionable behavior? I feel like accepting him is saying I accept how he treats women, people of color, and the disabled. I feel like accepting him says I’m OK with crudeness and deceiving the disenfranchised. His behavior cannot be condoned. I don’t want to be filled with disgust when I’m confronted with him, but I also don’t want our social fabric to continue to unravel to the point where we accept such egregious commentary and actions.

    • Evelyn says...

      Well put, these are my exact feelings

  60. I needed this post for my soul.

    It’s been a really sad & difficult day. As a result of all the hatred & anger we’re currently surrounded by, I’ve found myself being more compassionate to those around me. That’s positive, right? If the outcome of this is more compassion, maybe we’re headed in the right direction.

    xoxo
    Christina | http://www.cuddlepill.com

    • Me says...

      From liberals who are rioting because their feelings are hurt when their lying, thieving candidate lost a fair democratic election. Yes they probably should learn some compassion and self control.

  61. virginie says...

    Great text Joanna, as many others readers have said already, I loved the way you talked about this election throughout the weeks…
    I hope there is (still) hope on the other side of the border…
    I’m french but have been living in Canada for many years. This election has disturbed me more than I thought.
    I’m trying to understand that people have different issues and might use their vote to express their disagreement , and I don’t pretend to know enough about american politics…BUT I still think there is a good reason why so many people are shocked by this result.
    I feel very upset by the fact that people who do have the right and the chance to vote (which, obviously, is not the case for many in this world) actually use it to give POWER to someone who can barely align two coherent thoughts together. That makes me angry, because it’s sort of “normalizing” racist, misogynist and disrespectful speeches and behaviours.
    What kind of message does this send ? It is OK to accept because , you know, people are frustrated, and angry and so on?!
    By voting you are not just protesting, you give power, you give responsibility. As a US president, he was just given a HUGE one! And it doesn’t look that this guy can be given that sort of responsibility.
    I’m feeling even more worried that this will be an open door for some extreme right-wing parties else in the world (i.e. in France where there will be a presidential election in 2017).
    Where were all these guys during history class by the way?!
    Anyways…I cannot get over it still. I sincerely hope this is not going to be as worse as it looks.
    So many people can relate to what was written in this post… hopefully they will stand together .
    sending you warm thoughts and hoping for better days.

  62. You always find the right words even in the worst situations. Thank you for this! Let the healing begin!

  63. cz says...

    heart broken
    appreciative for those can inspire love over hate

  64. Andrea says...

    Thank you. Today has been hard. Tomorrow will be hard, but reading, hearing and sharing these thoughts and fears with others shows me how much love and good there is, we all just have to do our part to show what love looks like.

  65. Anna says...

    This post beautiful. Thank you.

  66. Lizbeth says...

    I voted for Trump. I am a legal immigrant to this beautiful country and love being an American. I am not afraid of a Trump presidency because I have faith. I am not a racist. I am tired of being called one. But mostly I am tired of having to work 2 part time jobs (one at Target and the other at Old Navy). I am a mother in my 40’s, and have two in college. We have lost our home. Do you think my family and I are worried about hurting people’s feelings about race? No! We are worried about where the next income will come from so we can eat a decent meal!! I am tired of liberals trying to persuade me that I should stop being selfish. My vote in Florida counted and helped pave a path to change that has hurt not only my family but millions of others like me as a result of miserable past 8 years. For those who do not understand what it is like to be homeless as a family, perhaps you take some time out of your comfortable home and live in your car for a day.

    • Katie says...

      Thank you for sharing your struggle, and I wish your hardworking family all the best.

      What I’m curious about, though is how exactly you imagine Trump’s “policies” will actually help your family.

    • Julia says...

      Well said. Thank you for that.

    • Stacy says...

      You are so right, Lizbeth. Most of us don’t understand and I’m so sorry for this. I applaud you for being vocal and standing up for your beliefs. I’m hoping for the absolute best in the coming months for your family.

    • Kate says...

      I’m sorry to hear of your tough situation. It is hard for me to understand why you wouldn’t want to vote for a candidate whose proposals would help someone in your position (raising minimum wage, taxing the rich to support infrastructure projects that will increase jobs and support social programs, among other things). Trump’s tax plan is the ill-advised “trickle-down economics” that is likely to wildly increase our debt and give the rich a huge tax break. I absolutely understand why some high-income earners would vote for him, but I don’t understand why low-income earners feel that Trump’s policies are better for their economic standing. I mean this seriously when I ask you to help me what understand what it is that you like about his policies. He talks a good game, but the policy details do not play out. Thank you and best of luck to you.

    • Johanna says...

      Then you’re only thinking of yourself, and in the short term at that.
      My family has struggled too, but blowing out so many others’ lights won’t make yours shine any brighter.
      I would really, truly rather be homeless (and I have been) than risk others being in fear for their lives.
      This isn’t hyperbole, many, many people of color and different gender identities have died because of the hate Trump has preached. What makes you so sure it won’t turn on you next?

    • Sadie says...

      Thank you for sharing this, from a Clinton supporter.

    • Catherine says...

      Thank you for your post. I was (and still am) a Hillary supporter. I am saddened and shocked at results but feel like I and many others obviously did not fully appreciate the views of others in this election season. Genuinely curious to know, though, why you think Trump will be able to improve your financial situation? He hasn’t spoken much on this and it’s hard for me to gauge his policies.

    • Jay says...

      I too wish Obama had been a magician. When you go from several million dollars to flat broke and being evicted, you want it magically reversed. So it has taken Obama eight years to get the economy to where it is today while fighting the Republicans every step of the way. All of this was because of his predecessor’s thoughtless mistakes. I’m sorry for you situation, but you’re blaming the wrong people.

    • Susan says...

      Lizabeth – you are right in that I don’t know what its like to live in my car….however, I truly hope for your sake that Trump will assist you. I have doubts and that certainly does not mean I don’t have faith. Faith in someone much higher than Trump, thank goondess. Wishing you the best.

    • KTMB says...

      Thank you Lizbeth, for following the law and working so hard for your family. I’m praying for you, your family and for the safety of our country. People are minsinformed about the Trump agenda. Criminals are ambushing the police, another one killed in PA this morning. Peace, love and health.

    • DF says...

      Here! Here! I think it’s probably safe to say that the majority (not all) of followers of this blog are of a certain cohort and socio-economic status, thus it’s easy to assume that voters couldn’t possibly vote for Trump based on issues of the economy and joblessness and real struggle, but it would have to be based solely on issues of “white backlash” or misogyny”. Let’s wake up people! There are people in this country who are really struggling out there, whom being able to shop at JCREW on a regular basis would be the equivalent of being able to hire their own personal chauffeur! Many of us tend to be isolated and completely out of touch with what is the reality for most Americans. Please remember that when you are drinking your 5$ lattes while window shopping and making dinner reservations in your tony Brooklyn Heights neighborhoods.

    • Joslyn says...

      Please try to understand that it isn’t hurt feelings about race that is the problem for those in marginalized groups, it is literal hurt. It is safety and health. It is life or death. The very things you are fighting for for your family. Not hurt feelings. As a fellow CofJ reader, I have no doubt you are an awesome and strong person (with really good taste) but I feel compelled to address this comment because, honestly, the race problem isn’t about hurt feelings. People’s actual lives are at stake. And that has always been the issue that social and ethnic minorities have had. In other words, we don’t need to be your friend, we just need you not to vote in ways that deliberately and profoundly harm us. You can still feel justified in putting your family first (in fact, you are justified, in my opinion) but you should call it what it is. It’s not hurt feelings we protest, it is bleeding bodies, broken families, unnaturally shortened lives. And if you think it is hard being a homeless family living in a car, try being a refugee family living in a car or a Mexican family living in a car or insert whatever marginalized group you can think of living in a car and then give thanks for the privilege you exercised in voting for a candidate who is actively going after those groups and not targeting yours.

