1. i’m tired.
    all my immediate family left w/exception of two nephews are women.
    i’m recharged.

    fight, rest, organize, read. keep going !!!

  2. We have no power so today I boiled water to wash my two son’s underpants and I hung them to dry in the basement. No day off for me!

  3. Britt says...

    Unfortunately I work for a funeral home In Manhattan . I couldn’t take the time off of work because I have to help people who are going through a difficult time. I hope that Im able to bring something to the table with my career path plus I’m a parent . ❤️❤️

  4. Jules says...

    Today, some of my female colleagues and I took the day off work and went to volunteer at a farm and zen center up north of San Francisco. After doing winter work with the veggie plots, we marched with the rest of the center’s employees and volunteers down to the beach! It was a great way to give to our community, have some bonding time, and share with others what International Women’s Day means to us :) It’s something I hope to do again next year and every year!

  5. Cind says...

    I agree with the above ” empty rhetoric “…. am so over this. Let’s us all move on. This is becoming just totally divisive—- We need to practice Peace….. and to remember it begins with ” me”.

  6. I am in FULL SUPPORT of #ADayWithoutWomen,
    But I gotta say I LOVE seeing all these comments from women who could not miss out on work (or motherhood) because it honestly shows just how valuable we are.
    If women ACTUALLY just stopped doing everything we do, didn’t go to work, didn’t make lunches, didn’t do a goddamn thing the world would actually stop running and it would be chaos.
    Like Beyonce isn’t lying to you, who run the world? GIRLS.

  7. We have to remember that this is more than just a day or a post on the Internet. This is a way of life: supporting each other, standing up, speaking up. It’s all part of it.

    xo, Sofia
    http://www.thecozie.co

  8. G says...

    If my female colleagues and I went on strike we’d leave a children’s hospital clinic, ER, inpatient wards, ICU, and NICU with only 6 of our 55 resident physicians to care for patients. I think ethically we made the right choice to show up :) that being said I understand the need to strike for equal recognition and pay for women in the workforce and appreciate the women who stayed out on my behalf.

    • I love this so much because one of the reasons for the strike is to show the IMPACT women have.
      And ya’ll have such a MASSIVE impact that you CAN’T strike.
      Lots of love to you and your colleagues!

      http://www.stellogirls.com

    • My friend who is an obstetrician posted the following on Facebook:
      Many women may choose not to work on March 8. My job gives me the privilege of taking care of women. I have a loving and supportive family that I know appreciate all that I do. I will work so that I can support women. Instead, I have made donations to the following organizations:
      Room to Read
      Planned Parenthood
      International Rescue Committee

    • I loved reading this comment as well. It inspired me so much that there are so many resident physicians at your hospital that are women.

      x Tali
      http://www.stylecheese.com

    • Ashley W says...

      Just wanted to write somewhere my great appreciation for women in the healthcare industry. I had to be induced on the 6th due to severe preeclampsia at 37.5 weeks, had our baby on the 7th, and was monitored through the 9th. All of the nurses, midwives, doctors, lactation consultants, pediatricians, etc etc that cared for us during those several days were so amazing. I am grateful to all who did not strike, knowing how important their job is. And this may go without saying, but all of them were women except for one man out of 8 or so people that came in just to draw my blood for testing!

  9. I sort of missed the boat on this day. I work from home and have given myself a little break from the political arena to recover and stay sane, so I hadn’t really planned on participating. Trying to last for the marathon and all. I’m so happy to see many women involved and motivated though! Don’t really get why there’s so many (I’ve seen comments on Instagram at least) who are being so judgy. If it’s people coming together to support each other, what’s the problem?

    http://www.shessobright.com

    • Em says...

      Lol, I work from home too- my not going to work would just mean that no one noticed I wasn’t there & everything would still be due the next day. I did dress myself and my daughter in red & gave thanks to all the women in my life that have been powerhouse role models and trailblazers. I know I can’t have it all– but I can certainly have a thriving career and a loving family because they’ve shown me that is possible and I want to make sure that possibility, and support system, is available to ALL women, not just the privileged few like myself.

  10. Whitney says...

    I don’t need one special day to celebrate my womanhood. I married a man who treats me with respect and values my role as a woman, wife, and mother. I’m teaching my two young children not to pass judgement on men or women, but to respect everyone. We’re all special. We all have something to offer the world.

    • rach says...