    • Leigh says...

      I was thinking the same thing. I voted for Hillary and I am disappointed she did not win. I don’t think it’s fair to say everyone who voted for Trump is a racist, hates women or anyone else. Stating such vitriol makes the Hillary supporters sound awful.

    • Erin says...

      Amen! I am a Christian mother in my 30s in Missouri. My husband and I own a small business that supports 30 employees in our small town. We have to worry each day about making payroll and running our business. We work very hard to support our family, be responsible and pay for insurance (on our own, no government help here, which ends up being over $1000 a month for a family of 5). The main reason I voted for Donald Trump is not because I am a bigot, xenophobic, anti-feminist or a redneck. I voted for Donald Trump because of the economic situation in our small town, state and country. The amount of government spending is out of control. The amount of people in poverty and on food stamps is unreal. There needs to be a change in the way we help people get back on their feet when they do need help. I will not begrudge help to anyone who needs it, it is one of my religious beliefs that we are to give freely and joyfully. However, when you have families that are in poverty for generations and nothing to encourage them to work harder or improve their situations it is not helpful to them. I see this first hand with our employees. Recently we gave a raise to one of our employees to reward him for his hard work. After a few weeks he came back and said he needed to cut his hours and go back to his previous pay rate because he lost over $400 a month in food stamps and benefits. The system encourages people to not strive for more, it encourages them to do the bare minimum. It is not the role of the government to take care of everyone’s needs, cradle to grave. Where is our own responsibility to ourselves? Smaller government encourages self-sufficiency.

      I followed the election daily to be sure that I was informed. I did not make my decision lightly. I spent a lot of time in prayer asking for wisdom to make the right decision. I could not vote for Hillary Clinton. I am tired of everyone saying that she was a wonderful candidate and would have been an amazing president. What about the corruption in the Clinton Foundation? What about her disregard for our country’s national security when she decided to put an unsecured server in her basement? What about Benghazi? What about her husband that has a history of being sexist and demeaning women, culminating in oral sex in the Oval Office and she is still married to him? When it comes down to my decision I want to put the SAFETY and PROSPERITY of my family, community and country first. I cannot vote for someone who supports abortion. I cannot vote for someone who is held to a different standard because of her last name. If everyone should be treated equally shouldn’t she be prosecuted for her crimes?

      Yes, Donald Trump has said some horrible things. However, he has said a lot of encouraging and positive things. People see what they want to see. I am with Joanna, I am going to be positive and continue to pray for our country. I am going to continue to be loving to those around me. I am going to teach my children empathy and show them that we may not agree with our neighbors, but we can still love them. I am tired of being called names because of my political decisions. I too believe that love trumps hate and we can only hope that this election will create a positive change in our country. If Hillary Clinton had one, I would have respected the democratic process and her position as president. I believe it is up to those who voted for her to do the same.

    • Laura says...

      Hi Lizbeth,
      Thanks for sharing. I am ignorant of many of the harsh realities you describe and your post sparked my curiosity. I hope I don’t offend you, but I would like to know how you feel the past 8 years would have been different for you without Obama, and how you think Trump will be able to help? I am willing to consider/accept your explanation, but there is of course no reason to reply to this if you don’t want to.

      Best wishes!

    • But the Republican platform has always been less government interference, requiring people and families to get by on their own mettle. They have done everything they can to defund programs that could help a family like yours. We are to pull ourselves up by our own bootstraps, with no assistance whatsoever – which yes, I agree, is the dream and ultimate goal. But sometimes we all need help, so how does this presidency help you in that regard? You will still have to work two jobs, most likely. I work at Target, too, and I don’t see my paycheck getting any fatter in the next four years.

    • Emma says...

      Lizbeth, I am so sorry for what your family has been through. No one should have to experience that. It is unfair and wrong, in a country as wealthy as ours, that people can work full time and still struggle to make ends meet in this way. I believe so strongly in providing equal opportunities to all. But I don’t see how Trump’s platform will deliver that. I’m struggling to understand why many in our country who feel (rightly!) that the economy has been unfair to them chose Trump over Clinton. I really want to understand this. I would be interested in hearing your perspective.

    • Jessica says...

      Lizbeth, I am among the people deeply saddened by the results of this election. I believe that in the words Trump used in his campaign he normalized a kind of hateful speech against women, immigrants, minorities, disabled people, LGBT people, Muslims, Jews, and others that I cannot stand for or stand behind. But I do not believe that everyone who voted for Trump is a racist, and I would never call you one.

      If you are willing to respond, I would like to understand why you believe that Trump’s policies are more likely to help you and your family than Clinton’s would have been. After listening to the two candidates and reviewing their records, my conclusion was that Clinton was interested in pursuing policies to help those in need. However, as I said, I want to understand what Trump voters see in their candidate. And I think that to heal as a nation, we all need to do our best to understand one another.

    • emily says...

      Thank you for sharing this. I’m about as far left as you can go and a Hillary supporter, but it helps me to try to make sense of how this happened when I hear why people voted for him. I think it’s an important distinction that not all Trump supporters are racist/sexist/islamophobic/xenophobic, but some are and they are loud and terrible and make it hard to see past them to people like you. I genuinely hope that I’ve got it all wrong and that he will be the president you are hoping for and that we are all a little better off in the future.

    • Ali says...

      I hear your frustration. However, it is only by bettering all of us that we can move forward. Donald Trump has no concrete economic or employment policies. Everything that he has done has been given to him. You are lucky you have legal status because legal and illegal immigration will stop under his rule. As a fellow Floridian, I am blown away by how desperate people are that they would believe this man’s lies. Just a complete disregard for everyone else, which is ironic is a supposedly “Christian” state.

    • Lindsey says...

      But how exactly does voting for Trump help your situation? The policies he suggests hurt the underserved in this country. Choosing the “change candidate” does not guarantee positive change, and will likely lead to stripping funding from the social programs that need it most.

    • Justine says...

      Hi Lizbeth, I have a question for you. I want to be clear that this is not meant to be combative, but for me to gain some insight from a person with a different perspective. What changes has Trump proposed that convinces you that he will help you?

      And wow, you have a lot on your plate with two jobs and two kiddos in college. I do hope that things turn around for you soon!

    • Lindsey says...

      @DF so your response is to vote for a party whose economic strategy makes the rich richer and defunds social programs that help the poor? Please explain this to me, because I legitimately do not understand.

    • Nancey says...

      thinking of you and wishing you well in your situation. I am as far left as you can be and a big Hillary supporter. I am the saddest of the fact that the very people that Trump talked to about creating jobs he has no clear plan for. I hope I am wrong but his economic policies are non existent. And the worst part of it is that he wants to abolish Obamacare, the one health care option that some people with limited means can afford. I just don’t get it, how will he help? I think he aimed so much of his candidacy at the very people he will never be able to help, and they believe it, it’s so sad.

    • Linda says...

      Hi Lizbeth,
      I feel a lot of compassion and empathy for your situation.
      And to be honest, it’s people like you that i feel Trump especially screwed over. He made a lot of noise, a lot of empty promises and he basically latched onto your despair to get himself elected.
      What you need is social services that help people like you.
      And what republicans want to do is get rid of all of that. I get why you voted for him. because he offered you a voice and a life line. I just hope he truly has the working/middle class in mind.
      i truly hope that Trump does the country well. i did not vote for him but i am not in the mindset of ‘burning the house down’ to prove my point.
      also- cheer up- good times are ahead. once your 2 kids graduate and start working, things will get better :)

    • Michele says...

      Hi Lizbeth- I am very sorry to hear about your struggles. You mention that you have two in college. Hillary proposed to make public college tuition free and had also proposed a student loan forgiveness plan. She was also fighting to raise the minimum wage. To do this she was going to raise taxes on the rich, who could afford it. She was fighting for the middle class and people like you.

    • Me says...

      Because raising taxes on the rich (who earn their money like everyone else) and middle class while forcing them to support everyone else is fair Michelle? Sorry my money is going to be spent to support my family and myself. I worked my way through college so can others. If you want to pay for everyone else then by all means tell them to tax you more.

  67. Cried after reading this…again. Thank you.

  68. Kathy says...

    Thank you for articulating what so many are experiencing.

    Today I am stunned, crushed, devastated, mystified and without sufficient words to express my horror. Looking back, I can only compare this emotion to when I was a medical student and helped set up a hospital at Ground zero on September 11, 2001 (and no one came). It was a shocking realization that millions of people not only didn’t agree with us, but they would harm us. It was a vast unknown future. That’s similar to what I feel today.

    This is beyond mere policial issues. It’s hard to be optimistic when we have witnessed indecent behavior and heard dangerous xenophobic words from our future POTUS.

    And please consider that if you look like a majority ethnic or religious group, you can’t possibly understand the fear of what many are experiencing now.

  69. Mette says...

    Thank you Joanna. After a day filled with anxiety and fear about my future (and that of my 6 month old son), this made me feel just a little bit better.

  70. Kayla says...

    I really want the art that was created to be shared. The sneak peaks have been beautiful & full me with hope & possibility on a day where I’ve been feeling sad & terrified. Please consider a post sharing the commissions. They can be what we hope for!

  71. Tara says...

    Thank you for this post. It gives me hope.

  72. Allison says...

    This is one of my favorite posts I have read today, and it helped. On this incredibly painful day, every little thing helps. Thank you for sharing.

    • Liz says...

      I feel the same way. I will never accept him as our president. Thank you for sharing.

    • TDS says...

      I feel the same. I can’t support someone on the premise that he will be different than the person he has been for 70 years–or different than the person he showed us during the campaign. I won’t support the citizens who put him in power choosing to “overlook” the racism, hatred and misogyny because they were “frustrated.” I’m not angry with Donald Trump–he’s a cartoon. I’m angry at (less than) half of the population who were too lazy to do the hard work and chose to roll the dice with this country. Shame on you. You will be held accountable.
      Joanna–this was a beautiful post and I thank you for the messages within it. I voted for those same messages yesterday.

    • Naomi says...

      Me neither. He is already a disgrace to the office. I doubt I’ll ever think of him as my president as to me he is a symbol of hate and ignorance.

  73. Jacqueline says...

    Just sending some love your way Jo. I’m a Canadian and don’t want to weigh in too much on something that doesn’t directly concern me…but I’m also mixed race and an immigrant to Canada and a woman and a mother. I hope for peace for your country and I love what you said about not wanting him to fail and I agree wholeheartedly. I’ll hold hope for all of you from a distance that love and togetherness will always win.

  74. Mala says...

    Like many of your readers, I too am touched by what you wrote. I have never seen such polarity in this country but the American people have spoken and we must accept the democratic process. As we unite as a country each of us in our own way can learn how to be better involved in our communities to help, emphathize and show compassion for each other. That’s what makes this country great.

  75. Nara says...

    As long as he don’t touch “the button”….. He’s ruthless. The rest of the world is in fear. Another butcher in power….

    • Karen says...

      I agree, that’s my biggest fear based on what was said during his campaign… Hopefully he’ll our some great advisors on his staff and listen.

  76. Casey says...

    I feel like I should offer some solace to those who feel oppression from those who voted for Trump. I mentioned it is a very complex decision. One example is this… imagine having someone in your family with early onset Alzheimer’s. The data readout for a first to market drug to stop the progression of Alz is weeks away. Did anyone notice the Biotech stocks went up today? A Republican Party has more favorable policies for medical innovation and commercialization. Someone in my family is hopeful for a drug discovery for Alz, and I work in that biotech space. My family’s livelihood depends on medical innovation in more ways than one. I am a Trump voter and I don’t hate anyone.

    • plch says...

      and what about all the people that depends on Obamacare for their health? have you thought of them before voting? Trump want to cancel Obamacare and many friends I have in America depend on it to get their meds.

    • KTMB says...

      Thank you! Less regulation and more jobs!

    • Paula says...

      and my best friend’s livelihood depends on obamacare for her son’s generic disorder NF1. And her mental state is also helped by a president-elect who doesn’t make fun of disabled people, like her son. cheers to your family. wish them all the best.

    • Steph says...

      I work in science research (not big business, pharma). This is the worst possible move for this industry. Most discoveries don’t come out of pharma companies, they come from research at universities (me) under federal funding. Republican president, House and Senate always means federal funding cuts for scientific research (for reference, my university houses one of the biggest Alzheimers and neurodegenerative disease research centers). I hope for your family members sake and all those that suffer from devastating diseases, that this wont be true.

    • Jen says...

      “I am a Trump voter and I don’t hate anyone.” I believe that you believe this. And yet…I see this again and again and I think that Gabrielle over at Design Mom summed it up best when she said,
      “Trump supporters are upset that they are being called racist and bigoted and sexist. They insist that they are not. Which is understandable. No one wants to be thought of as racist or bigoted or sexist, and very few people try to be those things. But remember, if we know about an evil thing, like a friend posting awful memes about Muslims on Facebook, or memes calling Michelle Obama a gorilla, and we don’t do or say anything to combat it, then that makes us complicit in the evil. That’s why Trump supporters — even when they aren’t KKK members themselves — are being called racist. Trump is racist. And if we are supporting him or being silent about him instead of fighting against him, then we are complicit in his racism. Which means we are racist.”
      You are COMPLICIT to hatred. You publicly own your vote. Now own your complicity.

  77. K says...

    Hi Joanna

    Would you consider still sharing (somewhere, in some form?) the works you commissioned? Even if Madame President is just a fantasy at this point, I would love to see them. I want a glimpse of what will be the future… one day, some day… a woman leading our Nation

    • S says...

      Yes!!!

    • Brianna says...

      This. Those artists deserve recognition for their work.

  78. Hayley says...

    Thank you <3

  79. Amber says...

    You’re amazing and this is awesome. Thank you!

  80. Jackie says...

    I think when you start electing reality TV stars to the highest position in your country it means you will no longer have the respect the USA has always had from the rest of the world. I am so sorry for you.

  81. Sav says...

    Good post Joanna.