      So well said!

    • SAME HERE! I don’t need one day to remember that… And I know some women are treated different and the world is very unfair. Today was a normal day for me. I did my thing, I’m always helping, supporting, respecting , and loving others. I try my best to teach my kid that every day.

    • Florrie says...

      This is absolutely true.
      Now let’s all get paid equally for what we have to offer.
      Let’s all feel equally safe walking in our streets.
      Let’s all have the equal right to education and let that education not be biased in favor of men.
      Let’s have the right to control our own bodies.

      Let’s do this Bitches!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Christy says...

      such a great idea~

  11. Sarah says...

    Hmm, honestly, I’m not feeling great about international women’s day. I keep seeing all these notes online about how amazing and important and valuable women are(!), and yet no one offered me a seat on the train this morning, or any morning. (I’m very conspicuously pregnant). It’s just empty rhetoric.

    • oh no! I’m so sorry to hear. I always asked people (usually young men or boys) to give me there seat and then pointed at my belly. Good luck mama and good job growing that baby, it’s hard work!

    • t says...

      Hmmm, I didn’t experience this at all while I was pregnant – I would say 80% of the time I was on the subway while visibly pregnant people gave me their seat.

      And also I don’t necessarily think that people should be expected to give up their seat to pregnant women. Before and after pregnancy there have been times where I gratefully snagged a seat and was so effing exhausted that I wouldn’t give it up to anyone. I feel that we almost all work ourselves ragged these days that we all need seats all the time. After the first trimester (pure exhaustion) of my pregnancies I actually felt more energized than any other time in my adult life. If someone needs a seat they should just speak up and ask – people will be quick to accommodate them.

  12. JCH says...

    As a woman, a human being, I don’t understand the need for this. There is so much more good to be done when doing something for others instead of standing still waiting to be exalted. The world will never fully appreciate others – no matter the gender, race, or whatever title applies. As long as distinction is called for and demanded, separation will always exist. People want to be equal but at the same time want to awarded for being different. Can you have it both ways? Life is so much more than awards and accolades from the media or society for doing nothing except being who you are. Really? Isn’t being alive and well a good thing for which to be grateful? Must we now demand recognition for simply being who we were born to be? Women are great at many things, but men are also great. Together, we complete a harmony. There will always be a divide somewhere. I honestly believe we should show love, respect and kindness to any person we meet – no matter what they look like and no matter what holiday / day the calendar says. This is something I strive for daily, but I fail daily too. I am not a perfect wife or mother but neither is anyone else. This is how we are connected – through imperfection and striving to make something beautiful out of (a sometimes hard and unfair) life. We should stop demanding that others bow down to us and instead ask what we can do to hold them up – to further goodness and love so. Because isn’t that what we all want anyway, to be loved, truly loved?

    • Courtney says...

      JCH, I understand what you’re saying about distinguishing a separation, but I think there may be some misunderstanding about Women’s Day in the States. Women’s Day has been celebrated forever (as long as I can remember) around the globe. It isn’t a protest or waiting around for people to notice how valuable women are. This is the first year that it’s also been a “Day Without Women”. Generally, Women’s Day is like Mother’s Day, but much more internationally recognized. I work in an international field, so I’ve always seen an outpouring of recognition and thanks on Women’s Day. It’s just a positive thing. It’s nice to see that people here are beginning to celebrate it more, but I hope it’s not misunderstood.

    • emily says...

      I can only speak for myself, but your suggestion of asking what we can do to lift others up is exactly my focus every Int’l Women’s Day.
      I share personal words of thanks with the women in my life who mean a lot to me, and I am especially intentional about supporting organizations that serve and support women around the world. It’s what I feel compelled to do, so I do it- maybe a little moreso this year than ever.

    • Martha Bracco says...

      You are so right. I’m 63 and saw how much things changed as a young woman. I made my way in my career and salary. I choose what I wanted for my body. I’ve grown stronger with age.
      I’m concerned about all these pink pussycats that they just keep whining and the MSM don’t help.

    • rach says...

      Could NOT agree more!!!

    • Lindsay says...

      Took the words right outta my mouth – and much more beautifully expressed than I would have done!

    • Anitra Sweet says...

      So good!

    • Meghan says...