  82. Hi Jo and readers, this is the first time that comment in your blog but i reed it everyday. I’m from Argentina and I know very well crisis, political division, crazy presidents, etc. Today I feel sad, not for Trump victory, just because I see a divided United States. Please don’t make that mistake, still fighting and working for a better place for everyone, rights, racism, don’t give up, I know that you can be ok. Cheers from Latinamerica! And your post is just beautiful.

    • Cat says...

      OMG, I agree completely. I’m also Argentinean; and the feeling of sadness is because I see so much hate between the two parties. Don’t let hate rule!

  83. C b says...

    This is one of your very best posts. Thank you.

  84. Casey says...

    I voted Trump and certainly do not hate anyone in our country. It is a very complex decision and we cannot make assumptions or generalizations as to why an individual would vote a certain way. I also think Hillary is amazing. She kinda blows my mind.

    • Casey says...

      Reading thru the comments here, wow, a lot of disgust and judgement towards Trump voters. I appreciate our democracy and wish we could respect that people have different views. I can appreciate your post but some of the comments are tactless.

    • Christy says...

      Casey, today may not be the day to judge how Hillary supporters are treating others. There is much grief and fear and immense disappointment. If you did not vote for Trump based on the bigoted, sexist and utter inflammatory words he spoke, you should not take offense to the words found here. Look at his words and see how people coming @ this with a different set of priorities might not feel like being the bigger person just yet. Let us grieve, cut us a bit of slack, focus on Jo’s words. Might be best to take a break from comments for a couple days.

    • Jen says...

      If you do not hate anyone in this country then why did you vote for someone who has made a point of being so hateful? A man who calls Mexicans rapists. Who degrades people with disabilities. If that isn’t hateful and based upon terrible assumptions and generalizations, what is? Does Donald Trump need to just say the words “I hate Mexicans” for you to understand that this is what he means? Our reasons for our votes are complex, yes, but I am trying to understand. Why? Where was the disconnect? I am in a lot of pain right now and I am so confused about how so many people can say that they don’t hate and then support someone who does.

    • plch says...

      I’m really interested, so, why you voted for him? do you realize that, if he realizes what he promised, many people are going to die?

    • Michelle says...

      The election was disappointing for many reasons the most significant of which is that the two major parties put forth probably two of the worst candidates that have ever run for election. Further, the DNC and Clinton team helped push Trump to the top of the Republican primaries thinking Clinton could easily defeat such a poor candidate. I would strongly question anyone’s judgment who openly despises Trump yet advances his interests behind closed doors for their own benefit.

      I understand the resentment and contempt of Trump’s behavior and views as I agree he is not a good person or a safe choice for President. However, there were also a lot of negative things about Clinton too, albeit different ones. The Trump supporters could easily question someone’s decision to vote for Clinton who supports the war on drugs which targets minorities in favor of big pharmaceutical and private prison interests, she will continue Obama’s drone strike campaign further interfering in the world in a careless and dangerous way, and her economic strategies will continue to erode the middle class, which has been the downfall of many free markets worldwide-just to name a few of the problems with Clinton.

      I voted for neither of these candidates and don’t feel that I will ever see a presidential candidate elected who supports the values of equality (including women’s rights), liberty, and good governance that I believe in during my lifetime. Yet I don’t fail to keep believing that it can happen and I also don’t disparage those whose opinions differ from mine. Instead, I try to focus on constructive criticism and informed opinions rather than emotional ones. A true democracy allows individuals to share differing opinions without fear of being silenced even if it’s a wrong one. To all of those demonizing and calling out for silencing Trump supporters, you cannot say that you support a platform of love and acceptance and intolerance for hate and then disregard that message when someone has a viewpoint that differs from yours. It’s hypocritical and contradictory to what you say you believe in. This us vs them mentality is why we had the election we did. This election was likely a difficult decision for everyone, involving very hard choices, and we can only move forward and strive for a better world. That will take a lot of sacrifice and hard work and negativity won’t get us there.

    • Lynn says...

      Unfortunately, you ARE cosigning the racism, nativism, and sexism that Trump has spewed by voting for him. A vote is an active (as in the case of many White Supremacist/Nationalist groups that supported him) or tacit approval of those beliefs. What’s the saying? You are the company you keep? Maybe in this case, sub in “the person you choose to represent you.”
      It sounds like your ~*feelings*~ are hurt by having this pointed out to you. Well, imagine how hurt the feelings are of the different minority groups that have been targeted (and will continue to be targeted) this entire election.

  85. alexis says...

    I appreciate your courage in coming out with a political statement on the internet. It meant a lot to me to wake up this morning and read your post and see the responses.

  86. Katie says...

    There are so many layers to my disappointment and disgust. First, I can’t get past the underlying misogyny surrounding Clinton’s candidacy. Attacks were waged at her because she was a woman. How do we even begin to challenge that for our daughters? Second, the hatred and vitriol, in the form of personal attacks, directed to her supporters (I read some on your Instagram feed!) made me doubt whether people are genuinely good at a base level. I have always believed they are, but am not so sure anymore. Third, it is impossible for me to separate a vote for him from a vote for racism, sexism, and bigotry. I read some of the comments from your other readers trying to explain how this is not the case, but I don’t agree with their logic. Even if that is not the reason some people voted for him, after all of his comments, voting for him is saying that it is acceptable to demean women, people of color, the disabled, Muslims, etc., because it gets these voters something they want. To me, no end justifies these means. These things, and many others, are making me incredibly sad in the aftermath of this election. At some point, I will take some time to understand what happened yesterday, and how and why people made that choice, but I’m not ready yet.

    • Katie says...

      Also, Joanna, I would welcome posts of suggested reading for identifying and combatting racism and sexism. There is so much I have to learn on these issues.

    • Sadie says...

      I think the understanding is right in your comment: You don’t understand their logic. I know a few Trump supporters. They didn’t like his words, but to them, it’s just talk. They don’t appreciate the harm it does to people, either through emotional pain, alienation, or actually inciting violence. We need to make that connection more clear. Which means we have to keep talking, and we have to hear them, too.

    • Courtney says...

      Katie, thank you for articulating this.<3

  87. Kristin says...

    I wish you’d post what you prepared for Hillary! We should celebrate how far she came, who she is, what she accomplished and where she almost ended up.

  88. Anna says...

    As your neighbour in Canada, my heart breaks for you all. We all watched your election so closely; we shared your tears last night and over and over and over again today.
    It’s impossible not to feel a huge sense of loss – something I feel was so very good and powerful was so close and it slipped away.
    However, while it’s easy to turn to despair and darkness, once the grief begins to subside, please try and notice the beautiful things. The kind things. I promise you they are there. Make an extra effort to be kind to be kind to yourself, and to those around you.

    “This is what you shall do; Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body.”
    ― Walt Whitman

  89. Meggles says...

    Absolutely devastated, heartbroken, and scared. I thought I knew my fellow Americans. I guess I don’t as much as I thought I did.

  90. Beautiful post, Joanna. I only wish the best for our country, too.

  91. Leah says...

    Today and (hopefully) only today, I will mourn the what-ifs. I look back to 15 years ago when the thought of Hillary as president thrilled me. After witnessing the ugliness of her campaign against Obama eight years ago, my affections for her dwindled. I voted for her yesterday, not because of her as a person, but what I thought she represented to me. I voted for her because Donald Trump was not an accepatable choice. I like neither as a person but she was the lesser of two evils. In my despair following the election results, an anger erupted within me- not so much against Trump, but, surprising, towards Hillary. I didn’t pay much mind to Bernie Sanders during the primaries. I thought his supporters needed to accept his defeat, move on and back Hillary. I couldn’t believe they were crying! I see now how horribly wrong I was and I would like to extend my sincerest apologies to his supporters. In hindsight, I believe Bernie would have won. Now I’m the one crying. For today (hopefully).

    • Ashley F. says...

      Thank you for this Leah. I truely believe Bernie would have been able to defeat Trump. His message was so powerful, relatable and refreshing. #dontblamemeIvotedforbernie

  92. Maggie says...

    Well said.

  93. Linda Taylor says...

    Thank you for sharing this. I did vote for the Donald (because of abortion and corruption, not bigotry or racism) and I have been called hilter so many times today. I understand how the other side feels from 08 and 12 and I just want to say I just want to be one country and stop hating each other. Thank you for writing such a lovely post

    • Hi Linda, this is the most lucid thing that I read today. Your words show the importance of freedom and democracy.

    • Savannah says...

      I did the same as well and on those elements. Thank you Linda.

    • Rae says...

      It’s sad to hear that people would call you “Hilter.” That is outrageous. . No matter what you feel about abortion or corruption, I really encourage you to think about the absolute hatred and fear this terrible man has inspired in many people. A Muslim co-worker today said his 6 year old son was afraid to go to school because he might be taken way due to their faith. Another person I know is a kindergarten teacher and the children in her class were expressing great fear that their parents would be deported because they are undocumented.

      I understand you are not for bigotry and racism, but when the person you votes for is, that means a racist and a bigot (and not to mention a misogynist) represents you and makes decisions in your name.

      I hope you don’t mind my response to your comment. I read your comment and saw that you had clear reasons for your decisions. I’d hope to start a conversation (which seems to be how we’ve gotten here in the first place), rather than simply dismiss another’s decision.

    • KTMB says...

      Dittos.

    • Heidi says...

      Hi Linda, thank you for your reply. It is just very difficult for me (and undoubtedly many many others) to understand to want a country without hate and then choose a national leader who promotes hate about people based on race and religion.

    • K says...

      Hi Linda,

      Thanks for your post. I have family who voted for Trump for the similar reasons. I voted for Hillary.

      First corruption. Have you seen the people that are being vetted for Trump’s Cabinet? All “elites” who are insiders, career politicians, and many with their own corruption or ethics scandals. Oh and they are (mostly if not all) white men.

      Second, abortion. Facts show that abortion rates go down when Democrats are in power because they support sexual education and access to birth control. The Republicans mainly promote abstinence which doesn’t work.
      Also, being Pro-Choice isn’t about forcing someone to have an abortion, it’s about choice and being there for women who have such a difficult decision to make. They would never force someone to have an abortion, but the Pro-Life side would force a woman to bear a child. Also, many on the Pro-Life side would cut vital programs to assist women who have difficultly supporting their child. That doesn’t really make sense to me.

      Wishing you all the best.

  94. Kaela says...

    Beautifully written. Thank you so much for this post and for this space.

  95. It’s incredible how emotional this election season has been. I sobbed this morning while watching Hillary’s concession speech, thinking of my 4 daughters and our future. Thank you for this beautiful post and recognizing the grief so much of us feel!

    Xoxo http://www.touchofcurl.com

  96. Leah says...

    super impressed 1) that you’ve been some honest about your opinions throughout this whole race, while others disagreed; 2) that you found the courage and clearheadedness to write this when you expected a completely different result; 3) that you managed to ease some heartbreak and spark some hope. xoxo

  97. I understand why you posted this and I agree this is a time to care for and encourage each other. However, at the same time, while you and your friends, family and neighbors may not be racist, many voters out there, especially in those red states, are indeed racist. It’s time to realize that we don’t live in a post-racist society. The voters have spoken. I am not saying to be discouraging, and while your Arab-American friend is in the company of loved ones, there are indeed a lot of people who don’t love minorities. I am Asian American and there are people who like me and there are also people who will not like me because my race and my parents’ immigrant background. It’s time for all of us to verbally recognize this out loud.

    • I agree. I too, am Asian American and it’s difficult to erase race from this election. I wish we can, but doing so will be denying people’s everyday experiences.

    • Kirsten says...

      Yes to this. And to all of the Trump voters on this page who say they are tired of being called racists–do something about that! Recognize that even though you yourself might not “hate” anyone, might not treat women disrespectfully, might not condone sexual assault, might not feel like you participate in race-based oppression–there are people in your party who do, and who often do so explicitly and aggressively. That there are many people in this country right now who feel terrified and physically threatened, and that that is real. It is not just words. I get that many people feel pressed economically and concerns about that felt more pressing than their desire to vote against hateful rhetoric. While I personally cannot disentangle them, I realize that there are people who can and do. But what I hope is that people in the Republican party who are tired of being called racists will work actively to shut down the parts of their party who are. So many white privileged liberals feel like this election was a “wake up call” for them to become more active and engaged in working for the things that they believe in. I hope that people on the right who feel unfairly villainized will really listen to the fears that people are expressing right now and not dismiss them, and work to speak out against those people in their own party when they do and say things that incite that fear. If I on the left speak out against your candidate calling all Mexican’s rapists, I’m dismissed as a “bleeding heart liberal” and a “liberal conspiracist.” When you do it it has power and it means something. Use that power.

  98. Jen says...

    “Unlike the Republican Party for the last eight years, I am not going to try to make my president fail. If he fails, we all fail. So yes, I will hope that a better man emerges than we saw in this campaign.”

    Yes to this! I was always surprised at how many felt it ok to say hateful things regarding President Obama to me. I vow to not do the same, but to continue to stay educated on happenings in our country and the world and to help wherever I can to truly make the world a better place for all people.

  99. Molly says...

    This is an absolutely beautiful post. You’re like a friend– after such a tough day I thought, I have to see what Joanna says! And this post brought me some peace. As did sitting and playing with my children, saying hi to strangers on the street, texting all day with family and friends, and sharing looks and murmurs of sadness and disbelief with parents at my son’s school pickup. I think your message here is exactly what we all needed to hear. Your description of the post you’ve been working on though– so many tears. Sending love!!!! xoxoxoxoxo

  100. Rachael says...

    Thank you, Joanna. Simply…thank you.

  101. florence says...

    Love this post and its message of hope and action!

  102. Joana says...

    Joanna, I am not American but feel deeply sadned by the outcome of this election. However it is a great tribute to democracy and its founding institutions (rule of law being the most important one), that the results are respected by all. Good luck, these are tough times ahead.

  103. Emily says...

    “…they feel socially left behind and are exercising the one power they have.” This comment is arrogant and elitist and the real reason many people voted against Hillary Clinton.

    • Julie says...

      Bingo

    • Inch says...

      I will choose to reject your assertion that the “real reason” many people voted for a racist misogynist who never served a day in government or the military, was because they felt condescended to. I will continue to believe their reasons were more complicated and less petulant than that. The least I can do in my disappointment is give people as much credit as I can.

    • anne says...

      i wonder what you mean by this. isn’t it true that many rural voters felt left out and ignored by mainstream politics and that’s why they came out for trump? i think that’s what was meant here, but i would like to know what you think. i’m trying to listen and learn from all sides after these results. personally, i have found words from my fellow dem voters about how they are realizing how much they don’t know as VERY encouraging (there is definitely a need for change in our political system and this election proves it). I think many would like to know more about not just racially etc. marginalized constituents, but socioeconomically marginalized constituents, as well, and i think this statement reflects that. i would love to hear from you on how you feel about that, and why you find elitism and arrogance in this statement.