      It really hurts my heart to see comments like this. Yes, while we have made some progress, we have backtracked a lot as well. Women STILL do not earn as much as men for equal work, and this breaks significantly among racial lines. Our right to choose to what to do with our body is constantly being chipped away at by republican lawmakers. Childcare is unaffordable for most women. We do not have paid maternity leave. I could go on. If you think there is no need for this day, you clearly write from a position of privilege and I urge you to think of other women beyond your own personal circumstances who are not as fortunate.

    • t says...

      I don’t want to sound naive but I truly feel that a big chunk of the wage gap is because women don’t demand/negotiate higher pay. In my research the wage gap is about $.06. That is significant but if women don’t settle and negotiate that gap will be reduced.

      I recognize that part of the reason women settle is because they have been conditioned to do so. Don’t walk in and demand equal pay. Walk in and get an offer and then negotiate that offer and prove that you are worth it.

      less complaining, more doing.

  13. I did not do this on purpose, but today was the day my dermatology appointment was scheduled.

    I went and was told that there was concern for skin cancer and that I would get the results in a week.

    The nurse complimented me on my red and white striped shirt. I told her it was the only red piece of clothing I found at home to commemorate International Women’s Day.

    Even though I know this may be benign, I will remember this day for a long time.

    All this to say that I am grateful that I am able to take some time for myself today (even though, as a freelancer living from paycheck to paycheck, I will be working today) and to receive the care I need, provided by a team of compassionate women.

    – Chloe
    http://consciousbychloe.com

  14. Kim J says...

    Thank you!

  15. Ramona says...

    I am wearing red at work. My husband travels for work and we have a 1-year-old, so there’s no way for me to avoid unpaid labor for a day, and since my mom watches the baby while I work it would seem a little disingenuous to have her there if I wasn’t going to work. Plus I’m behind since I had to take a few days off last week when the baby had an ear infection….And I read all that and think, “What? How come this whole child care thing is falling on me? Where are the men to pick up the pieces if the women can’t do their jobs today? Why should it be impossible for me to avoid work for even one day, when my husband could avoid work for a whole week if he needed to?” So clearly we have lots of work to do on shifting our culture and policies to conform to the expectation that men and women will share more equally in childcare and household responsibilities!

  16. Emma says...

    This is such an interesting discussion. I am on maternity leave and I breastfeed my son. It occurred to me today that most people would consider what I am doing today taking a day off and not working. Yet, if I didn’t feed my son and truly took any day off, he would not survive. It’s such an invisible position to be in.

    • Carrie says...

      My sister, who is one of my best friends, has a 4 month old and she’s very open about the challenges of motherhood. It’s just so amazing what a mother does. You grow a body and SOUL in your womb, nurture it with your own body until it’s ready to be born, which is done with great agony to you. And then once the baby is born you’re the one and only thing in the world it needs yet it can’t communicate it’s love or appreciation to you yet. Very tough indeed. You deserve so much love and praise.

    • Leni says...

      I am also on maternity leave and breastfeeding my daughter. We’ll never have a day off! I have received a lot of recognition for what I am doing and my husband supports me a lot.

    • Christy says...

      This hit me like a ton of bricks! Women must continue to do the work we’ve been put on this earth to do. We are the keepers, the holders of the good, the beauty, the sadness and the unjust. Always.

    • Whitney says...

      Strong words, Christy. International Women’s Day, for me, was two sick daughters. It was chopping firewood in the rain to keep our stove full and our house warm. It was making three meals. It was wiping noses and reading stories of adventurous girls and brainy women. I did not take the day off. But as I held my girls, I was holding Good. I was nursing Beauty. I was remembering every Sadness. I was mourning the Unjust.

      In that, I was with you. Not so invisible after all.

  17. Kaitlin says...

    I’d loved to have seen a post from CoJ on a brief history of International Women’s Day. So many people are decrying the day because they misunderstand it as “the only day in the year when we celebrate women,” rather than a day for women to rise up.

    IWD become surprising commercialized and though I appreciate that Cup of Jo is going dark today as a reminder of the absence and marginalization of women, it would have been nice for a bit of an educating moment.

    An excellent primer on this is today’s Vox article: http://www.vox.com/identities/2017/3/8/14844432/international-womens-day-2017-google-doodle

    Thanks for your continued support of the matriarchy!

    • Courtney says...

      Thanks, Kaitlin! I left a note about understanding of the day before reading your comment. I agree completely.

  18. Alex says...

    Thankful for the strongest woman I know. My mom who put personal dreams on hold to raise her kids.