  104. Trump Voter says...

    I feel for the Hilary supporters today, as that is exactly how I have felt for the last 8 years that my voice was not being heard. Hilary just promised the same, which is what NO one needs right now. What we need now is change – not just a hope for a change that never came. It really cant get any worse than how we have been divided since 2008. Give Trump a chance and spread the acceptance too all !

    • Louisa says...

      I’m so curious to know what Trump is saying that resonates with you.

    • Georgia says...

      I’m really interested to know why you think a candidate who made such reactionary, racist, divisive statements about groups of people represents an opportunity to “spread the acceptance.” I’m genuinely curious about you believe this would come about.

    • Jen says...

      To me, a lesbian woman with many LGBT friend, the last 8 years DID represent change. It represented more legal and physical safety for our partners and children. There are many changes that absolutely do need to happen and I appreciate your interest in bringing people together, but that will not happen with Donald Trump as president. I can not accept a man that calls Mexicans rapists and degrades people with disabilities. Nothing about that says ‘unity’ to me. So many people are rightfully scared for their families and their safety right now and they have earned that fear. I have no choice BUT to give Trump a chance because he was elected president. But I will absolutely not accept the removal of my basic human rights and my friend’s right to protect their families.

    • Rae says...

      There are many who support President Obama, including myself and about 50% of the country. I think the issue is that people like you and me never talk and hear that there is another person feeling the absolute opposite way.

      I will never accept this man elected to the presidency because of the absolutely disgraceful things he stands for and says. One of those things is silencing the voices of many others, including women. He only promises more division. Clearly we need to hear others and what they need. We need actual compromise in this country, not one side getting their way and another not getting there’s.

  105. Merce says...

    Hi,
    My husband (American) and I live in Madrid. After following the campaign very intensly, he voted for Trump, as did most of our family in the US. My husband is a great guy. He’s not a racist, biggot, sexist, anti-gay or anti-anything! He loves his country. He voted for Trump not because he likes him but because he views the Clintons as very corrupt people.

    • plch says...

      Does he really think that Trump is not corrupt? doesn’t he realize that, even if he is not one, he gave a strong voice to racists, biggots, sexists, anti-gays and anti-everything? that all minorities are now feeling even less safe?

  106. Thank you…I really needed that.

  107. Thank you for this.

  108. Tess says...

    Thank you for this. As an educator, it was a tough day to face my students. Some were crying, others were angry. I believe in hope, love, and justice; I’m ready to continue to work for them.

  109. Meredith says...

    This is a great, great post. Kudos. You’ll be alright.

  110. Caz says...

    What a graceful post. I’m so sad that circumstances aren’t different.

    I’m not American, but when I woke up and saw the news this morning, my heart just sank. I’m terrified to think of the legitimacy that his victory will give to other right-wing groups with similar racist, bigoted and misogynistic views, which are already gaining strength in many European countries. I hope that the analysis and reflection that will come from this will enable other countries to stop something similar from happening.

    • Kay says...

      You make an interesting point I’ve been thinking a lot about – why are so many countries supporting nationalism vs. globalism and multiculturalism? Why is there such a shift in they way people, universally, are thinking? It seems so clear to me that people are incredibly frustrated by so many things in the way that current systems are run. And yet we are shocked when leaders rise up to offer a possible solution that resonates with so many. Mostly, instead of asking why Trump? I’m asking, what are we currently doing now that isn’t working and how can I help be a part of the global solution where we can all reach a place of feeling like we aren’t suppressed, misunderstood, or forgotten.

  111. Miriah Elliott says...

    Thank you Joanna. For acknowledging the grief and showing us the way to the path forward.

  112. Kate says...

    How I wish we were celebrating Hillary’s victory today with those ten celebratory illustrations you commissioned, Joanna! It has been a very hard day. My favorite article so far was Adam Gopnik’s “Talking to Kids About Trump’s Victory” in the New Yorker. There he writes, “But I also believe that the comings and goings of politics and political actions in our lives must not be allowed to dominate our daily existence—and that if we struggle to emphasize to our children the necessities of community, ongoing life, daily pleasures, and shared enterprises, although we may not defeat the ogres of history, we can hope to remain who we are in their face.” Your post struck a similar note. Thank you for being a voice for hope on a very tough, emotional day in America.

  113. Thank you for sharing this. After the results and waking up to the new reality of America this morning, I didn’t even realize how much this election affected me until I skipped a class this afternoon and booked it back home only to sob, feeling physically sick by it all. This post helped soften the blow and to let all readers know that we are in it together, no need for fear. Really appreciate this.

  114. Rebecca says...

    You’re such a lovely person Joanna. I cried in my husband’s arms this morning while our little guy slept. He is almost 1 and I just felt so so sad. I hope I can teach him to be kind and respectful to ALL people and to stand up for others.

  115. Nothing is making me feel better at this moment, but I won’t succumb to fear the way the xenophobes, misogynists, racists and ignorant people did when THEY elected a demagogue.

    Like Stephen Colbert reminded us last night, the best way to face fear is by laughing at it. You can’t smile and be afraid at the same time.

  116. Juanita says...

    Goodness, Joanna. You never cease to amaze me with the beautiful and elegant way you can articulate even the most confusing things. I adore you. Thank you for this. It was a comforting “cup of jo” for my soul. Best and kindest regards to you and your sweet boys.

  117. Amanda says...

    Thank you! I am worried and saddened and have been crying all day, but I am also so very motivated and inspired to keep pushing and moving this country forward for my family, our friends, our community and the communities in all parts of our country. My family is all distraught, my children cried, my mom is having trouble talking to my brother who voted for him, but I, like you am trying to stay positive. If this election did anything for me it lit a fire to volunteer, to phone bank, to be as involved as possible and to hopefully, build bridges between friends and family that may have divided.

    I didn’t sleep last night, I contemplated moving to Australia, South America, Europe, but woke up saying NO! I am not a coward, and I’m not a cry baby, and I must show my kids how to lose and get back up.

  118. Karin L says...

    Here’s a chance at tolerance and coming together because I am a conservative and I voted for Trump. If any of you would like to really understand why Trump won the election, you could easily educate yourselves. If you want to understand conservatism, listen to Rush or other talk radio hosts like Dennis Prager or Michael Medved. You could understand so much! I used to be a progressive and I know exactly how most of you think of conservatives. You dismiss us without being interested in our reasons or even what we actually believe in. Or you lump us all as some kind of detestable xenophobes, racists, homophobes, etc, which couldn’t be further from the truth!

    But Trump is a populist rather than a conservative and I voted for him with serious reservations. Ultimately, I voted for him because Obama’s policies (particularly his healthcare reform but also his foreign policy) have been so destructive. I couldn’t bear to see 4 more years of the same policies under Hillary. I also had serious concerns over her character and the dealings of the Clinton Foundation. It didn’t matter to me that she is a woman. I have three daughters and I would love to see a woman president, but I would never make such an important decision based on gender! As far as “hoping for the best,” the way I see it, in the worst case scenario, if Trump is terrible or incompetent or both (which I grant is a distinct possibility), he will be impeached and thrown out.