  19. Laura says...

    I am in no way associated, but I noticed that Kiva is matching all loans to women made today. That’s pretty cool!

  20. Carrie says...

    At my job in the male dominated construction industry, I am proud to show up today and be a quick thinker and a hard worker!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      yes!!!! good for you, carrie!!!

    • Emily says...

      I agree! Isn’t my value as a woman employee actually showing up to do the job that (a bunch of men) hired me to do because they chose me to do it over other male candidates? Isn’t that the true power? I think the better way to exhibit the point of celebrating women is to go out and DO your job that you worked hard to get from the path forged by many, many brave women in the past. Taking the day off doesn’t really seem to celebrate us as women?

    • t says...

      YES!!! “a day without women” only serves to widen the wage gap in my opinion.

  21. Yay! I take it for granted most days that I have a woman boss — ME! She’s awesome and really supports me. :)

  22. Tracy says...

    I love we have International WOMENS day to indicate that we need change.
    We must celebrate these days for our daughters, our sons and for theirs. This will bring UNITY!!!

  23. Joy says...

    Working and wearing red.

  24. Erin says...

    I wish International Women’s Day felt more inspiring to me, because I support the goals of the designated day. But, something about it feels icky to me. It feels like “Women are actually real people too, so let’s treat them like that for one whole day out of 365 Day” to me. I find it insulting.

    • Carrie says...

      Agreed. It’s freaking hard being a woman. I don’t even have children yet and I already feel like my “work” is never ending. I think we deserve 365 days of appreciation!

    • Yesss. It feels so weird to single out a day to remind everyone of how important we are. There shouldn’t be a reminder, it should be ingrained into everyone’s mind.

    • Ramona says...

      Historically, International Women’s Day has actually often been about women taking political action rather than about women being thanked or celebrated. The Russian Revolution began with an International Women’s Day strike! So maybe instead of looking at it as the one day of the year when people notice and appreciate women, a different perspective would be to look at it as your yearly reminder to take action against all of the inequities faced by women here and around the world.

  25. j. says...

    I’m not able to take a day off work right now, but I’m not purchasing anything today! :)

  26. Fiona says...

    I’m working from home today, but dropped off a whole lot of stuff at the local homeless center (they always appreciate travel sized toiletries, women’s personal hygiene items and large ziplock bags), got a haircut at my local salon (woman owned and operated, and the owner lives in my building), and am now cooking a meal for a fundraising pot-luck this evening. Loving a full day of engaging and sharing!

    • Joanna Goddard says...

      that is wonderful, fiona!

  27. Zoe says...

    If you have time in your life today here is a great website for getting your voice heard!

    https://5calls.org/

    Just put in your zip code and the website will give you the number of who to call and a great script if you’re like me and you get super nervous leaving voicemails or talking on the phone. Happy calling!

    • mb says...

      This was awesome! Thanks for the tip!

  28. Betsie says...

    I work in international public health, and every year it amazes me that International Women’s Day is a national holiday in many of the countries we work in. Our offices in Cote d’Ivoire, Mali, Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia are all closed today and every March 8th!

    • L says...

      Wow, I had no idea – that is very cool! It just shows how this strike is at the very least raising awareness in America about a day that our sisters around the world have been recognizing for a long time. That recognition and the debate and conversation among women about it are a positive development, I think. Thank you for everything you do.

  29. I think it’s great that we are all coming together and supporting each other but really we don’t need a day to make us feel important! x

    http://www.wonkylauren.com

  30. Caroline says...

    Cheers to you all at Cup of Jo! I had to go to work today, but I am cheering you on from my desk and grateful for everyone’s myriad contributions to making women’s lives better. Our voices are complex and, importantly, loud.

  31. Jamie says...

    I fully support the cause, but I went to work today. I certainly could have taken it off, I have personal days and could’ve requested it. Maybe I’m a cynic but I don’t see how that would have helped. Anyone who would’ve noticed me not here would just think I took a personal day.

    • Carmen B. says...

      I feel the same way so I’m working today.
      Did wear red, tho.

    • Jamie says...

      Thanks Carmen B. I wish I had remembered to wear red.

  32. Sasha says...

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/world/2005/oct/18/gender.uk

    Iceland women’s strike.

    When we strike together, as part of a larger context of protest, the effects can be tremendous. And yes, as always, the sacrifice of a working class person is going to be greater. But the overall benefits of what could be accomplished will be far greater if not only the privileged strike, especially to working class women. Universal child care, parental leave, health care, these things mean far more when you are already in a low paying job with no other benefits. If you are a person of privilege, strike for those who can’t afford to.

  33. j. says...

    thank you for always supporting women! i’m making donations and have purchased from a couple of small women owned companies (fisheye brooklyn, ivyivyivy etc..) but I will be avoiding purchasing anything else today.

  34. Julie S says...

    Lots of love to the ladies of cup of jo!

  35. Laura says...

    Both my male co-workers are off today, and I’m at work. Go figure.

    • julie says...

      both of my male owners of the company are out today, too, and I’m here! go figure…but I’m spending time journaling and watching Midnight in Paris while they’re gone, because I can. Go women!

  36. bernadette says...

    I have always felt we make more of an impact by our presence not our absence.

    • Katie says...

      I agree!

    • TG says...

      YES, YES and YES. I completely agree with YOU, Bernadette.

    • Corinne says...

      100%! If we aren’t there, how can our voices be heard?

    • Daniela says...

      Agreed! To me it makes more sense to go to work and show that we are strong assets to the workforce and to celebrate how great we are all are at what we do.

    • M says...

      Oh lord, I’m glad others before you knew otherwise. Thanks to striking we have things like an 8-hour workday, WEEKENDS, and child labor laws.

    • Julia says...

      Go unions!

    • Amanda D says...

      Articles this like this are total crap and only hurt the movement. Some women can strike today, some cant. Some are privileged, some aren’t. Some strike in other ways besides missing work. I’m so sick of this “you’re not resisting right” messaging. The other side loves it because it divides us.

    • MB says...

      Anecdotally, my son’s preschool is closed today because so many of the teachers and staff are striking – I don’t think teachers (especially of younger children) fall into the privileged class.

    • Tammy says...

      It’s not about ‘taking a day off’ -it’s called a strike. It’s to show the country and the world what life would be like if women were silenced. If women weren’t allowed to voice their opinions, climb the career ladder, etc…but it is also a message to those who undervalue women’s work. Businesses, schools, the government- these things cannot function properly or at all without women and therefore we deserve to be respected, recognized and valued for our hard work, our creativity, and the diversity we bring to the table. This isn’t some sort of paid leave women are taking. So, in response to women who feel this is an injustice to women’s rights it is about SO MUCH MORE. In light of what is happening in this country and PP – to what is happening in Poland, the Middle East, Brazil, and other countries it is so important now, more than ever to make our voices heard. #IWD

    • Ramona says...

      I think that’s probably true, but I don’t think that means that privileged women should shy away from striking for that reason. Jia Tolentino writes in the New Yorker, “There’s an underlying note of guilt and aversion in these arguments—a sense that privilege renders a person politically ineffective. In reality, though, as the Women’s March demonstrated, privileged women are uniquely positioned to use their surfeit of cultural leverage to clear space for the causes of everyone else. And that seems to be the fundamental idea of the Women’s Strike: that it could help to forge solidarity between women with favorable working conditions and women who have no such thing.” (Full piece: http://www.newyorker.com/culture/jia-tolentino/the-womens-strike-and-the-messy-space-of-change)

  37. I normally wait until the end of the year to make donations but this year, in January, my husband and I thought it would send a message to make donations automatic and monthly to Planned Parenthood – we support, and will continue to support, women’s health and reproductive (and otherwise) rights! Set up a $5, $10, $15…or more donation to Planned Parenthood today :) – Charlie, http://www.lemonbutterlove.com @charlielbl

    • Carmen B. says...

      What a great idea! I think I’ll do the same.

  38. Ashley Sawyer says...

    Thank you! The best way to truly honor women, or any marginalized group for that matter, is to get out to actually do something to connect or support. On that note, I am signing off! Much love!

  39. Emilie says...

    My colleagues and I all wore red (those who didn’t strike), and I am refraining from purchases today. Also donating to organizations that support women’s rights!

  40. I’m focusing on ways I can support other women as much as possible. I switched accountants this year to consciously select a woman, I’m referring clients/business to other women entrepreneurs, and I’m connecting 1-on-1 with as many women as I can in the Philadelphia area to see how we can further support each other & connect as friends.

    http://hyggewellness.com/blog