    So that’s my honest opinion. I love this blog and I identify with Joanna and with so many of the readers in so many ways. Most of my good friends don’t even know that I voted for Trump (I wasn’t sure myself what I would do for quite a while). I suspect that they wouldn’t understand and wouldn’t want to understand and I wouldn’t want to have that between us. Thank you for this forum, Joanna.

    • Jane says...

      You said it so clearly:

      If you are not a “some kind of detestable xenophobe, racist, homophobe,” how can you support a man who clearly is? Didn’t it bother your conscience? And which part of Trump’s healthcare and foreign policy do you agree with? How will Trump “punish” women for getting aborions? (Quote from Trump) How does he plan to get Mexico to fund building the wall along the border? Go ahead console yourself thinking that you made an educated choice yet you still bought this man’s utter nonsense

    • Well said!

    • Kate says...

      I am not American and really appreciate this insight into why you voted for Trump! There is only pro-Hillary stuff in the international media, and we have battled to read anywhere on the Internet why people chose to vote for Trump. I imagine you have been hectically victimized by some for your choice and am sorry for that.

    • Erin says...

      Thank you. Your articulated my feelings exactly. :)

    • Lina says...

      Excellent post, Karin – I can’t think of a better way to phrase the thoughts of those of us who fall into the intelligent, worldly, well-educated, conservative demographic. I lost all respect yesterday for many of my liberal friends who refuse to see their own hypocrisy and acknowledge that the hate they spew towards us is identical to hate released on both sides during this election year.

      God Bless America.

    • Abby says...

      Can you please shed light on how you are more concerned with Hillary’s character than you are with Trump’s character?

    • Lynn says...

      Telling a progressive that they could learn about conservatism by listening to Rush Limbaugh is like telling an atheist they can learn about the benefits of Christianity by visiting a snake-handling church at the end of a dirt road. Like, Rush is the reason *why* is dismiss conservatism as nativist sexism.

    • Katie says...

      Thank you for sharing your viewpoint. I’m trying to be open-minded here…really trying. But it’s hard for me to reconcile that you didn’t vote for Hillary partially because of her character and the Clinton Foundation. I think Trump’s character speaks for itself, and have you done any research on his Foundation? It also concerns me that you think it’s a “distinct possibility” that he is either terrible or incompetent yet still voted on him and are relying on an impeachment to right the wrong?

  119. Taylor says...

    Thank you for using your platform for promoting healing. Sadly, I agree with your friend that the election results are evidence of the underlying racist (and sexist) views that remain prevalent in this country. As a person of color and mother to two young girls, I have many reasons to fear what the next four years may bring.

  120. Great post Joanna.

    Eh, I’m going to be cynical though and say his softer victory speech was more about damage control (stock markets dropping, people protesting etc). I’m pretty sure he would have been advised not to be his usual self.

    Thinking of all of you from Australia, it’s a massive shock but who knows? Maybe he’ll be ok, fingers crossed.

  121. LB says...

    That was beautiful. Much solidarity to everyone whose lives are now even more endangered. I hope white, privileged Americans will stand with them more than before.

  122. West Coast Mom says...

    Thank you, thank you for such a thoughtful and heartfelt post on a very difficult morning. I so appreciate your honesty and candor. I have shared this post with so many friends, family and colleagues as we try to figure out how we can move forward. Onward we must go!

  123. Kari P says...

    Excellent post. I so wish your original post would have been able to be posted. :(

  124. Lali says...

    Thank you for this lovely post.

  125. Amy says...

    This is such a beautiful post. Thank you for your openness. Your perspective is so encouraging.

  126. Laura says...

    I knew your response would warm my broken heart. I took much of this advice into my classroom today and had meaningful, honest and heart wrenching discussions with each of my students who needed to talk it out today.now I feel ready to sleep for a million years and then tomorrow build a new and hopeful day.

    • jen says...

      What a beautiful teacher you are to take the time to consider each student. By listening you helped build their voice and showed them that respecting the thoughts of others is something to be valued.

  127. Abby Schock says...

    After a day of endless sobbing, I knew where I needed to turn for something uplifting. Thank you for being that space, and thank you for standing up for what you believe in. I love this country so much and I am so saddened by the outcome, but there is still a lot of good here. We can find it together.

  128. Sherri says...

    Thank you for sharing. Let’s not forget to show some support to professional journalists (non Faux News) and NPR (see Garrison Keillor’s letter – Trump voters will not like what happens next in the WA Post). xo

  129. Gabriele says...

    The shock has a delayed effect on me. I try to be full of hope and optimism, but then I walked into my classes. I teach elementary school. My students were crying and scared. They are afraid. They say how can a bully become president, we know that bullying is wrong. So I pull myself together. I assured them they are safe. That’s about all I can do. Part of my family is Muslim so there is that fear. I’m a woman, so there is that. I am just scared, period. I hear give him a chance, give him the benefit of doubt. The way the Republican Party did with Obama? I know I will grapple with this for a while and eventually reach a type of numb acceptance. But for today I weep. I weep for our country. I weep for my children.

    • Jane says...

      I’m with you. I have heard two stories from people I know who were harassed by middle abated men who were clearly emboldened by these results. There is real danger for many people. I am sure that many people cast their votes without being guided by hatred, but there are also many who were. Let’s protect those who are most vulnerable and demand more from our representatives, and everyone we come in contact with. I’m certain it will get worse before it gets better. Numb acceptance got us here. We have to find ways to push back.

  130. Una says...

    Bravo, Joanna.

    Sending hugs in all directions – and practicing extra self care.

  131. As a Mexican citizen with many, many devastated friends in the US (and being so devastated myself) I truly thank you for this beautiful post from the bottom of my heart. I have heard and read so many posts, statuses, and think pieces that are so cynical and depressing, but this post is so sincere and hopeful without being deluded that it gives me hope. Thank to you and your team for always creating amazing content that is poignant to the context in which we live.

  132. Courtney says...

    I needed to hear this. Thanks for your motivating words on next steps as we move forward.

  133. I can’t tell you how helpful this post was I really needed it I have been brokenhearted and disgusted by last nights results.

  134. Cal says...

    I am prepared to endure some interesting comments if I dare post today. I have been remarkably silent but very informed during this long-ass election process. I am honestly relieved it is all over and I really do agree with you, Jo, that we as a nation can come together despite who is in office. After all, there are many checks and balances in our political and social systems and it is up to each of us to be the best person everyday no matter what.

    With all of that in mind, I want to proudly declare that I do not follow mainstream media and actively seek the truth in the very twisted governmental establishment we have seen develop for the past few decades. The reason why I voted for Trump was honestly to upset the status quo of the Clinton Tyranny who have been actively and illegally using their power for evil deeds and corruption. The curtains were slowly pulled back this year on what they have gotten away with and their actions have appalled me.

    Now I am not going to defend Trump, but I rolled the dice yesterday with many fellow Americans who chose to stand behind someone who hasn’t had a proven record for global-scale crime, just bad words. I decided to use my vote to empower us to keep pulling back the curtain on the elite establishment and their corrupt ways. Regardless of gender, race, or ethnicity, I think all of America deserves a chance to fight the good fight without the elite being praised for criminal behavior.

    • Roxana says...

      Thank you for sharing, Cal!

    • Merce says...

      Cal,
      Thank you. My husband, an American living in Spain, voted for Trump for the same reasons you mention. If you dare say something like this among friends in Europe they will scream at you and go completely bananas.

    • Kim says...

      I agree!

    • Zywie says...

      Completely agree!
      I can’t fathom how women choose to support Hillary, who has proven to be unethical in so many instances. Even after all the proven allegations, she continue the same route – by getting debate questions ahead of time.. I mean, seriously?!

      Karma was served!

    • E says...

      Wonderfully articulated. Applaud your bravery.

    • Meg says...

      I am so perplexed by this viewpoint. what global-scale crimes are you talking about?

    • Rachel says...

      I completely understand the desire to go for a candidate that doesn’t seem as smarmy as the Clinton administration; however, I think it’s a privileged position to feel as though you had a real choice. For the targeted and oppressed, I think Clinton was the ONLY choice – because Trump came out and directly promised to lessen (if not diminish) a variety of human rights. As a white woman, I woke up knowing that my voice in consent wasn’t as valuable this morning as it was yesterday. But, unlike many of my friends, I am spared the true terror of wondering if perhaps my life won’t be valued – or the lives of my children. I am sincerely 100% hoping that the President will not be like the candidate we saw. I appreciate your perspective.

    • Theresa says...

      Well said Cal. I agree.

    • Jessica says...

      I feel so troubled by the support for this comment. I cannot agree that it is brave to use your vote to “roll the dice” on someone who has no understanding of foreign policy, poorly thought out domestic policy, a history of assault, and who explicitly tapped into the thinly veiled bigotry and misogyny so rapant in this county in the effort to be elected president. We as a country should be so much better than that. And I hope you as a voter will be so much better than that in the future. If you want to see change, work for it. Don’t throw others in harm’s way because you want to “upset the status quo.”

    • Nicky says...

      The president is just a figurehead. The cronies in the senate and congress run things so don’t delude yourself into thinking the elites have been put on notice because you voted for Trump. Let’s be real, even he looked as surprised as anybody to actually win.

    • I think bragging about sexual assault is more than just bad words. My opinion anyway.

    • Jane says...

      Labeling what he said as mere “bad words” is shocking and disappointing to a fellow female. And you decided to disrupt the status quo by electing a reality TV star who said nothing of substance on the very debate you mentioned and threatened a fellow candidate that he would put her in jail after he gets elected?

    • Becky says...

      I completely agree. Thank you so much for this.

    • coco says...

      Ok. A call for change….then why the reelection of incumbents (i.e. people already in elected office)?

    • plch says...

      Sorry, but what global-scale crime? I’m sure Hillary Clinton is not guilt free, but she has been investigated many times (by Republican lead commissions, among the others) and nothing of significance was ever found.
      Trump has admitted proudly of assaulting and molesting women, that’s not just *bad words*.

    • Ana Cortez says...

      I find it confusing that Trump supporters are ok with the fact that this billionaire takes pride in not paying taxes and call Hillary Clinton corrupt and a criminal. I am not being ironic, it’s really weird to me and I think for most people in Europe (I’m from Portugal). Also, I can’t imagine how anyone can vote for someone who is not only a racist but a truly dangerous person, an ignorant and a bully. I think voting is not only a right but a big responsibility and I think voting for someone like him is, among other things, irresponsible. Hillary supporters are not only sad because she lost, they are concerned with what a man like Trump could do. We all should be.

    • K says...

      Hey Cal,

      Thanks for your comment. Good read to understand all sides.

      Please read up on the Trump Foundation. A reporter from the Washington Post did some great investigative reports on it. Crazy stuff.

      Also, I understand how people feel about the Clinton Foundation, but as an aid worker who has lived/worked all around the world I have seen the great work the Clinton Foundation has done for health and education programs. That information can also be found (on non liberal websites as well).

      The emails. Oh the emails. George W. Bush “lost” 22 million emails. They were apparently eventually all “found” but he did not receive the same scrutiny as Hillary Clinton did. Oh and he had a private server too, owned by the Republican National Committee.

      And like I said to Linda, please look at who is being vetted for Trump’s Cabinet. They are all “elites” and career politicians, insiders, and some have been involved with corruption or ethics scandals. Oh and most if not all are white men.

      I understand people’s views on Hillary, I have family who voted for Trump and we have discussions about it, but I think it is important whatever side you’re on to do proper research (Brietbart, Rush, etc are not that).

      All the best!

    • K says...

      I should probably also clarify I did not work for the Clinton Foundation I just know their programs.

  135. Beautiful post! It’s so important to be a chin-up person. For your children, for the world. Tomorrow is a new day!

  136. Cristina says...

    Thank you for your post and for sharing. My heart is broken today. It is comforting to hear hope from you and your other readers and to know I’m not alone. (And I absolutely love what that 4 year old, Nell, said in her mom’s comment above.)

    We must do better starting tomorrow, and especially in our 2018 and 2020 elections. I hope we never forget the feeling we have today and channel it into something positive and a renewed commitment to progress.

  137. Lindsey says...

    As a Canadian who lived for many years in the US I am deeply saddened. The conversations that keep cropping up (here and around the world) are “the US is far more sexist and racist then anyone could’ve imagined…” and this hurts because my time in the US was nothing short of lovely and I met and made a lot of great friends there.

  138. Your last line made me cry. I’m shocked and so upset today. I know we have to move forward but I’m not quite ready. Not today, anyway. But this was really nice to read and I appreciate your thoughts. xo

  139. Erin says...

    What a beautiful message. Thank you so much for this. It truly made me feel better.

  140. Jessica says...

    Beautiful and poignant post Joanna. Thank you so much. It meant a lot to me to read this today.

  141. Anniclaude says...

    Joanna- thank you for this! As one of your Canadian neighbours, I woke up to this bad news also feeling shocked and almost paralyzed. But as I’ve been reading articles and posts on social media, I realize that there is truly more love than hate. Sending a hug back to you! xo

  142. jen says...

    i needed this post today. thank you for speaking your mind

  143. Ana Cortez says...

    We’re crushed, over here in Europe, over this result. I can’t imagine how you must feel. I spent the night wishing for a miracle, but, in the end, had to face the horrible truth. Throughout the day there was some comfort in reading people like you, Joanna, who refuse to give up hope and refuse to give in to hate. All will be well. Love from Portugal.

  144. V says...

    Thank you Joanna. I feel that if people ask me how I am, all I can say is totally shot down and hopeless at this point. It’s also my first born’s first birthday today and I feel not 100% there. But, reality is reality and we have to work together to improve our nation. Hopefully, as Hillary suggested, giving this new administration the benefit of a doubt and being open to what they have to offer will not disappoint us as much as I think it will. It’s truly a dark day in history.

  145. Quinn C. says...

    What a beautiful post – I am in tears for the second time today. I am Canadian (and live in Canada ) and our election last year had an outcome that celebrated many of the same values that Hillary was campaigning on. I think many of us here in Canada felt optimism and were looking forward to celebrating with you last night, what would have been an echo of our celebration last fall. Instead, we are sharing in your shock and there is a solemn tone here as well this morning. I am finding hope in many of the reactions to these results, including yours contained in this post. Thank you for that.

  146. Jen says...

    Thank you <3
    Thank you so very much. I'm really struggling today and specifically came over to CoJ searching for comfort. As always, you knew the right thing to say.

    • Shannon says...

      I agree completely with Jen’s comment – your words were the most comforting I’d heard all day & I’m vowing to not give up hope. This post has become the topic of an ‘Articles Club’ party I’m having tonight (also a Cup of Jo idea!). Jo – please know the positive impact you make is deep & so appreciated!